National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for heterotrophic algae cxs

  1. algae

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    promote clean transportation fuels, that path could help bring the promise of algal biofuels closer to reality. As one of the fastest growing organisms on the planet, algae are...

  2. Algae Biotechnology

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... else. - E.g., Foundation in algal biology still needs significant strengthening. - ... help strengthen knowledge base in algal biology. * Algae Biotechnology Hub Structure: - ...

  3. Algae to Biofuels

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Algae to Biofuels Algae to Biofuels What if you could power your life using pond scum? Algae, plant-like aquatic microorganisms, produce oil similar to petroleum and can be grown ...

  4. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Process Design and Economics for Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction, a paper from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  5. Algae Biofuels Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Algae Biofuels Technology Algae Biofuels Technology Algae Biofuels Technology PDF icon Algae Biofuels Technology More Documents & Publications The Promise and Challenge of Algae as...

  6. Magnetic separation of algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nath, Pulak; Twary, Scott N.

    2016-04-26

    Described herein are methods and systems for harvesting, collecting, separating and/or dewatering algae using iron based salts combined with a magnetic field gradient to separate algae from an aqueous solution.

  7. Algae Biomass Summit

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 9th annual Algae Biomass Summit will be hosted at the Washington Marriot Wardman Park in Washington D.C., September 29 – October 2, 2015. The event will gather leaders in algae biomass from all sectors. U.S. Department of Energy Undersecretary Franklin Orr will give a keynote address at the conference, and Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Director Jonathan, Algae Program Manager Alison Goss Eng, and the BETO Algae Team will be in attendance.

  8. International Algae Symposium

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office Advanced Algal Systems Technology Manager Daniel Fishman represented the Office at the International Algae Symposium in Tokyo, Japan. Hosted at the University of Tsukuba’s newly established Algae Biomass Bioenergy Development Research Center, the symposium was an opportunity for algae researchers, policy makers, and industry leaders across the globe to learn about each other’s work.

  9. Algae Biotecnologia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Algae Biotecnologia Jump to: navigation, search Name: Algae Biotecnologia Place: Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Product: Brazil-based 2nd generation ethanol producer. References:...

  10. Algae Derived Biofuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jahan, Kauser

    2015-03-31

    One of the most promising fuel alternatives is algae biodiesel. Algae reproduce quickly, produce oils more efficiently than crop plants, and require relatively few nutrients for growth. These nutrients can potentially be derived from inexpensive waste sources such as flue gas and wastewater, providing a mutual benefit of helping to mitigate carbon dioxide waste. Algae can also be grown on land unsuitable for agricultural purposes, eliminating competition with food sources. This project focused on cultivating select algae species under various environmental conditions to optimize oil yield. Membrane studies were also conducted to transfer carbon di-oxide more efficiently. An LCA study was also conducted to investigate the energy intensive steps in algae cultivation.

  11. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Algae Biofuel BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel

  12. algae | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    algae Sandia algae raceway paves path from lab to real-world applications Sandia California held a ribbon cutting ceremony for the Algae Raceway Testing Facility last week. The new facility will help scientists advance laboratory research to real-world applications. In a twist of geometry, an oval can make a line. The new algae raceway testing facility at Sandia

  13. Florida Algae | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Algae Jump to: navigation, search Name: Florida Algae LLC Website: www.floridaalgae.com Coordinates: 27.6648274, -81.5157535 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  14. Potential for Biofuels from Algae (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pienkos, P. T.

    2007-11-15

    Presentation on the potential for biofuels from algae presented at the 2007 Algae Biomass Summit in San Francisco, CA.

  15. ATP3 Algae Testbed

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    5 DOE BETO Algae Platform Review Dr. Gary Dirks (Principal Investigator) and Dr. John McGowen (Presenting) Dir. of Operations and Program Management Arizona State University March 25, 2015 Goal Statement Mission: Establish a sustainable network of regional testbeds that empowers knowledge creation and dissemination within the algal R&D community, facilitates innovation, and accelerates growth of the nascent algal biofuels and bioproducts industry. Goals: - Increase stakeholder access to high

  16. Commercial Algae Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Algae Management Jump to: navigation, search Name: Commercial Algae Management Address: 320 Arbor Lane Place: Franklin, NC Zip: 28734 Year Founded: 2002 Phone Number: 828-634-7070...

  17. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Algae Biofuels, Exploring...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Algae Biofuels, Exploring the Energy of Tomorrow Today 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Algae Biofuels, Exploring the Energy of Tomorrow Today 2016 Bioenergizeme ...

  18. Fuel From Algae: Scaling and Commercialization of Algae Harvesting Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Led by CEO Ross Youngs, AVS has patented a cost-effective dewatering technology that separates micro-solids (algae) from water. Separating micro-solids from water traditionally requires a centrifuge, which uses significant energy to spin the water mass and force materials of different densities to separate from one another. In a comparative analysis, dewatering 1 ton of algae in a centrifuge costs around $3,400. AVSs Solid-Liquid Separation (SLS) system is less energy-intensive and less expensive, costing $1.92 to process 1 ton of algae. The SLS technology uses capillary dewatering with filter media to gently facilitate water separation, leaving behind dewatered algae which can then be used as a source for biofuels and bio-products. The biomimicry of the SLS technology emulates the way plants absorb and spread water to their capillaries.

  19. BT16 Algae Resources Factsheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2016 BILLION-TON REPORT Algae Resources The results of the BAT land characterization and suitability model resulted in 74,606 suitable "unit farms" (1,200 acres) totaling approximately 139,886 mi 2 (362,304 km 2 ). Algae Resources Algae are highly efficient at producing biomass, and they can be found all over the planet. Many use sunlight and nutrients to create biomass, which contain key components-including lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates- that can be converted and upgraded to a

  20. Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

    2014-10-21

    The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

  1. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Algae as a Biofuel | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Algae as a Biofuel 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Algae as a Biofuel 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Algae as a Biofuel

  2. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner ...

  3. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: The Algae's Always Greener |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy The Algae's Always Greener 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: The Algae's Always Greener 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: The Algae's Always Greener

  4. Webinar: Genetically Modified Algae: A Risk-Benefit Assessment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Algae: A Risk-Benefit Assessment Webinar: Genetically Modified Algae: A Risk-Benefit Assessment Genetically Modified (GM) Algae: A Risk-Benefit Assessment PDF icon...

  5. Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae Breakout Session 2-A: The Future of Algae-Based Biofuels ...

  6. Formation of algae growth constitutive relations for improved algae modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Drewry, Jessica Louise.

    2013-01-01

    This SAND report summarizes research conducted as a part of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve our abilities to model algal cultivation. Algae-based biofuels have generated much excitement due to their potentially large oil yield from relatively small land use and without interfering with the food or water supply. Algae mitigate atmospheric CO2 through metabolism. Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil by providing a domestic renewable energy source. Important factors controlling algal productivity include temperature, nutrient concentrations, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational models allow for inexpensive predictions of algae growth kinetics in these non-ideal conditions for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without the need for multiple expensive measurement setups. However, these models need to be calibrated for each algal strain. In this work, we conduct a parametric study of key marine algae strains and apply the findings to a computational model.

  7. The Algae Foundation Announces New DOE Funded Education Initiative to Enhance Algae Workforce Development

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Algae Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to expanding the algae industry through research, education, and outreach, announced plans at the 2015 Algae Biomass Organization Summit to develop an innovative formal degree program. The Department of Energy funded initiative seeks to strengthen workforce capabilities for commercial-scale algae production by developing a degree in algal cultivation technologies.

  8. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2013-01-15

    We consider the development of harmful algae blooms (HABs) in a lake with uncertain nutrients inflow. Two general frameworks, Fokker-Planck equation and the PDF methods, are developed to quantify the resultant concentration uncertainty of various algae groups, via deriving a deterministic equation of their joint probability density function (PDF). A computational example is examined to study the evolution of cyanobacteria (the blue-green algae) and the impacts of initial concentration and inflow-outflow ratio.

  9. Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Wastewater Reclamation and Biofuel Production Using Algae Tryg Lundquist, Ph.D., P.E., Presenter Ian Woertz, Matt Hutton, Ruth Spierling, Shelley Blackwell, Braden Crowe Bioenergy | June 24, 2015 | Washington DC 1 California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo, California MicroBio Engineering, Inc. San Luis Obispo, California * 2014 US DOE Algae Biomass Yield Project * 2013 US DOE Water & Nutrient Recycling Project * 2013 US DOE ATP 3 Testbed Site (Prime: ASU) * 2011 CEC Algae

  10. BioProcess Algae | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search Name: BioProcess Algae Place: Shenandoah, Iowa Sector: Biomass Product: US-based joint venture created to commercialize advanced photobioreactor technologies for...

  11. Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn about algae, a fast-growing, renewable resource that holds great promise to become a reliable, homegrown fuel source to reduce our nation's reliance on foreign oil.

  12. Algae Raceway to speed path to biofuels

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Algae Raceway to speed path to biofuels - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home ... Transportation Energy Co-Evolution of Biofuels Lignocellulosic Biomass Microalgae ...

  13. Algae Biorefinery Development for Biofuels and Bioproducts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Plenary V: National Algal Biofuels Technology Review Algae Biorefinery Development for Biofuels and Bioproducts Lieve Laurens, Senior Scientist, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  14. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Whole Algae Hydrothermal...

  15. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Tomorrow | Department of Energy Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae: for a Cleaner and Greener Tomorrow

  16. Unique Bioreactor Finds Algae's Sweet Spot - News Feature | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Unique Bioreactor Finds Algae's Sweet Spot February 18, 2014 Close-up photo of a vial of green algae. Enlarge image Aeration helps algae grow and helps replicate real-life ...

  17. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    The red alga Gracilaria tikvahiae may be grown outdoors year-round in central Florida with yields averaging 35.5 g dry wt/m/sup 2/.day, greater than the most productive terrestrial plants. This occurs only when the plants are in a suspended culture, with vigorous aeration and an exchange of 25 or more culture volumes of enriched seawater per day, which is not cost-effective. A culture system was designed in which Gracilaria, stocked at a density of 2 kg wet wt/m/sup 2/, grows to double its biomass in one to two weeks; it is then harvested to its starting density, and anaerobically digested to methane. The biomass is soaked for 6 hours in the digester residue, storing enough nutrients for two weeks' growth in unenriched seawater. The methane is combusted for energy and the waste gas is fed to the culture to provide mixing and CO/sub 2/, eliminating the need for aeration and seawater exchange. The green alga Ulva lactuca, unlike Gracilaria, uses bicarbonate as a photosynthesis carbon source, and can grow at high pH, with little or no free CO/sub 2/. It can therefore produce higher yields than Gracilaria in low water exchange conditions. It is also more efficiently converted to methane than is Gracilaria, but cannot tolerate Florida's summer temperatures so cannot be grown year-round. Attempts are being made to locate or produce a high-temperature tolerant strain.

  18. Algae Hard at Work in Hawaii | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Algae Hard at Work in Hawaii Algae Hard at Work in Hawaii October 24, 2016 - 12:00pm Addthis Aerial photograph of the company’s algae test ponds in Kauai, Hawaii. | Photo courtesy of Global Algae Innovations, Inc. Aerial photograph of the company's algae test ponds in Kauai, Hawaii. | Photo courtesy of Global Algae Innovations, Inc. Alison Goss Eng Alison Goss Eng Program Manager, Feedstock Supply and Logistics and Advanced Algal Systems, Bioenergy Technologies Office The beautiful island

  19. Hydrogen metabolism of photosynthetic bacteria and algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumazawa, S.; Mitsui, A.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolism, metabolic pathways and biochemistry of hydrogen in photosynthetic bacteria and algae are reviewed. Detailed information on the occurrence and measurement of hydrogenase activity is presented. Hydrogen production rates for different species of algae and bacteria are presented. 173 references, 1 figure, 7 tables.

  20. Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, R.S.

    2003-02-21

    Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

  1. EERE Success Story-California: Breakthrough in Algae Biology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Breakthrough in Algae Biology EERE Success Story-California: Breakthrough in Algae Biology January 31, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis Researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography ...

  2. Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project October 22, 2012 - 3:44pm Addthis Crow Nation...

  3. Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury Science Museum The Bradbury Science Museum is ...

  4. Whole Turf Algae to biofuels-final-sm

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Whole Turf Algae Polyculture Biofuels The production and conversion of whole turf algae ... and sustainable production of biofuels from benthic algal polyculture turf biomass. ...

  5. California: Breakthrough in Algae Biology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Breakthrough in Algae Biology California: Breakthrough in Algae Biology January 31, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis Researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at University of ...

  6. The Arizona Center for Algae Technology and Innovation | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Arizona Center for Algae Technology and Innovation Jump to: navigation, search Name: The Arizona Center for Algae Technology and Innovation Abbreviation: AzCATI Address: 7418 East...

  7. Flocculation of model algae under shear.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Flint; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2010-11-01

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of the flocculation of model algae particles under shear. We study the evolution of the cluster size distribution as well as the steady-state distribution as a function of shear rates and algae interaction parameters. Algal interactions are modeled through a DLVO-type potential, a combination of a HS colloid potential (Everaers) and a yukawa/colloid electrostatic potential. The effect of hydrodynamic interactions on aggregation is explored. Cluster strucuture is determined from the algae-algae radial distribution function as well as the structure factor. DLVO parameters including size, salt concentration, surface potential, initial volume fraction, etc. are varied to model different species of algae under a variety of environmental conditions.

  8. Method and apparatus for processing algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite; Di Salvo, Roberto

    2012-07-03

    Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells. The lysate separates into at least two layers including a lipid-containing hydrophobic layer and an ionic liquid-containing hydrophilic layer. A salt or salt solution may be used to remove water from the ionic liquid-containing layer before the ionic liquid is reused. The used salt may also be dried and/or concentrated and reused. The method can operate at relatively low lysis, processing, and recycling temperatures, which minimizes the environmental impact of algae processing while providing reusable biofuels and other useful products.

  9. EERE Success Story—California: Breakthrough in Algae Biology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Breakthrough in algae biology will have a significant impact in the economics of algal biofuel production.

  10. Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... convening and leverage ATP 3 : National open test bed The formation of the Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership leveraged the existing resources at AzCATI and partner sites. ...

  11. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Joyce

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Algae Platform Review meeting.

  12. Algae Biorefinery Development for Biofuels and Bioproducts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Algae Biorefinery Development for Biofuels and Bioproducts Bioenergy 2016 Washington, DC July 14, 2016 Lieve Laurens 2 Reduce cost of algal biofuels: * Harness unique position of algae as highly efficient photosynthetic cell factories * Identify key targets to contribute to lowering the overall cost of algal biofuels production * Quantify impact of major components supporting a multi-product algal biorefinery model * Analogous to replacing the whole barrel paradigm; low volume product streams

  13. Sustainable Development of Algae for Biofuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Algae Technology Area Review PI: Rebecca Efroymson Presenters: Virginia Dale, Matthew Langholtz ORNL Center for BioEnergy Sustainability 1.3.1.500 Sustainable Development of Algae for Biofuel DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Goal Statement To conduct 1) Sustainability studies (evaluate indicators and develop best practices) 2) Resource analysis (quantify supply of 'low-hanging fruit' biomass) 3) Experimental work on algal polycultures to increase yield Relevant

  14. Sustainable Development of Algae for Biofuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Peer Review May 21, 2013 Algae Platform Rebecca Efroymson (PI), Matthew Langholtz, Virginia Dale Oak Ridge National Laboratory Center for BioEnergy Sustainability http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ees/cbes/ Sustainable Development of Algae for Biofuel Goal Statement Project Goal * To support sustainable development of algal biofuels by conducting research that defines and addresses potential environmental, socioeconomic, and production hurdles * To conduct sustainability studies (including indicator

  15. What's in Your Algae Toolbox? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    What's in Your Algae Toolbox? What's in Your Algae Toolbox? September 23, 2016 - 5:00pm Addthis Engineer studies modification of algae for biofuel production. | Photo courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories Engineer studies modification of algae for biofuel production. | Photo courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories Alison Goss Eng Alison Goss Eng Program Manager, Feedstock Supply and Logistics and Advanced Algal Systems, Bioenergy Technologies Office What are the key facts? Algae scientists

  16. 2013 Peer Review Presentations-Algae | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Algae 2013 Peer Review Presentations-Algae The Bioenergy Technologies Office hosted its 2013 Project Peer Review on May 20-24, 2015, at the Hilton Mark Center in Alexandria, Virginia. The presentations from the algae session are available to view and download below. For detailed session descriptions and presentation titles, view the 2013 Project Peer Review Program Booklet. algae_abodeely_9131.pdf (2.13 MB) algae_anderson_9321.pdf (1.01 MB) algae_bagwell_9615.pdf (11.47 MB)

  17. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2013-07-29

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  18. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2014-06-24

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  19. Recent Developments in Hydrothermal Processing of Algae

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Recent Developments in Hydrothermal Processing of Algae DC ELLIOTT Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Bioenergy 2016, The National Algal Biofuels Technology Review, Washington, DC, July 14, 2016 Outline HTL at PNNL Upgrading of HTL biocrude CHG of aqueous phase Preliminary TEA/LCA Commercialization and future work 2 Box Flow for Algae Application Simplified HTL Process Flow Diagram 3 Solids Conc. [wt%] Ash [wt%, dry basis] Density [g/mL] 17-26 7-28 ~1.05 HTL Run Conditions Steady state window

  20. Reviving Algae from the (Almost) Dead - News Feature | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Reviving Algae from the (Almost) Dead October 31, 2014 Photo of a man in a lab coat ... Resurrecting Algae a Delicate Task Photo of a scientist in a white lab coat in front of a ...

  1. Reviving Algae from the (Almost) Dead - News Feature | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Reviving Algae from the (Almost) Dead October 31, 2014 Photo of a man in a lab coat standing next to green algae bubbling in containers. NREL Research Technician Nick Sweeney...

  2. Recent Developments in Hydrothermal Processing of Algae | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Developments in Hydrothermal Processing of Algae Recent Developments in Hydrothermal Processing of Algae Plenary V: National Algal Biofuels Technology Review Recent Developments in Hydrothermal Processing of Algae Doug Elliott, Laboratory Fellow (Retired), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory elliott_bioenergy_2016.pdf (1.86 MB) More Documents & Publications Excellence in Bioenergy Innovation-A Presentation of 2015 R&D 100 Award Winning Projects Whole Algae Hydrothermal

  3. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Review Report: Algae | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Review Report: Algae 2011 Biomass Program Platform Review Report: Algae This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Biomass Program's Algae Platform Review meeting, held on April 7-8, 2011, at the Doubletree Hotel in Annapolis, Maryland. 2011_algae_review.pdf (2.28 MB) More Documents & Publications 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review:

  4. Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling October 5, 2015 - 12:16pm Addthis Ryan Davis and Sandia National Laboratories colleagues have developed a method to recycle critical and costly algae cultivation nutrients phosphate and nitrogen. Photo by Dino Vournas. Ryan Davis and Sandia National Laboratories colleagues have developed a method to recycle critical and costly algae

  5. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Algae Biofuels, Exploring the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy of Tomorrow Today | Department of Energy Algae Biofuels, Exploring the Energy of Tomorrow Today 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Algae Biofuels, Exploring the Energy of Tomorrow Today 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Algae Biofuels, Exploring the Energy of Tomorrow Today

  6. Phototrophic Biofilm Assembly in Microbial-Mat-Derived Unicyanobacterial Consortia: Model Systems for the Study of Autotroph-Heterotroph Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Jessica K.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Kim, Young-Mo; Chrisler, William B.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Hu, Dehong; Metz, Thomas O.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lindemann, Stephen R.

    2014-04-07

    Though microbial autotroph-heterotroph interactions influence biogeochemical cycles on a global scale, the diversity and complexity of natural systems and their intractability to in situ environmental manipulation makes elucidation of the principles governing these interactions challenging. Examination of primary succession during phototrophic biofilm assembly provides a robust means by which to elucidate the dynamics of such interactions and determine their influence upon recruitment and maintenance of phylogenetic and functional diversity in microbial communities. We isolated and characterized two unicyanobacterial consortia from the Hot Lake phototrophic mat, quantifying the structural and community composition of their assembling biofilms. The same heterotrophs were retained in both consortia and included members of Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, taxa frequently reported as consorts of microbial photoautotrophs. Cyanobacteria led biofilm assembly, eventually giving way to a late heterotrophic bloom. The consortial biofilms exhibited similar patterns of assembly, with the relative abundances of members of Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria increasing and members of Gammaproteobacteria decreasing as colonization progressed. Despite similar trends in assembly at higher taxa, the consortia exhibited substantial differences in community structure at the species level. These similar patterns of assembly with divergent community structures suggest that, while similar niches are created by the metabolism of the cyanobacteria, the resultant webs of autotroph-heterotroph and heterotroph-heterotroph interactions driving metabolic exchange are specific to each primary producer. Altogether, our data support these Hot Lake unicyanobacterial consortia as generalizable model systems whose simplicity and tractability permit the deciphering of community assembly principles relevant to natural microbial communities.

  7. NREL Scientists Find Key Function for Ferredoxins in Algae Hydrogen

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Production - News Releases | NREL Scientists Find Key Function for Ferredoxins in Algae Hydrogen Production Two of six iron-rich proteins shown to have role in algae metabolism; discovery could lead to enhanced hydrogen production February 10, 2014 Scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory have demonstrated that just two of six iron-sulfur-containing ferredoxins in a representative species of algae promote electron transfers to and from hydrogenases. The

  8. Algae to Bio-Crude in Less Than 60 Minutes

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Elliott, Doug

    2014-06-02

    Engineers have created a chemical process that produces useful crude oil just minutes after engineers pour in harvested algae -- a verdant green paste with the consistency of pea soup. The PNNL team combined several chemical steps into one continuous process that starts with an algae slurry that contains as much as 80 to 90 percent water. Most current processes require the algae to be dried -- an expensive process that takes a lot of energy. The research has been licensed by Genifuel Corp.

  9. Method for producing hydrogen and oxygen by use of algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, Elias

    1984-01-01

    Efficiency of process for producing H.sub.2 by subjecting algae in an aqueous phase to light irradiation is increased by culturing algae which has been bleached during a first period of irradiation in a culture medium in an aerobic atmosphere until it has regained color and then subjecting this algae to a second period of irradiation wherein hydrogen is produced at an enhanced rate.

  10. Method for producing hydrogen and oxygen by use of algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, E.

    1982-06-16

    Efficiency of process for producing H/sub 2/ by subjecting algae in an aqueous phase to light irradiation is increased by culturing algae which has been bleached during a first period of irradiation in a culture medium in an aerobic atmosphere until it has regained color and then subjecting this algae to a second period of irradiation wherein hydrogen is produced at an enhanced rate.

  11. Method and apparatus for iterative lysis and extraction of algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chew, Geoffrey; Boggs, Tabitha; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Doherty, Stephen J.

    2015-12-01

    A method and system for processing algae involves the use of an ionic liquid-containing clarified cell lysate to lyse algae cells. The resulting crude cell lysate may be clarified and subsequently used to lyse algae cells. The process may be repeated a number of times before a clarified lysate is separated into lipid and aqueous phases for further processing and/or purification of desired products.

  12. EERE Assistant Secretary and BETO Director Confirmed Speakers for Algae

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Biomass Summit | Department of Energy EERE Assistant Secretary and BETO Director Confirmed Speakers for Algae Biomass Summit EERE Assistant Secretary and BETO Director Confirmed Speakers for Algae Biomass Summit September 17, 2014 - 4:33pm Addthis Dr. David Danielson, Assistant Secretary of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Jonathan Male, Director of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, will be speaking at the Algae Biomass Summit, September 29-October 2, 2014, in San

  13. Real Time Diagnostics for Algae-final-sm

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Real-time Monitoring And Diagnostics Detecting pathogens and predators to quickly recover from pond crashes Algal Pond Crash Detection Sandia National Laboratories is developing a suite of complementary technologies to help the emerging algae industry detect and quickly recover from algal pond crashes, an obstacle to large-scale algae cultivation for biofuels. Because of the way algae is grown and produced in most algal ponds, they are prone to attack by fungi, rotifers, viruses or other

  14. Whole Turf Algae to biofuels-final-sm

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Whole Turf Algae Polyculture Biofuels The production and conversion of whole turf algae polyculture maximizes fuels, chemicals and nutrients New Approach to Algal Biomass Production Sandia National Laboratories in partnership with the Smithsonian Institute and HydroMentia are pursuing the affordable, scalable and sustainable production of biofuels from benthic algal polyculture turf biomass. The highly productive, easily harvested and dewatered algae is a promising new alternative for achieving

  15. Algae to Bio-Crude in Less Than 60 Minutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Doug

    2013-12-17

    Engineers have created a chemical process that produces useful crude oil just minutes after engineers pour in harvested algae -- a verdant green paste with the consistency of pea soup. The PNNL team combined several chemical steps into one continuous process that starts with an algae slurry that contains as much as 80 to 90 percent water. Most current processes require the algae to be dried -- an expensive process that takes a lot of energy. The research has been licensed by Genifuel Corp.

