National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for gross power potential

  1. Floating Offshore Wind in California: Gross Potential for Jobs...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Floating Offshore Wind in California: Gross Potential for Jobs and Economic Impacts from ... April 2016 Floating Offshore Wind in California: Gross Potential for Jobs ...

  2. Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five Methane Reduction Scenarios Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five Methane Reduction Scenarios ...

  3. Soliton solutions of the 3D Gross-Pitaevskii equation by a potential control method

    SciTech Connect

    Fedele, R.; Eliasson, B.; Shukla, P. K.; Haas, F.; Jovanovic, D.; De Nicola, S.

    2010-12-14

    We present a class of three-dimensional solitary waves solutions of the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation, which governs the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). By imposing an external controlling potential, a desired time-dependent shape of the localized BEC excitation is obtained. The stability of some obtained localized solutions is checked by solving the time-dependent GP equation numerically with analytic solutions as initial conditions. The analytic solutions can be used to design external potentials to control the localized BECs in experiment.

  4. High Power Laser Innovation Sparks Geothermal Power Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    High Power Laser Innovation Sparks Geothermal Power Potential High Power Laser Innovation Sparks Geothermal Power Potential May 29, 2015 - 11:02am Addthis The Energy Department's ...

  5. Samantha Gross

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Samantha Gross is the Director for International Climate and Clean Energy at the Office of International Affairs in the U.S. Department of Energy. She directs U.S. activities under the Clean Energy...

  6. Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five Methane Reduction Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, David; Warner, Ethan; Curley, Christina

    2015-04-23

    Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas that is released from the natural gas supply chain into the atmosphere as a result of fugitive emissions1 and venting2 . We assess five potential CH4 reduction scenarios from transmission, storage, and distribution (TS&D) using published literature on the costs and the estimated quantity of CH4 reduced. We utilize cost and methane inventory data from ICF (2014) and Warner et al. (forthcoming) as well as data from Barrett and McCulloch (2014) and the American Gas Association (AGA) (2013) to estimate that the implementation of these measures could support approximately 85,000 jobs annually from 2015 to 2019 and reduce CH4 emissions from natural gas TS&D by over 40%. Based on standard input/output analysis methodology, measures are estimated to support over $8 billion in GDP annually over the same time period and allow producers to recover approximately $912 million annually in captured gas.

  7. Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five Methane Reduction Scenarios

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This study assessed five potential methane reduction scenarios from natural gas transmission, storage, and distribution (TS&D) infrastructure using published literature on the costs and the estimated quantity of methane reduced. The results show that implementation of these five measures could support approximately 85,000 jobs annually from 2015 to 2019 and reduce CH4 emissions from natural gas TS&D by over 40%. Based on standard input/output analysis methodology, measures are estimated to support over $8 billion in GDP annually over the same time period and allow producers to recover approximately $912 million annually in captured gas. Mitigation of methane emission reductions through repair, replacement and new technologies are found to support economic development and jobs. The study also found that a portfolio approach to infrastructure modernization may be appropriate to meaningfully improve safety, maintain or create high levels of employment, and significant losses of methane from across TS&D segments of natural gas systems.

  8. The potential economic impact of constructing and operating solar power generation facilities in Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Schwer, R. K.; Riddel, M.

    2004-02-01

    Nevada has a vast potential for electricity generation using solar power. An examination of the stock of renewable resources in Nevada proves that the state has the potential to be a leader in renewable-electric generation--one of the best in the world. This study provides estimates on the economic impact in terms of employment, personal income, and gross state product (GSP) of developing a portion of Nevada's solar energy generation resources.

  9. Fixed conditions for achieving the real-valued partition function of one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation coupled with time-dependent potential

    SciTech Connect

    Prayitno, T. B.

    2014-03-24

    We have imposed the conditions in order to preserve the real-valued partition function in the case of onedimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation coupled by time-dependent potential. In this case we have solved the Gross-Pitaevskii equation by means of the time-dependent perturbation theory by extending the previous work of Kivshar et al. [Phys. Lett A 278, 225–230 (2001)]. To use the method, we have treated the equation as the macroscopic quantum oscillator and found that the expression of the partition function explicitly has complex values. In fact, we have to choose not only the appropriate functions but also the suitable several values of the potential to keep the real-valued partition function.

  10. Combined Heat and Power Market Potential for Opportunity Fuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Combined Heat and Power Market Potential for Opportunity Fuels, August 2004 Combined Heat and Power Market Potential for Opportunity Fuels, August 2004 The purpose of this 2004...

  11. Mapping the Frontier of New Wind Power Potential | Department...

    Energy Saver

    the Frontier of New Wind Power Potential Mapping the Frontier of New Wind Power Potential December 10, 2014 - 6:03pm Addthis This map shows wind potential capacity for turbine hub ...

  12. Wind Concurrent Cooling Could Increase Power Transmission Potential...

    Energy Saver

    Concurrent Cooling Could Increase Power Transmission Potential by as Much as 40% Wind ... In areas where wind farms are being developed, there is potential to take advantage of ...

  13. Solar Power Potential in SE New Mexico

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Power International 2016 Solar Power International 2016 Solar Power International 2016 Welcome to the SunShot Initiative's hub for Solar Power International 2016. SunShot made some exciting announcements in conjunction with the conference, including new awards that drive breakthroughs in photovoltaic research and development, while developing the software and hardware solutions that will enable a high deployment solar future. SunShot also announced its intent to issue three new funding

  14. High Power Laser Innovation Sparks Geothermal Power Potential

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department is backing a new patented technology that uses high power lasers to maximize heat recovery for geothermal energy production.

  15. Combined Heat and Power Market Potential for Opportunity Fuels...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    for distributed energy resources and combined heat and power (DERCHP) applications, examine the DERCHP technologies that can use them, and assess the potential market impacts ...

  16. COLLOQUIUM: The Power of Neuroplasticity: Enhancing Human Potential...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    COLLOQUIUM: The Power of Neuroplasticity: Enhancing Human Potential Dr. Paula Tallal ... designed based on research findings from human and animal research and translated into ...

  17. Wind Concurrent Cooling Could Increase Power Transmission Potential by as

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Much as 40% | Department of Energy Concurrent Cooling Could Increase Power Transmission Potential by as Much as 40% Wind Concurrent Cooling Could Increase Power Transmission Potential by as Much as 40% May 18, 2015 - 5:40pm Addthis Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) are working with industry to model wind's cooling effects on power transmission lines to dynamically couple transmission systems with concurrent cooling processes. In areas

  18. Concentrating Solar Power Facilities and Solar Potential | Department...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Concentrating Solar Power Facilities and CSP Energy Potential Gradient Click icons to filter by CSP Plant Type All Plants In Operation New in 2014 In Progress Tower and Heliostat ...

  19. EERE Webinar: The Economic Potential of Renewable Power

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please join the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy for a webinar discussing their recent report analyzing the economic potential of renewable power in the United States. Estimating...

  20. DOE Explores Potential of Wind Power to Stabilize Electric Grids |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Explores Potential of Wind Power to Stabilize Electric Grids DOE Explores Potential of Wind Power to Stabilize Electric Grids March 28, 2016 - 10:31am Addthis DOE’s 1.5-MW wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center is being used to demonstrate that wind farms can provide the frequency-responsive back-up or “ancillary services” currently supplied to the electrical grid by conventional power plants. (Photo by Dennis Schroeder/National Renewable

  1. What is Gross Up?

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Gross up on relocation refers to money that is added to your pay to offset the federal and state tax deducted from the relocation reimbursement amount. You do not see the money in ...

  2. Combined Heat and Power Market Potential for Opportunity Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, David; Lemar, Paul

    2015-12-01

    This report estimates the potential for opportunity fuel combined heat and power (CHP) applications in the United States, and provides estimates for the technical and economic market potential compared to those included in an earlier report. An opportunity fuel is any type of fuel that is not widely used when compared to traditional fossil fuels. Opportunity fuels primarily consist of biomass fuels, industrial waste products and fossil fuel derivatives. These fuels have the potential to be an economically viable source of power generation in various CHP applications.

  3. NREL: POWER-UP: Potential of Widespread Electrification for Reducing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Unwanted Pollution POWER-UP: Potential of Widespread Electrification for Reducing Unwanted Pollution Through the POWER-UP study, NREL is leading a research team to explore a pathway toward deep decarbonization through mass electrification of the entire U.S. energy system. The study will identify the investments in zero-carbon generation sources-including renewables and nuclear-needed to support an electrified economy and the implications for emissions, consumers, and electric system

  4. Energy Department Releases Report, Evaluates Potential for Wind Power in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    All 50 States | Department of Energy Releases Report, Evaluates Potential for Wind Power in All 50 States Energy Department Releases Report, Evaluates Potential for Wind Power in All 50 States May 19, 2015 - 11:38am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 DOENews@hq.doe.gov Larger turbines will open up an additional one-fifth of the land area of the United States WASHINGTON, D.C. - In support of the President's all-of-the above energy strategy, Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz today announced

  5. Remote sensing for wind power potential: a prospector's handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, J.E.; Maule, P.A.; Bodvarsson, G.; Rosenfeld, C.L.; Woolley, S.G.; McClenahan, M.R.

    1983-02-01

    Remote sensing can aid in identifying and locating indicators of wind power potential from the terrestrial, marine, and atmospheric environments (i.e.: wind-deformed trees, white caps, and areas of thermal flux). It is not considered as a tool for determining wind power potential. A wide variety of remotely sensed evidence is described in terms of the scale at which evidence of wind power can be identified, and the appropriate remote sensors for finding such evidence. Remote sensing can be used for regional area prospecting using small-scale imagery. The information from such small-scale imagery is most often qualitative, and if it is transitory, examination of a number of images to verify presistence of the feature may be required. However, this evidence will allow rapid screening of a large area. Medium-scale imagery provides a better picture of the evidence obtained from small-scale imagery. At this level it is best to use existing imagery. Criteria relating to land use, accessibility, and proximity of candidate sites to nearby transmission lines can also be effectively evaluated from medium-scale imagery. Large-scale imagery provides the most quantitative evidence of the strength of wind. Wind-deformed trees can be identified at a large number of sites using only a few hours in locally chartered aircraft. A handheld 35mm camera can adequately document any evidence of wind. Three case studies that employ remote sensing prospecting techniques are described. Based on remotely sensed evidence, the wind power potential in three geographically and climatically diverse areas of the United States is estimated, and the estimates are compared to actual wind data in those regions. In addition, the cost of each survey is discussed. The results indicate that remote sensing for wind power potential is a quick, cost effective, and fairly reliable method for screening large areas for wind power potential.

  6. U.S. Hydropower Potential from Existing Non-powered Dams | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy U.S. Hydropower Potential from Existing Non-powered Dams U.S. Hydropower Potential from Existing Non-powered Dams U.S. Hydropower Potential from Existing Non-powered Dams

  7. Michael Gross | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Michael Gross Michael Gross Michael Gross Principal Investigator E-mail: mgross@wustl.edu Phone: (314) 935-4814 Website: Washington University in St. Louis Principal Investigator...

  8. Plasma potential mapping of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Albert; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Sanders, Jason M.; Anders, Andre

    2011-12-20

    Pulsed emissive probe techniques have been used to determine the plasma potential distribution of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges. An unbalanced magnetron with a niobium target in argon was investigated for pulse length of 100 ?s at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz, giving a peak current of 170 A. The probe data were taken with a time resolution of 20 ns and a spatial resolution of 1 mm. It is shown that the local plasma potential varies greatly in space and time. The lowest potential was found over the targets racetrack, gradually reaching anode potential (ground) several centimeters away from the target. The magnetic pre-sheath exhibits a funnel-shaped plasma potential resulting in an electric field which accelerates ions toward the racetrack. In certain regions and times, the potential exhibits weak local maxima which allow for ion acceleration to the substrate. Knowledge of the local E and static B fields lets us derive the electrons EB drift velocity, which is about 105 m/s and shows structures in space and time.

  9. New Analysis Shows National Potential for Solar Power in Low-Income

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Communities | Department of Energy Analysis Shows National Potential for Solar Power in Low-Income Communities New Analysis Shows National Potential for Solar Power in Low-Income Communities November 18, 2016 - 11:45am Addthis New Analysis Shows National Potential for Solar Power in Low-Income Communities New Analysis Shows National Potential for Solar Power in Low-Income Communities New Analysis Shows National Potential for Solar Power in Low-Income Communities New Analysis Shows National

  10. EERE Success Story-Mapping the Frontier of New Wind Power Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Frontier of New Wind Power Potential EERE Success Story-Mapping the Frontier of New Wind Power Potential February 18, 2015 - 11:40am Addthis This map shows wind potential capacity ...

  11. Modeling The Potential For Thermal Concentrating Solar Power Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.; Kyle, G. Page; Stackhouse, Jr., Paul W.

    2010-10-25

    In this paper we explore the tradeoffs between thermal storage capacity, cost, and other system parameters in order to examine possible evolutionary pathways for thermal Concen-trating Solar Power (CSP) technologies. A representation of CSP performance that is suit-able for incorporation into economic modeling tools is developed. We find that, as the fraction of electricity supplied by CSP technologies grows, the application of thermal CSP technologies might progress from current hybrid plants, to plants with a modest amount of thermal storage, and potentially even to plants with sufficient thermal storage to provide base load generation capacity. The representation of CSP cost and performance developed here was implemented in the ObjECTS MiniCAM long-term integrated assessment model. Datasets for global solar resource characteristics as applied to CSP technology were also developed. The regional and global potential of thermal CSP technologies is examined.

  12. The Power and Potential of Geothermal Energy | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    which is equivalent to 16 large nuclear power plants or dozens of coal fired power plants. ... a 79 million loan guarantee for the Blue Mountain power plant in northeastern Nevada. ...

  13. DOE Report Evaluates Potential for Wind Power in All 50 States...

    Energy Saver

    Report Evaluates Potential for Wind Power in All 50 States DOE Report Evaluates Potential for Wind Power in All 50 States September 16, 2015 - 11:41am Addthis A screenshot of the ...

  14. Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Utilizing a 1...