  16. Overall Energy Considerations for Algae Species Comparison and Selection in Algae-to-Fuels Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, D.; Kail, B.; Curtis, W.; Tuerk,A.

    2011-01-01

    The controlled growth of microalgae as a feedstock for alternative transportation fuel continues to receive much attention. Microalgae have the characteristics of rapid growth rate, high oil (lipid) content, and ability to be grown in unconventional scenarios. Algae have also been touted as beneficial for CO{sub 2} reuse, as algae can be grown using CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-based energy generation. Moreover, algae does not compete in the food chain, lessening the 'food versus fuel' debate. Most often, it is assumed that either rapid production rate or high oii content should be the primary factor in algae selection for algae-to-fuels production systems. However, many important characteristics of algae growth and lipid production must be considered for species selection, growth condition, and scale-up. Under light limited, high density, photoautotrophic conditions, the inherent growth rate of an organism does not affect biomass productivity, carbon fixation rate, and energy fixation rate. However, the oil productivity is organism dependent, due to physiological differences in how the organisms allocate captured photons for growth and oil production and due to the differing conditions under which organisms accumulate oils. Therefore, many different factors must be considered when assessing the overall energy efficiency of fuel production for a given algae species. Two species, Chlorella vulgaris and Botryococcus braunii, are popular choices when discussing algae-to-fuels systems. Chlorella is a very robust species, often outcompeting other species in mixed-culture systems, and produces a lipid that is composed primarily of free fatty acids and glycerides. Botryococcus is regarded as a slower growing species, and the lipid that it produces is characterized by high hydrocarbon content, primarily C28-C34 botryococcenes. The difference in growth rates is often considered to be an advantage oiChlorella. However, the total energy captured by each algal species in

  17. Deep subsurface life from North Pond: Enrichment, isolation, characterization and genomes of heterotrophic bacteria

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Russell, Joseph A.; Leon-Zayas, Rosa; Wrighton, Kelly; Biddle, Jennifer F.

    2016-05-10

    Studies of subsurface microorganisms have yielded few environmentally relevant isolates for laboratory studies. In order to address this lack of cultivated microorganisms, we initiated several enrichments on sediment and underlying basalt samples from North Pond, a sediment basin ringed by basalt outcrops underlying an oligotrophic watercolumn west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 22° N. In contrast to anoxic enrichments, growth was observed in aerobic, heterotrophic enrichments from sediment of IODP Hole U1382B at 4 and 68 m below seafloor (mbsf). These sediment depths, respectively, correspond to the fringes of oxygen penetration from overlying seawater in the top of the sedimentmore » column and upward migration of oxygen from oxic seawater from the basalt aquifer below the sediment. Here we report the enrichment, isolation, initial characterization and genomes of three isolated aerobic heterotrophs from North Pond sediments; an Arthrobacter species from 4 mbsf, and Paracoccus and Pseudomonas species from 68 mbsf. These cultivated bacteria are represented in the amplicon 16S rRNA gene libraries created from whole sediments, albeit at low (up to 2%) relative abundance. We provide genomic evidence from our isolates demonstrating that the Arthrobacter and Pseudomonas isolates have the potential to respire nitrate and oxygen, though dissimilatory nitrate reduction could not be confirmed in laboratory cultures. Furthermore, the cultures from this study represent members of abundant phyla, as determined by amplicon sequencing of environmental DNA extracts, and allow for further studies into geochemical factors impacting life in the deep subsurface.« less

  18. Pilot-Scale MixotrophicAlgae Integrated Biorefinery(IBR)

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Organization: BioProcess Algae This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information AGENDA * Project Overview * Project Approach * ...

  19. Sandia Energy - Better Monitoring and Diagnostics Tackle Algae...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Algae Biofuel Pond Crash Problem Home Renewable Energy Energy Transportation Energy Biofuels Capabilities News News & Events Research & Capabilities Systems Analysis Biomass...

  20. Energy 101 | Algae-to-Fuel | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    But that's exactly what Energy Department scientists and researchers are exploring right now - strategies to produce clean, renewable biofuel from algae. In this edition of our ...

  1. Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and Wastewater Breakout Session 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities for Advanced Biofuels ...

  2. Production-Scale Performance of Lipid Hyper-Accumulating Algae

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    21, 2013 Algae Platform Review Taraka Dale, Ph.D. Los Alamos National Laboratory WBS ... * CO 2 delivery * Gas diffusion * pH control * Rapid yet sterile sampling * ...

  3. Energy Department Announces $15 Million to Advance Algae-based...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of algae-based biofuels and bioproducts through improvements in algal biomass yields. ... intermediate in order to reduce the production costs of algal biofuels and bioproducts. ...

  4. Method and apparatus for lysing and processing algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Di Salvo, Roberto

    2013-03-05

    Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells at lower temperatures than existing algae processing methods. A salt or salt solution is used as a separation agent and to remove water from the ionic liquid, allowing the ionic liquid to be reused. The used salt may be dried or concentrated and reused. The relatively low lysis temperatures and recycling of the ionic liquid and salt reduce the environmental impact of the algae processing while providing biofuels and other useful products.

  5. Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling...

    Energy Savers

    Algae are a promising source of renewable biofuels and bioproducts, and researchers at ... the promise of sustainable, cost-effective algal biofuels for the American public. ...

  6. Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Algae-to-Fuel Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel Addthis Description As America takes steps to improve our energy security, home-grown fuel sources are more important that ever. One of the fuel sources of the future is algae, small aquatic organisms that convert sunlight into energy and store it in the form of oil. Scientists and engineers at the Energy Department and its national laboratories are researching the best strains of algae and developing the most efficient farming practices. This video shows

  7. Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    geothermal brines (EERE) * Solar grade silicon (commercial ... for fuel cells (DOE) * Low energy nuclear reaction ... 6 Algae to fuels - pros * Renewable fuel, low C ...

  8. Research Leads to Improved Fuel Yields from Smaller Antenna Algae |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Research Leads to Improved Fuel Yields from Smaller Antenna Algae Research Leads to Improved Fuel Yields from Smaller Antenna Algae May 13, 2014 - 12:06pm Addthis Tasios Melis (center) shows plates with tla3 algae and its parent strain to Katie Randolph (left) and Sunita Satyapal during a site visit to his lab at the University of California, Berkeley. Tasios Melis (center) shows plates with tla3 algae and its parent strain to Katie Randolph (left) and Sunita Satyapal

  9. Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae are a promising source of renewable biofuels and bioproducts, and researchers at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California, are taking a step toward realizing the promise of...

  10. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D ... chosen to convert biomass into hydrocarbon fuels by the Bioenergy Technologies Office. ...

  11. Effect of petroleum hydrocarbons on algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhadauria, S. ); Sengar, R.M.S. ); Mittal, S.; Bhattacharjee, S. )

    1992-01-01

    Algal species (65) were isolated from oil refinery effluent. Twenty-five of these species were cultured in Benecke's medium in a growth chamber, along with controls. Retardation in algal growth, inhibition in algal photosynthesis, and discoloration was observed in petroleum enriched medium. Few forms, viz. Cyclotella sp., Cosmarium sp., and Merismopedia sp. could not survive. The lag phase lengthened by several days and slope of exponential phase was also depressed. Chlamydomonas sp., Scenedesmus sp., Ankistrodesmus sp., Nitzschia sp. and Navicula sp. were comparatively susceptible to petroleum. Depression in carbon fixation, cell numbers, and total dry algal mass was noticeable, showing toxicity to both diatoms and green algae.

  12. Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-09-18

    ABCLAT was built to help any model user with spatially explicit Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Carbon Dioxide nutrient flux information, and solar resource information evaluate algal cultivation potential. Initial applications of this modeling framework include Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool Canada and Australia. The Canadian application was copyrighted November 29th 2011 as the Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool for Canada. This copyright assertion is for the general framework from which any country or region with themore » requisite data could create a regionally specific application. The ABCLAT model framework developed by SNL looks at the growth potential in a given region as a function of available nutrients from wastewater and other sources, carbon dioxide from power plants, available solar potential, and if available, land cover and use information. The model framework evaluates the biomass potential, fixed carbon dioxide, potential algal biocrude and required land area for nutrient sources. ABCLAT is built with an object-oriented software program that can provide an easy to use interface for exploring questions related to aigal biomass production.« less

  13. UTEX The Culture Collection of Algae at The University of Texas...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    UTEX The Culture Collection of Algae at The University of Texas at Austin Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Texas at Austin The Culture Collection of Algae...

  14. CX-005693: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    693: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005693: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solazyme Integrated Biorefinery (SzIBR): Diesel Fuels from Heterotrophic Algae CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 04/12/2011 Location(s): Peoria, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to Solazyme to build, operate and optimize a pilot-scale Solazyme Integrated Biorefinery (SzIBR). DOE completed the National

  15. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Zhang, J.; Gu, L.; Bao, F.; Cao, Y.; Hao, Y.; He, J.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Ren, Y.; Wang, F.; et al

    2014-09-10

    A longstanding puzzle in isotope studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has anmore » exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous contents of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotope ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found, for the first time, that higher nitrogen contents in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous contents had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotope ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic – heterotrophic difference in carbon isotope compositions.« less

  16. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jinxin [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A longstanding puzzle in isotopic studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has an exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotopic ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotopic ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found that higher nitrogen concentrations in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous concentrations had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotopic ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic heterotrophic difference in carbon isotopic compositions.

  17. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

    2012-04-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.

  18. Photobiological hydrogen production with switchable photosystem-II designer algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu

    2014-02-18

    A process for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production using transgenic alga. The process includes inducing exogenous genes in a transgenic alga by manipulating selected environmental factors. In one embodiment inducing production of an exogenous gene uncouples H.sub.2 production from existing mechanisms that would downregulate H.sub.2 production in the absence of the exogenous gene. In other embodiments inducing an exogenous gene triggers a cascade of metabolic changes that increase H.sub.2 production. In some embodiments the transgenic alga are rendered non-regenerative by inducing exogenous transgenes for proton channel polypeptides that are targeted to specific algal membranes.

  19. Solazyme Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Pennsylvania |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Solazyme Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Pennsylvania Solazyme Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Pennsylvania August 6, 2010 - 2:00pm Addthis A $20 million Recovery Act award will help Solazyme take production from tens of thousands of gallons a year of its algae "drop-in" oil to an annual production capacity of over half a million gallons. | Photo courtesy of Solazyme, Inc. | A $20 million Recovery Act award will help Solazyme

  20. Evaluation of defatted and whole algae as feed ingredients for the marine shrimp, litopenaeus vannamei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, J. L.; Patnaik, S.; Gatlin, III, D. M.; Lawrence, A. L.

    2012-06-13

    Evaluation of defatted and whole algae as feed ingredients for the marine shrimp, litopenaeus vannamei

  1. Genetic manipulation of competition for nitrate between heterotrophic bacteria and diatoms

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Diner, Rachel E.; Schwenck, Sarah M.; McCrow, John P.; Zheng, Hong; Allen, Andrew E.

    2016-06-09

    Diatoms are a dominant group of eukaryotic phytoplankton that contribute substantially to global primary production and the cycling of important elements such as carbon and nitrogen. Heterotrophic bacteria, including members of the gammaproteobacteria, are commonly associated with diatom populations and may rely on them for organic carbon while potentially competing with them for other essential nutrients. Considering that bacterioplankton drive oceanic release of CO2 (i.e., bacterial respiration) while diatoms drive ocean carbon sequestration vial the biological pump, the outcome of such competition could influence the direction and magnitude of carbon flux in the upper ocean. Nitrate availability is commonly amore » determining factor for the growth of diatom populations, particularly in coastal and upwelling regions. Diatoms as well as many bacterial species can utilize nitrate, however the ability of bacteria to compete for nitrate may be hindered by carbon limitation. Here we have developed a genetically tractable model system using the pennate diatom Phaeodactylurn tricomuturn and the widespread heterotrophic bacteria Alterornonas macleodii to examine carbon-nitrogen dynamics. While subsisting solely on P. tricomutum derived carbon. A. macleodii does not appear to be an effective competitor for nitrate, and may in fact benefit the diatom; particularly in stationary phase. However, allochthonous dissolved organic carbon addition in the form of pyruvate triggers A. macleodii proliferation and nitrate uptake, leading to reduced P. tricornutum growth. Nitrate reductase deficient mutants of A. macleodii (ΔnasA) do not exhibit such explosive growth and associated competitive ability in response to allochthonous carbon when nitrate is the sole nitrogen source, but could survive by utilizing solely P. tricomutum-derived nitrogen. Furthermore, allocthonous carbon addition enables wild-type A. macleodii to rescue nitrate reductase deficient P. tricomutum populations

  2. Solazyme Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Pennsylvani...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Some biotech companies use outdoor ponds to make algae-based biofuels, but Harrison Dillon and Jonathan Wolfson, co-founders of San Francisco-based Solazyme Inc., are taking an ...

  3. Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Student interns from the Crow Tribe in Montana participate in an algae biomass research project that could help prepare them for cleantech jobs and pave the way for their Tribe to produce clean, renewable energy.

  4. Energy 101 | Algae-to-Fuel | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers

    oil and you have the raw material to make fuel for cars, trucks, trains, and planes. Algae-based biofuels hold enormous potential for helping reduce our dependence on foreign oil. ...

  5. BETO Deputy Director Publishes Commentary on Development of Algae as

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Renewable Energy Source | Department of Energy Deputy Director Publishes Commentary on Development of Algae as Renewable Energy Source BETO Deputy Director Publishes Commentary on Development of Algae as Renewable Energy Source March 30, 2015 - 1:28pm Addthis Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Deputy Director Dr. Valerie Sarisky-Reed's commentary, "Algal Progress Report," was published in the February edition of the bimonthly research journal Industrial Biotechnology. Her

  6. Renewable Fuels from Algae Boosted by NREL Refinery Process | Bioenergy |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Renewable Fuels from Algae Boosted by NREL Refinery Process February 9, 2016 A new biorefinery process developed by scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has proven to be significantly more effective at producing ethanol from algae than previous research. The process, dubbed Combined Algal Processing (CAP), is detailed in a new paper by NREL's Tao Dong, Eric Knoshaug, Ryan Davis, Lieve Laurens, Stefanie Van Wychen, Philip Pienkos, and Nick

  7. Algae culture for cattle feed and water purification. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varani, F.T.; Schellenbach, S.; Veatch, M.; Grover, P.; Benemann, J.

    1980-05-16

    The feasibility of algae growth on centrate from anaerobic digester effluent and the refeed of both effluent solids and the algae to feedlot cattle were investigated. The digester was operated with dirt feedlot manure. The study serves as a supplement for the work to design a utility sized digester for the City of Lamar to convert local feedlot manure into a fuel gas. The biogas produced would power the electrical generation plant already in service. Previous studies have established techniques of digester operation and the nutritional value for effluent solids as fed to cattle. The inclusion of a single-strain of algae, Chlorella pyrenidosa in the process was evaluated here for its capability (1) to be grown in both open and closed ponds of the discharge water from the solids separation part of the process, (2) to purify the discharge water, and (3) to act as a growth stimulant for cattle feed consumption and conversion when fed at a rate of 6 grams per head per day. Although it was found that the algae could be cultured and grown on the discharge water in the laboratory, the study was unable to show that algae could accomplish the other objectives successfully. However, the study yielded supplementary information useful to the overall process design of the utility plant. This was (1) measurement of undried digester solids fed to cattle in a silage finishing ration (without algae) at an economic value of $74.99 per dry ton based on nutritional qualities, (2) development of a centrate treatment system to decolorize and disinfect centrate to allow optimum algae growth, and (3) information on ionic and mass balances for the digestion system. It is the recommendation of this study that algae not be used in the process in the Lamar bioconversion plant.

  8. Multi-Scale Characterization of Improved Algae Strains

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Slide 1 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Multi-Scale Characterization of Improved Algae Strains March 23, 2015 Algae Technology Area Review Dr. Taraka Dale Los Alamos National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information LA-UR-15-21927 Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA UNCLASSIFIED Goal Statement The overall goal of this project is to develop a

  9. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway (Technical Report)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway This technology pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with

  10. Development of Green Fuels From Algae - The University of Tulsa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crunkleton, Daniel; Price, Geoffrey; Johannes, Tyler; Cremaschi, Selen

    2012-12-03

    The general public has become increasingly aware of the pitfalls encountered with the continued reliance on fossil fuels in the industrialized world. In response, the scientific community is in the process of developing non-fossil fuel technologies that can supply adequate energy while also being environmentally friendly. In this project, we concentrate on green fuels which we define as those capable of being produced from renewable and sustainable resources in a way that is compatible with the current transportation fuel infrastructure. One route to green fuels that has received relatively little attention begins with algae as a feedstock. Algae are a diverse group of aquatic, photosynthetic organisms, generally categorized as either macroalgae (i.e. seaweed) or microalgae. Microalgae constitute a spectacularly diverse group of prokaryotic and eukaryotic unicellular organisms and account for approximately 50% of global organic carbon fixation. The PI's have subdivided the proposed research program into three main research areas, all of which are essential to the development of commercially viable algae fuels compatible with current energy infrastructure. In the fuel development focus, catalytic cracking reactions of algae oils is optimized. In the species development project, genetic engineering is used to create microalgae strains that are capable of high-level hydrocarbon production. For the modeling effort, the construction of multi-scaled models of algae production was prioritized, including integrating small-scale hydrodynamic models of algae production and reactor design and large-scale design optimization models.

  11. Exploratory Research - Using Volatile Organic Compounds to Separate Heterotrophic and Autotrophic Forest Soil Respiration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Scott D; Hatten, Jeffrey A

    2015-02-09

    The initial focus of this project was to develop a method to partition soil respiration into its components (autotrophic, heterotrophic etc.) using the fingerprint of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soils. We were able to identify 63 different VOCs in our study; however, due to technical difficulties we were unable to take reliable measurements in order to test our hypotheses and develop this method. In the end, we changed the objectives of the project. Our new objectives were to characterize the effects of species and soil moisture regime on the composition of soil organic matter. We utilized the soils from the greenhouse experiment we had established for the soil VOC study and determined the lignin biomarker profiles of each of the treatments. We found that moisture had a significant effect on the carbon content of the soils with the low moisture treatments having higher carbon content than the high moisture treatments. We found that the relative yield of syringyl phenols (SP), ligin (Lig), and substituted fatty acids (SFA) were elevated in deciduous planted pots and reduced in conifer planted pots relative to plant-free treatments. Our results suggest nuttall oak preserved lignin and SFA, while loblolly pine lost lignin and SFA similarly to the plant free treatments. Since we did not find that the carbon concentrations of the soils were different between the species, nuttall oak probably replaced more native soil carbon than loblolly pine. This suggests that relative to loblolly pine, nuttall oak is a priming species. Since priming may impact soil carbon pools more than temperature or moisture, determining which species are priming species may facilitate an understanding of the interaction that land use and climate change may have on soil carbon pools.

  12. Method to transform algae, materials therefor, and products produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunahay, T.G.; Roessler, P.G.; Jarvis, E.E.

    1997-08-26

    Disclosed is a method to transform chlorophyll C-containing algae. The method includes introducing a recombinant molecule comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a dominant selectable marker operatively linked to an algal regulatory control sequence into a chlorophyll C-containing alga in such a manner that the marker is produced by the alga. In a preferred embodiment the algal regulatory control sequence is derived from a diatom and preferably Cyclotella cryptica. Also disclosed is a chimeric molecule having one or more regulatory control sequences derived from one or more chlorophyll C-containing algae operatively linked to a nucleic acid molecule encoding a selectable marker, an RNA molecule and/or a protein, wherein the nucleic acid molecule does not normally occur with one or more of the regulatory control sequences. Further, specifically disclosed are molecules pACCNPT10, pACCNPT4.8 and pACCNPT5.1. The methods and materials of the present invention provide the ability to accomplish stable genetic transformation of chlorophyll C-containing algae. 2 figs.

  13. Method to transform algae, materials therefor, and products produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunahay, Terri Goodman; Roessler, Paul G.; Jarvis, Eric E.

    1997-01-01

    Disclosed is a method to transform chlorophyll C-containing algae which includes introducing a recombinant molecule comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a dominant selectable marker operatively linked to an algal regulatory control sequence into a chlorophyll C-containing alga in such a manner that the marker is produced by the alga. In a preferred embodiment the algal regulatory control sequence is derived from a diatom and preferably Cyclotella cryptica. Also disclosed is a chimeric molecule having one or more regulatory control sequences derived from one or more chlorophyll C-containing algae operatively linked to a nucleic acid molecule encoding a selectable marker, an RNA molecule and/or a protein, wherein the nucleic acid molecule does not normally occur with one or more of the regulatory control sequences. Further specifically disclosed are molecules pACCNPT10, pACCNPT4.8 and pACCNPT5.1. The methods and materials of the present invention provide the ability to accomplish stable genetic transformation of chlorophyll C-containing algae.

  14. Method and apparatus using an active ionic liquid for algae biofuel harvest and extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salvo, Roberto Di; Reich, Alton; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Teixeira, Rodrigo

    2012-11-06

    The invention relates to use of an active ionic liquid to dissolve algae cell walls. The ionic liquid is used to, in an energy efficient manner, dissolve and/or lyse an algae cell walls, which releases algae constituents used in the creation of energy, fuel, and/or cosmetic components. The ionic liquids include ionic salts having multiple charge centers, low, very low, and ultra low melting point ionic liquids, and combinations of ionic liquids. An algae treatment system is described, which processes wet algae in a lysing reactor, separates out algae constituent products, and optionally recovers the ionic liquid in an energy efficient manner.

  15. EERE Success Story-Algae Hard at Work in Hawaii | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Algae Hard at Work in Hawaii EERE Success Story-Algae Hard at Work in Hawaii October 27, 2016 - 1:10pm Addthis Aerial photograph of the company’s algae test ponds in Kauai, Hawaii. | Photo courtesy of Global Algae Innovations, Inc. Aerial photograph of the company's algae test ponds in Kauai, Hawaii. | Photo courtesy of Global Algae Innovations, Inc. The beautiful island of Kauai, Hawaii, is known for its pristine beaches and dramatic mountain ranges. But Kauai is not just a vacation spot;

  16. Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, James Weifu

    2011-04-26

    A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

  17. Algae from the arid southwestern United States: an annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, W.H.; Gaines, S.R.

    1983-06-01

    Desert algae are attractive biomass producers for capturing solar energy through photosynthesis of organic matter. They are probably capable of higher yields and efficiencies of light utilization than higher plants, and are already adapted to extremes of sunlight intensity, salinity and temperature such as are found in the desert. This report consists of an annotated bibliography of the literature on algae from the arid southwestern United States. It was prepared in anticipation of efforts to isolate desert algae and study their yields in the laboratory. These steps are necessary prior to setting up outdoor algal culture ponds. Desert areas are attractive for such applications because land, sunlight, and, to some extent, water resources are abundant there. References are sorted by state.

  18. Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool for Canada

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-11-29

    The Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool for Canada uses chemical stoichiometry to estimate Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Carbon atom availability from waste water and carbon dioxide emissions streams, and requirements for those same elements to produce a unit of algae. This information is then combined to find limiting nutrient information and estimate potential productivity associated with waste water and carbon dioxide sources. Output is visualized in terms of distributions or spatial locations. Distances are calculated betweenmore » points of interest in the model using the great circle distance equation, and the smallest distances found by an exhaustive search and sort algorithm.« less

  19. Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool for Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-29

    The Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool for Canada uses chemical stoichiometry to estimate Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Carbon atom availability from waste water and carbon dioxide emissions streams, and requirements for those same elements to produce a unit of algae. This information is then combined to find limiting nutrient information and estimate potential productivity associated with waste water and carbon dioxide sources. Output is visualized in terms of distributions or spatial locations. Distances are calculated between points of interest in the model using the great circle distance equation, and the smallest distances found by an exhaustive search and sort algorithm.

  20. 3 Reasons We're Closer to an Algae Future than You Think | Department...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    carbon-neutral. In addition, algae can grow in a variety of environments -- including man-made ponds, brackish water and wastewater. While algae shows great potential as a...

  1. BETO-Funded Algae Project at NREL Named a Finalist for 2015 R...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Algae Project at NREL Named a Finalist for 2015 R&D 100 Awards BETO-Funded Algae Project at NREL Named a Finalist for 2015 R&D 100 Awards August 13, 2015 - 4:44pm Addthis ...

  2. Algae-Based Biofuels: Applications and Co-Products | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Algae-Based Biofuels: Applications and Co-Products Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Algae-Based Biofuels: Applications and Co-Products AgencyCompany...

  3. "The Promise and Challenge of Algae as Renewable Sources of Biofuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    "The Promise and Challenge of Algae as Renewable Sources of Biofuels" 9-8-2010 - Transcript "The Promise and Challenge of Algae as Renewable Sources of Biofuels" 9-8-2010 - ...

  4. California and New Mexico: Sapphire Energy Advances the Commercialization of Algae Crude Oil

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sapphire Green Crude Farm is the first algae-to-energy facility. If adopted and commercialized by other refineries, this algae-based crude oil is a viable green alternative fuel option.

  5. Algae Education Helping Grow Jobs of the Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Algae Education Helping Grow Jobs of the Future Algae Education Helping Grow Jobs of the Future August 30, 2016 - 3:30pm Addthis The Algae Technology Education Consortium (ATEC) is developing opportunities for education and training for next-generation jobs in the algal industry. | <em>Photo courtesy of ATEC</em> The Algae Technology Education Consortium (ATEC) is developing opportunities for education and training for next-generation jobs in the algal industry. | Photo courtesy of

  6. Science on the Hill: Driving toward an algae-powered future

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Science on the Hill: Driving toward an algae-powered future Driving toward an algae-powered future A new research project led by Los Alamos National Laboratory seeks to drive algal biofuels to marketability, decreasing our nation's dependence on fossil fuels and putting the brakes on global warming. December 24, 2015 LANL scientist Richard Sayre Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist David Fox holds a vial of blue-green algae that is part of the Laboratory's research into improving algae

  7. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrothermal Liquefaction | Department of Energy Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Whole algae hydrothermal liquefaction is one of eight priority pathways chosen to convert biomass into hydrocarbon fuels by the Bioenergy Technologies Office. These pathways were down-selected from an initial list of 18. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae Hydrothermal

  8. Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Five Things You Should Know About Algae Top Five Things You Should Know About Algae November 6, 2013 - 2:40pm Addthis National Renewable Energy Laboratory researcher Lee Elliott collects samples of algae at a creek in Golden, Colorado. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory researcher Lee Elliott collects samples of algae at a creek in Golden, Colorado. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Christy

  9. EA-1829: Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, Hawaii

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal, through a cooperative agreement with Phycal, Inc., to partially fund implementing and evaluating new technology for the reuse of Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources for green energy products. This project would use CO2 to grow algae for the production of algal oil and subsequent conversion to fuel.

  10. Switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu

    2010-01-05

    A switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production. The designer transgenic algae includes at least two transgenes for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production wherein a first transgene serves as a genetic switch that can controls photosystem II (PSII) oxygen evolution and a second transgene encodes for creation of free proton channels in the algal photosynthetic membrane. In one embodiment, the algae includes a DNA construct having polymerase chain reaction forward primer (302), a inducible promoter (304), a PSII-iRNA sequence (306), a terminator (308), and a PCR reverse primer (310). In other embodiments, the PSII-iRNA sequence (306) is replaced with a CF.sub.1-iRNA sequence (312), a streptomycin-production gene (314), a targeting sequence (316) followed by a proton-channel producing gene (318), or a PSII-producing gene (320). In one embodiment, a photo-bioreactor and gas-product separation and utilization system produce photobiological H.sub.2 from the switchable PSII designer alga.

  11. ATP3 Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ATP3 Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership ATP3 Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership Breakout Session 3B-Integration of Supply Chains III: Algal Biofuels Strategy ATP3 Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership John A. McGowen, Director of Operations and Program, Arizona State University, AzCATI and ATP3 mcgowen_biomass_2014.pdf (2.54 MB) More Documents & Publications How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D 2013 Peer Review Presentations-Algae Algal

  12. 3 Reasons We're Closer to an Algae Future than You Think | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy We're Closer to an Algae Future than You Think 3 Reasons We're Closer to an Algae Future than You Think July 29, 2015 - 12:35pm Addthis Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs KEY FACTS Algae shows great potential as a homegrown and renewable fuel source. The Bioenergy Technologies Office supports important research and development to make an algae future possible. Go to energy.gov/algae for more on the Energy Department's work related to algal

  13. 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office Algae Platform Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Algae Platform Review Dr. Gary Dirks (Principle Investigator) and Dr. John McGowen (Program Manager and Dir. of Operations) Arizona State University May 23, 2:00 pm Vision The ATP 3 vision is to establish a sustainable network of regional testbeds that empowers knowledge creation and dissemination within the algal biofuels community, facilitates innovation, and accelerates growth of the nascent algal fuels industry. 2 The ATP 3 goal is to create a network of operating testbeds, bringing together

  14. Large-scale production of marine algae for biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Tuesday May 21, 2013 Algae Platform Review Mark Huntley (Contact Principal Investigator) Charles Greene (Principal Investigator) Cornell University Marine Algal Biofuels Consortium Marine Algal Biofuels Consortium Overall Goal and Key Objectives Our primary goal is to evaluate the commercial viability of a fully integrated, marine algal-production-to-finished-fuel technology pathway, based on data from scalable outdoor unit operations, that demonstrates: (1) by Q4 2013, performance against clear

  15. Sandia National Laboratories Algae Raceway Testing Facility Ribbon Cutting

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sandia National Laboratories will be hosting a ribbon cutting on Feb. 4, 2016 at its Livermore Valley Open Campus to commemorate the opening of a new algae raceway testing facility. The new facility will allow researchers to better understand algal cultivation techniques, and is funded in part by the Bioenergy Technologies Office. Advanced Algal Systems Program Manager Alison Goss Eng and Technology Manager Daniel Fishman will be in attendance.

  16. Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership Workshop on Principles and Processes: Algae Culture Management, Production and Downstream Harvesting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The spring 2016 Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership (ATP3) workshop will occur May 16–20, 2016, at Santa Fe Community College and Los Alamos National Laboratory's New Mexico Consortium Biological Laboratory. These unique facilities will give participants incredible insights into aspects across the algae value chain and the food, energy, and water nexus. Lectures will cover the fundamentals of managing microalgal cultures, culturing techniques, measuring and analyzing biomass, harvesting and processing technologies, and life-cycle analysis and operations at the production scale. Participants will have opportunities to work in the laboratory and learn how to measure culture density (cell counting and optical density), use a light and fluorescence microscope, use flow cytometry, and perform gravimetric analyses (dry weight and ash-free dry weight) and techniques necessary to analyze biomass compounds.

  17. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Gu, L.; Bao, F.; Cao, Y.; Hao, Y.; He, J.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Ren, Y.; Wang, F.; Wu, R.; Yao, B.; Zhao, Y.; Lin, G.; Wu, B.; Lu, Q.; Meng, P.

    2014-09-10

    A longstanding puzzle in isotope studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has an exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous contents of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotope ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found, for the first time, that higher nitrogen contents in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous contents had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotope ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic – heterotrophic difference in carbon isotope compositions.

  18. Sandia algae raceway paves path from lab to real-world applications |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Sandia algae raceway paves path from lab to real-world applications Tuesday, February 9, 2016 - 9:25am NNSA Blog Sandia California held a ribbon cutting ceremony for the Algae Raceway Testing Facility last week. The new facility will help scientists advance laboratory research to real-world applications. In a twist of geometry, an oval can make a line. The new algae raceway testing facility at Sandia National Laboratories in California may be

  19. EERE Success Story-Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Nutrient Recycling | Department of Energy Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling EERE Success Story-Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling October 19, 2015 - 3:40pm Addthis Ryan Davis and Sandia National Laboratories colleagues have developed a method to recycle critical and costly algae cultivation nutrients phosphate and nitrogen. Photo by Dino Vournas. Ryan Davis and Sandia National Laboratories colleagues have developed a method

  20. Energy Department Announces $15 Million to Advance Algae-based Biofuels and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Bioproducts | Department of Energy 5 Million to Advance Algae-based Biofuels and Bioproducts Energy Department Announces $15 Million to Advance Algae-based Biofuels and Bioproducts July 14, 2016 - 11:00am Addthis The Energy Department today announced up to $15 million for three projects aimed at reducing the production costs of algae-based biofuels and bioproducts through improvements in algal biomass yields. These projects will develop highly productive algal cultivation systems and couple

  1. The Promise and Challenge of Algae as Renewable Sources of Biofuels |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy The Promise and Challenge of Algae as Renewable Sources of Biofuels The Promise and Challenge of Algae as Renewable Sources of Biofuels This PDF focuses on the Biomass Program's approach to algal biofuels research and development, and it includes presentations from four representatives of its recently funded consortia. This PDF also highlights from the National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap. algae_webinar.pdf (11.67 MB) More Documents & Publications Pathways for

  2. 9.1.3.1 Algae-Based Integrated Assessment Framework: Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    information Goal Statement Reduce the cost of producing algal oil by investigating ... Assessment Tool (PNNL) and the Algae Logistics Model (INL) to consider productivity, ...

  3. EERE Success Story-Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved...

    Energy Savers

    Algae are a promising source of renewable biofuels and bioproducts, and researchers at ... the promise of sustainable, cost-effective algal biofuels for the American public. ...

  4. Science on the Hill: Driving toward an algae-powered future

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    These amazing - and amazingly prolific - photosynthetic microorganisms began pumping ... Algae's appetite for CO2 and their remarkable ability to produce oil might soon have us ...

  5. Study: Algae Could Replace 17% of U.S. Oil Imports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Study: Algae Could Replace 17% of U.S. Oil Imports Study: Algae Could Replace 17% of U.S. Oil Imports April 13, 2011 - 6:30pm Addthis Algae samples back at the NREL lab, ready to be analyzed and run through the Fluorescent-Activated Cell Sorter, or FACS, which separates the cells. | Credit: NREL Staff Photographer Dennis Schroeder. Algae samples back at the NREL lab, ready to be analyzed and run through the Fluorescent-Activated Cell Sorter, or FACS, which separates the cells. | Credit: NREL

  6. Algae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and Wastewater

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2-C: Biogas and Beyond: Challenges and Opportunities for Advanced Biofuels from Wet-Waste FeedstocksAlgae-to-Fuel: Integrating Thermochemical Conversion, Nutrient Recycling, and...

  7. Spectroradiometric monitoring for open outdoor culturing of algae and cyanobacteria

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Collins, Aaron M.; McBride, Robert C.; Behnke, Craig A.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.

    2014-08-20

    We assess the measurement of hyperspectral reflectance for the outdoor monitoring of green algae and cyanobacteria cultures with a multi-channel, fiber-coupled spectroradiometer. Reflectance data acquired over a four-week period are interpreted via numerical inversion of a reflectance model, in which the above-water reflectance is expressed as a quadratic function of the single backscattering albedo, dependent on the absorption and backscatter coefficients. The absorption coefficient is treated as the sum of component spectra consisting of the cultured species (green algae or cyanobacteria), dissolved organic matter, and water (including the temperature dependence of the water absorption spectrum). The backscatter coefficient is approximatedmore » as the scaled Hilbert transform of the culture absorption spectrum with a wavelength-independent vertical offset. Additional terms in the reflectance model account for the pigment fluorescence features and the water surface reflection of sunlight and skylight. For both the green algae and cyanobacteria, the wavelength-independent vertical offset of the backscatter coefficient is found to scale linearly with daily dry weight measurements, providing the capability for a non-sampling measurement of biomass in outdoor ponds. Other fitting parameters in the reflectance model are compared to auxiliary measurements and physics-based calculations. The magnitudes of the sunlight and skylight water-surface contributions derived from the reflectance model compare favorably with Fresnel reflectance calculations, while the reflectance-derived quantum efficiency of Chl-a fluorescence is found to be in agreement with literature values. To conlclude, the water temperature derived from the reflectance model exhibits excellent agreement with thermocouple measurements during the morning hours and highlights significantly elevated temperatures in the afternoon hours.« less

  8. Spectroradiometric monitoring for open outdoor culturing of algae and cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Collins, Aaron M.; McBride, Robert C.; Behnke, Craig A.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.

    2014-08-20

    We assess the measurement of hyperspectral reflectance for the outdoor monitoring of green algae and cyanobacteria cultures with a multi-channel, fiber-coupled spectroradiometer. Reflectance data acquired over a four-week period are interpreted via numerical inversion of a reflectance model, in which the above-water reflectance is expressed as a quadratic function of the single backscattering albedo, dependent on the absorption and backscatter coefficients. The absorption coefficient is treated as the sum of component spectra consisting of the cultured species (green algae or cyanobacteria), dissolved organic matter, and water (including the temperature dependence of the water absorption spectrum). The backscatter coefficient is approximated as the scaled Hilbert transform of the culture absorption spectrum with a wavelength-independent vertical offset. Additional terms in the reflectance model account for the pigment fluorescence features and the water surface reflection of sunlight and skylight. For both the green algae and cyanobacteria, the wavelength-independent vertical offset of the backscatter coefficient is found to scale linearly with daily dry weight measurements, providing the capability for a non-sampling measurement of biomass in outdoor ponds. Other fitting parameters in the reflectance model are compared to auxiliary measurements and physics-based calculations. The magnitudes of the sunlight and skylight water-surface contributions derived from the reflectance model compare favorably with Fresnel reflectance calculations, while the reflectance-derived quantum efficiency of Chl-a fluorescence is found to be in agreement with literature values. To conlclude, the water temperature derived from the reflectance model exhibits excellent agreement with thermocouple measurements during the morning hours and highlights significantly elevated temperatures in the afternoon hours.

  9. The value of post-extracted algae residue

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Bryant, Henry; Gogichaishvili, Ilia; Anderson, David; Richardson, James; Sawyer, Jason; Wickersham, Tryon; Drewery, Merritt

    2012-07-26

    This paper develops a hedonic pricing model for post-extracted algae residue (PEAR), which can be used for assessing the economic feasibility of an algal production enterprise. Prices and nutritional characteristics of commonly employed livestock feed ingredients are used to estimate the value of PEAR based on its composition. We find that PEAR would have a value lower than that of soybean meal in recent years. The value of PEAR will vary substantially based on its characteristics. PEAR could have generated algal fuel co-product credits that in recent years would have ranged between $0.95 and $2.43 per gallon of fuel produced.

  10. Multi-scale Characterization of Improved Algae Strains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Taraka T.

    2015-04-01

    This report relays the important role biofuels such as algae could have in the energy market. The report cites that problem of crude oil becoming less abundant while the demand for energy continues to rise. There are many benefits of producing energy with biofuels such as fewer carbon emissions as well as less land area to produce the same amount of energy compared to other sources of renewable fuels. One challenge that faces biofuels right now is the cost to produce it is high.

  11. Human Health Risk Assessment of Algae Production Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D LA-UR-13-22931 Slide 1 Human Health Risk Assessment of Algae Production Systems May 21, 2013 BETO Platform Review: Algal Sustainability E.J. Sullivan Los Alamos National Laboratory Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Slide 2 Goals  Explore the potential for environmental or human health risks associated with large

  12. Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Bachy, Charles; Sudek, Sebastian; Wong, Chee -Hong; Jimenez, Valeria; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Reistetter, Emily N.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Price, Dana C.; Wei, Chia -Lin; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Lagarias, J. Clark; Worden, Alexandra Z.

    2014-09-29

    Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found in Micromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (<2 µm cell diameter). Together with phytochromes identified from other prasinophyte lineages, we establish that prasinophyte and streptophyte phytochromes share core light-input and signaling-output domain architectures except for the loss of C-terminal response regulator receiver domains in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Phylogenetic reconstructions robustly support the presence of phytochrome in the common progenitor of green algae and land plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. The expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae.

  13. Marine algae and land plants share conserved phytochrome signaling systems

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Bachy, Charles; Sudek, Sebastian; Wong, Chee -Hong; Jimenez, Valeria; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Reistetter, Emily N.; van Baren, Marijke J.; et al

    2014-09-29

    Phytochrome photosensors control a vast gene network in streptophyte plants, acting as master regulators of diverse growth and developmental processes throughout the life cycle. In contrast with their absence in known chlorophyte algal genomes and most sequenced prasinophyte algal genomes, a phytochrome is found in Micromonas pusilla, a widely distributed marine picoprasinophyte (<2 µm cell diameter). Together with phytochromes identified from other prasinophyte lineages, we establish that prasinophyte and streptophyte phytochromes share core light-input and signaling-output domain architectures except for the loss of C-terminal response regulator receiver domains in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Phylogenetic reconstructions robustly support the presence ofmore » phytochrome in the common progenitor of green algae and land plants. These analyses reveal a monophyletic clade containing streptophyte, prasinophyte, cryptophyte, and glaucophyte phytochromes implying an origin in the eukaryotic ancestor of the Archaeplastida. Transcriptomic measurements reveal diurnal regulation of phytochrome and bilin chromophore biosynthetic genes in Micromonas. The expression of these genes precedes both light-mediated phytochrome redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased expression of photosynthesis-associated genes. Prasinophyte phytochromes perceive wavelengths of light transmitted farther through seawater than the red/far-red light sensed by land plant phytochromes. Prasinophyte phytochromes also retain light-regulated histidine kinase activity lost in the streptophyte phytochrome lineage. Our studies demonstrate that light-mediated nuclear translocation of phytochrome predates the emergence of land plants and likely represents a widespread signaling mechanism in unicellular algae.« less

  14. Algal Lipids and Omega-3 Production via Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Pathways at Cellana?s Kona Demonstration Facility, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Xuemei; Knurek, Emily; Goes, Nikki; Griswold, Lynn

    2012-05-05

    Cellana?s Kona Demonstration Facility (KDF) is a 2.5 hectare facility, with 17,000 sq. ft. under roof and 1 hectare of cultivation systems. KDF is designed to execute and support all stages of the production process at pilot scale, from cultivation through extraction. Since Feb. 2009, KDF has been producing up to 0.7MT dry weight of algal biomass per month, while at the same time optimizing processes of cultivation, harvesting, dewatering and extraction. The cultivation system at KDF uses ALDUO? technology, a hybrid system of photobioreactors (PBRs) and open ponds. All fluid transfers related to KDF cultivation and harvesting processes are operated and monitored by a remote Process-Control System. Fluid transfer data, together with biochemical data, enable the mass balance calculations necessary to measure productivity. This poster summarizes methods to improve both biomass and lipids yield by 1) alleviating light limitation in open ponds, 2) de-oxygenation and 3) heterotrophic lipid production for post-harvesting cultures.

  15. June 2012 News Blast: Algae on the Mind | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2 News Blast: Algae on the Mind June 2012 News Blast: Algae on the Mind Biomass Program monthly newsletter from June 2012. june2012_newsblast.pdf (137.87 KB) More Documents & Publications Biomass Program Monthly News Blast - May 2012 July 2012 Biomass Program Monthly News Blast July 2012 Biomass Program

  16. Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacey, Ph.D, P.E., Ronald E.

    2012-07-16

    Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

  17. How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D Breakout Session 2-A: The Future of Algae-Based Biofuels How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D Dr. John McGowen, Director of Operations and Program Manager, Arizona Center for Algae Technology and Innovation: Arizona State University mcgowen_bioenergy_2015.pdf (2.1 MB) More

  18. Energy Productivity of the High Velocity Algae Raceway Integrated Design (ARID-HV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attalah, Said; Waller, Peter M.; Khawam, George; Ryan, Randy D.; Huesemann, Michael H.

    2015-06-03

    The original Algae Raceway Integrated Design (ARID) raceway was an effective method to increase algae culture temperature in open raceways. However, the energy input was high and flow mixing was poor. Thus, the High Velocity Algae Raceway Integrated Design (ARID-HV) raceway was developed to reduce energy input requirements and improve flow mixing in a serpentine flow path. A prototype ARID-HV system was installed in Tucson, Arizona. Based on algae growth simulation and hydraulic analysis, an optimal ARID-HV raceway was designed, and the electrical energy input requirement (kWh ha-1 d-1) was calculated. An algae growth model was used to compare the productivity of ARIDHV and conventional raceways. The model uses a pond surface energy balance to calculate water temperature as a function of environmental parameters. Algae growth and biomass loss are calculated based on rate constants during day and night, respectively. A 10 year simulation of DOE strain 1412 (Chlorella sorokiniana) showed that the ARID-HV raceway had significantly higher production than a conventional raceway for all months of the year in Tucson, Arizona. It should be noted that this difference is species and climate specific and is not observed in other climates and with other algae species. The algae growth model results and electrical energy input evaluation were used to compare the energy productivity (algae production rate/energy input) of the ARID-HV and conventional raceways for Chlorella sorokiniana in Tucson, Arizona. The energy productivity of the ARID-HV raceway was significantly greater than the energy productivity of a conventional raceway for all months of the year.

  19. World's First Algae Surfboard Makes Waves in San Diego | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy World's First Algae Surfboard Makes Waves in San Diego World's First Algae Surfboard Makes Waves in San Diego April 23, 2015 - 4:15pm Addthis On the eve of Earth Day, UCSD unveiled their new innovative and sustainable algae surfboard at the San Diego Symphony Hall. San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer, Marty Gilchrist of Arctic Foam, Steve Mayfield of Cal-CAB, and champion surfer Rob Machado discuss the development of the "surfboard of the future." Credit: UC San Diego

  20. 2010-09-08 14.03 The Promise and Challenges of Algae as a Renewable...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sources of Biofuels" 9-8-2010 Joanne Morello: Today we're going to be talking about, as you know, "The Promise and Challenge of Algae as Renewable Sources of Biofuels," but I do ...