  15. The Market and Technical Potential for Combined Heat and Power in the Industrial Sector, January 2000

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Report of an analysis of the market and technical potential for combined heat and power in the industrial sector

  16. Mashreq Arab interconnected power system potential for economic energy trading

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shehri, A.M.; El-Amin, I.M.; Opoku, G.; Al-Baiyat, S.A.; Zedan, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    The Mashreq Arab countries covered in this study are Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, the United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. A feasibility study for the interconnection of the electrical networks of the Mashreq Arab countries, sponsored by the Arab Fund, was completed in June 1992. Each country is served by one utility except Saudi Arabia, which is served by four major utilities and some smaller utilities serving remote towns and small load centers. The major utilities are the Saudi consolidated electric Company in the Eastern Province (SCECO East), SCECO Center, SCECO West, and SCECO South. These are the ones considered in this study. The Mashreq Arab region has a considerable mix of energy resources. Egypt and Syria have some limited amounts of hydropower resources, and the Arabian Gulf region is abundant in fossil fuel reserves. Owing to the differences in energy production costs, a potential exists for substantial energy trading between electric utilities in the region. The major objective of this project is to study the feasibility of electric energy trading between the Mashreq Arab countries. The basis, assumptions, and methodologies on which this energy trading study is based relate to the results and conclusions arising out of the previous study, power plant characteristics and costs, assumptions on economic parameters, rules for economy energy exchange, etc. This paper presents the basis, methodology, and major findings of the study.

  17. The Market and Technical Potential for Combined Heat and Power...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    or combined heat and power (CHP) in the industrial market. As part of this effort, OSEC has characterized typical technologies used in industrial CHP, analyzed existing CHP ...

  18. The Market and Technical Potential for Combined Heat and Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and power (CHP) in the commercialinstitutional market. As part of this effort, in this report, OSEC has characterized typical technologies used in commercial CHP, analyzed ...

  19. Fuel Savings Potential from Future In-motion Wireless Power Transfer...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Savings Potential from Future In-motion Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) E. Burton, L. ... charge or direct power to the motor o Charging efficiencies at high speed o Metrics ...

  20. An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjerioua, Boualem

    2012-04-01

    This document provides results from a nation-scale analysis to determine the potential capacity and generation available from adding power production capability to U.S. non-powered dams.

  1. EERE Success Story-Mapping the Frontier of New Wind Power Potential |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Frontier of New Wind Power Potential EERE Success Story-Mapping the Frontier of New Wind Power Potential February 18, 2015 - 11:40am Addthis This map shows wind potential capacity for turbine hub heights at 140 meters. This map shows wind potential capacity for turbine hub heights at 140 meters. Partnered with AWS Truepower, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Energy Department's Wind Program released maps in December 2014 that highlight the potential for

  2. An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States- The United States has produced clean, renewable electricity from hydropower for more than 100 years, but hydropower producing facilities represent only a fraction of the infrastructure development that has taken place on the nation's waterways.

  3. The market and technical potential for combined heat and power in the commercial/institutional sector

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2000-01-01

    Report of an analysis to determine the potential for cogeneration or combined heat and power (CHP) in the commercial/institutional market.

  4. Potential power sources for high-temperature geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.; Dobranich, D

    1996-05-01

    The thermal response under geothermal-borehole conditions of a conventional thermal battery was evaluated for various designs by numerical simulations using a finite-element thermal model. This technology, which is based on molten salts, may be suitable as a power source for geothermal borehole applications for data logging. Several promising candidate electrolytes were identified for further study.

  5. Mapping the Frontier of New Wind Power Potential

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partnered with AWS Truepower, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Energy Departments Wind Program released maps in December 2014 that highlight the potential for wind energy...

  6. Solar-Augment Potential of U.S. Fossil-Fired Power Plants

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar-Augment Potential of U.S. Fossil-Fired Power Plants Craig Turchi and Nicholas Langle ... DE-AC36-08GO28308 Solar-Augment Potential of U.S. Fossil-Fired Power Plants Craig Turchi ...

  7. The Future Potential of Waver Power in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Mirko Previsic; Jeff Epler; Maureen Hand; Donna Heimiller; Walter Short; Kelly Eurek

    2012-09-20

    The theoretical ocean wave energy resource potential exceeds 50% of the annual domestic energy demand of the United States, is located close to coastal population centers, and, although variable in nature, may be more consistent and predictable than some other renewable generation technologies. As a renewable electricity generation technology, ocean wave energy offers a low air pollutant option for diversifying the U.S. electricity generation portfolio. Furthermore, the output characteristics of these technologies may complement other renewable technologies. This study addresses the following: (1) The theoretical, technical and practical potential for electricity generation from wave energy (2) The present lifecycle cost profile (Capex, Opex, and Cost of Electricity) of wave energy conversion technology at a reference site in Northern California at different plant scales (3) Cost of electricity variations as a function of deployment site, considering technical, geo-spatial and and electric grid constraints (4) Technology cost reduction pathways (5) Cost reduction targets at which the technology will see significant deployment within US markets, explored through a series of deployment scenarios RE Vision Consulting, LLC (RE Vision), engaged in various analyses to establish current and future cost profiles for marine hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, quantified the theoretical, technical and practical resource potential, performed electricity market assessments and developed deployment scenarios. RE Vision was supported in this effort by NREL analysts, who compiled resource information, performed analysis using the ReEDSa model to develop deployment scenarios, and developed a simplified assessment of the Alaska and Hawaii electricity markets.

  8. Lunar dust transport and potential interactions with power system components

    SciTech Connect

    Katzan, C.M.; Edwards, J.L.

    1991-11-01

    The lunar surface is covered by a thick blanket of fine dust. This dust may be readily suspended from the surface and transported by a variety of mechanisms. As a consequence, lunar dust can accumulate on sensitive power components, such as photovoltaic arrays and radiator surfaces, reducing their performance. In addition to natural mechanisms, human activities on the Moon will disturb significant amounts of lunar dust. Of all the mechanisms identified, the most serious is rocket launch and landing. The return of components from the Surveyor III provided a rare opportunity to observe the effects of the nearby landing of the Apollo 12 lunar module. The evidence proved that significant dust accumulation occurred on the Surveyor at a distance of 155 m. From available information on particle suspension and transport mechanisms, a series of models was developed to predict dust accumulation as a function of distance from the lunar module. The accumulation distribution was extrapolated to a future lunar lander scenario. These models indicate that accumulation is expected to be substantial even as far as 2 km from the landing site. Estimates of the performance penalties associated with lunar dust coverage on radiators and photovoltaic arrays are presented. Because of the lunar dust adhesive and cohesive properties, the most practical dust defensive strategy appears to be the protection of sensitive components from the arrival of lunar dust by location, orientation, or barriers.

  9. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9010WV2" "Date","West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ...

  10. ,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...2016 10:10:10 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9010NY2" "Date","New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ...

  11. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...2016 10:10:09 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9010NM2" "Date","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ...

  12. Combined Heat and Power Market Potential for Opportunity Fuels, August 2004

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy Power Market Potential for Opportunity Fuels, August 2004 Combined Heat and Power Market Potential for Opportunity Fuels, August 2004 The purpose of this 2004 report was to determine the best opportunity fuel(s) for distributed energy resources and combined heat and power (DER/CHP) applications, examine the DER/CHP technologies that can use them, and assess the potential market impacts of opportunity fueled DER/CHP applications. chp_opportunityfuels.pdf (2.56 MB) More

  13. Power market analysis and potential revenues of new transmission lines in a deregulated environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Koritarov, V. S.; Veselka, T. D.; Trouille, B.

    2002-05-15

    This paper describes an approach that was developed to analyze the market potential for power transactions via proposed transmission lines among the electric power utilities of Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Albania. The approach uses an integrated modeling framework consisting of several computer models that estimate the financial and economic benefits of constructing new transmission lines. The integrated model simulates open power markets under several scenarios that include cases with and without the proposed interconnections. The approach estimates power transactions among the three Balkan utility systems and the benefits of coordinated or joint system operations, including short-term power sales agreements.

  14. Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  15. US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  16. Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  17. Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Gross ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  18. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  19. Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Gross ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  20. US--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) US--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  1. Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  2. Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Gross ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  3. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and ...

  4. New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells New Mexico Natural Gas Gross ...

  5. Webinar: Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production and Concentrating Solar Power: A Systems Analysis

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production and Concentrating Solar Power: A Systems Analysis" on Thursday, January 21, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST).

  6. Potential Role of Concentrating Solar Power in Enabling High Renewables Scenarios in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Mai, T.; Margolis, R.; Brinkman, G.; Drury, E.; Mowers, M.; Turchi, C.

    2012-10-01

    This work describes the analysis of concentrating solar power (CSP) in two studies -- The SunShot Vision Study and the Renewable Electricity Futures Study -- and the potential role of CSP in a future energy mix.

  7. Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production and Concentrating Solar Power: A Systems Analysis Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production and Concentrating Solar Power: A Systems Analysis" held on January 21, 2016.

  8. Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential January 3, 2014 - 9:05am Addthis John Fox, CEO of Electratherm, with Tim Reinhardt, Low-Temperature and Coproduced Technology Manager for the Department of Energy, join Joel Murphy, general manager of the Florida Canyon Mine for Jipangu International. The mine's byproduct of geothermal brine allows for an additional revenue stream from existing infrastructure. John Fox, CEO of

  9. Savings Potential of ENERGY STAR(R) External Power Adapters andBattery Chargers

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Carrie; Korn, David; Sanchez, Marla

    2007-02-28

    External power adapters may lose 10 to 70 percent of theenergy they consume, dissipated as heat rather than converted into usefulenergy. Battery charging systems have more avenues for losses: inaddition to power conversion losses, power is consumed by the chargingcircuitry, and additional power may be needed after the battery is fullcharged to balance self-discharge. In 2005, the Environmental ProtectionAgency launched a new ENERGY STAR(R) label for external power supplies(EPSs) that convert line-voltage AC electricity into low-voltage DCelectricity for certain electronic devices. The specification includedpower supplies for products with battery charging functions (e.g. laptopsand cell phones), but excluded others. In January 2006, a separatespecification was issued for battery charging systems contained primarilyin small household appliances and power tools. In addition to the ENERGYSTAR(R) label, the state of California will implement minimum energyperformance standards for EPSs in 2007, and similar standards for EPSsand battery chargers are in development at the national level.Many of theproducts covered by these policies use relatively little power and havemodest per-unit savings potential compared to conventional energyefficiency targets. But with an estimated 1.5 billion adapters and 230million battery charging systems in use in the United States, theaggregate savings potential is quite high. This paper presents estimatesof the savings potential for external power adapters and battery chargingsystems through 2025.

  10. Gross alpha analytical modifications that improve wastewater treatment compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, B.J.; Arndt, S.

    2007-07-01

    This paper will propose an improvement to the gross alpha measurement that will provide more accurate gross alpha determinations and thus allow for more efficient and cost-effective treatment of site wastewaters. To evaluate the influence of salts that may be present in wastewater samples from a potentially broad range of environmental conditions, two types of efficiency curves were developed, each using a thorium-230 (Th-230) standard spike. Two different aqueous salt solutions were evaluated, one using sodium chloride, and one using salts from tap water drawn from the Bergen County, New Jersey Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW). For each curve, 13 to 17 solutions were prepared, each with the same concentration of Th-230 spike, but differing in the total amount of salt in the range of 0 to 100 mg. The attenuation coefficients were evaluated for the two salt types by plotting the natural log of the counted efficiencies vs. the weight of the sample's dried residue retained on the planchet. The results show that the range of the slopes for each of the attenuation curves varied by approximately a factor of 2.5. In order to better ensure the accuracy of results, and thus verify compliance with the gross alpha wastewater effluent criterion, projects depending on gross alpha measurements of environmental waters and wastewaters should employ gross alpha efficiency curves prepared with salts that mimic, as closely as possible, the salt content of the aqueous environmental matrix. (authors)

  11. Study of the export potential of the Bolivian Power Sector. Final report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This study, conducted by Black & Veatch International, was conducted by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report shows the results of a review of export potential and to assess the ability of the Bolivian power sector to provide these exports economically and with financially viable projects. The study includes technical, economic, and financial analyses of export power stations alternatives. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) Executive Summary; (2) The Bolivian Power Sector; (3) Market Assessment for Brazil; (4) Market Assessment for Argentina; (5) Market Assessment for Export; (6) Market Assessment for Peru; (7) Project Selection; (8) Transmission Plans for Power Export; (9) Delivered Natural Gas Costs; (10) Power Plant Characteristics; (11) Economic Screening of Export Power Station Options; (12) Project Financing; (13) Conclusions and Recommendations.

  12. Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply

    SciTech Connect

    Appen, Jan von; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Momber, Ilan; Klapp, David; Scheven, Alexander von

    2011-05-01

    As power generation from variable distributed energy resources (DER) grows, energy flows in the network are changing, increasing the requirements for ancillary services, including voltage support. With the appropriate power converter, DER can provide ancillary services such as frequency control and voltage support. This paper outlines the economic potential of DERs coordinated in a microgrid to provide reactive power and voltage support at its point of common coupling. The DER Customer Adoption Model assesses the costs of providing reactive power, given local utility rules. Depending on the installed DER, the cost minimizing solution for supplying reactive power locally is chosen. Costs include the variable cost of the additional losses and the investment cost of appropriately over-sizing converters or purchasing capacitors. A case study of a large health care building in San Francisco is used to evaluate different revenue possibilities of creating an incentive for microgrids to provide reactive power.

  13. Power system impacts of potential changes in Glen Canyon power plant operations. Phase 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The Phase III report reflects several changes in assumptions and methodologies which augment the Phase II approach. The most significant changes from the Phase II, October 1993 report include the following: Inclusion of SO2 costs; Modeling of the Salt River Project transmission curtailment deterministically rather than probabilistically; Changes were made to the Combined Cycle and Combustion Turbine characteristics and costs; Inclusion of emissions for all interconnected systems. Inclusion of emissions for purchased power contracts; Only the winter/summer marketable capacity for the No Action and Modified Low Fluctuating Flow Dam Alternatives were modeled; Common fuel escalation rates were used in the extension periods; Corrections were made to the modeling of DSM programs and the market penetration of these programs was reevaluated; Two new sensitivity cases are included; 1995 as the Base Year and full replacement cost of capacity lost at Glen Canyon Dam.