  1. Re-utilization of Industrial CO2 for Algae Production Using a Phase Change Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, Brian

    2013-12-31

    This is the final report of a 36-month Phase II cooperative agreement. Under this project, Touchstone Research Laboratory (Touchstone) investigated the merits of incorporating a Phase Change Material (PCM) into an open-pond algae production system that can capture and re-use the CO2 from a coal-fired flue gas source located in Wooster, OH. The primary objective of the project was to design, construct, and operate a series of open algae ponds that accept a slipstream of flue gas from a coal-fired source and convert a significant portion of the CO2 to liquid biofuels, electricity, and specialty products, while demonstrating the merits of the PCM technology. Construction of the pilot facility and shakedown of the facility in Wooster, OH, was completed during the first two years, and the focus of the last year was on operations and the cultivation of algae. During this Phase II effort a large-scale algae concentration unit from OpenAlgae was installed and utilized to continuously harvest algae from indoor raceways. An Algae Lysing Unit and Oil Recovery Unit were also received and installed. Initial parameters for lysing nanochloropsis were tested. Conditions were established that showed the lysing operation was effective at killing the algae cells. Continuous harvesting activities yielded over 200 kg algae dry weight for Ponds 1, 2 and 4. Studies were conducted to determine the effect of anaerobic digestion effluent as a nutrient source and the resulting lipid productivity of the algae. Lipid content and total fatty acids were unaffected by culture system and nutrient source, indicating that open raceway ponds fed diluted anaerobic digestion effluent can obtain similar lipid productivities to open raceway ponds using commercial nutrients. Data were also collected with respect to the performance of the PCM material on the pilot-scale raceway ponds. Parameters such as evaporative water loss, temperature differences, and growth/productivity were tracked. The pond with the

  2. Algae Raceway Testing Facility Brings Algal Biofuels One Step Closer to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Reality | Department of Energy Algae Raceway Testing Facility Brings Algal Biofuels One Step Closer to Reality Algae Raceway Testing Facility Brings Algal Biofuels One Step Closer to Reality February 18, 2016 - 11:25am Addthis (From left to right) BETO Technology Manager Daniel Fishman, and Program Manager Alison Goss Eng, Livermore Mayor John March, Sandia National Laboratories Vice President Marianne Walck, California State Assembly Catharine Baker, and Chief Scientific and Technology

  3. GREET for Algae Life Cycle Analysis WBS 9.6.5.2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    for Algae Life Cycle Analysis WBS 9.6.5.2 May 22, 2013 Algae Technology Area Edward D. Frank (PI), Michael Q. Wang (co-PI) Argonne National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement * Determine reduction in GHG emissions and fossil energy use when algal biofuels replace petroleum fuels. * "Support program decisions by establishing basis of quantitative metrics" - MYPP 2 3 Abbreviations * AD -

  4. Renewable Fuels from Algae Boosted by NREL Refinery Process - News Releases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    | NREL Renewable Fuels from Algae Boosted by NREL Refinery Process February 9, 2016 A new biorefinery process developed by scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has proven to be significantly more effective at producing ethanol from algae than previous research. The process, dubbed Combined Algal Processing (CAP), is detailed in a new paper by NREL's Tao Dong, Eric Knoshaug, Ryan Davis, Lieve Laurens, Stefanie Van Wychen, Philip Pienkos, and Nick

  5. "The Promise and Challenge of Algae as Renewable Sources of Biofuels"

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    9-8-2010 - Transcript | Department of Energy "The Promise and Challenge of Algae as Renewable Sources of Biofuels" 9-8-2010 - Transcript "The Promise and Challenge of Algae as Renewable Sources of Biofuels" 9-8-2010 - Transcript This focused on the Office's approach to algal biofuels research and development and included presentations from four representatives of its recently funded consortia. This session also discussed highlights from the National Algal Biofuels

  6. Microsoft Word - PhycalAlgaePilotProject_NEPAFinalEA_October2011.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Phycal Algae Pilot Project DOE/EA-1829 Phycal, Inc. November 2011 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes, through a cooperative agreement with Phycal, Inc. (Phycal), to partially fund implementing and evaluating new technology for the reuse of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from industrial sources for green energy products. This project would use CO 2 to grow algae for the production of algal

  7. Improved Algae-based Biorefining and High-throughput Screening of Algal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Photosynthetic Efficiency - Energy Innovation Portal Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Improved Algae-based Biorefining and High-throughput Screening of Algal Photosynthetic Efficiency University of Colorado Contact CU About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication CU2807B (Biorefining Flow Cytometer) Marketing Summary.pdf (164 KB) Technology Marketing Summary Improved Algae-based Biorefining and High-throughput Screening of Algal

  8. How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ASU Confidential Proprietary How ATP 3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D John A. McGowen, PhD, PMP Director of Operations and Program Management Arizona Center For Algae Technology and Innovation Arizona State University Bioenergy 2015 Washington, DC June 24, 2015 Policy  Support from USDA for algae as precision agriculture  EPA and USDA collaboration critical on CO 2 and GMO policies, crop designation, agricultural practices and policies and tax

  9. Bioenergy Technologies Office Conversion R&D Pathway: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Microalgal biomass grown via autotrophic pathways is dewatered to 20% solids concentration. * The slurry of whole algae reacts in a pressure vessel (2000-3000 pounds per square inch and 300°C-350°C) to predominately form liquids with some gas and solids. * The oil phase spontaneously separates from the water phase. * AHTL makes use of all algal lipids and biomass-provid- ing high oil yields even from low triacylglyceride (TAG) lipid content algae; polar lipids are not hexane extractable.

  10. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Lignin-Rich Biorefinery Residues and Algae Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Zacher, Alan H.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Jones, Susanne B.; Tjokro Rahardjo, Sandra A.

    2009-11-03

    This report describes the results of the work performed by PNNL using feedstock materials provided by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, KL Energy and Lignol lignocellulosic ethanol pilot plants. Test results with algae feedstocks provided by Genifuel, which provided in-kind cost share to the project, are also included. The work conducted during this project involved developing and demonstrating on the bench-scale process technology at PNNL for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of lignin-rich biorefinery residues and algae. A technoeconomic assessment evaluated the use of the technology for energy recovery in a lignocellulosic ethanol plant.

  11. ALDUO(TM) Algae Cultivation Technology for Delivering Sustainable Omega-3s, Feed, and Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Xuemei

    2012-09-24

    * ALDUO(TM) Algae Production Technology Cellana?s Proprietary, Photosynthetic, & Proven * ALDUO(TM) Enables Economic Algae Production Unencumbered by Contamination by Balancing Higher-Cost PBRs with Lower-Cost Open Ponds * ALDUO(TM) Advantages * ALDUO(TM) Today o Large collection of strains for high value co-products o Powerful Mid-scale Screening & Optimization System o Solution to a Conflicting Interest o Split Pond Yield Enhancement o Heterotrophy & mixotrophy as a "finishing step" o CO2 Mitigation-flue Gas Operation o Worldwide Feed Trials with Livestock & Aquatic Species * ALDUO(TM) Technology Summarized

  12. Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Museum Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury Science Museum The Bradbury Science Museum is opening two new exhibits as part of the Laboratory's 70th Anniversary celebration. July 22, 2013 What if you could power your life using pond scum? Los Alamos researchers are working to make this a reality. What if you could power your life using pond scum? Los Alamos researchers are working to make this a

  13. Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop Brings Lead Experts to Inform Algae-Based Biofuel Strategy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is hosting a two-day workshop gathering lead experts in the field of algal biology from May 24–25, 2016. This workshop, “Sharpening Our Tools: Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop,” held in San Diego, California, will discuss research and development (R&D) needed to achieve affordable, scalable, and sustainable algae-based biofuels. It is the first algal biofuels strategy workshop to focus specifically on improvements in algal biology—a key research focus required to advance the economic viability of algae-based biofuels.

  14. Uptake and Retention of Cs137 by a Blue-Green Alga in Continuous Flow and Batch Culture Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, J.R.

    2003-02-18

    Since routine monitoring data show that blue-green algae concentrate radioactivity from water by factors as great as 10,000, this study was initiated to investigate the uptake and retention patterns of specific radionuclides by the dominant genera of blue-green algae in the reactor effluents. Plectonema purpureum was selected for this study.

  15. The Dark Side of Algae Cultivation. Characterizing night biomass loss in three photosynthetic algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, Nannochloropsis salina and Picochlorum sp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmundson, Scott J.; Huesemann, Michael H.

    2015-10-28

    Night biomass loss in photosynthetic algae is an essential parameter that is often overlooked when modeling or optimizing biomass productivities. Night respiration acts as a tax on daily biomass gains and has not been well characterized in the context of biofuel production. We examined the night biomass loss in three algae strains that may have potential for commercial biomass production (Nannochloropsis salina- CCMP1776, Chlorella sorokiniana- DOE1412, and Picochlorum sp. LANL-WT). Biomass losses were monitored by ash free dry weight (AFDW mg/L-1) and optical density (OD750) on a thermal-gradient incubator. Night biomass loss rates were highly variable (ranging from -0.006 to -0.59 day -1), species-specific, and dependent on both culture growth phase prior to the dark period and night pond temperature. In general, the fraction of biomass lost over a 10 hour dark period, which ranged from ca. 1 to 22% in our experiments, was positively correlated with temperature and declined as the culture transitioned from exponential to linear to stationary phase. The dynamics of biomass loss should be taken into consideration in algae strain selection, are critical in predictive modeling of biomass production based on geographic location and can influence the net productivity of photosynthetic cultures used for bio-based fuels or products.

  16. Algae Biofuels Collaborative Project: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-371

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, R. J.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this project is to advance biofuels research on algal feedstocks and NREL's role in the project is to explore novel liquid extraction methods, gasification and pyrolysis as means to produce fuels from algae. To that end several different extraction methods were evaluated and numerous gasification and pyrolysis conditions were explored. It was found that mild hydrothermal treatment is a promising means to improve the extraction and conversion of lipids from algae over those produced by standard extraction methods. The algae were essentially found to gasify completely at a fairly low temperature of 750 degrees C in the presence of oxygen. Pyrolysis from 300-550 degrees C showed sequential release of phytene hydrocarbons, glycerides, and aromatics as temperature was increased. It appears that this has potential to release the glycerides from the non-fatty acid groups present in the polar lipids to produce a cleaner lipid. Further research is needed to quantify the pyrolysis and gasification yields, analyze the liquids produced and to test strategies for removing organic-nitrogen byproducts produced because of the high protein content of the feed. Possible strategies include use of high-lipid/low-protein algae or the use of catalytic pyrolysis.

  17. NREL Refinery Process Shows Increased Effectiveness of Producing Ethanol from Algae

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    A new biorefinery process developed by scientists at the Energy Department’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) has proven to be significantly more effective at producing ethanol from algae than previous methods.

  18. Algae: The Source of Reliable, Scalable, and Sustainable Liquid Transportation Fuels

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the February 12, 2009 joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Brian Goodall (Sapphire Energy) spoke on Continental Airlines’ January 7th Biofuels Test. The flight was fueled, in part, by Sapphire’s algae-based jet fuel.

  19. Bioenergy Technologies Office R&D with University of California San Diego Results in First Algae Surfboard

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fossil-fuel derived polyurethane products may not be in demand in the coming years thanks to algae researchers. A joint research and development investment from the Energy Departments Bioenergy...

  20. One-pot bioconversion of algae biomass into terpenes for advanced biofuels and bioproducts

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Davis, Ryan Wesley; Wu, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    In this study, rising demand for transportation fuels, diminishing reserved of fossil oil, and the concerns with fossil fuel derived environmental pollution as well as the green-house gas emission derived climate change have resulted in the compelling need for alternative, sustainable new energy sources(1). Algae-based biofuels have been considered one of the promising alternatives to fossil fuels as they can overcome some of these issues (2-4). The current state-of-art of algal biofuel technologies have primarily focused on biodiesel production through prompting high algal lipid yields under the nutrient stress conditions. There are less interests of using algae-based carbohydrate and proteinsmore » as carbon sources for the fermentative production of liquid fuel compounds or other high-value bioproducts(5-7).« less

  1. One-pot bioconversion of algae biomass into terpenes for advanced biofuels and bioproducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Ryan Wesley; Wu, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    In this study, rising demand for transportation fuels, diminishing reserved of fossil oil, and the concerns with fossil fuel derived environmental pollution as well as the green-house gas emission derived climate change have resulted in the compelling need for alternative, sustainable new energy sources(1). Algae-based biofuels have been considered one of the promising alternatives to fossil fuels as they can overcome some of these issues (2-4). The current state-of-art of algal biofuel technologies have primarily focused on biodiesel production through prompting high algal lipid yields under the nutrient stress conditions. There are less interests of using algae-based carbohydrate and proteins as carbon sources for the fermentative production of liquid fuel compounds or other high-value bioproducts(5-7).

  2. PYOMELANIN IS PRODUCED BY SHEWANELLA ALGAE BRY AND EFFECTED BY EXOGENOUS IRON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turick, C; Frank Caccavo, F; Jr., J; Louis S. Tisa, L

    2006-11-29

    Melanin production by S. algae BrY occurred during late/post-exponential growth in lactate-basal-salts liquid medium supplemented with tyrosine or phenylalanine. The antioxidant ascorbate inhibited melanin production, but not production of the melanin precursor, homogentisic acid. In the absence of ascorbate, melanin production was inhibited by the 4-hydroxyplenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitor, sulcotrione and Fe(II) (>0.2mM). These data support the hypothesis that pigment production by S. algae BrY was a result the conversion of tyrosine or phenylalanine to homogentisic acid which was excreted, auto-oxidized and self-polymerized to form pyomelanin. The inverse relationship between Fe(II) concentration and pyomelanin production has implications that pyomelanin may play a role in iron assimilation under Fe(II) limiting conditions.

  3. Lipid Extraction from Wet-Algae for Biofuel Production - Energy Innovation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Lipid Extraction from Wet-Algae for Biofuel Production University of Colorado Contact CU About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryThere is a growing interest in algal biofuels; however, current methods of a thermal separation process for solvent mixtures involve concomitant issues and increased energy consumption. A research team at the University of Colorado

  4. Extensive horizontal gene transfer, duplication, and loss of chlorophyll synthesis genes in the algae

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Hunsperger, Heather M.; Randhawa, Tejinder; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    2015-02-10

    Two non-homologous, isofunctional enzymes catalyze the penultimate step of chlorophyll a synthesis in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria, eukaryotic algae and land plants: the light independent (LIPOR) and light-dependent (POR) protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases. Whereas the distribution of these enzymes in cyanobacteria and land plants is well understood, the presence, loss, duplication, and replacement of these genes have not been surveyed in the polyphyletic and remarkably diverse eukaryotic algal lineages.

  5. Genomic analysis of organismal complexity in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prochnik, Simon E.; Umen, James; Nedelcu, Aurora; Hallmann, Armin; Miller, Stephen M.; Nishii, Ichiro; Ferris, Patrick; Kuo, Alan; Mitros, Therese; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Hellsten, Uffe; Chapman, Jarrod; Simakov, Oleg; Rensing, Stefan A.; Terry, Astrid; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Kapitonov, Vladimir; Jurka, Jerzy; Salamov, Asaf; Shapiro, Harris; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Schmitt, Rudiger; Kirk, David; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2010-07-01

    Analysis of the Volvox carteri genome reveals that this green alga's increased organismal complexity and multicellularity are associated with modifications in protein families shared with its unicellular ancestor, and not with large-scale innovations in protein coding capacity. The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri and its morphologically diverse close relatives (the volvocine algae) are uniquely suited for investigating the evolution of multicellularity and development. We sequenced the 138 Mb genome of V. carteri and compared its {approx}14,500 predicted proteins to those of its unicellular relative, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Despite fundamental differences in organismal complexity and life history, the two species have similar protein-coding potentials, and few species-specific protein-coding gene predictions. Interestingly, volvocine algal-specific proteins are enriched in Volvox, including those associated with an expanded and highly compartmentalized extracellular matrix. Our analysis shows that increases in organismal complexity can be associated with modifications of lineage-specific proteins rather than large-scale invention of protein-coding capacity.

  6. Direct conversion of wet algae to crude biodiesel under supercritical ethanol conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, Harvind K.; Muppaneni, Tapaswy; Patil, Prafulla D.; Ponnusamy, Sundaravadivelnathan; Cooke, Peter; Schaub, Tanner; Deng, Shuguang

    2013-08-06

    This paper presents a single-step, environmentally friendly approach for the direct conversion of wet algae to crude biodiesel under supercritical ethanol conditions. Ethanol was used for the simultaneous extraction and transesterification of lipids in algae to produce fatty acid ethyl esters at supercritical conditions. In this work the effects of process parameters dry algae to ethanol (wt./vol.) ratio (1:6-1:15), reaction temperature (245-270 C), and reaction time (2-30 min.) on the yield of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) were studied. 67% conversion was achieved at 265 C and 20 min of reaction time. The calorific value of a purified biodiesel sample produced at optimum conditions was measured to be 43 MJ/kg, which is higher than that of fatty acid methyl esters produced from the same biomass. The purified fatty acid ethyl esters were analyzed using GC-MS and FTIR. TGA analysis of algal biomass and purified FAEE was presented along with TEM images of the biomass captured before and after supercritical ethanol transesterification. This green conversion process has the potential to provide an energy-efficient and economical route for the production of renewable biodiesel production.

  7. Study of the flow mixing in a novel ARID raceway for algae production

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Xu, Ben; Li, Peiwen; Waller, P.

    2014-07-31

    A novel flow field for algae raceways has been proposed, which is fundamentally different from traditional paddlewheel-driven raceways. To reduce freezing and heat loss in the raceway during cold time, the water is drained to a deep storage canal. The ground bed of the new raceway has a low slope so that water, lifted by propeller pump, can flow down in laterally-laid serpentine channels, relying on gravitational force. The flow rate of water is controlled so that it can overflow the lateral channel walls and mix with the main flow in the next lower channel, which thus creates a bettermore » mixing. In order to optimize the design parameters of the new flow field, methods including flow visualization, local point velocity measurement, and CFD analysis were employed to investigate the flow mixing features. Different combinations of channel geometries and water velocities were evaluated. An optimized flow field design and details of flow mixing are presented. The study offers an innovative design for large scale algae growth raceways which is of significance to the algae and biofuel industry.« less

  8. Process Development for Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Algae Feedstocks in a Continuous-Flow Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hallen, Richard T.; Holladay, Johnathan E.

    2013-10-01

    Wet algae slurries can be converted into an upgradeable biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). High levels of carbon conversion to gravity-separable biocrude product were accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 °C) in a continuous-flow, pressurized (sub-critical liquid water) environment (20 MPa). As opposed to earlier work in batch reactors reported by others, direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent and biomass trace components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause process difficulties. High conversions were obtained even with high slurry concentrations of up to 35 wt% of dry solids. Catalytic hydrotreating was effectively applied for hydrodeoxygenation, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrodesulfurization of the biocrude to form liquid hydrocarbon fuel. Catalytic hydrothermal gasification was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup and fuel gas production from water soluble organics, allowing the water to be considered for recycle of nutrients to the algae growth ponds. As a result, high conversion of algae to liquid hydrocarbon and gas products was found with low levels of organic contamination in the byproduct water. All three process steps were accomplished in bench-scale, continuous-flow reactor systems such that design data for process scale-up was generated.

  9. Developing New Alternative Energy in Virginia: Bio-Diesel from Algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatcher, Patrick

    2012-03-29

    The overall objective of this study was to select chemical processing equipment, install and operate that equipment to directly convert algae to biodiesel via a reaction patented by Old Dominion University (Pat. No. US 8,080,679B2). This reaction is a high temperature (250- 330{degrees}C) methylation reaction utilizing tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to produce biodiesel. As originally envisioned, algal biomass could be treated with TMAH in methanol without the need to separately extract triacylglycerides (TAG). The reactor temperature allows volatilization and condensation of the methyl esters whereas the spent algae solids can be utilized as a high-value fertilizer because they are minimally charred. During the course of this work and immediately prior to commencing, we discovered that glycerol, a major by-product of the conventional transesterification reaction for biofuels, is not formed but rather three methoxylated glycerol derivatives are produced. These derivatives are high-value specialty green chemicals that strongly upgrade the economics of the process, rendering this approach as one that now values the biofuel only as a by-product, the main value products being the methoxylated glycerols. A horizontal agitated thin-film evaporator (one square foot heat transfer area) proved effective as the primary reactor facilitating the reaction and vaporization of the products, and subsequent discharge of the spent algae solids that are suitable for supplementing petrochemicalbased fertilizers for agriculture. Because of the size chosen for the reactor, we encountered problems with delivery of the algal feed to the reaction zone, but envision that this problem could easily disappear upon scale-up or can be replaced economically by incorporating an extraction process. The objective for production of biodiesel from algae in quantities that could be tested could not be met, but we implemented use of soybean oil as a surrogate TAG feed to overcome this limitation

  10. Chemical Processing in High-Pressure Aqueous Environments. 9. Process Development for Catalytic Gasification of Algae Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2012-07-26

    Through the use of a metal catalyst, gasification of wet algae slurries can be accomplished with high levels of carbon conversion to gas at relatively low temperature (350 C). In a pressurized-water environment (20 MPa), near-total conversion of the organic structure of the algae to gases has been achieved in the presence of a supported ruthenium metal catalyst. The process is essentially steam reforming, as there is no added oxidizer or reagent other than water. In addition, the gas produced is a medium-heating value gas due to the synthesis of high levels of methane, as dictated by thermodynamic equilibrium. As opposed to earlier work, biomass trace components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties in the fixed catalyst bed tubular reactor system. As a result, the algae feedstocks, even those with high ash contents, were much more reliably processed. High conversions were obtained even with high slurry concentrations. Consistent catalyst operation in these short-term tests suggested good stability and minimal poisoning effects. High methane content in the product gas was noted with significant carbon dioxide captured in the aqueous byproduct in combination with alkali constituents and the ammonia byproduct derived from proteins in the algae. High conversion of algae to gas products was found with low levels of byproduct water contamination and low to moderate loss of carbon in the mineral separation step.

  11. Review and evaluation of immobilized algae systems for the production of fuels from microalgae. Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate the use of immobilized algae systems. It was the finding that commercial immobilized algae systems are not in operation at this time but, with research, could certainly become so. The use of immobilized algae will depend on, as in all commercial systems, the economic value of the product. This paper reviews the technical feasibility of immobilization as it applies to algae. Finally, the economics of possible immobilized algal systems that would produce liquid fuels were investigated. It was calculated that an immobilized system would have 8.5 times the capital costs of a conventional microalgae culture system. Operational costs would be about equal, although there would be substantial savings of water with the immobilized system. A major problem with immobilizing algae is the fact that sunlight drives the system. At present, an immobilized algal system to mass produce lipids for use as a liquid fuel does not appear to be economically feasible. The major drawback is developing a low-cost system that obtains the same amount of solar energy as provided to a shallow 3 square mile pond while increasing the culture density by an order of magnitude. R and D to increase light availability and to develop low cost transparent tanks could increase the competitiveness of immobilized algal systems. 44 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Surface complexation of neptunium (V) onto whole cells and cell componets of Shewanella alga

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, Donald Timothy; Deo, Randhir P; Rittmann, Bruce E; Songkasiri, Warinthorn

    2008-01-01

    We systematically quantified surface complexation of neptunium(V) onto whole cells of Shewanella alga strain BrY and onto cell wall and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of S. alga. We first performed acid and base titrations and used the mathematical model FITEQL with constant-capacitance surface-complexation to determine the concentrations and deprotonation constants of specific surface functional groups. Deprotonation constants most likely corresponded to a carboxyl site associated with amino acids (pK{sub a} {approx} 2.4), a carboxyl group not associated with amino acids (pK{sub a} {approx} 5), a phosphoryl site (pK{sub a} {approx} 7.2), and an amine site (pK{sub a} > 10). We then carried out batch sorption experiments with Np(V) and each of the S. alga components at different pHs. Results show that solution pH influenced the speciation of Np(V) and each of the surface functional groups. We used the speciation sub-model of the biogeochemical model CCBATCH to compute the stability constants for Np(V) complexation to each surface functional group. The stability constants were similar for each functional group on S. alga bacterial whole cells, cell walls, and EPS, and they explain the complicated sorption patterns when they are combined with the aqueous-phase speciation of Np(V). For pH < 8, NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was the dominant form of Np(V), and its log K values for the low-pK{sub a} carboxyl, other carboxyl, and phosphoryl groups were 1.75, 1.75, and 2.5 to 3.1, respectively. For pH greater than 8, the key surface ligand was amine >XNH3+, which complexed with NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5-}. The log K for NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5-} complexed onto the amine groups was 3.1 to 3.6. All of the log K values are similar to those of Np(V) complexes with aqueous carboxyl and N-containing carboxyl ligands. These results point towards the important role of surface complexation in defining key actinide-microbiological interactions in the subsurface.

  13. Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Green Algae: Milestone Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amos, W. A.

    2004-01-01

    This report updates the 1999 economic analysis of NREL's photobiological hydrogen production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The previous study had looked mainly at incident light intensities, batch cycles and light adsorption without directly attempting to model the saturation effects seen in algal cultures. This study takes a more detailed look at the effects that cell density, light adsorption and light saturation have on algal hydrogen production. Performance estimates based on actual solar data are also included in this study. Based on this analysis, the estimated future selling price of hydrogen produced from algae ranges $0.57/kg to $13.53/kg.

  14. BETO-Funded Algae Project at NREL Named a Finalist for 2015 R&D 100 Awards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy Algae Project at NREL Named a Finalist for 2015 R&D 100 Awards BETO-Funded Algae Project at NREL Named a Finalist for 2015 R&D 100 Awards August 13, 2015 - 4:44pm Addthis Cyanobacteria cultures. Photo by Dennis Schroeder/NREL. Cyanobacteria cultures. Photo by Dennis Schroeder/NREL. The R&D 100 Awards, presented annually by R&D Magazine, recognize 100 of the most innovative technologies and services of the year across nine categories and are selected by

  15. Algal Biofuel Techno-Economic Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... considered PBR, heterotrophic cultivation Sun et al, Energy 2011 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ... (Harmonization) 8 Green algae cell density Cell Disruption + Lipid Extraction ...

  16. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Anderson, Daniel B.; Hallen, Richard T.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hart, Todd R.; Butcher, Mark G.; Drennan, Corinne; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Davis, Ryan; Kinchin, Christopher

    2014-03-20

    This report provides a preliminary analysis of the costs associated with converting whole wet algal biomass into primarily diesel fuel. Hydrothermal liquefaction converts the whole algae into an oil that is then hydrotreated and distilled. The secondary aqueous product containing significant organic material is converted to a medium btu gas via catalytic hydrothermal gasification.

  17. A lipid-accumulating alga maintains growth in outdoor, alkaliphilic raceway pond with mixed microbial communities

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Bell, Tisza A.S.; Prithiviraj, Bharath; Wahlen, Brad D.; Fields, Matthew W.; Peyton, Brent M.

    2016-01-07

    Algal biofuels and valuable co-products are being produced in both open and closed cultivation systems. Growing algae in open pond systems may be a more economical alternative, but this approach allows environmental microorganisms to colonize the pond and potentially infect or outcompete the algal “crop.” In this study, we monitored the microbial community of an outdoor, open raceway pond inoculated with a high lipid-producing alkaliphilic alga, Chlorella vulgaris BA050. The strain C. vulgaris BA050 was previously isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, a system characterized by a high pH (~9.8). An outdoor raceway pond (200 L) was inoculated with C. vulgarismore » and monitored for 10 days and then the culture was transferred to a 2,000 L raceway pond and cultivated for an additional 6 days. Community DNA samples were collected over the 16-day period in conjunction with water chemistry analyses and cell counts. Universal primers for the SSU rRNA gene sequences for Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea were used for barcoded pyrosequence determination. The environmental parameters that most closely correlated with C. vulgaris abundance were pH and phosphate. Community analyses indicated that the pond system remained dominated by the Chlorella population (93% of eukaryotic sequences), but was also colonized by other microorganisms. Bacterial sequence diversity increased over time while archaeal sequence diversity declined over the same time period. Using SparCC co-occurrence network analysis, a positive correlation was observed between C. vulgaris and Pseudomonas sp. throughout the experiment, which may suggest a symbiotic relationship between the two organisms. The putative relationship coupled with high pH may have contributed to the success of C. vulgaris. As a result, the characterization of the microbial community dynamics of an alkaliphilic open pond system provides significant insight into open pond systems that could be used to control photoautotrophic biomass

  18. Chromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulation pathway for biofuels production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngan, Chew Yee; Wong, Chee-Hong; Choi, Cindy; Pratap, Abhishek; Han, James; Wei, Chia-Lin

    2013-02-19

    The diminishing reserve of fossil fuels calls for the development of biofuels. Biofuels are produced from renewable resources, including photosynthetic organisms, generating clean energy. Microalgae is one of the potential feedstock for biofuels production. It grows easily even in waste water, and poses no competition to agricultural crops for arable land. However, little is known about the algae lipid biosynthetic regulatory mechanisms. Most studies relied on the homology to other plant model organisms, in particular Arabidopsis or through low coverage expression analysis to identify key enzymes. This limits the discovery of new components in the biosynthetic pathways, particularly the genetic regulators and effort to maximize the production efficiency of algal biofuels. Here we report an unprecedented and de novo approach to dissect the algal lipid pathways through disclosing the temporal regulations of chromatin states during lipid biosynthesis. We have generated genome wide chromatin maps in chlamydomonas genome using ChIP-seq targeting 7 histone modifications and RNA polymerase II in a time-series manner throughout conditions activating lipid biosynthesis. To our surprise, the combinatory profiles of histone codes uncovered new regulatory mechanism in gene expression in algae. Coupled with matched RNA-seq data, chromatin changes revealed potential novel regulators and candidate genes involved in the activation of lipid accumulations. Genetic perturbation on these candidate regulators further demonstrated the potential to manipulate the regulatory cascade for lipid synthesis efficiency. Exploring epigenetic landscape in microalgae shown here provides powerful tools needed in improving biofuel production and new technology platform for renewable energy generation, global carbon management, and environmental survey.

  19. Investigating Sources of Toxicity in Stormwater: Algae Mortality in Runoff Upstream of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, C G; Folks, K; Mathews, S; Martinelli, R

    2003-10-06

    A source evaluation case study is presented for observations of algae toxicity in an intermittent stream passing through the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory near Livermore, California. A five-step procedure is discussed to determine the cause of water toxicity problems and to determine appropriate environmental management practices. Using this approach, an upstream electrical transfer station was identified as the probable source of herbicides causing the toxicity. In addition, an analytical solution for solute transport in overland flow was used to estimate the application level of 40 Kg/ha. Finally, this source investigation demonstrates that pesticides can impact stream water quality regardless of application within levels suggested on manufacturer labels. Environmental managers need to ensure that pesticides that could harm aquatic organisms (including algae) not be used within close proximity to streams or storm drainages and that application timing should be considered for environmental protection.

  20. Molecular Breeding Algae For Improved Traits For The Conversion Of Waste To Fuels And Commodities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagwell, C.

    2015-10-14

    This Exploratory LDRD aimed to develop molecular breeding methodology for biofuel algal strain improvement for applications in waste to energy / commodity conversion technologies. Genome shuffling technologies, specifically protoplast fusion, are readily available for the rapid production of genetic hybrids for trait improvement and have been used successfully in bacteria, yeast, plants and animals. However, genome fusion has not been developed for exploiting the remarkable untapped potential of eukaryotic microalgae for large scale integrated bio-conversion and upgrading of waste components to valued commodities, fuel and energy. The proposed molecular breeding technology is effectively sexual reproduction in algae; though compared to traditional breeding, the molecular route is rapid, high-throughput and permits selection / improvement of complex traits which cannot be accomplished by traditional genetics. Genome fusion technologies are the cutting edge of applied biotechnology. The goals of this Exploratory LDRD were to 1) establish reliable methodology for protoplast production among diverse microalgal strains, and 2) demonstrate genome fusion for hybrid strain production using a single gene encoded trait as a proof of the concept.

  1. Use of prolines for improving growth and other properties of plants and algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Knight, Thomas J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.

    2003-04-29

    Increasing the concentration of prolines such as 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline, in the foliar portions of plants has been shown to cause an increase in carbon dioxide fixation, growth rate, dry weight, nutritional value (amino acids), nodulation and nitrogen fixation, photosynthetically derived chemical energy, and resistance to insect pests over the same properties for wild type plants. This can be accomplished in four ways: (1) the application of a solution of the proline directly to the foliar portions of the plant by spraying these portions; (2) applying a solution of the proline to the plant roots; (3) genetically engineering the plant and screening to produce lines that overexpress glutamine synthetase in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of the metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (this proline is also known as 2-oxoglutaramnate); and (4) impairing the glutamine synthetase activity in the plant roots which causes increased glutamine synthetase activity in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline. Prolines have also been found to induce similar effects in algae.

  2. Use of prolines for improving growth and other properties of plants and algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Knight, Thomas J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.

    2003-07-15

    Increasing the concentration of prolines, such as 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline, in the foliar portions of plants has been shown to cause an increase in carbon dioxide fixation, growth rate, dry weight, nutritional value (amino acids), nodulation and nitrogen fixation, photosynthetically derived chemical energy, and resistance to insect pests over the same properties for wild type plants. This can be accomplished in four ways: (1) the application of a solution of the proline directly to the foliar portions of the plant by spraying these portions; (2) applying a solution of the proline to the plant roots; (3) genetically engineering the plant and screening to produce lines that over-express glutamine synthetase in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of the metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (this proline is also known as 2-oxoglutaramate); and (4) impairing the glutamine synthetase activity in the plant roots which causes increased glutamine synthetase activity in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline. Prolines have also been found to induce similar effects in algae.

  3. Use of prolines for improving growth and other properties of plants and algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Knight, Thomas J.; Martinez, Rodolfo A.

    2004-12-14

    Increasing the concentration of prolines, such as 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline, in the foliar portions of plants has been shown to cause an increase in carbon dioxide fixation, growth rate, dry weight, nutritional value (amino acids), nodulation and nitrogen fixation, photosynthetically derived chemical energy, and resistance to insect pests over the same properties for wild type plants. This can be accomplished in four ways: (1) the application of a solution of the proline directly to the foliar portions of the plant by spraying these portions; (2) applying a solution of the proline to the plant roots; (3) genetically engineering the plant and screening to produce lines that over-express glutamine synthetase in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of the metabolite, 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline (this proline is also known as 2-oxoglutaramate); and (4) impairing the glutamine synthetase activity in the plant roots which causes increased glutamine synthetase activity in the leaves which gives rise to increased concentration of 2-hydroxy-5-oxoproline. Prolines have also been found to induce similar effects in algae.

  4. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J.; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Jin, Qiaoling; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2015-02-24

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolutionmore » beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub–30-nm resolution structural images and ~90-nm–resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. This combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context.« less

  5. Characterization of Hydrogen Metabolism in the Multicellular Green Alga Volvox carteri

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Cornish, Adam J.; Green, Robin; Gärtner, Katrin; Mason, Saundra; Hegg, Eric L.

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen gas functions as a key component in the metabolism of a wide variety of microorganisms, often acting as either a fermentative end-product or an energy source. The number of organisms reported to utilize hydrogen continues to grow, contributing to and expanding our knowledge of biological hydrogen processes. Here we demonstrate that Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, a multicellular green alga with differentiated cells, evolves H2 both when supplied with an abiotic electron donor and under physiological conditions. The genome of Volvox carteri contains two genes encoding putative [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA1 and HYDA2), and the transcripts for these genes accumulate under anaerobicmore » conditions. The HYDA1 and HYDA2 gene products were cloned, expressed, and purified, and both are functional [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally, within the genome the HYDA1 and HYDA2 genes cluster with two putative genes which encode hydrogenase maturation proteins. This gene cluster resembles operon-like structures found within bacterial genomes and may provide further insight into evolutionary relationships between bacterial and algal [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes.« less

  6. Characterization of Hydrogen Metabolism in the Multicellular Green Alga Volvox carteri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornish, Adam J.; Green, Robin; Gärtner, Katrin; Mason, Saundra; Hegg, Eric L.

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen gas functions as a key component in the metabolism of a wide variety of microorganisms, often acting as either a fermentative end-product or an energy source. The number of organisms reported to utilize hydrogen continues to grow, contributing to and expanding our knowledge of biological hydrogen processes. Here we demonstrate that Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, a multicellular green alga with differentiated cells, evolves H2 both when supplied with an abiotic electron donor and under physiological conditions. The genome of Volvox carteri contains two genes encoding putative [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA1 and HYDA2), and the transcripts for these genes accumulate under anaerobic conditions. The HYDA1 and HYDA2 gene products were cloned, expressed, and purified, and both are functional [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally, within the genome the HYDA1 and HYDA2 genes cluster with two putative genes which encode hydrogenase maturation proteins. This gene cluster resembles operon-like structures found within bacterial genomes and may provide further insight into evolutionary relationships between bacterial and algal [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes.

  7. Colony organization in the green alga Botryococcus braunii is specified by a complex extracellular matrix

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Weiss, Taylor L.; Roth, Robyn; Goodson, Carrie; Vithda, Stanislav; Black, Ian; Azadi, Parastoo; Rusch, Jannette; Holzenburg, Andreas; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Goodenough, Ursula

    2012-08-31

    Botryococcus braunii is a colonial green alga whose cells associate via a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) and produce prodigious amounts of liquid hydrocarbons that can be readily converted into conventional combustion engine fuels. We used quickfreeze deep-etch electron microscopy and biochemical/histochemical analysis to elucidate many new features of B. braunii cell/colony organization and composition. Intracellular lipid bodies associate with the chloroplast and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but show no evidence of being secreted. The ER displays striking fenestrations and forms a continuous subcortical system in direct contact with the cell membrane. The ECM has three distinct components. (i) Each cell ismore » surrounded by a fibrous β-1, 4- and/or β-1, 3-glucan-containing cell wall. (ii) The intracolonial ECM space is filled with a cross-linked hydrocarbon network permeated with liquid hydrocarbons. (iii) Colonies are enclosed in a retaining wall festooned with a fibrillar sheath dominated by arabinose-galactose polysaccharides, which sequesters ECM liquid hydrocarbons. Each cell apex associates with the retaining wall and contributes to its synthesis. Retaining-wall domains also form "drapes" between cells, with some folding in on themselves and penetrating the hydrocarbon interior of a mother colony, partitioning it into daughter colonies. In addition, we propose that retaining-wall components are synthesized in the apical Golgi apparatus, delivered to apical ER fenestrations, and assembled on the surfaces of apical cell walls, where a proteinaceous granular layer apparently participates in fibril morphogenesis. We further propose that hydrocarbons are produced by the nonapical ER, directly delivered to the contiguous cell membrane, and pass across the nonapical cell wall into the hydrocarbon-based ECM.« less

  8. Characterization of the bacterial metagenome in an industrial algae bioenergy production system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Shi; Fulbright, Scott P; Zeng, Xiaowei; Yates, Tracy; Wardle, Greg; Chisholm, Stephen T; Xu, Jian; Lammers, Peter

    2011-03-16

    Cultivation of oleaginous microalgae for fuel generally requires growth of the intended species to the maximum extent supported by available light. The presence of undesired competitors, pathogens and grazers in cultivation systems will create competition for nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, iron and other micronutrients in the growth medium and potentially decrease microalgal triglyceride production by limiting microalgal health or cell density. Pathogenic bacteria may also directly impact the metabolism or survival of individual microalgal cells. Conversely, symbiotic bacteria that enhance microalgal growth may also be present in the system. Finally, the use of agricultural and municipal wastes as nutrient inputs for microalgal production systems may lead to the introduction and proliferation of human pathogens or interfere with the growth of bacteria with beneficial effects on system performance. These considerations underscore the need to understand bacterial community dynamics in microalgal production systems in order to assess microbiome effects on microalgal productivity and pathogen risks. Here we focus on the bacterial component of microalgal production systems and describe a pipeline for metagenomic characterization of bacterial diversity in industrial cultures of an oleaginous alga, Nannochloropsis salina. Environmental DNA was isolated from 12 marine algal cultures grown at Solix Biofuels, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR, and 16S amplicons were sequenced using a 454 automated pyrosequencer. The approximately 70,000 sequences that passed quality control clustered into 53,950 unique sequences. The majority of sequences belonged to thirteen phyla. At the genus level, sequences from all samples represented 169 different genera. About 52.94% of all sequences could not be identified at the genus level and were classified at the next highest possible resolution level. Of all sequences, 79.92% corresponded to 169 genera and 70 other taxa. We

  9. Algae as a Feedstock for Biofuels: An Assessment of the State of Technology and Opportunities. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikes, K.; McGill, R.; Van Walwijk, M.

    2011-05-15

    The pursuit of a stable, economically-sound, and environmentally-friendly source of transportation fuel has led to extensive research and development (R&D) efforts focused on the conversion of various feedstocks into biofuels. Some feedstocks, such as sugar cane, corn and woody biomass, are targeted because their structures can be broken down into sugars and fermented into alcohols. Other feedstocks, such as vegetable oils, are appealing because they contain considerable amounts of lipids, which can be extracted and converted into biodiesel or other fuels. While significant R&D and commercial strides have been made with each of these feedstocks, technical and market barriers (e.g., cost, scalability, infrastructure requirements, and 'food vs. fuel' debates) currently limit the penetration of the resultant biofuels into the mainstream. Because of algae's ability to potentially address several of these barriers, its use as a feedstock for biofuels has led to much excitement and initiative within the energy industry. Algae are highly diverse, singleor multi-cellular organisms comprised of mostly lipids, protein, and carbohydrates, which may be used to produce a wide variety of biofuels. Algae offer many competitive advantages over other feedstocks, including: 1) Higher potential lipid content than terrestrial plants, sometimes exceeding 50% of the cell's dry biomass (U.S. DOE, May '10; Tornabene et al., 1983) 2) Rapid growth rates that are 20-30 times higher than terrestrial crops (McDill, 2009) and, in some cases, capable of doubling in size with 10 hours 3) Diverse number of species that can collectively thrive in a wide range of environments throughout the world, presenting an overall high overall tolerance for climate, sunlight, nutrient levels, etc. 4) Daily harvesting potential instead of seasonal harvest periods associated with terrestrial crops 5) Potential to redirect CO2 from industry operations to algal cultivation facilities to be used in an algal biofuel

  10. The GC-Rich Mitochondrial and Plastid Genomes of the Green Alga Coccomyxa Give Insight into the Evolution of Organelle DNA Nucleotide Landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, David Roy; Burki, Fabien; Yamada, Takashi; Grimwood, Jane; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Van Etten, James L.; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2011-05-13

    Most of the available mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences are biased towards adenine and thymine (AT) over guanine and cytosine (GC). Examples of GC-rich organelle DNAs are limited to a small but eclectic list of species, including certain green algae. Here, to gain insight in the evolution of organelle nucleotide landscape, we present the GC-rich mitochondrial and plastid DNAs from the trebouxiophyte green alga Coccomyxa sp. C-169. We compare these sequences with other GC-rich organelle DNAs and argue that the forces biasing them towards G and C are nonadaptive and linked to the metabolic and/or life history features of this species. The Coccomyxa organelle genomes are also used for phylogenetic analyses, which highlight the complexities in trying to resolve the interrelationships among the core chlorophyte green algae, but ultimately favour a sister relationship between the Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae, with the Trebouxiophyceae branching at the base of the chlorophyte crown.

  11. Fuel from wastewater : harnessing a potential energy source in Canada through the co-location of algae biofuel production to sources of effluent, heat and CO2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Passell, Howard David; Whalen, Jake; Pienkos, Philip P.; O'Leary, Stephen J.; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Moreland, Barbara D.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2010-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with the National Research Council (NRC) Canada and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a decision-support model that will evaluate the tradeoffs associated with high-latitude algae biofuel production co-located with wastewater, CO2, and waste heat. This project helps Canada meet its goal of diversifying fuel sources with algae-based biofuels. The biofuel production will provide a wide range of benefits including wastewater treatment, CO2 reuse and reduction of demand for fossil-based fuels. The higher energy density in algae-based fuels gives them an advantage over crop-based biofuels as the 'production' footprint required is much less, resulting in less water consumed and little, if any conversion of agricultural land from food to fuel production. Besides being a potential source for liquid fuel, algae have the potential to be used to generate electricity through the burning of dried biomass, or anaerobically digested to generate methane for electricity production. Co-locating algae production with waste streams may be crucial for making algae an economically valuable fuel source, and will certainly improve its overall ecological sustainability. The modeling process will address these questions, and others that are important to the use of water for energy production: What are the locations where all resources are co-located, and what volumes of algal biomass and oil can be produced there? In locations where co-location does not occur, what resources should be transported, and how far, while maintaining economic viability? This work is being funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and is part of a larger collaborative effort that includes sampling, strain isolation, strain characterization and cultivation being performed by the NREL and Canada's NRC. Results from the NREL / NRC collaboration including specific

  12. Algal Testbed Public Private Partnerships Workshop on Principles and Processes: Algae Culture Management, Production and Downstream Harvesting

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Spring 2016 ATP3 workshop will occur May 16th-20th at Santa Fe Community College (SFCC) and the Los Alamos National Lab's New Mexico Consortium (LANL NMC). These unique facilities will give participants incredible insights into aspects across the algae value chain and the food, energy and water nexus. Lectures will cover the fundamentals of managing microalgal cultures, culturing techniques, measuring and analyzing biomass, harvesting and processing technologies, as well as life cycle analysis and operations at the production scale. Participants will have opportunities to work in the laboratory and learn how to measure culture density (cell counting and optical density), use a light and fluorescence microscope, use flow cytometry, and perform gravimetric analyses (dry weight and ash-free dry weight), and techniques necessary to analyze biomass compounds.

  13. Strain selection, biomass to biofuel conversion, and resource colocation have strong impacts on the economic performance of algae cultivation sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard

    2014-09-16

    Decisions involving strain selection, biomass to biofuel technology, and the location of cultivation facilities can strongly influence the economic viability of an algae-based biofuel enterprise. In this contribution we summarize our past results in a new analysis to explore the relative economic impact of these design choices. We present strain-specific growth model results from two saline strains (Nannocloropsis salina, Arthrospira sp.), a fresh to brackish strain (Chlorella sp., DOE strain 1412), and a freshwater strain of the order Sphaeropleales. Biomass to biofuel conversion is compared between lipid extraction (LE) and hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) technologies. National-scale models of water, CO2 (as flue gas), land acquisition, site leveling, construction of connecting roads, and transport of HTL oil to existing refineries are used in conjunction with estimates of fuel value (from HTL) to prioritize and select from 88,692 unit farms (UF, 405 ha in pond area), a number sufficient to produce 136E+9 L yr-1 of renewable diesel (36 billion gallons yr-1, BGY). Strain selection and choice of conversion technology have large economic impacts, with differences between combinations of strains and biomass to biofuel technologies being up to $10 million dollars yr-1 UF-1. Results based on the most productive species, HTL-based fuel conversion, and resource costs show that the economic potential between geographic locations within the selection can differ by up to $4 million yr-1 UF-1, with 2.0 BGY of production possible from the most cost-effective sites. The local spatial variability in site rank is extreme, with very high and low rank sites within 10s of km of each other. Colocation with flue gas sources has a strong influence on site rank, but the most costly resource component varies from site to site. The highest rank sites are located predominantly in Florida and Texas, but most states south of 37°N latitude contain promising locations. Keywords: algae

  14. CX-009895: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    25A1786 - Scaling and Commercialization of Algae Harvesting Technologies CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/14/2010 Location(s): Ohio, Indiana, Alabama, California Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy

  15. CX-100059 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot-Scale Mixotrophic Algae Integrated Biorefinery Award Number: DE-EE0006245 CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.15 Date: 09/15/2014 Location(s): IA Office(s): Golden Field Office

  16. CX-010749: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot-Scale Mixotrophic Algae Integrated Biorefinery CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.15 Date: 08/15/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-011696: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership (ATP3) - a RAFT Partnership CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.15 Date: 01/16/2014 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  18. Colony organization in the green alga Botryococcus braunii is specified by a complex extracellular matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, Taylor L.; Roth, Robyn; Goodson, Carrie; Vithda, Stanislav; Black, Ian; Azadi, Parastoo; Rusch, Jannette; Holzenburg, Andreas; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Goodenough, Ursula

    2012-08-31

    Botryococcus braunii is a colonial green alga whose cells associate via a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) and produce prodigious amounts of liquid hydrocarbons that can be readily converted into conventional combustion engine fuels. We used quickfreeze deep-etch electron microscopy and biochemical/histochemical analysis to elucidate many new features of B. braunii cell/colony organization and composition. Intracellular lipid bodies associate with the chloroplast and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but show no evidence of being secreted. The ER displays striking fenestrations and forms a continuous subcortical system in direct contact with the cell membrane. The ECM has three distinct components. (i) Each cell is surrounded by a fibrous β-1, 4- and/or β-1, 3-glucan-containing cell wall. (ii) The intracolonial ECM space is filled with a cross-linked hydrocarbon network permeated with liquid hydrocarbons. (iii) Colonies are enclosed in a retaining wall festooned with a fibrillar sheath dominated by arabinose-galactose polysaccharides, which sequesters ECM liquid hydrocarbons. Each cell apex associates with the retaining wall and contributes to its synthesis. Retaining-wall domains also form "drapes" between cells, with some folding in on themselves and penetrating the hydrocarbon interior of a mother colony, partitioning it into daughter colonies. In addition, we propose that retaining-wall components are synthesized in the apical Golgi apparatus, delivered to apical ER fenestrations, and assembled on the surfaces of apical cell walls, where a proteinaceous granular layer apparently participates in fibril morphogenesis. We further propose that hydrocarbons are produced by the nonapical ER, directly delivered to the contiguous cell membrane, and pass across the nonapical cell wall into the hydrocarbon-based ECM.