  14. ,"Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  15. ,"Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  16. ,"Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  17. ,"Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  18. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  19. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  20. ,"Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  1. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  2. ,"California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  3. ,"Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","72016","01151991" ,"Release ...

  4. David J. Gross and the Strong Force

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from Cal Alum David Gross (PhD '66) Shares Nobel Prize in Physics, University of California Berkeley Resources with Additional Information Additional information about David ...

  5. ,"Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","62016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  6. ,"Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","62016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  7. ,"Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","62016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  8. ,"California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","62016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  9. ,"Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","62016","01151991" ,"Release ...

  10. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","62016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  11. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","62016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  12. ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","62016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  13. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","62016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  14. ,"Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","62016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  15. ,"Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","62016","01151991" ,"Release ...

  16. ,"Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","62016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  17. ,"Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","62016","01151991" ,"Release ...

  18. ,"Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","62016","01151989" ,"Release ...

  19. ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","62016","01151991" ,"Release ...

  20. David J. Gross and the Strong Force

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    published their proposal simultaneously with H. David Politzer, a graduate student at Harvard University who independently came up with the same idea. ... The discovery of Gross,...

  1. David J. Gross and the Strong Force

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    David J. Gross and the Strong Force Resources with Additional Information The 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to David Gross for "the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction". 'Gross, who obtained his PhD in physics in 1966, currently is a professor of physics and director of the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at UC Santa Barbara. ... David Gross Courtesy of UC Santa Barbara [When on the faculty at Princeton University,] he and

  2. NREL Confirms Large Potential for Grid Integration of Wind, Solar Power (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    To fully harvest the nation's bountiful wind and solar resources, it is critical to know how much electrical power from these renewable resources could be integrated reliably into the grid. To inform the discussion about the potential of such variable sources, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) launched two key regional studies, examining the east and west sections of the U.S. power grid. The studies show that it is technically possible for U.S. power systems to integrate 20%-35% renewable electricity if infrastructure and operational improvements can be made.

  3. Solar-Augment Potential of U.S. Fossil-Fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, C.; Langle, N.; Bedilion, R.; Libby, C.

    2011-02-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) systems utilize solar thermal energy for the generation of electric power. This attribute makes it relatively easy to integrate CSP systems with fossil-fired power plants. The 'solar-augment' of fossil power plants offers a lower cost and lower risk alternative to stand-alone solar plant construction. This study ranked the potential to add solar thermal energy to coal-fired and natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants found throughout 16 states in the southeast and southwest United States. Each generating unit was ranked in six categories to create an overall score ranging from Excellent to Not Considered. Separate analysis was performed for parabolic trough and power tower technologies due to the difference in the steam temperatures that each can generate. The study found a potential for over 11 GWe of parabolic trough and over 21 GWe of power tower capacity. Power towers offer more capacity and higher quality integration due to the greater steam temperatures that can be achieved. The best sites were in the sunny southwest, but all states had at least one site that ranked Good for augmentation.

  4. Geographic Variation in Potential of Rooftop Residential Photovoltaic Electric Power Production in the United States

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This paper describes a geographic evaluation of Zero Energy Home (ZEH) potential, specifically an assessment of residential roof-top solar electric photovoltaic (PV) performance around the United States and how energy produced would match up with very-efficient and super-efficient home designs. We performed annual simulations for 236 TMY2 data locations throughout the United States on two highly-efficient one-story 3-bedroom homes with a generic grid-tied solar electric 2kW PV system. These annual simulations show how potential annual solar electric power generation (kWh) and potential energy savings from PV power vary geographically around the U.S. giving the user in a specific region an indication of their expected PV system performance.

  5. An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States Report April 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program Budget Activity Number ED 19 07 04 2 Prepared by OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 Managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 Boualem Hadjerioua, Principal Investigator Yaxing Wei and Shih-Chieh Kao DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996,

  6. Hydroelectric power in Hawaii. A report on the statewide survey of potential hydroelectric sites

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, C. A.

    1981-02-01

    An assessment was made of the hydropower potential in Hawaii. The major conclusion of this study is that hydropower resources in the State of Hawaii are substantial, and they offer the potential for major increases in hydropower generating capacity. Hydropower resources on all islands total about 50 MW of potential generating capacity. Combined with the 18 MW of existing hydropower capacity, hydropower resources potentially could generate about 307 million kWh of electric energy annually. This represents about 28% of the present combined electricity needs of the Neighbor Islands, Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and the Big Island. Hydropower resources on Kauai equal 72% of that island's electricity needs; on Molokai, 40%, on the Big Island, 20%; and on Maui, 18%. The island of Oahu, however, has only small hydropower resources, and could only generate a negligible portion of its electricity needs from this energy source. A summary of existing and future (potential) hydropower capacities and estimated annual outputs for each island is presented. How much of the potential capacity is being actively considered for development and how much is only tentatively proposed at the time is indicated. The economics of hydropower at specific sites were analyzed. The major conclusion of this analysis is that hydropower development costs vary widely among the different sites, but that generally the cost of hydroelectric power is either less than or comparable to the cost of oil-fired power.

  7. The Market and Technical Potential for Combined Heat and Power in the Commercial/Institutional Sector, January 2000

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Report of an analysis to determine the potential for cogeneration or combined heat and power (CHP) in the commercial/institutional market.

  8. Preliminary Feasibility Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential for TVA's John Sevier and Kingston Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ellen D; Saulsbury, Bo

    2008-03-01

    This is a preliminary assessment of the potential for geologic carbon sequestration for the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) John Sevier and Kingston power plants. The purpose of this assessment is to make a 'first cut' determination of whether there is sufficient potential for geologic carbon sequestration within 200 miles of the plants for TVA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to proceed with a joint proposal for a larger project with a strong carbon management element. This assessment does not consider alternative technologies for carbon capture, but assumes the existence of a segregated CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration.

  9. Drifting potential humps in ionization zones: The propeller blades of high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andr; Ni, Pavel; Panjan, Matja; Joef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana ; Franz, Robert; Montanuniversitt Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, 8700 Leoben ; Andersson, Joakim; Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, 117543 Singapore

    2013-09-30

    Ion energy distribution functions measured for high power impulse magnetron sputtering show features, such as a broad peak at several 10 eV with an extended tail, as well as asymmetry with respect to EB, where E and B are the local electric and magnetic field vectors, respectively. Here it is proposed that those features are due to the formation of a potential hump of several 10 V in each of the traveling ionization zones. Potential hump formation is associated with a negative-positive-negative space charge that naturally forms in ionization zones driven by energetic drifting electrons.

  10. NREL Triples Previous Estimates of U.S. Wind Power Potential (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently released new estimates of the U.S. potential for wind-generated electricity, using advanced wind mapping and validation techniques to triple previous estimates of the size of the nation's wind resources. The new study, conducted by NREL and AWS TruePower, finds that the contiguous 48 states have the potential to generate up to 37 million gigawatt-hours annually. In comparison, the total U.S. electricity generation from all sources was roughly 4 million gigawatt-hours in 2009.

  11. Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production and Concentrating Solar Power: A Systems Analysis Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production and Concentrating Solar Power: A Systems Analysis U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office January 21st, 2016 Presenter: Scott Paap - Sandia National Laboratory DOE Host: Eric Miller - DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Question and Answer  Please type your questions into the question box 2 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary

  12. Potential Role of Concentrating Solar Power in Enabling High Renewables Scenarios in the United States

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential Role of Concentrating Solar Power in Enabling High Renewables Scenarios in the United States Paul Denholm, Maureen Hand, Trieu Mai, Robert Margolis, Greg Brinkman, Easan Drury, Matthew Mowers, and Craig Turchi Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-56294 October 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West

  13. New Release-- U.S. DOE Analysis: Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Technical Potential in the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The “Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Technical Potential in the United States” market analysis report provides data on the technical potential in industrial facilities and commercial buildings for ...

  14. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10072016 7:57:22 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" "Sourcekey","N9010AR2","N9011AR2","N9012AR2","NGME...

  15. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10072016 7:57:21 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" "Sourcekey","N9010AL2","N9011AL2","N9012AL2","NGME...

  16. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10072016 7:57:22 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" "Sourcekey","N9010AL2","N9011AL2","N9012AL2","NGME...

  17. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"08292016 11:11:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" "Sourcekey","N9010AR2","N9011AR2","N9012AR2","NGME...

  18. ,"Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"08292016 11:11:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" "Sourcekey","N9010AZ2","N9011AZ2","N9012AZ2","NGME...

  19. ,"Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"08292016 11:11:30 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" "Sourcekey","N9010AZ2","N9011AZ2","N9012AZ2","NGME...

  20. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"08292016 11:11:28 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" "Sourcekey","N9010AL2","N9011AL2","N9012AL2","NGME...

  1. ,"Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"4292016 6:48:19 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" "Sourcekey","N9010AK2","N9011AK2","N9012AK2","NGME...

  2. Direct Carbon Fuel Cells: Assessment of their Potential as Solid Carbon Fuel Based Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, R

    2004-04-23

    Small-scale experimental work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has confirmed that a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) containing a molten carbonate electrolyte completely reacts solid elemental carbon with atmospheric oxygen contained in ambient air at a temperature of 650-800 C. The efficiency of conversion of the chemical energy in the fuel to DC electricity is 75-80% and is a result of zero entropy change for this reaction and the fixed chemical potentials of C and CO{sub 2}. This is about twice as efficient as other forms power production processes that utilize solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal. These range from 30-40% for coal fired conventional subcritical or supercritical boilers to 38-42% for IGCC plants. A wide range of carbon-rich solids including activated carbons derived from natural gas, petroleum coke, raw coal, and deeply de-ashed coal have been evaluated with similar conversion results. The rate of electricity production has been shown to correlate with disorder in the carbon structure. This report provides a preliminary independent assessment of the economic potential of DCFC for competitive power generation. This assessment was conducted as part of a Director's Research Committee Review of DCFC held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on April 9, 2004. The key question that this assessment addresses is whether this technology, which appears to be very promising from a scientific standpoint, has the potential to be successfully scaled up to a system that can compete with currently available power generation systems that serve existing electricity markets. These markets span a wide spectrum in terms of the amount of power to be delivered and the competitive cost in that market. For example, DCFC technology can be used for the personal power market where the current competition for delivery of kilowatts of electricity is storage batteries, for the distributed generation market where the competition for on-site power

  3. Potential nanotechnology applications for reducing freshwater consumption at coal fired power plants : an early view.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.

    2010-09-17

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the overall research effort of the Existing Plants Research Program by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. A growing challenge to the economic production of electricity from coal-fired power plants is the demand for freshwater, particularly in light of the projected trends for increasing demands and decreasing supplies of freshwater. Nanotechnology uses the unique chemical, physical, and biological properties that are associated with materials at the nanoscale to create and use materials, devices, and systems with new functions and properties. It is possible that nanotechnology may open the door to a variety of potentially interesting ways to reduce freshwater consumption at power plants. This report provides an overview of how applications of nanotechnology could potentially help reduce freshwater use at coal-fired power plants. It was developed by (1) identifying areas within a coal-fired power plant's operations where freshwater use occurs and could possibly be reduced, (2) conducting a literature review to identify potential applications of nanotechnology for facilitating such reductions, and (3) collecting additional information on potential applications from researchers and companies to clarify or expand on information obtained from the literature. Opportunities, areas, and processes for reducing freshwater use in coal-fired power plants considered in this report include the use of nontraditional waters in process and cooling water systems, carbon capture alternatives, more efficient processes for removing sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, coolants that have higher thermal conductivities than water alone, energy storage options, and a variety of plant inefficiencies, which, if improved

  4. Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Release Date: 09302016 Next Release Date: 10312016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production ...

  5. ,"Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ...

  6. ,"Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ...

  7. ,"Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ... to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ...

  8. ,"Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ... to Contents","Data 1: Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ...

  9. ,"Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Federal Offshore--Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ...

  10. ,"Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ... to Contents","Data 1: Alabama--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ...

  11. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Release Date: 05312016 Next Release Date: 06302016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas ...

  12. Property:DailyOpWaterUseGross | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Property Name DailyOpWaterUseGross Property Type Number Description Daily Operation Water Use (afday) Gross. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:...

  13. ,"Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab ... for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and ...

  14. Power Transfer Potential to the Southeast in Response to a Renewable Portfolio Standard: Interim Report 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Stanton W; Key, Thomas S

    2009-03-01

    The power transfer potential for bringing renewable energy into the Southeast in response to a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) will depend not only on available transmission capacity but also on electricity supply and demand factors. This interim report examines how the commonly used EIA NEMS and EPRI NESSIE energy equilibrium models are considering such power transfers. Using regional estimates of capacity expansion and demand, a base case for 2008, 2020 and 2030 are compared relative to generation mix, renewable deployments, planned power transfers, and meeting RPS goals. The needed amounts of regional renewable energy to comply with possible RPS levels are compared to inter-regional transmission capacities to establish a baseline available for import into the Southeast and other regions. Gaps in the renewable generation available to meet RPS requirements are calculated. The initial finding is that the physical capability for transferring renewable energy into the SE is only about 10% of what would be required to meet a 20% RPS. Issues that need to be addressed in future tasks with respect to modeling are the current limitations for expanding renewable capacity and generation in one region to meet the demand in another and the details on transmission corridors required to deliver the power.

  15. The one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation and its some excitation states

    SciTech Connect

    Prayitno, T. B.

    2015-04-16

    We have derived some excitation states of the one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation coupled by the gravitational potential. The methods that we have used here are taken by pursuing the recent work of Kivshar et. al. by considering the equation as a macroscopic quantum oscillator. To obtain the states, we have made the appropriate transformation to reduce the three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation into the one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation and applying the time-independent perturbation theory in the general solution of the one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation as a linear superposition of the normalized eigenfunctions of the Schrödinger equation for the harmonic oscillator potential. Moreover, we also impose the condition by assuming that some terms in the equation should be so small in order to preserve the use of the perturbation method.

  16. Power Transfer Potential to the Southeast in Response to a Renewable Portfolio Standard: Interim Report 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Stanton W; Key, Thomas S; Deb, Rajat

    2009-05-01

    Electricity consumption in the Southeastern US, not including Florida, is approximately 24% of the total US. The availability of renewable resources for electricity production is relatively small compared to the high consumption. Therefore meeting a national renewable portfolio standard (RPS) is particularly challenging in this region. Neighboring regions, particularly to the west, have significant wind resources and given sufficient long distant transmission these resources could serve energy markets in the SE. This report looks at renewable resource supply relative to demands and the potential for power transfer into the SE. It shows that development of wind resources will depend not only on available transmission capacity but also on electricity supply and demand factors.

  17. Concentrating Solar Power Projects - Solana Generating Station...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Turbine Capacity (Gross): 280.0 MW Turbine Capacity (Net): 250.0 MW Turbine Description: 2x140 MWe gross Output Type: Steam Rankine Power Cycle Pressure: 100.0 bar Cooling Method: ...

  18. Worldwide wind/diesel hybrid power system study: Potential applications and technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.R.; Johnson, B.L. III )

    1991-04-01

    The world market potential for wind/diesel hybrid technology is a function of the need for electric power, the availability of sufficient wind resource to support wind/diesel power, and the existence of buyers with the financial means to invest in the technology. This study includes data related to each of these three factors. This study does not address market penetration, which would require analysis of application specific wind/diesel economics. Buyer purchase criteria, which are vital to assessing market penetration, are discussed only generally. Countries were screened for a country-specific market analysis based on indicators of need and wind resource. Both developed countries and less developed countries'' (LDCs) were screened for wind/diesel market potential. Based on the results of the screening, ten countries showing high market potential were selected for more extensive market analyses. These analyses provide country-specific market data to guide wind/diesel technology developers in making design decisions that will lead to a competitive product. Section 4 presents the country-specific data developed for these analyses, including more extensive wind resource characterization, application-specific market opportunities, business conditions, and energy market characterizations. An attempt was made to identify the potential buyers with ability to pay for wind/diesel technology required to meet the application-specific market opportunities identified for each country. Additionally, the country-specific data are extended to corollary opportunities in countries not covered by the study. Section 2 gives recommendations for wind/diesel research based on the findings of the study. 86 refs.

  19. The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-11-16

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e., ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site's annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities plus a natural gas company, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB's assumed utilization is far higherthan is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff

  20. Report to Congress on Assessment of Potential Impact of Concentrating Solar Power for Electriicty Generation (EPACT 2005--Section 934(c))

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, F.

    2007-02-01

    Summary of DOE's assessment of issues regarding EPAct 2005, which requires the Secretary of Energy to assess conflicting guidance on the economic potential of concentrating solar power for electricity production.

  1. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2012 2013 2014 View History Gross Withdrawals 821 1,407 1,344 770 770 950 1979-2014 From Gas Wells 821 1,407 1,344 770 770 950 1979-2014 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2014 From ...

  2. Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    10 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Gross Withdrawals 325,591 309,952 296,299 292,467 286,080 292,450 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 247,651 236,834 264,610 264,223 260,715 ...

  3. Webinar November 19: Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production and Concentrating Solar Power: A Systems Analysis

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production and Concentrating Solar Power: A Systems Analysis" on Thursday, November 19, from 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. EST. This webinar will present the results of an analysis conducted by Sandia National Laboratories that explored potential synergies that may be realized by integrating solar hydrogen production and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies.

  4. Webinar January 21: Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production and Concentrating Solar Power: A Systems Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production and Concentrating Solar Power: A Systems Analysis" on Thursday, January 21, from 12 to 1 p.m. EST. This webinar will present the results of an analysis conducted by Sandia National Laboratories that explored potential synergies that may be realized by integrating solar hydrogen production and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies.

  5. Power Transfer Potential to the Southeast in Response to a Renewable Portfolio Standard: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Key, Thomas S; Hadley, Stanton W; Deb, Rajat

    2010-02-01

    Electricity consumption in the Southeastern US, including Florida, is approximately 32% of the total US. The availability of renewable resources for electricity production is relatively small compared to the high consumption. Therefore meeting a national renewable portfolio standard (RPS) is particularly challenging in this region. Neighboring regions, particularly to the west, have significant wind resources and given sufficient transmission these resources could serve energy markets in the SE. This report looks at renewable resource supply relative to demands and the potential for power transfer into the SE. We found that significant wind energy transfers, at the level of 30-60 GW, are expected to be economic in case of federal RPC or CO2 policy. Development of wind resources will depend not only on the available transmission capacity and required balancing resources, but also on electricity supply and demand factors.

  6. Automated Data Collection for Determining Statistical Distributions of Module Power Undergoing Potential-Induced Degradation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hacke, P.; Spataru, S.

    2014-08-01

    We propose a method for increasing the frequency of data collection and reducing the time and cost of accelerated lifetime testing of photovoltaic modules undergoing potential-induced degradation (PID). This consists of in-situ measurements of dark current-voltage curves of the modules at elevated stress temperature, their use to determine the maximum power at 25 degrees C standard test conditions (STC), and distribution statistics for determining degradation rates as a function of stress level. The semi-continuous data obtained by this method clearly show degradation curves of the maximum power, including an incubation phase, rates and extent of degradation, precise time to failure, and partial recovery. Stress tests were performed on crystalline silicon modules at 85% relative humidity and 60 degrees C, 72 degrees C, and 85 degrees C. Activation energy for the mean time to failure (1% relative) of 0.85 eV was determined and a mean time to failure of 8,000 h at 25 degrees C and 85% relative humidity is predicted. No clear trend in maximum degradation as a function of stress temperature was observed.

  7. GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, Scott; Theiss, Timothy J; Bunce, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

  8. Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... 1.5 33 Compressor stations (transmission) T 1.3 101 Reciprocating compressor fugitives T ... This value ranges from 520 million (at 10%) to 600 million (at 5%). At a 10% discount ...

  9. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ...

  10. Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ...

  11. Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ...

  12. New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ...

  13. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells Missouri Natural Gas Gross ...

  14. Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 ...

  15. Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 ...

  16. Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 21 ...

  17. Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 ...

  18. Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 ...

  19. Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 64,057 ...

  20. Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 ...

  1. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 159 ...

  2. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 3 3 5 ...

  3. California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec ...

  4. Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 13,138 ...

  5. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec ...

  6. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec ...

  7. Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 57 ...

  8. Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 ...

  9. Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 562 ...

  10. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 ...

  11. Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 41 ...

  12. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 ...

  13. Booster main magnet power supply, present operation and potential future upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Bajon, E.; Bannon, M.; Marneris, I.; Danowski, G.; Sandberg, J.; Savatteri, S.

    2011-03-28

    The Brookhaven Booster Main Magnet Power Supply (MMPS) is a 24 pulse thyristor control supply, rated at 5500 Amps, +/-2000 Volts, or 3000 Amps, +/-6000 Volts. The power supply is fed directly from the power utility and the peak magnet power is 18 MWatts. This peak power is seen directly at the incoming ac line. This power supply has been in operation for the last 18 years. This paper will describe the present topology and operation of the power supply, the feedback control system and the different modes of operation of the power supply. Since the power supply has been in operation for the last 18 years, upgrading this power supply is essential. A new power supply topology has been studied where energy is stored in capacitor banks. DC to DC converters are used to convert the dc voltage stored in the capacitor banks to pulsed DC voltage into the magnet load. This enables the average incoming power from the ac line to be constant while the peak magnet power is pulsed to +/- 18 MWatts. Simulations and waveforms of this power supply will be presented.

  14. Potential Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Stanton W; Tsvetkova, Alexandra A

    2008-01-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed around the world, with much work aiming to optimize engine and battery for efficient operation, both during discharge and when grid electricity is available for recharging. However, the general expectation has been that the grid will not be greatly affected by the use of PHEVs because the recharging will occur during off-peak hours, or the number of vehicles will grow slowly enough so that capacity planning will respond adequately. This expectation does not consider that drivers will control the timing of recharging, and their inclination will be to plug in when convenient, rather than when utilities would prefer. It is important to understand the ramifications of adding load from PHEVs onto the grid. Depending on when and where the vehicles are plugged in, they could cause local or regional constraints on the grid. They could require the addition of new electric capacity and increase the utilization of existing capacity. Usage patterns of local distribution grids will change, and some lines or substations may become overloaded sooner than expected. Furthermore, the type of generation used to meet the demand for recharging PHEVs will depend on the region of the country and the timing of recharging. This paper analyzes the potential impacts of PHEVs on electricity demand, supply, generation structure, prices, and associated emission levels in 2020 and 2030 in 13 regions specified by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), and on which the data and analysis in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2007 are based (Figure ES-1). The estimates of power plant supplies and regional hourly electricity demand come from publicly available sources from EIA and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Electricity requirements for PHEVs are based on analysis from the Electric Power Research Institute, with an optimistic

  15. Turbulence at Hydroelectric Power Plants and its Potential Effects on Fish.

    SciTech Connect

    Cada, Glenn F.; Odeh, Mufeed

    2001-01-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural fluid phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This paper discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. The final section

  16. OE Requests Comments on Potential Creation of a Reserve of Large Power Transformers

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    OE issued a Request for Information (RFI), asking for comments on the possible establishment of a reserve of large power transformers that would support the nation’s bulk power system. Large power transformers (LPTs), which are a critical component of the power grid, are a concern because transformer failures can interrupt electricity service to a large number of customers and replacing one quickly could be difficult. Today’s RFI responds to the recommendation in the Energy Department’s Quadrennial Energy Review to evaluate a national initiative to mitigate the risks associated with the loss of transformers.

  17. Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Agenda...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Britta Gross, General Motors 4. Fuel Cell Company Perspective Pinakin Patel, FuelCell Energy 12:00 pm Lunch (Provided) Transportation and Stationary Power Integration ...

  18. 1?10 kW Stationary Combined Heat and Power Systems Status and Technical Potential: Independent Review

    SciTech Connect

    Maru, H. C.; Singhal, S. C.; Stone, C.; Wheeler, D.

    2010-11-01

    This independent review examines the status and technical potential of 1-10 kW stationary combined heat and power fuel cell systems and analyzes the achievability of the DOE cost, efficiency, and durability targets for 2012, 2015, and 2020.

  19. Potential

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential and Frictional Drag on a Floating Sphere in a Flowing Plasma I. H. Hutchinson Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA...

  20. Gross national happiness as a framework for health impact assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Pennock, Michael; Ura, Karma

    2011-01-15

    The incorporation of population health concepts and health determinants into Health Impact Assessments has created a number of challenges. The need for intersectoral collaboration has increased; the meaning of 'health' has become less clear; and the distinctions between health impacts, environmental impacts, social impacts and economic impacts have become increasingly blurred. The Bhutanese concept of Gross National Happiness may address these issues by providing an over-arching evidence-based framework which incorporates health, social, environmental and economic contributors as well as a number of other key contributors to wellbeing such as culture and governance. It has the potential to foster intersectoral collaboration by incorporating a more limited definition of health which places the health sector as one of a number of contributors to wellbeing. It also allows for the examination of the opportunity costs of health investments on wellbeing, is consistent with whole-of-government approaches to public policy and emerging models of social progress.

  1. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSWVMMCF" "Date","West Virginia ...

  2. ,"California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSCAMMCF" "Date","California Natural ...

  3. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSMSMMCF" "Date","Mississippi Natural ...

  4. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSLAMMCF" "Date","Louisiana Natural ...

  5. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","22016","1151991" ,"Release ...

  6. DOE Report Evaluates Potential for Wind Power in All 50 States...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    wind potential to 1.8 million square miles. Technological advancements, such as taller wind turbine towers of 110 and 140 meters and larger rotors-currently under...

  7. Hydrogen Resource Assessment: Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, and Hydro Power

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrandt, A.; Mann, M.

    2009-02-01

    This paper estimates the quantity of hydrogen that could be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power by county in the United States. The study estimates that more than 72 million tonnes of hydrogen can be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power per year in the country (considering only 30% of their total annual production). The United States consumed about 396 million tonnes of gasoline in 2007; therefore, the report suggests the amount of hydrogen from these sources could displace about 80% of this consumption.

  8. Potential Environmental Impacts of Hydrogen-based Transportation and Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grieb, Thomas M; Mills, W B; Jacobson, Mark Z; Summers, Karen V; Crossan, A Brook

    2010-12-31

    Hydrogen (H2) offers advantages as an energy carrier: minimal discharge of pollutants, production from multiple sources, increased thermodynamic efficiencies compared to fossil fuels, and reduced dependence on foreign oil. However, potential impacts from the H2 generation processes, transport and distribution of H2, and releases of H2 into the atmosphere have been proposed. The goal of this project was to analyze the effects of emissions of hydrogen, the six criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases on climate, human health, materials and structures. This project was part of a larger effort by DOE to assess the life-cycle costs and benefits and environmental impacts to inform decisions regarding future hydrogen research. Technical Approach: A modeling approach was developed and used to evaluate the potential environmental effects associated with the conversion of the on-road vehicle fleet from fossil-fuel vehicles to hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. GATOR-GCMOM was the primary tool used to predict atmospheric concentrations of gases and aerosols for selected scenarios. This model accounts for all feedbacks among major atmospheric processes based on first principles. The future scenarios and the emission rates selected for this analysis of hydrogen environmental effects are based on the scenarios developed by IPCC. The scenarios selected for the model simulations are a 2000 and 2050 A1B base cases, and a 2050 A1B case with hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs). The hydrogen fuel cell scenario assumed conversion of 90% of fossil-fuel on-road vehicles (FFOV) in developed countries and 45% of FFOVs vehicles in other countries to HFCVs, with the H2 produced by steam-reforming of natural gas (SHFCVs). Simulations were conducted to examine the effect of converting the world's FFOVs to HFCVs, where the H2 is produced by wind-powered electrolysis (WHFCVs). In all scenarios a 3% leakage of H2 consumed was assumed. Two new models were developed that provide the ability to evaluate a

  9. High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Zia, Jalal; Sevincer, Edip; Chen, Huijuan; Hardy, Ajilli; Wickersham, Paul; Kalra, Chiranjeev; Laursen, Anna Lis; Vandeputte, Thomas

    2013-06-29

    A thermo-economic model has been built and validated for prediction of project economics of Enhanced Geothermal Projects. The thermo-economic model calculates and iteratively optimizes the LCOE (levelized cost of electricity) for a prospective EGS (Enhanced Geothermal) site. It takes into account the local subsurface temperature gradient, the cost of drilling and reservoir creation, stimulation and power plant configuration. It calculates and optimizes the power plant configuration vs. well depth. Thus outputs from the model include optimal well depth and power plant configuration for the lowest LCOE. The main focus of this final report was to experimentally validate the thermodynamic properties that formed the basis of the thermo-economic model built in Phase 2, and thus build confidence that the predictions of the model could be used reliably for process downselection and preliminary design at a given set of geothermal (and/or waste heat) boundary conditions. The fluid and cycle downselected was based on a new proprietary fluid from a vendor in a supercritical ORC cycle at a resource condition of 200�C inlet temperature. The team devised and executed a series of experiments to prove the suitability of the new fluid in realistic ORC cycle conditions. Furthermore, the team performed a preliminary design study for a MW-scale turbo expander that would be used for a supercritical ORC cycle with this new fluid. The following summarizes the main findings in the investigative campaign that was undertaken: 1. Chemical compatibility of the new fluid with common seal/gasket/Oring materials was found to be problematic. Neoprene, Viton, and silicone materials were found to be incompatible, suffering chemical decomposition, swelling and/or compression set issues. Of the materials tested, only TEFLON was found to be compatible under actual ORC temperature and pressure conditions. 2. Thermal stability of the new fluid at 200�C and 40 bar was found to be acceptable after 399

  10. Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 1231 Reserves ...