  19. CX-006439: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Novel Heterotrophic Algae ReactorCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/05/2011Location(s): CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  20. Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how hydrogen photoproduction activity in algal cultures can be improved dramatically by increasing the gas-phase to liquid-phase volume ratio of the photobioreactor. NREL, in partnership with subcontractors from the Institute of Basic Biological Problems in Pushchino, Russia, demonstrated that the hydrogen photoproduction rate in algal cultures always decreases exponentially with increasing hydrogen partial pressure above the culture. The inhibitory effect of high hydrogen concentrations in the photobioreactor gas phase on hydrogen photoproduction by algae is significant and comparable to the effect observed with some anaerobic bacteria.

  1. Algae Protein Fermentation

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Protein Fermentation March 24, 2015 Ryan W Davis, PhD Sandia National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted ...

  2. Bio-crude transcriptomics: Gene discovery and metabolic network reconstruction for the biosynthesis of the terpenome of the hydrocarbon oil-producing green alga, Botryococcus braunii race B (Showa)*

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Molnár, István; Lopez, David; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Weiss, Taylor L.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Hackett, Jeremiah D.

    2012-10-30

    Microalgae hold promise for yielding a biofuel feedstock that is sustainable, carbon-neutral, distributed, and only minimally disruptive for the production of food and feed by traditional agriculture. Amongst oleaginous eukaryotic algae, the B race of Botryococcus braunii is unique in that it produces large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons of terpenoid origin. These are comparable to fossil crude oil, and are sequestered outside the cells in a communal extracellular polymeric matrix material. The biosynthetic engineering of terpenoid bio-crude production requires identification of genes and reconstruction of metabolic pathways responsible for production of both hydrocarbons and other metabolites of the alga thatmore » compete for photosynthetic carbon and energy.« less

  3. Bio-crude transcriptomics: Gene discovery and metabolic network reconstruction for the biosynthesis of the terpenome of the hydrocarbon oil-producing green alga, Botryococcus braunii race B (Showa)*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molnár, István; Lopez, David; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Weiss, Taylor L.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Hackett, Jeremiah D.

    2012-10-30

    Microalgae hold promise for yielding a biofuel feedstock that is sustainable, carbon-neutral, distributed, and only minimally disruptive for the production of food and feed by traditional agriculture. Amongst oleaginous eukaryotic algae, the B race of Botryococcus braunii is unique in that it produces large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons of terpenoid origin. These are comparable to fossil crude oil, and are sequestered outside the cells in a communal extracellular polymeric matrix material. The biosynthetic engineering of terpenoid bio-crude production requires identification of genes and reconstruction of metabolic pathways responsible for production of both hydrocarbons and other metabolites of the alga that compete for photosynthetic carbon and energy.

  4. Siting algae cultivation facilities for biofuel production in the United States: trade-offs between growth rate, site constructability, water availability, and infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; McBride, Robert; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-02-21

    Locating sites for new algae cultivation facilities is a complex task. The climate must support high growth rates, and cultivation ponds require appropriate land and water resources as well as key utility and transportation infrastructure. We employ our spatiotemporal Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT) to select promising locations based on the open-pond cultivation of Arthrospira sp. and a strain of the order Desmidiales. 64,000 potential sites across the southern United States were evaluated. We progressively apply a range of screening criteria and track their impact on the number of selected sites, geographic location, and biomass productivity. Both strains demonstrate maximum productivity along the Gulf of Mexico coast, with the highest values on the Florida peninsula. In contrast, sites meeting all selection criteria for Arthrospira were located along the southern coast of Texas and for Desmidiales were located in Louisiana and southern Arkansas. Site selection was driven mainly by the lack of oil pipeline access in Florida and elevated groundwater salinity in southern Texas. The requirement for low salinity freshwater (<400 mg L-1) constrained Desmidiales locations; siting flexibility is greater for salt-tolerant species such as Arthrospira. Combined siting factors can result in significant departures from regions of maximum productivity but are within the expected range of site-specific process improvements.

  5. X-ray dense cellular inclusions in the cells of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as seen by soft-x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stead, A.D.; Ford, T.W.; Page, A.M.; Brown, J.T.; Meyer-Ilse, W.

    1997-04-01

    Soft x-rays, having a greater ability to penetrate biological material than electrons, have the potential for producing images of intact, living cells. In addition, by using the so-called {open_quotes}water window{close_quotes} area of the soft x-ray spectrum, a degree of natural contrast is introduced into the image due to differential absorption of the wavelengths by compounds with a high carbon content compared to those with a greater oxygen content. The variation in carbon concentration throughout a cell therefore generates an image which is dependent upon the carbon density within the specimen. Using soft x-ray contact microscopy the authors have previously examined the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and the most prominent feature of the cells are the numerous x-ray absorbing spheres, But they were not seen by conventional transmission electron microscopy. Similar structures have also been reported by the Goettingen group using their cryo transmission x-ray microscope at BESSY. Despite the fact that these spheres appear to occupy up to 20% or more of the cell volume when seen by x-ray microscopy, they are not visible by transmission electron microscopy. Given the difficulties and criticisms associated with soft x-ray contact microscopy, the present study was aimed at confirming the existence of these cellular inclusions and learning more of their possible chemical composition.

  6. Solazyme Pilot-Scale Biorefinery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    11 Printed with a renewable-source ink on paper containing at least 50% wastepaper, including 10% post consumer waste Solazyme Integrated Biorefinery: Diesel Fuels from Heterotrophic Algae Solazyme, Inc. will build, operate and optimize a pilot-scale "Solazyme Integrated Biorefinery" (SzIBR). SzIBR will demonstrate integrated scale-up of Solazyme's novel heterotrophic algal oil biomanufacturing process, validate the projected commercial-scale economics of producing multiple advanced

  7. Realization of Algae Potential Algae Biomass Yield Program

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    -> Arizona State University This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement * Develop an integrated process ...

  8. Algae R&D Activities

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... that we took three NAABB-based algal strains through the ... from using well water with high salinity, 2) the ... for the lipid extraction route and do some ...

  9. Mining fatty acids from algae

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Minimizing Energy Losses in Ducts Minimizing Energy Losses in Ducts Placing ductwork in conditioned space can help reduce energy losses. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/SimplyCreativePhotography Placing ductwork in conditioned space can help reduce energy losses. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/SimplyCreativePhotography Your air ducts are one of the most important systems in your home, and if the ducts are poorly sealed or insulated they are likely contributing to higher energy bills. Your

  10. CX-100500 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    PACE: Producing Algae for Coproducts and Energy Award Number: DE-EE0007089 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Bioenergy Technologies Office Date: 02/25/2016 Location(s): CO Office(s): Golden Field Office

  11. CX-100341 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    PACE: Producing Algae for Co-products and Energy Award Number: DE-EE0007089 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Bioenergy Technologies Office Date: 08/31/2015 Location(s): CO Office(s): Golden Field Office

  12. CX-009565: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of Bio-Oil Commodity Fuel as a Refinery Feedstock From High Impact Algae Biomass CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/12/2012 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  13. CX-011159: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Temporary Modification (ETP-TMC-13-01) to Install an Ultrasonic Sound-Emitting Device to Control Algae in the H-Retention Basin CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/13/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  14. CX-010845: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Temporary Modification (ETP-TMC-13-01) to Install an Ultrasonic Sound Emitting Device to Control Algae in the H-Retention Basin CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 07/31/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  15. CX-100482 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership (ATP3) – a RAFT Partnership Award Number: DE-EE0005996 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.15 Bioenergy Technology Office Date: 01/16/2014 Location(s): AZ Office(s): Golden Field Office

  16. CX-100363 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Marine Algae Industrialization Consortium (MAGIC): Combining biofuel and high-value bioproducts to meet the RFS Award Number: DE-EE0007091 CX(s) Applied: A9 Bioenergy Technologies Office Date: 09/08/2015 Location(s): NC Office(s): Golden Field Office

  17. CX-100014: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Realization of Algae Potential CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.15 Date: 08/19/2014 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Golden Field Office Technology Office: Bioenergy Program Award Number: DE-EE0006313

  18. CX-100111 Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrothermal Liquefaction Pathways for Low-Nitrogen Biocrude from Wet Algae Award Number: DE-EE0006635 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.16, B3.6 Date: 10/29/2014 Location(s): CA Office(s): Golden Field Office

  19. Characterization of the Kootenai River Algae Community and Primary Productivity Before and After Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2004–2007 [Chapter 2, Kootenai River Algal Community Characterization, 2009 KTOI REPORT].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charlie; Anders, Paul; Shafii, Bahman

    2009-07-01

    , and a meandering reach. The study design included 14 sampling sites: an upstream, unimpounded reference site (KR-14), four control (non-fertilized) canyon sites downstream from Libby Dam, but upstream from nutrient addition (KR-10 through KR-13), two treatment sites referred to collectively as the nutrient addition zone (KR-9 and KR-9.1, located at and 5 km downstream from the nutrient addition site), two braided reach sites (KR-6 and KR-7), and four meander reach sites (KR-1 through KR-4). A series of qualitative evaluations and quantitative analyses were used to assess baseline conditions and effects of experimental nutrient addition treatments on chlorophyll, primary productivity, and taxonomic composition and metric arrays for the diatom and green algae communities. Insufficient density in the samples precluded analyses of bluegreen algae taxa and metrics for pre- and post-nutrient addition periods. Chlorophyll a concentration (mg/m{sup 2}), chlorophyll accrual rate (mg/m{sup 2}/30d), total chlorophyll concentration (chlorophyll a and b) (mg/m{sup 2}), and total chlorophyll accrual rate (mg/m{sup 2}/30d) were calculated. Algal taxa were identified and grouped by taxonomic order as Cyanophyta (blue-greens), Chlorophyta (greens), Bacillariophyta (diatoms), Chrysophyta (goldens), and dominant species from each sample site were identified. Algal densities (number/ml) in periphyton samples were calculated for each sample site and sampling date. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed to reduce the dimension of diatom and algae data and to determine which taxonomic groups and metrics were contributing significantly to the observed variation. PCA analyses were tabulated to indicate eigenvalues, proportion, and cumulative percent variation, as well as eigenvectors (loadings) for each of the components. Biplot graphic displays of PCA axes were also generated to characterize the pattern and structure of the underlying variation. Taxonomic data and a series of

  20. Solazyme Pilot-Scale Biorefinery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Solazyme Pilot-Scale Biorefinery Solazyme Pilot-Scale Biorefinery The Solazyme integrated biorefinery will use a heterotrophic algal oil biomanufacturing process to create biofuels. ibr_arra_solazyme.pdf (305.49 KB) More Documents & Publications CX-005693: Categorical Exclusion Determination Algae Biofuels Technology 2016 National Algal Biofuels Technology Review

  1. Genome-Based Metabolic Mapping and 13C Flux Analysis Reveal Systematic Properties of an Oleaginous Microalga Chlorella protothecoides

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Wu, Chao; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2014-12-15

    We report that integrated and genome-based flux balance analysis, metabolomics, and 13C-label profiling of phototrophic and heterotrophic metabolism in Chlorella protothecoides, an oleaginous green alga for biofuel. The green alga Chlorella protothecoides, capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth with rapid lipid synthesis, is a promising candidate for biofuel production. Based on the newly available genome knowledge of the alga, we reconstructed the compartmentalized metabolic network consisting of 272 metabolic reactions, 270 enzymes, and 461 encoding genes and simulated the growth in different cultivation conditions with flux balance analysis. Phenotype-phase plane analysis shows conditions achieving theoretical maximum of the biomass andmore » corresponding fatty acid-producing rate for phototrophic cells (the ratio of photon uptake rate to CO2 uptake rate equals 8.4) and heterotrophic ones (the glucose uptake rate to O2 consumption rate reaches 2.4), respectively. Isotope-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry reveals higher metabolite concentrations in the glycolytic pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in heterotrophic cells compared with autotrophic cells. We also observed enhanced levels of ATP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), reduced, acetyl-Coenzyme A, and malonyl-Coenzyme A in heterotrophic cells consistently, consistent with a strong activity of lipid synthesis. To profile the flux map in experimental conditions, we applied nonstationary 13C metabolic flux analysis as a complementing strategy to flux balance analysis. We found that the result reveals negligible photorespiratory fluxes and a metabolically low active tricarboxylic acid cycle in phototrophic C. protothecoides. In comparison, high throughput of amphibolic reactions and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with no glyoxylate shunt activities were measured for heterotrophic cells. Lastly, taken together, the metabolic network modeling assisted

  2. Genome-Based Metabolic Mapping and 13C Flux Analysis Reveal Systematic Properties of an Oleaginous Microalga Chlorella protothecoides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Chao; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2014-12-15

    We report that integrated and genome-based flux balance analysis, metabolomics, and 13C-label profiling of phototrophic and heterotrophic metabolism in Chlorella protothecoides, an oleaginous green alga for biofuel. The green alga Chlorella protothecoides, capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth with rapid lipid synthesis, is a promising candidate for biofuel production. Based on the newly available genome knowledge of the alga, we reconstructed the compartmentalized metabolic network consisting of 272 metabolic reactions, 270 enzymes, and 461 encoding genes and simulated the growth in different cultivation conditions with flux balance analysis. Phenotype-phase plane analysis shows conditions achieving theoretical maximum of the biomass and corresponding fatty acid-producing rate for phototrophic cells (the ratio of photon uptake rate to CO2 uptake rate equals 8.4) and heterotrophic ones (the glucose uptake rate to O2 consumption rate reaches 2.4), respectively. Isotope-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry reveals higher metabolite concentrations in the glycolytic pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in heterotrophic cells compared with autotrophic cells. We also observed enhanced levels of ATP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), reduced, acetyl-Coenzyme A, and malonyl-Coenzyme A in heterotrophic cells consistently, consistent with a strong activity of lipid synthesis. To profile the flux map in experimental conditions, we applied nonstationary 13C metabolic flux analysis as a complementing strategy to flux balance analysis. We found that the result reveals negligible photorespiratory fluxes and a metabolically low active tricarboxylic acid cycle in phototrophic C. protothecoides. In comparison, high throughput of amphibolic reactions and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with no glyoxylate shunt activities were measured for heterotrophic cells. Lastly, taken together, the

  3. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... 4 Algal HTL oil requires milder upgrading conditions than fast pyrolysis oil, which requires 2-3 reactors in series, each operating at different temperatures and space velocities. ...

  4. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  5. Algae Biomass Summit Conference | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers

    Alexander Melin Oak Ridge National Laboratory Roger Kisner Oak Ridge National Laboratory Ricardo Vidrio Oak Ridge National Laboratory Modern nuclear reactor designs are creating new challenges in component design, operation, and maintenance. Many advanced reactor types, such as fluoride salt reactors, increase intrinsic safety margins and efficiency but require new components that can operate reliably in extreme environments. These extreme environments can include high temperatures and corrosive

  6. Rewiring Algae's Catalytic Circuits - Continuum Magazine | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Revolution...Now The Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy Technologies - 2015 Update November 2015 ii Contributors Luke Bassett, DOE Office of Energy Policy & Systems Analysis and Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy James Brodrick, DOE Building Technologies Office Steve Capanna, DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Jonathan Castellano, DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Christy Cooper, DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Paul Donohoo-Vallett, DOE Office of Energy

  7. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This technology pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  8. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Program Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 09 BIOMASS FUELS; 59 BASIC ...

  9. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC36-08GO28308 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO. Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Energy ...

  10. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway Biddy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MICROALGAL-DERIVED BIOFUEL; HYDROCARBON FUEL; BIOMASS TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE; NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY; PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY; Bioenergy MICROALGAE;...

  11. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Space Algae

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Cascade High School in Everett, WA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  12. 2016 Bioenergizeme Infographic Challenge: Algae Biofuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks High School in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  13. Carbon2Algae, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    facilities through the utilization of captured CO2 emissions to produce high quality bio-fuel in all climatic conditions. This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  14. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Review Report: Algae

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... solicitations with the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E), the Offce of Science, ... Project lists, abstracts, and presentations were provided to each reviewer in ...

  15. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, M.; Davis, R.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  16. CX-100754 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    4 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100754 Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Algal Biomass Yield Improvements in an Integrated Process Award Number: DE-EE0007689 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Bioenergy Technologies Office Date: 9/9/2016 Location(s): CA Office(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to Global Algae Innovations Inc. (GAI) to facilitate development of the commercial algae biofuel industry, by improving

  17. CX-100364 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    64 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100364 Categorical Exclusion Determination Algae Production CO2 Absorber with Immobilized Carbonic Anhydrase Award Number: DE-EE0007092 CX(s) Applied: A9 Bioenergy Technologies Office Date: 09/08/2015 Location(s): CA Office(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to Global Algae Innovations (GAI) to develop a small-scale absorber system that would be designed, built, and started up. It would be

  18. CX-100518 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    18 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100518 Categorical Exclusion Determination PACE: Producing Algae for Coproducts and Energy Award Number: DE-EE0007089 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Bioenergy Technologies Office Date: 02/25/2016 Location(s): CO Office(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) to reduce the cost of fuel produced from algae to less than $5.00/gallon gasoline equivalent (gge), and

  19. CX-100573 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    3 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100573 Categorical Exclusion Determination Marine AlGae Industrialization Consortium (MAGIC): Combining biofuel and high-value bioproducts to meet the RFS Award Number: DE-EE0007091 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.15 Bioenergy Technologies Office Date: 03/18/2016 Location(s): NC Office(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to Duke University to use the Marine Algae Industrialization Consortium's

  20. CX-100639 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    39 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100639 Categorical Exclusion Determination Algae Production CO2 Absorber with Immobilized Carbonic Anhydrase Award Number: DE-EE0007092 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.15 Bioenergy Technologies Office Date: 6/2/2016 Location(s): CA Office(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to Global Algae Innovations (GAI) to develop a small-scale absorber system that would be designed, built, and tested. It

  1. CX-006836: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    36: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006836: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alternative and Unconventional Energy Research and Development CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B3.8 Date: 09/29/2011 Location(s): Utah Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office This task involves installing a floating pond on top of an existing drainage collection pond at Utah Slate University for the purpose of conducting a field demonstration of a selected algae strain. Department of Energy

  2. Heterotrophic Archaea Contribute to Carbon Cycling in Low-pH, Suboxic Biofilm Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Justice, Nicholas B; Pan, Chongle; Mueller, Ryan; Spaulding, Susan E.; Shah, Vega; Sun, Christine; Yelton, Alexis P; Miller, CS; Thomas, BC; Shah, Manesh B; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2012-01-01

    Archaea are widely distributed and yet are most often not the most abundant members of microbial communities. Here, we document a transition from Bacteria- to Archaea-dominated communities in microbial biofilms sampled from the Richmond Mine acid mine drainage (AMD) system (pH 1.0,38 C) and in laboratory-cultivated biofilms. This transition occurs when chemoautotrophic microbial communities that develop at the air-solution interface sink to the sediment-solution interface and degrade under microaerobic and anaerobic conditions. The archaea identified in these sunken biofilms are from the class Thermoplasmata, and in some cases, the highly divergent ARMAN nanoarchaeal lineage. In several of the sunken biofilms, nanoarchaea comprise 10 to 25% of the community, based on fluorescent in situ hybridization and metagenomic analyses. Comparative community proteomic analyses show a persistence of bacterial proteins in sunken biofilms, but there is clear evidence for amino acid modifications due to acid hydrolysis. Given the low representation of bacterial cells in sunken biofilms based on microscopy, we infer that hydrolysis reflects proteins derived from lysed cells. For archaea, we detected 2,400 distinct proteins, including a subset involved in proteolysis and peptide uptake. Laboratory cultivation experiments using complex carbon substrates demonstrated anaerobic enrichment of Ferroplasma and Aplasma coupled to the reduction of ferric iron. These findings indicate dominance of acidophilic archaea in degrading biofilms and suggest that they play roles in anaerobic nutrient cycling at low pH.

  3. Final Report - Cycling of DOC and DON by novel heterotrophic and photoheterotrophic bacteria in the ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, David F

    2011-06-10

    This report describes a collaboration between Lincoln University and the College of Earth, Ocean and Environment at the University of Delaware and was funded under the Department of Energy Biological Investigations – Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). The principal outcomes of the grant are (1) the opportunity for Lincoln students to participate in marine research at the University of Delaware, (2) the opportunity for participating students to present their research at a variety of scientific meetings, (3) the establishment of an environmental science major and a microbial ecology course at Lincoln, (4) the upgrade of research capabilities at Lincoln, and (5) the success of participating students in graduate and professional school.

  4. Cycling of DOC and DON by Novel Heterotrophic and Photoheterotrophic Bacteria in the Ocean: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirchman, David L

    2008-12-09

    The flux of dissolved organic matter (DOM) through aquatic bacterial communities is a major process in carbon cycling in the oceans and other aquatic systems. Our work addressed the general hypothesis that the phylogenetic make-up of bacterial communities and the abundances of key types of bacteria are important factors influencing the processing of DOM in aquatic ecosystems. Since most bacteria are not easily cultivated, the phylogenetic diversity of these microbes has to be assessed using culture-independent approaches. Even if the relevant bacteria were cultivated, their activity in the lab would likely differ from that under environmental conditions. This project found variation in DOM uptake by the major bacterial groups found in coastal waters. In brief, the data suggest substantial differences among groups in the use of high and molecular weight DOM components. It also made key discoveries about the role of light in affecting this uptake especially by cyanobacteria. In the North Atlantic Ocean, for example, over half of the light-stimulated uptake was by the coccoid cyanobacterium, Prochlorococcus, with the remaining uptake due to Synechococcus and other photoheterotrophic bacteria. The project also examined in detail the degradation of one organic matter component, chitin, which is often said to be the second most abundant compound in the biosphere. The findings of this project contribute to our understanding of DOM fluxes and microbial dynamics supported by those fluxes. It is possible that these findings will lead to improvements in models of the carbon cycle that have compartments for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the largest pool of organic carbon in the oceans.

  5. Geothermal Development and the Use of Categorical Exclusions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) geothermal CXs; Compare current CXs for oil, gas, and geothermal energy; Describe bills proposing new statutory CXs; Examine the ...

  6. Geothermal Development and the Use of Categorical Exclusions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    history of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) geothermal CXs;Compare current CXs for oil, gas, and geothermal energy; Describe bills proposing new statutory CXs; Examine the ...

  7. CX-100526 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    26 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100526 Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Algal Biomass Yield Improvements in an Integrated Process Award Number: DE-EE0006314 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.15 Bioenergy Technologies Office Date: 07/17/2014 Location(s): HI Office(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to Hawaii Bioenergy, LLC to accelerate the development of a commercial industry for algae-derived transportation

  8. Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    This article was originally published in the DOE Office of Indian Energy's Indian Energy Beat newsletter, which highlights opportunities and success stories in tribal energy ...

  9. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Algae Biofuel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Seward HS in Seward, AK, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge encourages young people to improve their foundational understanding of bioenergy, which is a broad and complex topic. The ideas expressed in these infographics reflect where students are in the learning process and do not necessarily reflect the state of knowledge of the U.S. Department of Energy or other experts in the bioenergy

  10. BETO Deputy Director Publishes Commentary on Development of Algae...

    Energy Savers

    "Algal lipids are useful for the production of biodiesel, bioethanol, renewable diesel and biogasoline, biohydrogen, and bio-jet fuels, and they also serve as a feedstock for ...

  11. Buoyant triacylglycerol-filled green algae and methods therefor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodenough, Ursula; Goodson, Carrie

    2015-04-14

    Cultures of Chlamydomonas are disclosed comprising greater than 340 mg/l triacylglycerols (TAG). The cultures can include buoyant Chlamydomonas. Methods of forming the cultures are also disclosed. In some embodiments, these methods comprise providing Chlamydomonas growing in log phase in a first culture medium comprising a nitrogen source and acetate, replacing the first culture medium with a second medium comprising acetate but no nitrogen source, and subsequently supplementing the second medium with additional acetate. In some embodiments, a culture can comprise at least 1,300 mg/l triacyglycerols. In some embodiments, cultures can be used to produce a biofuel such as biodiesel.