  11. Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History ...

  12. The potential role of nuclear power in controlling CO sub 2 emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Fulkerson, W.; Jones, J.E.; Delene, J.G.; Perry, A.M.; Cantor, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear power currently reduces CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel burning worldwide by about 8% (0.4 Gt(C)/yr). It can continue to play an important role only if it can grow substantially in the next 50 years. For such growth to occur public confidence will need to improve throughout the world. That might happen if (a) other non-fossil alternatives are inadequate to meet electricity demand growth, (b) the risks to society from global warming are perceived to be very high, (c) nuclear technology improves substantially, and (d) an international institutional setting is devised to manage the nuclear enterprise so that the technology is available to all nations while catastrophic accidents and proliferation of nuclear weapon capabilities are avoided. It seems feasible that the necessary technological and institutional advances can be devised and tested over the next 20 years. It is also plausible that the direct costs of electricity produced by the system would be in the range of 50-100 mills/kWhr (1990 dollars) delivered to the grid. In other words, the direct costs of nuclear power should not be greater than they are today. Achieving such an outcome will require aggressive technical and institutional RD D performed in a cooperative international setting. If rapid growth of nuclear power can begin again in 15-20 years it could supply 30-50% of world electricity in 50 years and cut CO{sub 2} emission rates by up to 2.5 Gt(C)/yr. This would be a substantial contribution to controlling greenhouse gases, but it is not sufficient. Improved efficiency and various renewable energy sources must also grow rapidly if CO{sub 2} emission rates from electricity generation are to be reduced from the current value of about 2 Gt(C)/yr. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse GasAbatement Potential for California in 2020

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare,Kristina

    2007-07-31

    The objective of this scoping project is to help the California Energy Commission's (CEC) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program determine where it should make investments in research to support combined heat and power (CHP) deployment. Specifically, this project will: {sm_bullet} Determine what impact CHP might have in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, {sm_bullet} Determine which CHP strategies might encourage the most attractive early adoption, {sm_bullet} Identify the regulatory and technological barriers to the most attractive CHP strategies, and {sm_bullet} Make recommendations to the PIER program as to research that is needed to support the most attractive CHP strategies.

  14. Wave power: An overview of recent international developments and potential U.S. projects

    SciTech Connect

    Hagerman, G.

    1996-11-01

    The total capacity of grid-connected wave power is just under 700 kW worldwide, dominated by a 350 kW Tapered Channel plant in Norway, and a 150 kW oscillating water column in India. Three smaller plants (20, 30, and 60 kW) are now operating in Japan, as is a 75 kW project at Islay, on the southwest coast of Scotland. These are all land- or breakwater-based systems. A 2 MW plant known as OSPREY, based on a pre-fabricated steel caisson, was briefly deployed as a stand-alone unit off the north coast of Scotland in August 1995. Floating wave energy conversion devices have been ocean tested at a much smaller scale and only for periods of months at a time. Wave energy activities in the US have been confined to regional studies by coastal utilities and state government agencies, with relatively little technology development compared to overseas efforts. A significant opportunity exists in northern California for integrating wave power into a harbor breakwater, and an economic feasibility study of this project is now underway.

  15. An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjerioua, Boualem; Wei, Yaxing; Kao, Shih-Chieh

    2012-04-01

    fleet by 15%. A majority of this potential is concentrated in just 100 NPDs, which could contribute approximately 8 GW of clean, reliable hydropower; the top 10 facilities alone could add up to 3 GW of new hydropower. Eighty-one of the 100 top NPDs are U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) facilities, many of which, including all of the top 10, are navigation locks on the Ohio River, Mississippi River, Alabama River, and Arkansas River, as well as their major tributaries. This study also shows that dams owned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation hold the potential to add approximately 260 MW of capacity; the Bureau has also engaged in an effort to conduct a more detailed evaluation of its own facilities.

  16. The potential impact of externalities considerations on the market for biomass power technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Swezey, B.G.; Porter, K.L.; Feher, J.S.

    1994-02-01

    This study assesses the current status of externalities considerations--nonmarket costs and benefits--in state and utility electricity resource planning processes and determines how externalities considerations might help or hinder the development of biomass power plants. It provides an overview of biomass resources and technologies, including their market status and environmental impacts; reviews the current treatment of externalities in the states; and documents the perspectives of key utility, regulatory, and industry representatives concerning externalities considerations. The authors make the following recommendations to the biomass industry: (1) the wood and agricultural waste industries should work toward having states and utilities recognize that wood and agricultural waste are greenhouse gas neutral resources because of carbon sequestration during growth; (2) the biomass industry should emphasize nonenvironmental benefits such as economic development and job creation; and (3) the biomass industry should pursue and support efforts to establish renewable energy set-asides or ``green`` requests for proposals.

  17. Property:GrossGen | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    B Blundell 1 Geothermal Facility + 213,599 + Blundell 2 Geothermal Facility + 85,633 + G Gumuskoy Geothermal Power Plant + 104,000 + L Las Tres Virgenes Geothermal Plant + 19 +...

  18. Characterization of low-melting electrolytes for potential geothermal borehole power supplies: The LiBr-KBr-LiF eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.; Reinhardt, F.W.

    1998-05-01

    The suitability of modified thermal-battery technology for use as a potential power source for geothermal borehole applications is under investigation. As a first step, the discharge processes that take place in LiSi/LiBr-KBr-LiF/FeS{sub 2} thermal cells were studied at temperatures of 350 C and 400 C using pelletized cells with immobilized electrolyte. Incorporation of a reference electrode allowed the relative contribution of each electrode to the overall cell polarization to be determined. The results of single-cell tests are presented, along with preliminary data for cells based on a lower-melting CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic salt.

  19. POTENTIAL HEALTH RISK REDUCTION ARISING FROM REDUCED MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T. M.; Lipfert, F. W.; Morris, S. C.; Moskowitz, P. D.

    2001-09-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced plans to regulate mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired power plants. EPA has not prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. To address this issue, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) with support from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy (DOE FE) prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in human health risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. The primary pathway for Hg exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to Hg exposure is the fetus. Therefore the risk assessment focused on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Dose response factors were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions. Three scenarios for reducing Hg emissions from coal plants were considered: (1) A base case using current conditions; (2) A 50% reduction; and, (3) A 90% reduction. These reductions in emissions were assumed to translate linearly into a reduction in fish Hg levels of 8.6% and 15.5%, respectively. Population risk estimates were also calculated for two subsistence fisher populations. These groups of people consume substantially more fish than the general public and, depending on location, the fish may contain higher Hg levels than average. Risk estimates for these groups were calculated for the three Hg levels used for the general population analyses. Analysis shows that the general population risks for exposure of the fetus to Hg are small. Estimated risks under current conditions (i.e., no

  20. Gross Gamma-Ray Calibration Blocks (May 1978) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Gross Gamma-Ray Calibration Blocks (May 1978) Gross Gamma-Ray Calibration Blocks (May 1978) Gross Gamma-Ray Calibration Blocks (May 1978) Gross Gamma-Ray Calibration Blocks (May 1978) (1.74 MB) More Documents & Publications Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983) A Brief Review of the Basis for, and the Procedures Currently Utilized in, Gross Gamma-Ray Log Calibration (October 1976) Parameter Assignments for Spectral

  1. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8:00:06 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSVAMMCF" "Date","Virginia Natural Gas ...

  2. ,"Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8:00:06 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSUTMMCF" "Date","Utah Natural Gas ...

  3. ,"Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8:00:00 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSFLMMCF" "Date","Florida Natural Gas ...

  4. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7:59:58 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSARMMCF" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas ...

  5. ,"Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8:00:02 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSMTMMCF" "Date","Montana Natural Gas ...

  6. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8:00:06 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSWYMMCF" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas ...

  7. ,"Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8:00:00 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSINMMCF" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas ...

  8. ,"Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8:00:02 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSMOMMCF" "Date","Missouri Natural Gas ...

  9. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 13,204 ...

  10. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7:59:58 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSALMMCF" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas ...

  11. ,"Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8:00:01 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSMIMMCF" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas ...

  12. ,"Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7:59:59 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSAZMMCF" "Date","Arizona Natural Gas ...

  13. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8:00:00 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSKSMMCF" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas ...

  14. ,"Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7:59:59 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSCOMMCF" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas ...

  15. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8:00:07 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSWYMMCF" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas ...

  16. ,"Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7:59:59 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSFLMMCF" "Date","Florida Natural Gas ...

  17. ,"Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8:00:01 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSSMOMMCF" "Date","Missouri Natural Gas ...

  18. Fact #564: March 30, 2009 Transportation and the Gross Domestic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Housing, health care, and food are the only categories with greater shares of the GDP. GDP ... Gross Domestic Product, 2007 Housing 24.3% Health Care 17.4% Food 11.6% ...

  19. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 72,328 ...

  20. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 0 0 ...

  1. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 ...

  2. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 ...

  3. Physics Nobel winner David Gross gives public lecture at Jefferson...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nobel winner David Gross gives public lecture at Jefferson Lab on June 12 (Monday) Physics ... "The Coming Revolutions in Fundamental Physics" beginning at 8 p.m. at Jefferson Lab on ...

  4. Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 4,561 3,826 4,106 ...

  5. Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 21,638 18,808 21,037 ...

  6. Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 7,051 6,368 ...

  7. Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 425,704 369,500 ...

  8. Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...

  9. Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 9,579 8,593 ...

  10. Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 1,239 1,119 1,239 ...

  11. Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 11,582 10,461 ...

  12. Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 1,273 1,150 ...

  13. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 246 244 232 ...

  14. Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 11,749 10,612 ...

  15. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 14,797 13,076 ...

  16. Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 58,111 51,244 ...

  17. Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 331 299 331 320 ...

  18. Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 15,390 18,697 ...

  19. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0 0 0 ...

  20. Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 107,415 97,020 ...

  1. Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 3,459 3,117 ...

  2. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov ...

  3. Fact# 904: December 21, 2015 Gross Domestic Product and Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    With the growth of VMT in 2015, the gap between the two series has narrowed for the first time since the Great Recession. GDP and VMT Trends, 1960-2015 Graph showing gross national ...

  4. Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseSummerGross | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Property Name CoolingTowerWaterUseSummerGross Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (afday) Gross. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  5. Fuel Savings Potential from Future In-motion Wireless Power Transfer (WPT); NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, E.; Wang, L.; Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.; Konan, A.

    2015-02-10

    This presentation discusses the fuel savings potential from future in-motion wireless power transfer. There is an extensive overlap in road usage apparent across regional vehicle population, which occurs primarily on high-capacity roads--1% of roads are used for 25% of the vehicle miles traveled. Interstates and highways make up between 2.5% and 4% of the total roads within the Consolidated Statistical Areas (CSAs), which represent groupings of metropolitan and/or micropolitan statistical areas. Mileage traveled on the interstates and highways ranges from 54% in California to 24% in Chicago. Road electrification could remove range restrictions of electric vehicles and increase the fuel savings of PHEVs or HEVs if implemented on a large scale. If 1% of the road miles within a geographic area are electrified, 25% of the fuel used by a 'fleet' of vehicles enabled with the technology could be displaced.

  6. Evaluation of severe accident risks and the potential for risk reduction: Surry Power Station, Unit 1: Draft report for comment

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, A.S.; Boyd, G.J.; Kunsman, D.M.; Murfin, W.B.; Williams, D.C.

    1987-02-01

    The Severe Accident Risk Reduction Program (SARRP) has completed a rebaselining of the risks to the public from a particular pressurized water reactor with a subatmospheric containment (Surry, Unit 1). Emphasis was placed on determining the magnitude and character of the uncertainties, rather than focusing on a point estimate. The risk-reduction potential of a set of proposed safety option backfits was also studied, and their costs and benefits were also evaluated. It was found that the risks from internal events are generally lower than previously evaluated in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS). However, certain unresolved issues (such as direct containment heating) caused the top of the uncertainty band to appear at a level that is comparable with the RSS point estimate. None of the postulated safety options appears to be cost effective for the Surry power plant. This work supports the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's assessment of severe accidents in NUREG-1150.

  7. Greenhouse gas and air pollutant emission reduction potentials of renewable energy - case studies on photovoltaic and wind power introduction considering interactions among technologies in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-Ming Kuo; Yasuhiro Fukushima

    2009-03-15

    To achieve higher energy security and lower emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and pollutants, the development of renewable energy has attracted much attention in Taiwan. In addition to its contribution to the enhancement of reliable indigenous resources, the introduction of renewable energy such as photovoltaic (PV) and wind power systems reduces the emission of GHGs and air pollutants by substituting a part of the carbon- and pollutant-intensive power with power generated by methods that are cleaner and less carbon-intensive. To evaluate the reduction potentials, consequential changes in the operation of different types of existing power plants have to be taken into account. In this study, a linear mathematical programming model is constructed to simulate a power mix for a given power demand in a power market sharing a cost-minimization objective. By applying the model, the emission reduction potentials of capacity extension case studies, including the enhancement of PV and wind power introduction at different scales, were assessed. In particular, the consequences of power mix changes in carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulates were discussed. Seasonally varying power demand levels, solar irradiation, and wind strength were taken into account. In this study, we have found that the synergetic reduction of carbon dioxide emission induced by PV and wind power introduction occurs under a certain level of additional installed capacity. Investigation of a greater variety of case studies on scenario development with emerging power sources becomes possible by applying the model developed in this study. 15 refs., 8 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 317 313 314 307 308 303 307 309 309 312 320 329 2007 330 329 324 320 328 330 325 331 335 334 340 339 2008 334 330 332 331 327 323 324 327 330 330 326 302 2009 304 311 305 302 297 292 286 281 279 275 268 263 2010 265 264 267 265 259 258 256 251 251 249 247 236 2011 229 223 221 221 219 217 218 217 225 211 208 206 2012 202 202

  9. Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 247 244 238 236 230 228 224 224 228 240 249 252 2007 252 249 243 240 234 232 228 228 233 245 254 257 2008 243 232 234 232 226 224 220 220 224 236 245 248 2009 254 251 245 242 236 234 230 230 235 247 256 259 2010 223 221 215 213 208 206 203 203 206 217 225 228 2011 226 223 217 215 210 208 204 204 208 220 227 230

  10. Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 271 275 277 274 280 287 282 285 290 284 291 290 2007 295 299 302 298 304 312 307 310 316 309 316 316 2008 338 331 346 342 349 358 352 355 362 354 362 362 2009 375 376 369 377 379 380 394 395 396 400 404 383 2010 404 406 400 397 403 403 403 404 408 401 406 406 2011 414 430 413 409 410 407 411 418 410 416 413 419 2012 421 414

  11. Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 850 862 874 869 858 823 817 832 816 829 815 822 2007 815 808 802 769 774 767 768 815 805 794 792 814 2008 785 794 775 748 783 770 747 743 693 760 749 753 2009 689 749 740 724 730 727 726 704 686 637 622 686 2010 664 670 700 684 683 677 631 628 603 684 669 620 2011 644 651 648 639 581 626 627 629 522 546 501 575 2012 627 629

  12. California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 998 992 986 967 989 976 962 924 934 917 927 909 2007 971 965 958 942 963 950 936 898 907 887 899 883 2008 953 914 940 925 945 932 919 881 890 870 882 866 2009 876 871 864 850 869 857 845 810 819 801 812 797 2010 915 909 901 883 906 895 883 848 857 839 849 836 2011 798 816 790 796 776 776 757 748 734 714 744 732 2012 685 697

  13. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 190 280 281 279 248 310 196 231 398 95 257 377 2007 115 404 361 105 315 441 45 268 270 240 268 320 2008 175 265 281 299 316 316 463 379 289 283 479 198 2009 254 445 151 174 402 368 109 359 391 339 339 406 2010 332 624 146 355 356 344 394 335 382 623 167 408 2011 308 359 379 366 292 327 365 295 339 307 340 410 2012 290 290 290

  14. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    835,855 800,065 771,577 830,756 806,396 819,763 1984-2014 Residential 5 5 4 7 7 8 1984-2014 Commercial 26,641 23,713 26,383 26,386 24,019 28,803 1984-2014 Industrial 21,853 18,362 15,450 20,153 21,186 19,595 1984-2014 Oil Company 3,955 4,262 4,058 6,226 7,450 6,419 1984-2014 Farm 41,080 57,087 52,559 81,878 84,753 79,443 1984-2014 Electric Power 3,796 3,393 2,019 1,674 2,223 1,921 1984-2014 Railroad 24,727 17,936 37,741 29,848 32,550 35,578 1984-2014 Vessel Bunkering 141,302 93,384 58,285 58,505

  15. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...

  16. Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...

  17. New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals 1,341,475 1,287,682 1,276,296 1,247,394 1,265,579 1,289,908 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 616,134 556,024 653,057 588,127 535,181 1967-2014 From Oil Wells 238,580 ...

  18. Feasibility Assessment of the Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants: Main Report and Appendix A

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Main Report and Appendix A: Evaluates water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MWa) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MWa) projects.

  19. Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 88,258 418,474 760,566 1980's 949,177 1,010,772 1,120,830 992,041 1,021,260 942,413 1,169,038 1,330,604 1,376,093 1,457,841 1990's 1,555,568 1,494,494 1,411,147 1,355,333 1,392,727 1,346,674 1,401,753 1,351,067 1,241,264 1,206,045 2000's 1,177,257 53,649 57,063 53,569 44,946 36,932 24,785

  20. Texas--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 5,296,865 5,461,594 5,518,978 5,525,982 5,626,448 5,665,074 5,738,595 5,526,033 2000's 5,681,726 5,698,798 5,603,941 5,737,755 5,688,972 5,969,905 6,301,649 6,931,629 7,753,869 7,615,836 2010's 7,565,123 7,910,898 8,127,004 8,285,436 8,647,988 8,791,961 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  1. Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,838,521 4,600,197 4,750,119 1980's 4,617,585 4,584,491 4,246,464 3,635,942 4,070,279 3,542,827 3,279,165 3,610,041 3,633,594 3,577,685 1990's 3,731,764 3,550,230 3,442,437 3,508,112 3,673,494 3,554,147 3,881,697 3,941,802 3,951,997 3,896,569 2000's 3,812,991 153,871 137,192 133,456

  2. Louisiana--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,535,033 1,538,511 1,552,603 1,608,633 1,469,698 1,357,155 1,386,478 1,434,389 2000's 1,342,963 1,370,802 1,245,270 1,244,672 1,248,050 1,202,328 1,280,758 1,309,960 1,301,523 1,482,252 2010's 2,148,447 2,969,297 2,882,193 2,289,193 1,907,296 1,731,680 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  3. Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 0 9 13 1990's 19,861 32,603 191,605 218,023 349,380 356,598 361,068 409,091 392,320 376,435 2000's 361,289 200,862 202,002 194,339 165,630 152,902 145,762 134,451 125,502 109,214 2010's 101,487 84,270 87,398 75,660 70,829 64,184 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  4. Alaska--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,409,336 2,545,144 2,861,599 3,256,352 3,247,533 3,257,096 3,245,736 3,236,241 2000's 3,265,436 3,164,843 3,183,857 3,256,295 3,309,960 3,262,379 2,850,934 3,105,086 3,027,696 2,954,896 2010's 2,826,952 2,798,220 2,857,485 2,882,956 2,803,410 2,804,644 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  5. Calif--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Calif--onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 386,382 346,733 334,987 322,544 326,919 317,137 315,701 347,667 2000's 334,983 336,629 322,138 303,480 287,205 291,271 301,921 286,584 281,088 258,983 2010's 273,136 237,388 214,509 219,386 218,668 217,517 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  6. California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Feet) Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,417 19,929 20,394 1980's 19,980 26,692 31,904 38,084 60,207 84,062 77,355 67,835 60,308 59,889 1990's 58,055 59,465 62,473 58,635 60,765 60,694 73,092 80,516 81,868 84,547 2000's 83,882 78,209 74,884 64,961 61,622 60,773 47,217 52,805 51,931 47,281 2010's 46,755 41,742

  7. Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5,417 5,166 5,431 1980's 5,900 12,763 17,751 24,168 46,363 64,558 59,078 54,805 49,167 50,791 1990's 49,972 51,855 55,231 52,150 53,561 54,790 66,784 73,345 74,985 77,809 2000's 76,075 70,947 67,816 58,095 54,655 54,088 40,407 45,516 44,902 41,229 2010's 41,200 36,579 27,262 27,454

  8. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 520 546 489 552 551 583 595 593 606 630 653 653 2007 678 690 709 736 749 756 714 717 752 809 845 813 2008 847 877 880 896 929 913 927 948 945 1,046 1,057 1,091 2009 1,079 1,098 941 876 853 840 880 916 917 964 1,084 1,161 2010 1,040 1,011 1,055 960 1,024 1,048 1,090 1,110 1,180 1,200 1,262 1,219 2011 1,233 1,223 1,201 1,236

  9. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 503 534 487 469 459 480 455 469 481 481 465 505 2007 521 553 505 486 475 497 471 486 498 499 482 523 2008 567 581 549 529 517 540 512 529 542 543 524 569 2009 783 832 758 730 714 746 708 731 749 749 724 785 2010 733 733 733 1,284 1,284 1,284 1,779 1,779 1,779 2,461 2,461 2,461 2011 2,718 2,718 2,718 3,178 3,178 3,178

  10. Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 7 7 7 7 6 6 7 8 8 8 8 8 2007 10 10 10 10 10 10 11 11 11 12 12 12 2008 12 12 12 12 11 11 13 13 14 14 15 15 2009 14 14 14 14 13 13 15 15 16 16 17 17 2010 13 13 13 13 13 12 14 15 15 15 16 16 2011 13 13 12 12 12 12 14 14 14 14 15 15 2012 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 2013 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15

  11. Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Arkansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 600 607 639 654 681 718 732 775 808 856 899 923 2007 596 603 636 651 680 717 731 774 810 861 899 923 2008 940 1,005 1,065 1,104 1,142 1,196 1,256 1,313 1,316 1,375 1,422 1,517 2009 1,605 1,627 1,679 1,774 1,816 1,877 1,839 2,047 1,571 2,028 2,217 2,273 2010 2,263 2,295 2,340 2,450 2,471 2,517 2,582 2,660

  12. Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 8 8 9 9 8 7 8 8 8 7 7 7 2007 6 6 6 6 6 5 5 5 6 5 5 5 2008 8 8 9 8 8 7 7 7 8 7 7 7 2009 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2010 19 30 27 34 33 32 37 49 50 48 50 49 2011 49 54 48 50 49 51 42 34 45 47 47 47 2012 51 50 49 53 36 37 43 56 60 57 67 53 2013 55 54 47 23 37 45 44 59 53 55 58 62 2014 8 9 9 10 8 8 9 9 9 8 8 8

  13. Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 44,712 56,555 53,775 2000's 47,189 46,801 81,867 32,168 30,624 58,418 42,729 62,567 34,586 33,214 2010's 45,900 47,510 89,300 52,266 42,538 83,570

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 4 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 4 2008 4 4 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3

  14. Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 7 8 8 8 8 8 6 8 9 9 9 9 2007 9 8 9 11 10 9 10 11 10 12 12 7 2008 11 13 13 14 14 13 13 12 12 14 14 11 2009 14 11 14 14 14 13 12 14 12 15 15 15 2010 15 16 14 17 15 18 19 18 21 24 24 23 2011 25 22 26 25 26 25 24 24 25 25 25 25 2012 20 25 26 25 24 24 24 25 25 24 24 24 2013 23 23 23 23 23 23 22 21 22 17 22 19 2014 16 19 20 20 19 17

  15. Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 1,049 1,035 1,041 1,046 1,041 1,057 1,030 1,024 988 979 975 968 2007 1,034 1,021 1,027 1,031 1,026 1,043 1,015 1,010 974 965 962 954 2008 1,017 1,028 1,032 1,024 979 1,024 1,034 1,033 1,032 1,026 1,092 988 2009 1,009 1,018 994 984 994 976 952 985 972 953 951 901 2010 903 923 911 907 812 902 876 904 890 899 895 886 2011 873 838

  16. Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 665 635 896 482 548 1,023 668 792 739 717 550 1,103 2007 941 681 675 563 869 679 741 790 832 695 776 642 2008 439 435 438 429 433 435 437 443 436 434 424 422 2009 408 412 503 404 388 406 482 402 427 392 511 504 2010 383 381 379 374 373 374 371 379 378 371 370 365 2011 394 399 399 399 393 390 393 395 399 391 393 385 2012 362

  17. Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    + F Fang Geothermal Power Station + 0.3 + Farinello Geothermal Power Station + 60 + Faulkner I Energy Generation Facility + 49.5 + H Hellisheidi Geothermal Power Station + 303 +...

  18. Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseWinterGross | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    lingTowerWaterUseWinterGross Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (winter average) (afday) Gross. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProper...

  19. Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseAnnlAvgGross | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Property Name CoolingTowerWaterUseAnnlAvgGross Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Gross. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  20. Expanding the potential for saline formations : modeling carbon dioxide storage, water extraction and treatment for power plant cooling.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-04-01

    The National Water, Energy and Carbon Sequestration simulation model (WECSsim) is being developed to address the question, 'Where in the current and future U.S. fossil fuel based electricity generation fleet are there opportunities to couple CO{sub 2} storage and extracted water use, and what are the economic and water demand-related impacts of these systems compared to traditional power systems?' The WECSsim collaborative team initially applied this framework to a test case region in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. Recently, the model has been expanded to incorporate the lower 48 states of the U.S. Significant effort has been spent characterizing locations throughout the U.S. where CO{sub 2} might be stored in saline formations including substantial data collection and analysis efforts to supplement the incomplete brine data offered in the NatCarb database. WECSsim calculates costs associated with CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) for the power plant to saline formation combinations including parasitic energy costs of CO{sub 2} capture, CO{sub 2} pipelines, water treatment options, and the net benefit of water treatment for power plant cooling. Currently, the model can identify the least-cost deep saline formation CO{sub 2} storage option for any current or proposed coal or natural gas-fired power plant in the lower 48 states. Initial results suggest that additional, cumulative water withdrawals resulting from national scale CCS may range from 676 million gallons per day (MGD) to 30,155 MGD depending on the makeup power and cooling technologies being utilized. These demands represent 0.20% to 8.7% of the U.S. total fresh water withdrawals in the year 2000, respectively. These regional and ultimately nation-wide, bottom-up scenarios coupling power plants and saline formations throughout the U.S. can be used to support state or national energy development plans and strategies.