  12. Potential consequences of GM algae escape on ecosystem services

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Richard Sayre Los Alamos National Laboratory New Mexico Consortium Outline * Historical ... Renewable fuels and green chemical feedstocks 50-90% Other biomass 4-50% Oils Rapid growth ...

  13. Sandia Algae Researchers Cut Costs with Improved Nutrient Recycling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Sandia molecular biologists Todd Lane and Ryan Davis, ... sustainable design by reducing the demand for ... Renewable Energy Laboratory researcher Lee Elliott ...

  14. Sandia's Algae Nutrient Recycling Project Is a Triple Win

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Sandia molecular biologists (in Sandia's Systems Biology Dept.) and Ryan Davis (in ... Liao runs the Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology Laboratory and is chairman of ...

  15. Sandia Energy - The National Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    (ATP3) kick-off meeting at Arizona State University. Sandians Ron Pate (Earth Systems Analysis Dept.), Todd Lane (Systems Biology Dept.), Tricia Gharagozloo (ThermalFluid...

  16. June 2012 News Blast: Algae on the Mind

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    June 2012 Biomass 2012 Is Less Than Two Weeks Away It's not too late to reserve your spot at Biomass 2012: Confronting Challenges, Creating Opportunities - Sustaining a Commitment to Bioenergy, the Energy Department's fifth annual networking and informational conference. Join Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, White House Energy Advisor Heather Zichal, members of Congress, and an exciting list of confirmed speakers by registering now! Visit the Biomass 2012 website to find out more information

  17. Energy 101: Algae-to-Fuel | Department of Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    sequence of cars, trains, and planes in motion. Extract that oil, and you have the raw materials to make fuel for cars, trucks, trains, and planes. In the future, anything that...

  18. The Algae Foundation Announces New DOE Funded Education Initiative...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    development and education 2015 Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships spring interns and mentors at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Workforce development and education...

  19. Real Time Diagnostics for Algae-final-sm

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Real-time Monitoring And Diagnostics Detecting pathogens and predators to quickly recover ... Real-time Monitoring With Online Algal Reflectance Monitor System Researchers have ...

  20. PetroAlgae formerly Dover Glen Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    University, and bred selectively over many generations, to produce rapid growth and high oil yield for biodiesel production. Coordinates: -37.817532, 144.967148 Show Map...

  1. Algae Raceway Testing Facility Brings Algal Biofuels One Step...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and Program Manager Alison Goss Eng, Livermore Mayor John March, Sandia National ... and Program Manager Alison Goss Eng, Livermore Mayor John March, Sandia National ...

  2. Algae Testbed Public Private Partnership Workshop on Principles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Participants will have opportunities to work in the laboratory and learn how to measure culture density (cell counting and optical density), use a light and fluorescence microscope...

  3. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae and fresh water aquatic weeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-02-01

    The ORCA clone of the red seaweed Gracilaria tikvahiae has been in culture continuously for over two years. Yield for the past year has averaged 12 g ash-free dry wt/m/sup 2/ .day (17.5 t/a.y) in suspended 2600-1 aluminum tank cultures with four exchanges of enriched seawater per day and continuous aeration. Yields from nonintensive pond-bottom culture, similar to commercial Gracilaria culture methods in Taiwan, averaged 3 g afdw/m/sup 2/.day in preliminary experiments. Rope and spray cultures were not successful. Yields of water hyacinths from March 1978 to March 1979 averaged 25 g afdw/m/sup 2/.day (37 t/a.y). Season, nutrient availability (form and quantity) and stand density were found to affect the relative proportions of structural and nonstructural tissue in water hyacinths and thereby significantly affect digestibility of and methane production by the plants. Pennywort (Hydrocotyle) grew poorly in winter and its annual yield averaged only one-third that of water hyacinth. Water lettuce (Pistia) appears more comparable to hyacinths in preliminary studies and its yields will be monitored throughout a complete year. Stable, continuous anaerobic digestion of both water hyacinths and Gracilaria has been maintained with an average gas production from both species of 0.4 1/g volatile solids at 60% methane.

  4. Magnetic mesoporous material for the sequestration of algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trewyn, Brian G.; Kandel, Kapil; Slowing, Igor Ivan; Lee, Show-Ling

    2014-09-09

    The present invention provides a magnetic mesoporous nanoparticle that includes a mesoporous silicate nanoparticle and iron oxide. The present invention also provides a method of using magnetic mesoporous nanoparticles to sequester microorganisms from a media.

  5. Magneto-optical properties of biogenic photonic crystals in algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwasaka, M.; Mizukawa, Y.

    2014-05-07

    In the present study, the effects of strong static magnetic fields on the structural colors of the cell covering crystals on a microalgae, coccolithophore, were investigated. The coccolithophore, Emiliania huxleyi, generates a precise assembly of calcite crystals called coccoliths by biomineralization. The coccoliths attached to the cells exhibited structural colors under side light illumination, and the colors underwent dynamic transitions when the magnetic fields were changed between 0?T and 5?T, probably due to diamagnetically induced changes of their inclination under the magnetic fields. The specific light-scattering property of individual coccoliths separated from the cells was also observed. Light scattering from a condensed suspension of coccoliths drastically decreased when magnetic fields of more than 4?T were applied parallel to the direction of observation. The magnetically aligned cell-covering crystals of the coccolithophores exhibited the properties of both a photonic crystal and a minimum micromirror.

  6. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes (Conference)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Media, September 12-14, 2011, Coimbra, Portugal. Springer Proceedings in Mathematics & Statistics, 28:99-108 Publisher: JA Ferreira, et al; Springer, New York, United States(US). ...

  7. DOE Announces Webinars on Genetically Modified Algae, NREL's...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Laboratory (NREL) has led a multi-year project studying the effect of system-derived contaminants on the performance and durability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. ...

  8. Enzyme Fusions Optimize Photosynthetic Hydrogen Production in Algae (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    Research at NREL is demonstrating that engineering enzymes has the potential to improve efficiencies.

  9. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction: 2014 State of Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Anderson, Daniel; Hallen, Richard T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2014-07-30

    This report describes the base case yields and operating conditions for converting whole microalgae via hydrothermal liquefaction and upgrading to liquid fuels. This serves as the basis against which future technical improvements will be measured.

  10. NREL Researcher Discusses Revitalized Algae Program - News Releases...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Presentation on July 7 at University of Minnesota Available Online July 1, 2010 Dr. Philip ... research on July 7, from 3-5 p.m., at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities Campus. ...

  11. Heterotrophic Soil Respiration in Warming Experiments: Using Microbial Indicators to Partition Contributions from Labile and Recalcitrant Soil Organic Carbon. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradford, M A; Melillo, J M; Reynolds, J F; Treseder, K K; Wallenstein, M D

    2010-06-10

    The central objective of the proposed work was to develop a genomic approach (nucleic acid-based) that elucidates the mechanistic basis for the observed impacts of experimental soil warming on forest soil respiration. The need to understand the mechanistic basis arises from the importance of such information for developing effective adaptation strategies for dealing with projected climate change. Specifically, robust predictions of future climate will permit the tailoring of the most effective adaptation efforts. And one of the greatest uncertainties in current global climate models is whether there will be a net loss of carbon from soils to the atmosphere as climate warms. Given that soils contain approximately 2.5 times as much carbon as the atmosphere, a net loss could lead to runaway climate warming. Indeed, most ecosystem models predict that climate warming will stimulate microbial decomposition of soil carbon, producing such a positive feedback to rising global temperatures. Yet the IPCC highlights the uncertainty regarding this projected feedback. The uncertainty arises because although warming-experiments document an initial increase in the loss of carbon from soils, the increase in respiration is short-lived, declining to control levels in a few years. This attenuation could result from changes in microbial physiology with temperature. We explored possible microbial responses to warming using experiments and modeling. Our work advances our understanding of how soil microbial communities and their activities are structured, generating insight into how soil carbon might respond to warming. We show the importance of resource partitioning in structuring microbial communities. Specifically, we quantified the relative abundance of fungal taxa that proliferated following the addition of organic substrates to soil. We added glycine, sucrose, cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein to soils in conjunction with 3-bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU), a nucleotide analog. Active microbes absorb BrdU from the soil solution; if they multiply in response to substrate additions, they incorporate the BrdU into their DNA. After allowing soils to incubate, we extracted BrdU-labeled DNA and sequenced the ITS regions of fungal rDNA. Fungal taxa that proliferated following substrate addition were likely using the substrate as a resource for growth. We found that the structure of active fungal communities varied significantly among substrates. The active fungal community under glycine was significantly different from those under other conditions, while the active communities under sucrose and cellulose were marginally different from each other and the control. These results indicate that the overall community structure of active fungi was altered by the addition of glycine, sucrose, and cellulose and implies that some fungal taxa respond to changes in resource availability. The community composition of active fungi is also altered by experimental warming. We found that glycine-users tended to increase under warming, while lignin-, tannin/protein-, and sucrose-users declined. The latter group of substrates requires extracellular enzymes for use, but glycine does not. It is possible that warming selects for fungal species that target, in particular, labile substrates. Linking these changes in microbial communities and resource partitioning to soil carbon dynamics, we find that substrate mineralization rates are, in general, significantly lower in soils exposed to long-term warming. This suggests that microbial use of organic substrates is impaired by warming. Yet effects are dependent on substrate identity. There are fundamental differences in the metabolic capabilities of the communities in the control and warmed soils. These differences might relate to the changes in microbial community composition, which appeared to be associated with groups specialized on different resources. We also find that functional responses indicate temperature acclimation of the microbial community. There are distinct seasonal patterns and to long-term soil warming, with higher-temperature optima for soils exposed to warmer temperatures. To relate these changes within the microbial community to potential positive feedbacks between climate warming and soil respiration, we develop a microbial-enzyme model to simulate the responses of soil carbon to warming. We find that declines in microbial biomass and degradative enzymes can explain the observed attenuation of soil-carbon emissions in response to warming. Specifically, reduced carbon-use efficiency limits the biomass of microbial decomposers and mitigates loss of soil carbon. However, microbial adaptation or a change in microbial communities could lead to an upward adjustment of the efficiency of carbon use, counteracting the decline in microbial biomass and accelerating soil-carbon loss. We conclude that the soil-carbon response to climate warming depends on the efficiency of soil microbes in using carbon.

  12. Recovery Act: Beneficial CO{sub 2} Capture in an Integrated Algal Biorefinery for Renewable Generation and Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Christopher; Hampel, Kristin; Rismani-Yazdi, Hamid; Kessler, Ben; Moats, Kenneth; Park, Jonathan; Schwenk, Jacob; White, Nicholas; Bakhit, Anis; Bargiel, Jeff; Allnutt, F. C.

    2014-03-31

    DOE DE-FE0001888 Award, Phase 2, funded research, development, and deployment (RD&D) of Phycal’s pilot-scale, algae to biofuels, bioproducts, and processing facility in Hawai’i. Phycal’s algal-biofuel and bioproducts production system integrates several novel and mature technologies into a system that captures and reuses industrially produced carbon dioxide emissions, which would otherwise go directly to the atmosphere, for the manufacture of renewable energy products and bioproducts from algae (note that these algae are not genetically engineered). At the end of Phase 2, the project as proposed was to encompass 34 acres in Central Oahu and provide large open ponds for algal mass culturing, heterotrophic reactors for the Heteroboost™ process, processing facilities, water recycling facilities, anaerobic digestion facilities, and other integrated processes. The Phase 2 award was divided into two modules, Modules 1 & 2, where the Module 1 effort addressed critical scaling issues, tested highest risk technologies, and set the overall infrastructure needed for a Module 2. Phycal terminated the project prior to executing construction of the first Module. This Final Report covers the development research, detailed design, and the proposed operating strategy for Module 1 of Phase 2.

  13. An Algal Biofuels Consortium Algae R&D Activities Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... 1annual gallon installed capacity (biodiesel) 2annual gallon installed capacity ... Sustainable Lipid Extraction Biodiesel FAMEs Hydrocarbon Fuels Animal Feed ...

  14. The Promise and Challenge of Algae as Renewable Sources of Biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Jose Olivares (Los Alamos National Laboratory) * Biology, Cultivation, HarvestDewater, ... Harvesting and Processing Strain BiologySelection Cultivation Strategy ...

  15. Development of Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading Technologies for Lipid-Extracted Algae Conversion to Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yunhua; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-10-01

    Bench-scale tests were performed for lipid-extracted microalgae (LEA) conversion to liquid fuels via hydrotreating liquefaction (HTL) and upgrading processes. Process simulation and economic analysis for a large-scale LEA HTL and upgrading system were developed based on the best available test results. The system assumes an LEA feed rate of 608 dry metric ton/day and that the feedstock is converted to a crude HTL bio-oil and further upgraded via hydrotreating and hydrocracking to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels, mainly alkanes. Performance and cost results demonstrate that HTL would be an effective option to convert LEA to liquid fuel. The liquid fuels annual yield was estimated to be 26.9 million gallon gasoline-equivalent and the overall energy efficiency at higher heating value basis was estimated to be 69.5%. The minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) was estimated to be $0.75/L with LEA feedstock price at $33.1 metric ton at dry basis and 10% internal rate of return. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the largest effects to production cost would come from the final products yields and the upgrading equipments cost. The impact of plant scale on MFSP was also investigated.

  16. Genomic and ecosystem evidence demonstrate the importance of selenium for the harmful alga, Aureococcus anophagefferens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gobler, Christopher J; Lobanov, Alexei V; Tang, Ying-Zhong; Turanov, Anton A; Zhang, Yan; Doblin, Martina; Taylor, Gordon T; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A; Grigoriev, Igor V; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2012-10-19

    The trace element selenium (Se) is required for the biosynthesis of selenocysteine (Sec), the 21st amino acid in the genetic code, but its role in the ecology of harmful algal blooms (HABs) is unknown. Here, we examined the role of Se in the biology and ecology of the harmful pelagophyte, Aureococcus anophagefferens, through cell culture, genomic analyses, and ecosystem studies. This organism has the largest and the most diverse selenoproteome identified to date that consists of at least 59 selenoproteins, including known eukaryotic selenoproteins, selenoproteins previously only detected in bacteria, and novel selenoproteins. The A. anophagefferens selenoproteome was dominated by the thioredoxin fold proteins and oxidoreductase functions were assigned to the majority of detected selenoproteins. Insertion of Sec in these proteins was supported by a unique Sec insertion sequence. Se was required for the growth of A. anophagefferens as cultures grew maximally at nanomolar Se concentrations. In a coastal ecosystem, dissolved Se concentrations were elevated before and after A. anophagefferens blooms, but were reduced by >95percent during the peak of blooms to 0.05 nM. Consistent with this pattern, enrichment of seawater with selenite before and after a bloom did not affect the growth of A. anophagefferens, but enrichment during the peak of the bloom significantly increased population growth rates. These findings demonstrate that Se inventories, which can be anthropogenically enriched, can support proliferation of HABs, such as A. anophagefferens through its synthesis of a large arsenal of Se-dependent oxidoreductases that fine-tune cellular redox homeostasis.

  17. Effect of Morphology of ZnO Nanostructures on Their Toxicity to Marine Algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, X.; Wong, S.; Palma, S.; Fisher, N.S.

    2011-04-01

    The influence of ZnO nanoparticle morphology on its toxicity for marine diatoms was evaluated. Four ZnO nanoparticle motifs, possessing distinctive sizes and shapes, were synthesized without adding surfactants. Diameters of ZnO spheres ranged from 6.3 nm to 15.7 nm, and lengths of rod-shaped particles were 242 nm to 862 nm. Their effects on the growth of the marine diatoms, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Chaetoceros gracilis, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, were determined in laboratory cultures. Between 4.1 and 4.9% of the Zn from all types of nanoparticles dissolved within 72 h and was neither concentration dependent nor morphology dependent. Addition of all nanoparticles at all concentrations tested stopped growth of T. pseudonana and C. gracilis, whereas P. tricornutum was the least sensitive, with its growth rate inversely proportional to nanoparticle concentration. Bioaccumulation of Zn released from nanoparticles in T. pseudonana was sufficient to kill this diatom. The toxicity of rod-shaped particles to P. triocornutum was noted to be greater than that of the spheres. The overall results suggest that toxicity studies assessing the effects of nanoparticles on aquatic organisms need to consider both the dissolution of these particles and the cellular interaction of nanoparticle aggregates.

  18. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Is Algae the Next Big Thing

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Daniel Boone Area High School in Birdsboro, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair.

  19. Microsoft Word - PhycalAlgaePilotProject_NEPAFinalEA_October2011...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... These key areas are described in greater detail below. * Oil Extraction process allows the ... The marine sedimentary deposits consist of calcareous silts, sands and gravels and ...

  20. Algae as a Feedstock for Transportation Fuels. The Future of Biofuels?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGill, Ralph

    2008-05-15

    Events in world energy markets over the past several years have prompted many new technical developments as well as political support for alternative transportation fuels, especially those that are renewable. We have seen dramatic rises in the demand for and production of fuel ethanol from sugar cane and corn and biodiesel from vegetable oils. The quantities of these fuels being used continue to rise dramatically, and their use is helping to create a political climate for doing even more. But, the quantities are still far too small to stem the tide of rising crude prices worldwide. In fact, the use of some traditional crops (corn, sugar, soy, etc.) in making fuels instead of food is apparently beginning to impact the cost of food worldwide. Thus, there is considerable interest in developing alternative biofuel feedstocks for use in making fuels -- feedstocks that are not used in the food industries. Of course, we know that there is a lot of work in developing cellulosic-based ethanol that would be made from woody biomass. Process development is the critical path for this option, and the breakthrough in reducing the cost of the process has been elusive thus far. Making biodiesel from vegetable oils is a well-developed and inexpensive process, but to date there have been few reasonable alternatives for making biodiesel, although advanced processes such as gasification of biomass remain an option.

  1. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes (Book) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Springer Proceedings in Mathematics & Statistics, 28:99-108 Publisher: JA Ferreira, et al; Springer, New York, NY, United States(US). Research Org: Pacific Northwest National ...

  2. Genomic Sequence of a Marine Blooming Alga | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23Germantown Building ... bloom in the Barents Sea north of Russia, their scales giving off a bright green glow. ...

  3. DOE Announces Webinars on Genetically Modified Algae, NREL’s Fuel Cell Contaminant Database, and More

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. View this week's webinars.

  4. Dynamics of radionuclide exchange in the calcareous algae Halimeda at Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spies, R.B.; Marsh, K.V.; Kercher, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of /sup 239 +240/Pu in the detrital inclusions and in acid-soluble and acid-insoluble fractions of Halimeda macrophysa showed a 10-fold higher concentration in the acid-insoluble coenocytic filaments than in the acid-soluble fraction. In a depuration experiment with Halimeda incrassata at Enewetak Atoll the loss rate of six radionuclides was measured. Data for /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 102//sup m/Rh were fit to loss curves by using one term for exponential loss; data for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am required two terms. For each radionuclide, compartment size and transfer functions were determined for the apropriate one- and two-compartment models. Of 26 possible two-compartment models, only seven gave solutions with our data. Nearly identical loss rates were obtained for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in the fast-exchanging compartments for all seven models. The uptake rates for these nuclides were also similar when uptake rates were normalized to local sediment concentrations. The fast-exchanging compartment probably corresponds to the mucilage surface layer of the coenocytic filaments. The identity of the slow-exchanging compartment is less certain but it may correspond to the skeletal surface.

  5. Dynamics of radionuclide exchange in the calcareous algae Halimeda at Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spies, R.B.; Marsh, K.V.; Kercher, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of /sup 239+240/Pu in the detrital inclusions and in acid-soluble and acid-insoluble fractions of Halimeda macrophysa showed a 10-fold higher concentration in the acid-insoluble coenocytic filaments than in the acid-soluble fraction. In a depuration experiment with Halimeda incrassata at Enewetak Atoll the loss rate of six radionuclides was measured. Data for /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 102m/Rh were fit to loss curves by using one term for exponential loss; data for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239+240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am required two terms. For each radionuclide, compartment size and transfer functions were determined for the appropriate one- and two-compartment models. Of 26 possible two-compartment models, only seven gave solutions with our data. Nearly identical loss rates were obtained for /sup 155/Eu, /sup 239+240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in the fast-exchanging compartments for all seven models. The uptake rates for these nuclides were also similar when uptake rates were normalized to local sediment concentrations. The fast-exchanging compartment probably corresponds to the mucilage surface layer of the coenocytic filaments. The identity of the slow-exchanging compartment is less certain but it may correspond to the skeletal surface.

  6. Release of the 2016 National Algal Biofuels Technology Review Charts Path Forward for Algae

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The 2016 National Algal Biofuels Technology Review, which was just released today, captures the exciting achievements of the field of algal biofuels, as well as articulates new challenges, lessons learned, and critical next steps.

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - Peer Review_Slides_Algae_Bagwell_v2.ppt...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Human & Environmental Health Risks Assessment of Algal Production Systems (9.6.1.5) May ... the potential for environmental or human health risks associated with large scale ...

  8. Use of De Novo transcriptome libraries to characterize a novel oleaginous marine Chlorella species during the accumulation of triacylglycerols

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Richter, Lubna V.; Ahner, Beth A.; Cochlan, William P.; Richardson, Ruth E.; Chen, Shilin

    2016-02-03

    Here, marine chlorophytes of the genus Chlorella are unicellular algae capable of accumulating a high proportion of cellular lipids that can be used for biodiesel production. In this study, we examined the broad physiological capabilities of a subtropical strain (C596) of Chlorella sp. “SAG-211-18” including its heterotrophic growth and tolerance to low salt.We found that the alga replicates more slowly at diluted salt concentrations and can grow on a wide range of carbon substrates in the dark.We then sequenced the RNA of Chlorella strain C596 to elucidate key metabolic genes and investigate the transcriptomic response of the organism when transitioningmore » from a nutrient-replete to a nutrient-deficient condition when neutral lipids accumulate. Specific transcripts encoding for enzymes involved in both starch and lipid biosynthesis, among others, were up-regulated as the cultures transitioned into a lipid-accumulating state whereas photosynthesis-related genes were down-regulated. Transcripts encoding for two of the up-regulated enzymes—a galactoglycerolipid lipase and a diacylglyceride acyltransferase—were also monitored by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The results of these assays confirmed the transcriptome-sequencing data. The present transcriptomic study will assist in the greater understanding, more effective application, and efficient design of Chlorella-based biofuel production systems.« less

  9. Impacts | Bioenergy | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Algal Pretreatment Improves Biofuels Yield and Value Reviving Algae from the (Almost) Dead Unique Bioreactor Finds Algae's Sweet Spot Rewiring Algae's Catalytic Circuits Biomass ...

  10. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Advanced Technology Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Reequipping and Engineering CX(s) Applied: B1.31, B5.1 Date: 09062011 ... Aptera All-Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles CX(s) Applied: B1.31, B5.1 Date: 0620...

  11. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Idaho Operations Office...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Stack Modifications for Sample Probe Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.2 Date: 05112015 ... Determination Test Reactor Area-774 Substation Equipment Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B2.5 ...

  12. A Combined Genetic, Biochemical, and Biophysical Analysis of the A1 Phylloquinone Binding Site of Photosystem I from Green Algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin E. Redding

    2011-12-17

    This project has resulted in the increase in our understanding of how proteins interact with and influence the properties of bound cofactors. This information is important for several reasons, including providing essential information for the re-engineering of biological molecules, such as proteins, for either improved function or entirely new ones. In particular, we have found that a molecule, such as the phylloquinone used in Photosystem I (PS1), can be made a stronger electron donor by placing it in a hydrophobic environment surrounded by negative charges. In addition, the protein is constrained in its interactions with the phylloqinone, in that it must bind the cofactor tightly, but not in such a way that would stabilize the reduced (negatively-charged) version of the molecule. We have used a combination of molecular genetics, in order to make specific mutations in the region of the phylloquinone, and an advanced form of spectroscopy capable of monitoring the transfer of electrons within PS1 using living cells as the material. This approach turned out to produce a significant savings in time and supplies, as it allowed us to focus quickly on the mutants that produced interesting effects, without having to go through laborious purification of the affected proteins. We followed up selected mutants using other spectroscopic techniques in order to gain more specialized information. In addition to the main project funded by this work, this grant supported several related side-projects that also increased our understanding about related issues.