  1. Physics Nobel winner David Gross gives public lecture at Jefferson Lab on

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    June 12 (Monday) | Jefferson Lab Nobel winner David Gross gives public lecture at Jefferson Lab on June 12 (Monday) Physics Nobel winner David Gross gives public lecture at Jefferson Lab on June 12 (Monday) June 6, 2006 David Gross David Gross, Nobel Prize recipient and lecturer David Gross, Nobel Prize recipient is scheduled to give a free, public lecture titled "The Coming Revolutions in Fundamental Physics" beginning at 8 p.m. at Jefferson Lab on (Monday) June 12. He is one of

  2. Wind Power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Power As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the best wind power generation potential near WIPP is along the Delaware Mountain ridge line of the southern Guadalupe ...

  3. In-Situ Measurement of Crystalline Silicon Modules Undergoing Potential-Induced Degradation in Damp Heat Stress Testing for Estimation of Low-Light Power Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Kurtz, S.

    2013-08-01

    The extent of potential-induced degradation of crystalline silicon modules in an environmental chamber is estimated using in-situ dark I-V measurements and applying superposition analysis. The dark I-V curves are shown to correctly give the module power performance at 200, 600 and 1,000 W/m2 irradiance conditions, as verified with a solar simulator. The onset of degradation measured in low light in relation to that under one sun irradiance can be clearly seen in the module design examined; the time to 5% relative degradation measured in low light (200 W/m2) was 28% less than that of full sun (1,000 W/m2 irradiance). The power of modules undergoing potential-induced degradation can therefore be characterized in the chamber, facilitating statistical analyses and lifetime forecasting.

  4. New York State oil company gross receipts taxation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.E., Jr.

    1983-12-01

    New York's Governor Cuomo was able to mediate a settlement with 18 major oil companies subject to gross receipts taxation. The compromise was intended to end three years of litigation and to assure a tax revenue flow to the state of hundreds of millions of dollars. It represents New York's effort to single out a handful of large national companies for special burdens and a final resolution of a dispute over the state's attempt to prevent these companies from passing through their tax liabilities to consumers in the prices of petroleum products. This article reviews oil company taxation in New York State and the effects of the recent accord. 95 references.

  5. California--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) California--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14,763 14,963 1980's 14,080 13,929 14,153 13,916 13,844 19,504 18,277 13,030 11,141 9,098 1990's 8,083 7,610 7,242 6,484 7,204 5,904 6,309 7,171 6,883 6,738 2000's 7,808 7,262 7,068 6,866 6,966 6,685 6,809 7,289 7,029 6,052 2010's 5,554 5,163 5,051 5,470 5,805 5,146 - = No Data Reported;

  6. Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 2007 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 7 6 6 2008 8 9 8 8 8 8 9 8 9 9 9 8 2009 9 10 10 9 9 9 7 7 7 7 7 6 2010 6 6 6 6 7 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 2011 5 5 5 6 5 6 6 6 6 5 5 5 2012 5 5 5 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 2013 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 2 4 2014 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2015 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 2016 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA - = No Data

  7. Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 4,412 4,442 4,472 4,563 4,567 4,760 4,700 4,664 4,722 4,747 4,732 4,739 2007 4,634 4,850 5,019 4,778 4,979 4,916 4,902 4,924 4,892 4,945 4,909 4,888 2008 5,018 5,144 5,074 5,208 5,215 5,241 5,256 4,896 5,224 5,126 5,145 5,318 2009 5,322 5,433 5,262 5,207 5,325 5,331 5,293 5,241 5,076 5,055 5,067 4,923 2010 4,915 4,976 5,005

  8. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 2007 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 2008 3 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 2 3 2009 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 2 8 2010 6 7 5 5 5 4 3 1 2 2 3 4 2011 5 6 4 3 4 4 5 3 2 3 3 3 2012 3 2 2 2 3 2 2 1 1 2 2 3 2013 3 3 2 2 3 2 2 1 1 2 2 3 2014 4 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 2 2 3 3 2015 3 2 2 2 3 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 2016 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA - = No Data

  9. Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 17,026 16,952 17,141 17,220 17,297 17,234 17,273 17,375 17,575 17,553 17,641 17,679 2007 17,566 18,044 18,509 18,549 18,805 19,080 19,125 19,431 19,564 19,755 20,088 20,268 2008 20,241 20,613 20,917 21,066 21,391 21,446 21,547 21,777 20,435 21,948 22,218 22,112 2009 22,211 22,025 22,007 21,633 21,304 21,058 20,772 20,705 20,303

  10. Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 919 931 941 945 953 956 948 987 1,010 1,023 1,046 1,053 2007 997 1,050 1,093 1,098 1,126 1,083 1,091 1,098 984 900 1,057 1,092 2008 1,092 1,130 1,148 1,185 1,196 1,198 1,200 1,277 1,276 1,241 1,275 1,259 2009 1,273 1,289 1,300 1,278 1,254 1,218 1,224 1,222 1,178 1,195 1,203 1,148 2010 1,146 1,169 1,188 1,223 1,234 1,216 1,198

  11. Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 5,624 5,636 5,666 5,613 5,495 5,656 5,823 5,730 5,658 6,063 6,164 6,284 2007 6,196 6,040 6,149 6,093 6,046 6,085 6,094 6,179 6,176 6,047 6,512 6,604 2008 6,469 6,436 6,722 6,767 6,771 6,839 6,940 6,835 6,447 6,909 7,126 7,297 2009 7,067 7,220 7,135 7,028 6,957 7,030 6,446 6,746 6,461 7,010 7,256 7,057 2010 7,074 7,092 7,110

  12. Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 9,244 9,681 9,288 8,745 7,770 8,330 7,865 8,192 8,642 9,084 9,268 9,369 2007 10,019 10,510 10,078 9,495 8,441 9,040 8,531 8,899 9,389 9,855 10,059 10,159 2008 9,833 9,963 9,894 9,323 8,290 8,875 8,375 8,739 9,221 9,674 9,876 9,972 2009 9,533 10,007 9,594 9,042 8,040 8,606 8,120 8,476 8,943 9,380 9,577 9,668 2010 9,389 9,849

  13. Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2007 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2008 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2009 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2010 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2011 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2014 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2015 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2016 NA NA NA NA NA NA

  14. Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 3,344 3,357 3,340 3,314 3,325 3,313 3,299 3,357 3,329 3,380 3,369 3,202 2007 3,377 3,358 3,396 3,475 3,462 3,485 3,477 3,393 3,617 3,456 3,543 3,209 2008 3,707 3,645 3,679 3,900 3,707 3,576 3,834 4,056 4,049 3,860 3,978 3,998 2009 4,330 4,353 4,298 4,238 4,244 4,149 4,148 4,104 4,032 3,985 4,025 3,810 2010 4,233 4,350 4,295

  15. Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 3,649 3,687 3,775 3,772 3,822 3,858 3,789 3,785 3,810 3,799 3,786 3,776 2007 3,718 3,672 3,750 3,794 3,866 3,875 3,869 3,759 3,784 3,789 3,785 3,793 2008 3,797 3,791 3,820 3,852 3,934 3,989 4,008 3,896 2,960 3,718 3,916 3,802 2009 3,829 3,925 3,941 4,034 4,119 4,134 4,220 4,382 4,448 4,616 4,801 4,772 2010 4,930 5,193 5,385

  16. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest.

  17. Concentrating Solar Deployment System (CSDS) -- A New Model for Estimating U.S. Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Market Potential: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Short, W.; Heimiller, D.

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents the Concentrating Solar Deployment System Model (CSDS). CSDS is a multiregional, multitime-period, Geographic Information System (GIS), and linear programming model of capacity expansion in the electric sector of the United States. CSDS is designed to address the principal market and policy issues related to the penetration of concentrating solar power (CSP) electric-sector technologies. This paper discusses the current structure, capabilities, and assumptions of the model. Additionally, results are presented for the impact of continued research and development (R&D) spending, an extension to the investment tax credit (ITC), and use of a production tax credit (PTC). CSDS is an extension of the Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model created at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). While WinDS examines issues related to wind, CSDS is an extension to analyze similar issues for CSP applications. Specifically, a detailed representation of parabolic trough systems with thermal storage has been developed within the existing structure.

  18. Solar Power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Power Solar Power Project Opportunities Abound in the Region The WIPP site is receives abundant solar energy with 6-7 kWh/sq meter power production potential As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the WIPP site enjoys abundant year-round sunshine. With an average solar power production potential of 6-7 kWh/sq meter per day, one exciting project being studied for location at WIPP is a 30-50 MW Solar Power Tower: The American Solar Energy Society (ASES) is is a national trade

  19. Fact# 904: December 21, 2015 Gross Domestic Product and Vehicle Travel:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Both Increased during 2015 | Department of Energy 4: December 21, 2015 Gross Domestic Product and Vehicle Travel: Both Increased during 2015 Fact# 904: December 21, 2015 Gross Domestic Product and Vehicle Travel: Both Increased during 2015 SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week The nation's highway vehicle miles of travel (VMT) and the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) reflect strikingly similar patterns, indicating the strong relationship between the nation's economy and its travel. Beginning in

  20. Fact #904: December 21, 2015 Gross Domestic Product and Vehicle Travel:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Both Increased during 2015 - Dataset | Department of Energy Fact #904: December 21, 2015 Gross Domestic Product and Vehicle Travel: Both Increased during 2015 - Dataset Fact #904: December 21, 2015 Gross Domestic Product and Vehicle Travel: Both Increased during 2015 - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Gross Domestic Product and Vehicle Travel: Both Increased during 2015 fotw#904_web_rev.xlsx (19.75 KB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Spring 2016 Quarterly

  1. Table 6.4 Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Natural Gas Well Productivity, 1960-2011

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Natural Gas Well Productivity, 1960-2011 Year Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals From Crude Oil, Natural Gas, Coalbed, and Shale Gas Wells Natural Gas Well Productivity Texas 1 Louisiana 1 Oklahoma Other States 1 Federal Gulf of Mexico 2 Total Onshore Offshore Total Gross With- drawals From Natural Gas Wells 3 Producing Wells 4 Average Productivity Federal State Total Million Cubic Feet Million Cubic Feet Million Cubic Feet Number Cubic Feet per Well 1960 6,964,900

  2. Feasibility assessment of the water energy resources of the United States for new low power and small hydro classes of hydroelectric plants: Appendix B - Assessment results by state

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 were evaluated to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MWa) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MWa) projects. The methodologies for performing the feasibility assessment and estimating hydropower potential are described. The results for the country in terms of the number of feasible sites, their total gross power potential, and their total hydropower potential are presented. The spatial distribution of the feasible potential projects is presented on maps of the conterminous U.S. and Alaska and Hawaii. Results summaries for each of the 50 states are presented in Appendix B. The results of the study are also viewable using a Virtual Hydropower Prospector geographic information system application accessible on the Internet at: http://hydropower.inl.gov/prospector.

  3. Feasibility Assessment of Water Energy Resources of the United States for New Low Power and Small Hydro Classes of Hydroelectric Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas G. Hall

    2006-01-01

    Water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 were evaluated to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MW) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MW) projects. The methodologies for performing the feasibility assessment and estimating hydropower potential are described. The results for the country in terms of the number of feasible sites, their total gross power potential, and their total hydropower potential are presented. The spatial distribution of the feasible potential projects is presented on maps of the conterminous U.S. and Alaska and Hawaii. Results summaries for each of the 50 states are presented in an appendix. The results of the study are also viewable using a Virtual Hydropower Prospector geographic information system application accessible on the Internet at: http://hydropower.inl.gov/prospector.

  4. Feasibility assessment of the water energy resources of the United States for new low power and small hydro classes of hydroelectric plants: Main report and Appendix A

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Douglas G.; Reeves, Kelly S.; Brizzee, Julie; Lee, Randy D.; Carroll, Gregory R.; Sommers, Garold L.

    2006-01-01

    Water energy resource sites identified in the resource assessment study reported in Water Energy Resources of the United States with Emphasis on Low Head/Low Power Resources, DOE/ID-11111, April 2004 were evaluated to identify which could feasibly be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of the sites estimated in the previous study was refined to determine the realistic hydropower potential of the sites using a set of development criteria assuming they are developed as low power (less than 1 MWa) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MWa) projects. The methodologies for performing the feasibility assessment and estimating hydropower potential are described. The results for the country in terms of the number of feasible sites, their total gross power potential, and their total hydropower potential are presented. The spatial distribution of the feasible potential projects is presented on maps of the conterminous U.S. and Alaska and Hawaii. Results summaries for each of the 50 states are presented in an appendix. The results of the study are also viewable using a Virtual Hydropower Prospector geographic information system application accessible on the Internet at: http://hydropower.inl.gov/prospector.

  5. U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Gross Withdrawals 26,056,893 26,816,085 28,479,026 29,542,313 30,005,254 31,895,427 1936-2014 From Gas Wells 14,414,287 13,247,498 12,291,070 12,504,227 11,255,616 1967-2013 From Oil Wells 5,674,120 5,834,703 5,907,919 4,965,833 5,427,676 1967-2013 From Shale Gas Wells 3,958,315 5,817,122

  6. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2009 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2013 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2014 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2015 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA

  7. Concentrating Solar Power Projects - Crescent Dunes Solar Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Turbine Capacity (Gross): 110.0 MW Turbine Capacity (Net): 110.0 MW Turbine Manufacturer: Alstom Output Type: Steam Rankine Power Cycle Pressure: 115.0 bar Cooling Method: Hybrid ...

  8. Spatial confinement and thermal deconfinement in the Gross-Neveu model

    SciTech Connect

    Malbouisson, J. M. C.; Khanna, F. C.; Malbouisson, A. P. C.

    2007-06-19

    We discuss the occurrence of spatial confinement and thermal deconfinement in the massive, D-dimensional, Gross-Neveu model with compactified spatial dimensions.

  9. Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Logging Systems (December 1983) | Department of Energy Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983) Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983) Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983) Grade Assignments for Models Used for Calibration of Gross-Count Gamma-Ray Logging Systems (December 1983) (2.28 MB)

  10. Natural Gas Electric Power Price

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...

  11. Investigation of the Potential for Biofuel Blends in Residual Oil-Fired Power Generation Units as an Emissions Reduction Strategy for New York State

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, C.R.; McDonald, R.

    2009-05-01

    There is a significant amount of oil, about 12.6 million barrels per year, used for power generation in New York State. The majority of it is residual oil. The primary reason for using residual oil probably is economic, as these fuels are cheaper than distillates. However, the stack emissions from the use of such fuels, especially in densely populated urban areas, can be a cause for concern. The emissions of concern include sulfur and nitrogen oxides and particulates, particularly PM 2.5. Blending with distillate (ASTM No.2) fuels may not reduce some or all of these emissions. Hence, a case can be made for blending with biofuels, such as biodiesel, as they tend to have very little fuel bound sulfur and nitrogen and have been shown in prior work at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to reduce NOx emissions as well in small boilers. Some of the research carried out at CANMET in Canada has shown potential reductions in PM with blending of biodiesel in distillate oil. There is also the benefit obtaining from the renewable nature of biofuels in reducing the net carbon dioxide emitted thus contributing to the reduction of green house gases that would otherwise be emitted to the atmosphere. The present project was conceived to examine the potential for such benefits of blending biofuels with residual oil. A collaboration was developed with personnel at the New York City Poletti Power Plant of the New York Power Authority. Their interest arose from an 800 MW power plant that was using residual oil and which was mandated to be shut down in 2010 because of environmental concerns. A blend of 20% biodiesel in residual oil had also been tested for a short period of about two days in that boiler a couple of years back. In this project, emission measurements including particulate measurements of PM2.5 were made in the commercial boiler test facility at BNL described below. Baseline tests were done using biodiesel as the blending biofuel. Biodiesel is currently and probably in

  12. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Summary of results. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, D.W.; Staple, B.D.; Daniel, S.L.

    1995-07-01

    During 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry and Grand Gulf, were selected as the plants to be studied by Brookhaven National Laboratory (Surry) and Sandia National Laboratories (Grand Gulf). This report documents the work performed during the analysis of the Grand Gulf plant. A phased approach was used for the overall study. In Phase 1, the objectives were to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenario frequencies and risks, and to provide a foundation for a detailed Phase 2 analysis. It was in Phase 1 that the concept of plant operational states (POSs) was developed to allow the analysts to better represent the plant as it transitions from power operation to nonpower operation than was possible with the traditional technical specification divisions of modes of operation. This phase consisted of a coarse screening analysis performed for all POSs, including seismic and internal fire and flood for some POSs. In Phase 2, POS 5 (approximately cold shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications) during a refueling outage was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the Phase 1 study. The scope of the Level 1 study includes plant damage state analysis and uncertainty analysis and is documented in a multi-volume NUREG/CR report (i.e., NUREG/CR-6143). The internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4, respectively. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. The Level 2/3 study of the traditional internal events is documented in Volume 6, and a summary of the results for all analyses is documented in Volume 1.

  13. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 1231 Reserves ...

  14. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History ...

  15. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History ...

  16. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 1231 Reserves ...

  17. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History ...

  18. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 1231 Reserves ...

  19. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History ...

  20. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2014 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2015 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2016 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available;

  1. Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2014 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2015 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2016 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  2. NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Power Block R&D

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Power block research at NREL focuses on assessing the potential of advanced power cycles to integrate with concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. This research increases the ...

  3. Detection of potential genetic hazards in complex environmental mixtures using plant cytogenetics and microbial mutagenesis assays. [Arsenic-contaminated groundwater and power plant fly ash extract

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, M J; Lowe, K; Rao, T K; Larimer, F W; Epler, J L

    1980-01-01

    Solid wastes have been characterized to determine their potential hazards to humans and the environment. An arsenic-contaminated ground water sample increased the frequency of histidine revertants in Salmonella typhimurium (TA-98) at 0.025 to 5.000 ..mu..l per plate with Aroclor-induced S-9 liver microsomes. When 2.5 to 75 ..mu..l of the XAD-2 concentrate (12.5-fold, v:v) were used, the mutant frequency was increased in strains TA-98, TA-100, and TA-1537; metabolic activation was not required. Only the XAD-2 concentrate was mutagenic in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid strain XL-7-10B; metabolic activation was not required. The mutagenic principal, which is not known, appears to be at the limit of resolution; hence, the XAD-2 concentration is necessary to demonstrate mutagenic activity. The arsenic-contaminated ground water (0.0625 and 0.125 dilutions) and the power plant fly ash extract (undiluted) increased the frequency of bridges and fragements at anaphase in root tip cells of Hordeum. The fly ash sample was negative in the microbial assays. Results emphasize (1) the need for a battery of assays with different organisms and (2) the potential of a simple assay using plant root tip cells to detect mutagenic activity in complex environmental mixtures.

  4. Fact #768: February 25, 2013 New Light Vehicle Sales and Gross Domestic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Product | Department of Energy 8: February 25, 2013 New Light Vehicle Sales and Gross Domestic Product Fact #768: February 25, 2013 New Light Vehicle Sales and Gross Domestic Product Over the last four decades, new light vehicle sales have gone from a low of 9.9 million vehicles in 1970 to a high of 17.1 million vehicles sold in 2001, but along the way, there have been significant ups and downs. Those ups and downs are also reflected in the change in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) over time

  5. Fact #621: May 3, 2010 Gross Vehicle Weight vs. Empty Vehicle Weight

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The gross weight of a vehicle (GVW) is the weight of the empty vehicle plus the weight of the maximum payload that the vehicle was designed to carry. In cars and small light trucks, the difference...

  6. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7:59:57 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSNUSMMCF" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas ...

  7. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4e. Gross Output by Selected Industries...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    e Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4e. Gross Output1by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars 2) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002...

  8. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3e. Gross Output by Selected Industries...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    e Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3e. Gross Output1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998...

  9. Fact #564: March 30, 2009 Transportation and the Gross Domestic Product, 2007

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation plays a major role in the U.S. economy. About 10% of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2007 is related to transportation. Housing, health care, and food are the only...

  10. OSTIblog Articles in the David Gross Topic | OSTI, US Dept of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    David Gross Topic 100th DOE R&D Accomplishments Feature Page Celebration by Linda McBrearty 07 Jul, 2013 in Products and Content 7566 Accomp100slide.preview.jpg 100th DOE R&D ...

  11. 23 V.S.A. Section 1392 Gross Weight Limits on Highways | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Section 1392 Gross Weight Limits on HighwaysLegal Abstract Statute establishes the motor vehicle weight, load size, not to exceed 80,000 pounds without a permit. Published NA...

  12. Simulation of gross and net erosion of high-Z materials in the DIII-D divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, William R.; Ding, R.; Stangeby, P. C.; Elder, J. D.; Tskhakaya, D.; Kirschner, A.; Guo, H. Y.; Chan, V. S.; McLean, A. G.; Snyder, P. B.; Rudakov, D. L.

    2015-12-17

    The three-dimensional Monte Carlo code ERO has been used to simulate dedicated DIII-D experiments in which Mo and W samples with different sizes were exposed to controlled and well-diagnosed divertor plasma conditions to measure the gross and net erosion rates. Experimentally, the net erosion rate is significantly reduced due to the high local redeposition probability of eroded high-Z materials, which according to the modelling is mainly controlled by the electric field and plasma density within the Chodura sheath. Similar redeposition ratios were obtained from ERO modelling with three different sheath models for small angles between the magnetic field and the material surface, mainly because of their similar mean ionization lengths. The modelled redeposition ratios are close to the measured value. Decreasing the potential drop across the sheath can suppress both gross and net erosion because sputtering yield is decreased due to lower incident energy while the redeposition ratio is not reduced owing to the higher electron density in the Chodura sheath. Taking into account material mixing in the ERO surface model, the net erosion rate of high-Z materials is shown to be strongly dependent on the carbon impurity concentration in the background plasma; higher carbon concentration can suppress net erosion. As a result, the principal experimental results such as net erosion rate and profile and redeposition ratio are well reproduced by the ERO simulations.

  13. Simulation of gross and net erosion of high-Z materials in the DIII-D divertor

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Wampler, William R.; Ding, R.; Stangeby, P. C.; Elder, J. D.; Tskhakaya, D.; Kirschner, A.; Guo, H. Y.; Chan, V. S.; McLean, A. G.; Snyder, P. B.; et al

    2015-12-17

    The three-dimensional Monte Carlo code ERO has been used to simulate dedicated DIII-D experiments in which Mo and W samples with different sizes were exposed to controlled and well-diagnosed divertor plasma conditions to measure the gross and net erosion rates. Experimentally, the net erosion rate is significantly reduced due to the high local redeposition probability of eroded high-Z materials, which according to the modelling is mainly controlled by the electric field and plasma density within the Chodura sheath. Similar redeposition ratios were obtained from ERO modelling with three different sheath models for small angles between the magnetic field and themore » material surface, mainly because of their similar mean ionization lengths. The modelled redeposition ratios are close to the measured value. Decreasing the potential drop across the sheath can suppress both gross and net erosion because sputtering yield is decreased due to lower incident energy while the redeposition ratio is not reduced owing to the higher electron density in the Chodura sheath. Taking into account material mixing in the ERO surface model, the net erosion rate of high-Z materials is shown to be strongly dependent on the carbon impurity concentration in the background plasma; higher carbon concentration can suppress net erosion. As a result, the principal experimental results such as net erosion rate and profile and redeposition ratio are well reproduced by the ERO simulations.« less

  14. Characterization of the LiSi/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/FeS(2) System for Potential Use as a Geothermal Borehole Power Source

    SciTech Connect

    GUIDOTTI, RONALD A.; REINHARDT, FREDERICK W.

    1999-10-18

    We are continuing to study the suitability of modified thermal-battery technology as a potential power source for geothermal borehole applications. Previous work focused on the LiSi/FeS{sub 2} couple over a temperature range of 350 C to 400 C with the LiBr-KBr-LiF eutectic, which melts at 324.5 C. In this work, the discharge processes that take place in LiSi/CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic/FeS{sub 2} thermal cells were studied at temperatures between 250 C and 400 C using pelletized cells with immobilized electrolyte. The CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic was selected because of its lower melting point (228.5 C). Incorporation of a quasi-reference electrode allowed the determination of the relative contribution of each electrode to the overall cell polarization. The results of single-cell tests and limited battery tests are presented, along with preliminary data for battery stacks tested in a simulated geothermal borehole environment.

  15. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capturefrom Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 GeologicStorage

    SciTech Connect

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-02-23

    Conventional coal-burning power plants are major contributors of excess CO2 to the atmospheric inventory. Because such plants are stationary, they are particularly amenable to CO2 capture and disposal by deep injection into confined geologic formations. However, the energy penalty for CO2 separation and compression is steep, and could lead to a 30-40 percent reduction in useable power output. Integrated gas combined cycle (IGCC) plants are thermodynamically more efficient, i.e.,produce less CO2 for a given power output, and are more suitable for CO2 capture. Therefore, if CO2 capture and deep subsurface disposal were to be considered seriously, the preferred approach would be to build replacement IGCC plants with integrated CO2 capture, rather than retrofit existing conventional plants. Coal contains minor quantities of sulfur and nitrogen compounds, which are of concern, as their release into the atmosphere leads to the formation of urban ozone and acid rain, the destruction of stratospheric ozone, and global warming. Coal also contains many trace elements that are potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. During CO2 separation and capture, these constituents could inadvertently contaminate the separated CO2 and be co-injected. The concentrations and speciation of the co-injected contaminants would differ markedly, depending on whether CO2 is captured during the operation of a conventional or an IGCC plant, and the specific nature of the plant design and CO2 separation technology. However, regardless of plant design or separation procedures, most of the hazardous constituents effectively partition into the solid waste residue. This would lead to an approximately two order of magnitude reduction in contaminant concentration compared with that present in the coal. Potential exceptions are Hg in conventional plants, and Hg and possibly Cd, Mo and Pb in IGCC plants. CO2 capture and injection disposal could afford an opportunity to deliberately capture

  16. Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced and Other Oil Field...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... was calculated assuming a temperature drop to 70C and efficiencies varying by ... TM MT ORC Module Power 125 kW Gross Voltage 3, 400 to 480 V L-L (Nominal) Frequency ...

  17. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix I, Volume 2, Part 5

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.; Holmes, B.

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL) and Sandia National Labs. (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this volume of the report is to document the approach utilized in the level-1 internal events PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1, which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis examining accidents initiated by internal events (including internal fire and flood) was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis.

  18. ,"California--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  19. ,"Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  20. North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 158 155 160 165 167 169 170 174 182 186 185 190 2007 187 188 185 189 191 194 196 204 202 203 207 182 2008 209 207 215 221 232 243 243 249 260 267 269 242 2009 241 243 245 250 247 249 258 263 260 255 267 262 2010 252 272 279 282 302 305 324 331 343 348 360 343 2011 340 342 360 359 364 397 434 466

  1. ,"Other States Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Other States Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","8/2016","01/15/1989" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release

  2. ,"Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","na1060_rtxsf_2a.xls"

  3. ,"US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","na1060_rusf_2a.xls"

  4. ,"US--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","US--State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","na1060_russf_2a.xls"

  5. Capturing the Invisible Resource. Analysis of Waste Heat Potential in Chinese Industry and Policy Options for Waste Heat to Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Hongyou

    2015-05-01

    This study analyzed the theoretical maximum potential and practical potential of waste heat in the cement, iron, and steel, and glass sectors in China, based on thermal energy modeling, expert interviews, and literature reviews.

  6. "Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected vs. Actual"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Real GDP Growth Trend" " (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO

  7. Gross error detection and stage efficiency estimation in a separation process

    SciTech Connect

    Serth, R.W.; Srikanth, B. . Dept. of Chemical and Natural Gas Engineering); Maronga, S.J. . Dept. of Chemical and Process Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    Accurate process models are required for optimization and control in chemical plants and petroleum refineries. These models involve various equipment parameters, such as stage efficiencies in distillation columns, the values of