  13. On the structural stability and catalytic properties of smectities pillared with RE-Al, Al-Ga polyoxications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caballero, L.; Dominguez, J.M.; De los Santos, J.L.

    1995-12-01

    Pillaring of Smectite type clays offers the possibility to develop highly porous catalytic materials with surface acid properties, (1) their me in hydrotreating and FCC hydrocarbon processes has been extensively discussed (2) and still some research on the stabilization of the clays structure is being carried out. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to investigate thermal stability of Montmorillonite type clays, by means of pillaring with distinct polyoxications and by ion-exchanging and treating the clays under several conditions.

  14. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae and freshwater aquatic needs. Progress report, May 1, 1979-December 15, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryther, J H

    1980-01-01

    Progress for the period May 1979 to December 1979 is reported in the following subject areas: (1) the ORCA clone of the red seaweed Gracilaria tikvakiae has now been grown continuously in tank culture for two years; (2) studies were continued on the culture of freshwater plants such as water hyacinth, pennywort, water lettuce, and duckweed; (3) the loss of water from evapotranspiration of freshwater plants was measured and compared with water loss from evaporation from open water; and (4) experiments were conducted to investigate the possibility of recycling the chemicals left in the solid and liquid residues following anaerobic digestion and methane production as a source of nutrients for new plant production. (ACR)

  15. Suppression of Tla1 gene expression for improved solar conversion efficiency and photosynthetic productivity in plants and algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melis, Anastasios; Mitra, Mautusi

    2010-06-29

    The invention provides method and compositions to minimize the chlorophyll antenna size of photosynthesis by decreasing TLA1 gene expression, thereby improving solar conversion efficiencies and photosynthetic productivity in plants, e.g., green microalgae, under bright sunlight conditions.

  16. NREL Discovers Novel Protein Interaction in Green Algae that Suggests New Strategies to Improve Hydrogen Photoproduction (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    A research team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered a specific interaction between the protein ferredoxin - responsible for distributing reductants from photosynthesis to different metabolic pathways - and the HYDA2 hydrogenase, suggesting a role for HYDA2 in photohydrogen production.

  17. CONTACT INFORMATION: Steve Karsjen Public Affairs

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    particles. Thanks to these particles someday, you could be riding in a car powered by biodiesel made from algae. Why make fuel from algae? For starters, algae grow quickly, and...

  18. Transportation Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Algae Raceway to speed path to biofuels News, Transportation Energy Algae Raceway to speed path to biofuels With the aim of transforming algae into a cost-competitive biofuel, ...

  19. Economic comparison of open pond raceways to photo bio-reactors for profitable production of algae for transportation fuels in the Southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, James W.; Johnson, Myriah D.; Outlaw, Joe L.

    2012-05-01

    As energy prices continue to climb there is an increasing interest in alternative, renewable energy sources. Currently, “most of the energy consumed in the U.S. comes from fossil fuels - petroleum, coal, and natural gas, with crude oil-based petroleum products as the dominant source of energy”. The use of renewable energy has grown, but is only making a small dent in current consumption at about eight percent of the United States total. Another concern with the use of fossil fuels is the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and complications to the climate. This is because, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) “fossil fuels are responsible for 99% of CO2 emissions”.

  20. Economic comparison of open pond raceways to photo bio-reactors for profitable production of algae for transportation fuels in the Southwest

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Richardson, James W.; Johnson, Myriah D.; Outlaw, Joe L.

    2012-05-01

    As energy prices continue to climb there is an increasing interest in alternative, renewable energy sources. Currently, “most of the energy consumed in the U.S. comes from fossil fuels - petroleum, coal, and natural gas, with crude oil-based petroleum products as the dominant source of energy”. The use of renewable energy has grown, but is only making a small dent in current consumption at about eight percent of the United States total. Another concern with the use of fossil fuels is the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and complications to the climate. This is because, according to themore » U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) “fossil fuels are responsible for 99% of CO2 emissions”.« less

  1. Pilot Scale Integrated Biorefinery for Producing Ethanol from Hybrid Algae: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-389

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pienkos, P. T.

    2013-11-01

    This collaboration between Algenol Biofuels Inc. and NREL will provide valuable information regarding Direct to Ethanol technology. Specifically, the cooperative R&D will analyze the use of flue gas from industrial sources in the Direct to Ethanol process, which may demonstrate the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions while simultaneously producing a valuable product, i.e., ethanol. Additionally, Algenol Biofuels Inc. and NREL will develop both a techno-economic model with full material and energy balances and an updated life-cycle analysis to identify greenhouse gas emissions relative to gasoline, each of which will provide a better understanding of the Direct to Ethanol process and further demonstrate that it is a breakthrough technology with varied and significant benefits.

  2. A National-Scale Comparison of Resource and Nutrient Demands for Algae-Based Biofuel Production by Lipid Extraction and Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2014-03-01

    Algae’s high productivity provides potential resource advantages over other fuel crops. However, demand for land, water, and nutrients must be minimized to avoid impacts on food production. We apply our national-scale, open-pond, growth and resource models to assess several biomass to fuel technological pathways based on Chlorella. We compare resource demands between hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and lipid extraction (LE) to meet 1.89E+10 and 7.95E+10 L yr-1 biofuel targets. We estimate nutrient demands where post-fuel biomass is consumed as co-products and recycling by anaerobic digestion (AD) or catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG). Sites are selected through prioritization based on fuel value relative to a set of site-specific resource costs. The highest priority sites are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast, but potential sites exist nationwide. We find that HTL reduces land and freshwater consumption by up to 46% and saline groundwater by around 70%. Without recycling, nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) demand is reduced 33%, but is large relative to current U.S. agricultural consumption. The most nutrient-efficient pathways are LE+CHG for N and HTL+CHG for P (by 42%). Resource gains for HTL+CHG are offset by a 344% increase in N consumption relative to LE+CHG (with potential for further recycling). Nutrient recycling is essential to effective use of alternative nutrient sources. Modeling of utilization availability and costs remains, but we find that for HTL+CHG at the 7.95E+10 L yr-1 production target, municipal sources can offset 17% of N and 40% of P demand and animal manures can generally meet demands.

  3. New Screening System Detects Algae with Increased H2 Production (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Science, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector August 23, 2012 - 12:20pm Addthis New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean

  4. CX-009419: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Magnetic Pulser CX(s) Applied: None applied. Date: 10/30/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Kansas City Site Office

  5. CX-006491: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006491: Categorical Exclusion Determination Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consortium CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09012011 Location(s): Florida...

  6. CX-007867: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Exclusion Determination CX-007867: Categorical Exclusion Determination Northeast Photovoltaic Regional Training Provider CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.16 Date: 01272012...

  7. CX-010028: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flame Forming Proppants CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/17/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  8. CX-013995: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Meson Hill Well Abandonment CX CX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 07/24/2015 Location(s): IllinoisOffices(s): Fermi Site Office

  9. CX-012809: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    LURR 20140313 City of Vancouver Sewer Lateral CX(s) Applied: B4.9Date: 41906 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  10. CX-012122: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    OCGen Module Mooring Project CX(s) Applied: B5.25 Date: 04/29/2014 Location(s): Maine Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  11. CX-008471: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Tree Planting Initiative - Rebuild Western Mass CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 06/08/2012 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-010150: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Celilo Fiber System CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 04/15/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. CX-010375: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace Existing Firehouse CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 09/20/2011 Location(s): California Offices(s): Berkeley Site Office

  14. CX-012231: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mica Peak Radio Station upgrade CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 06/09/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-009515: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tide Creek Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/08/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. CX-011215: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nepese Marsh Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 10/17/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Fermi Site Office

  17. FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    8, 2011 CX-006459: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Physics - Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08082011 Location(s): Albany, Oregon...

  18. CX-012606: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Preparing of Environmental Samples for Analysis CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41810 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  19. CX-012581: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Demolition of Outfall Sampling Station CX(s) Applied: B1.23Date: 41844 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  20. CX-012572: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    H-Area Vehicle Barrier Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 41862 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  1. CX-012566: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Z-Area Fire Tank Painting CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41865 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  2. CX-012628: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Deactivation and Decommissioning of 711-L CX(s) Applied: B1.23Date: 41793 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  3. CX-012559: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Seal Access Plugs at 105-C CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41872 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  4. CX-012587: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    HB-Line Security Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41835 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  5. CX-012583: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biofuels Production Experiment CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41841 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  6. CX-008973: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Petrography Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/01/2012 Location(s): West Virginia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-010367: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Asbestos Abatement Actions CX(s) Applied: B1.16 Date: 11/19/2012 Location(s): Tennessee, California, Virginia Offices(s): Berkeley Site Office

  8. CX-009312: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pecan Street Smart Grid Extension Service CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/30/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-011628: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Enclosure Modification Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/05/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  10. CX-012580: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tritium Responsive Infrastructure Modifications CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 41844 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  11. CX-007793: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jonesboro Maintenance Facility Additions CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 05/10/2011 Location(s): Arkansas Offices(s): Southwestern Power Administration

  12. CX-007798: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Springfield Maintenance Garage CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 12/08/2010 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Southwestern Power Administration

  13. CX-005846: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    CX-005846: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacement and Minor Access Road Maintenance Along Various Transmission Line Rights-Of-Way in the Wenatchee District CX(s) ...

  14. CX-008729: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reverse Osmosis System Removal CX(s) Applied: B1.26 Date: 06/25/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  15. CX-010768: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    ZIRCEX Nuclear Fuel Dissolution Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/12/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  16. CX-003164: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003164: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization of Biomass Production Across a Landscape CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 07262010...

  17. CX-011194: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Particle Physics Division Outback Garage CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 09/19/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Fermi Site Office

  18. CX-012310: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sawmill Creek Stream Bank Erosion CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/06/2014 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Argonne Site Office

  19. CX-012437: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    High Energy Density Lithium Battery CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41878 Location(s): New YorkOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-012028: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    High Temperature Laboratory CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/21/2014 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-011416: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Technology Integration Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 12/19/2013 Location(s): Ohio Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-011538: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ninemile Creek Lower Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/26/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. CX-011536: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Aeneans Creek Spring Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/25/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. CX-011537: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wanacut Creek Upper Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/26/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  5. CX-012793: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    15-Minute Transmission Scheduling CX(s) Applied: B4.4, B4.5Date: 41933 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. CX-012110: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cowlitz Falls Fish Facility Access Agreement Extension CX(s) Applied: A2 Date: 04/02/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  7. CX-009707: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alcoa Power Sales Contract CX(s) Applied: B4.1 Date: 12/04/2012 Location(s): Oregon, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. CX-009513: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Aquatic Invasive Mussels Monitoring CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 10/15/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  9. CX-013632: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alcoa Power Sales Contract Amendment CX(s) Applied: B4.11Date: 04/23/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  10. CX-008989: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/27/2012 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  11. CX-008144: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Planned Repair of Flow Lines CX(s) Applied: B5.4 Date: 08/09/2011 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): RMOTC

  12. CX-010195: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Polymer Synthesis Lab - Modification CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/15/2013 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-010241: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Pathway Analyses CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 02/28/2013 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  14. CX-011564: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excess Facilities Deactivation and Demolition CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  15. CX-012705: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC)-703 Fire Alarm Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.2Date: 41858 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  16. CX-012725: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Materials and Fuel Complex (MFC)-782 Fire Sprinkler Installation CX(s) Applied: B2.2Date: 41829 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  17. CX-001627: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CX-001627: Categorical Exclusion Determination Test Reactor Cask Implementation CX(s) ... This proposed action is a process and facility modification. The Advanced Test Reactor ...

  18. CX-013825: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lab A19 Cleanroom Construction CX(s) Applied: B1.31Date: 06/29/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  19. CX-012729: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Sulfide Scavenger BOA (Multiple) CX(s) Applied: B5.2Date: 41880 Location(s): LouisianaOffices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  20. CX-012799: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Malin-Hilltop Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41915 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  1. CX-012805: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brasada-Harney #1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41908 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  2. CX-008724: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rexburg Bus Lot Lease Termination CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 07/05/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  3. CX-014379: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ouagga Mussel Study Funding CX(s) Applied: B3.16Date: 10/29/2015 Location(s): NevadaOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. CX-012283: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    USC Autoclave CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/14/2014 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-013386: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chemical Vapor Deposition CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 01/07/2015 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  6. CX-007853: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Arizona Rooftop Challenge (ARC) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  7. CX-007864: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Broward County SOLAR Project CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): Florida Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  8. CX-010514: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Center for Nanoscale Energy CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/24/2013 Location(s): North Dakota Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  9. CX-100596 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (MCLBA), GA - Biomass Steam Turbine Generator Award Number: DE-EE0007461 CX(s) ... Command (MCICOM) in support of the proposed Biomass Steam Turbine Generator project. ...

  10. CX-014374: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Underwood Tap Structure Relocation CX(s) Applied: B4.13Date: 12/01/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-012640: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lexington-Longview #1 Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41865 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  12. CX-011065: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 08/29/2013 Location(s): Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-011788: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    I-75 Green Corridor Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 02/10/2014 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-007497: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Clean Energy Coalition - Michigan Green Fleets CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 12/06/2011 Location(s): Michigan Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  15. CX-010938: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 09/17/2013 Location(s): Kansas, Kansas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. CX-011271: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Idaho Petroleum Reduction Leadership Project CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 09/30/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  17. CX-010756: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar Utility Network Deployment Acceleration CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 08/15/2013 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  18. CX-011102: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    American Solar Transformation Initiative CX(s) Applied: A11 Date: 08/09/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  19. CX-013721: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar Vacuum Furnace CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 04/28/2015 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. CX-013432: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Process Demonstration Unit Support Structure CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 02/04/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  1. CX-014376: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ross Complex Road Project CX(s) Applied: B1.32Date: 11/12/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  2. CX-014404: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Microgrid Research Laboratory Remodel CX(s) Applied: B1.31Date: 11/30/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  3. CX-014005: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    INL Helicopter Training CX(s) Applied: B1.2Date: 07/22/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  4. CX-012498: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Light Extraction Structure for OLED Lighting CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41852 Location(s): MarylandOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  5. CX-009797: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eni USA Gas Marketing, LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.7 Date: 02/06/2013 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Fossil Energy

  6. CX-013534: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    ENI USA Gas Marketing, LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.7Date: 04/14/2015 Location(s): Multiple LocationsOffices(s): Fossil Energy

  7. CX-010338: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eugene Substation Fiber Interconnection CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 05/21/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. CX-006681: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Drilling Location in Section 29CX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 12/23/2009Location(s): Casper, WyomingOffice(s): RMOTC

  9. CX-011634: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Closure Turf Installation CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 08/27/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Pantex Site Office

  10. CX-008700: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Natapoc Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 06/12/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-010091: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Power Line Configuration 2013-1 CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 04/15/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  12. CX-011642: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pantex Lake Land Utilization CX(s) Applied: B1.11 Date: 11/05/2013 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Pantex Site Office

  13. CX-013605: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electrochemistry Corrosion Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/05/2015Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  14. CX-012658: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chief Joseph and Custer Substations Security Fence Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.11Date: 41843 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-007650: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Control Room Consolidation CX(s) Applied: B2.2 Date: 12/29/2011 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  16. CX-001856: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Exclusion Determination Rural Cooperative Geothermal Development Electric and Agriculture CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04282010 Location(s): Paisley, Oregon Office(s): Energy...

  17. CX-010532: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Various Demolition Jobs CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 06/07/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): Fermi Site Office

  18. CX-012317: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    High Performance Computing Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 06/16/2014 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  19. CX-012708: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex Training Trailer CX(s) Applied: B1.15Date: 41844 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  20. CX-003608: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    CX-003608: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sustainable Algal Energy Production and Environmental Remediation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08252010 Location(s): Virginia ...

  1. CX-008926: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Texas Alternative Fuel Vehicle Pilot Program CX(s) Applied: A1 Date: 08/24/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. CX-008545: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar Energy Evolution and Diffusion Studies CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06/19/2012 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  3. CX-011822: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Light Willow Demonstration CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/09/2014 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  4. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Golden Field Office | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Categorical Exclusion Determination U.S. Department of Energy Collegiate Entrepreneurship Prize Award Number: TBD FOA CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 12222014 Location(s): CO...

  5. CX-012656: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Bend Communication Site Engine Generator Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41848 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. CX-006520: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    CX-006520: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Energy Density Distributed Hydrostatic Direct Drive for Large Wind Turbine and Marine Hydro-Kinetic Device Applications CX(s) ...

  7. CX-012278: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Building 36 Use Permit CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 06/23/2014 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. CX-012434: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low Cost Titanium Casting Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41878 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  9. CX-010155: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Augspurger Radio Tower Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 04/03/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  10. CX-008683: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shaniko Radio Station Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 07/11/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-011190: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alberton Communication Site Construction CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 08/26/2013 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  12. CX-012790: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Haystack Butte Radio Site Land Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.24Date: 41939 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. CX-012495: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building 6 Stack Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41855 Location(s): West VirginiaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-012798: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Davis Creek Tap Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41915 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-007549: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Harrisonville - Waste Water Treatment Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  16. CX-013332: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Magnesium Chloride Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/15/2014 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  17. CX-007522: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Crane Removal Project CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 12/15/2011 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  18. CX-009028: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wisconsin Biodiesel Blending Program CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 08/22/2012 Location(s): Wisconsin Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  19. CX-008250: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geotechnical Core Drilling for USGS 138 CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04/18/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  20. CX-012632: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    LURR 20140456 - Salmon Creek Avenue Pathway Project CX(s) Applied: B4.9Date: 41885 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  1. CX-011625: Categorical Exclusion Determinationc

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    9103 Second Floor Refurbishment CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/05/2013 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  2. CX-007856: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sacramento Regional Energy Alliance CX(s) Applied: B5.23 Date: 01/27/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  3. CX-011992: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carib Energy (USA) LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.7 Date: 05/30/2014 Location(s): Nationwide Offices(s): Fossil Energy

  4. CX-012666: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carib Energy (USA) LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.7Date: 05/30//2014 Location(s): FloridaOffices(s): Fossil Energy

  5. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A9 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers

    ... September 9, 2016 CX-100743 Categorical Exclusion Determination Biomass Gasification for Chemicals Production Using Chemical Looping Techniques Award Number: DE-EE0007530 CX(s) ...

  6. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Ohio | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    September 9, 2016 CX-100743 Categorical Exclusion Determination Biomass Gasification for Chemicals Production Using Chemical Looping Techniques Award Number: DE-EE0007530 CX(s) ...

  7. CX-010590: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kalispell Shunt Cap Addition Project CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 07/01/2013 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. CX-012637: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    LURR 20140521 - David King - Sewer Line Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.9Date: 41876 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  9. CX-007792: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Gore Substation Safety Lighting CX(s) Applied: B2.3 Date: 09/01/2011 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): Southwestern Power Administration

  10. CX-014375: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Cinder Cones Property Acquisition Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25Date: 11/23/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-013353: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Motor Silencer Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.21Date: 12/02/2014 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  12. CX-013428: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sempra LNG Marketing, LLC CX(s) Applied: B5.7Date: 01/23/2015 Location(s): LouisianaOffices(s): Fossil Energy

  13. CX-013780: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Troy Substation Tap Yard Expansion CX(s) Applied: B4.11Date: 07/14/2015 Location(s): MontanaOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. CX-009711: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tucannon River Substation Expansion Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 11/01/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-010148: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Merritt Radio Station Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 04/18/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. CX-013345: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plant Accumulators Study CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 12/08/2014 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  17. CX-012482: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mid-Atlantic Regional Infrastructure Development Project CX(s) Applied: B5.22Date: 41862 Location(s): MarylandOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. CX-013604: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Corrosion Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/05/2015 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  19. CX-012641: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mossy Rock-Chehalis #1 Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41865 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  20. CX-008234: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Whole Energy Glycerin Refinery CX(s) Applied: B5.15 Date: 04/20/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  1. CX-009543: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sopogy Subcontract CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.15 Date: 11/28/2012 Location(s): Hawaii Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  2. CX-009753: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Propane Corridor Development Program CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 12/06/2012 Location(s): Georgia Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  3. CX-011535: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    East Grangeville Substation Sale CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 11/14/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. CX-012233: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Shed Acquisition at Kalispell Substation CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 06/09/2014 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  5. CX-010157: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fairmount Substation Equipment Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.24 Date: 03/27/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. CX-012570: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Install Elevated Fire Water Storage Tank CX(s) Applied: B2.5Date: 41862 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  7. CX-012706: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Radiochemistry Laboratory (RCL) Supply Intake Filter Housing CX(s) Applied: B2.5Date: 41858 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Nuclear Energy

  8. CX-010113: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Compression Stress Relaxometer CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/28/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  9. CX-012472: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Technology Integration Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.11Date: 41873 Location(s): OhioOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-012791: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Grizzly Captain Jack Transmission Line Access Road Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.24Date: 41935 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-012776: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Catalyst Processing, KCP14-05 CX(s) Applied: NOT NOTEDDate: 41857 Location(s): MissouriOffices(s): Kansas City Site Office

  12. CX-014616: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biogasification CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 01/12/2016 Location(s): West VirginiaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. CX-009203: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ross Maintenance Headquarters Project CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 09/19/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  14. CX-011686: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ross Communication Tower Fiber Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 01/15/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-009198: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ross Transformer Oil Terminal Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 09/24/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. CX-012808: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    LURR 20140504 Ross Substation Comcast Fiber Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.9Date: 41906 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. CX-007844: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Retrofits CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 12/01/2011 Location(s): Rhode Island Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  18. CX-001198: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    98: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001198: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: 1010 Avenue of the Arts - New School and Performing Arts Theater CX(s) Applied: ...

  19. CX-013565: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    65: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-013565: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Methods for Radiochemical Measurements CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04162015 ...

  20. CX-012557: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    557: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-012557: Categorical Exclusion Determination Electrodepositon of Molybdenum, NickelMolybdenum alloy, Cesium, and Strontium CX(s) Applied: ...

  1. CX-014082: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    4082: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-014082: Categorical Exclusion Determination Understanding Transient Combustion Phenomena in Low-NOx Gas Turbines CX(s) Applied: A9, ...

  2. CX-001199: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    9: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001199: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tennessee Energy Efficient Schools Initiative Ground Source Heat Pump Program CX(s) Applied: ...

  3. CX-000703: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    03: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000703: Categorical Exclusion Determination Maryland - Clean Energy Economic Development Initiative (CEEDI) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, ...

  4. CX-010117: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    10117: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010117: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analytical Methods for Radiochemical Measurements CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03282013 ...

  5. CX-004024: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    24: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004024: Categorical Exclusion Determination Backside Contact Multijunction Solar Cells for High Concentration Applications CX(s) Applied: ...

  6. CX-100275 Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    75 Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-100275 Categorical Exclusion Determination High Performance Building Envelope Assemblies Award Number: DE- EE0007054, 7059, 7060 CX(s) ...

  7. CX-007550: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kearney - Waste Water Treatment Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/10/2012 Location(s): Missouri Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  8. CX-012788: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Bio-Aviation Fuel LCA with GREET CX(s) Applied: B5.15Date: 41906 Location(s): IllinoisOffices(s): Argonne Site Office

  9. CX-012474: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Refractories/Ceramics Project CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41870 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  10. CX-012730: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace West Hackberry Radio Tower CX(s) Applied: B1.19Date: 41880 Location(s): LouisianaOffices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  11. CX-012531: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Distributed Wireless Antenna Sensors for Boiler Condition CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41836 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. CX-013309: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Burns Communication Site Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 01/13/2015 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. CX-012539: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Distributed Wireless Antenna Sensors for Boiler Condition CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41836 Location(s): TexasOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  14. CX-008797: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Coal Pile Basin Project CX(s) Applied: B1.29 Date: 06/04/2012 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office

  15. CX-010742: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Integrated Simulation Development and Decision Support CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/15/2013 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  16. CX-008146: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Formation Evaluator Tools (Haliburton) CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 09/11/2011 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): RMOTC

  17. CX-012563: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Roof repairs at 735-A CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41870 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  18. CX-011679: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Antifoam Degradation Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/05/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  19. CX-008556: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Haiti Renewable Resource Study CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Haiti Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  20. CX-010433: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Memaloose Meadows Land Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 06/04/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration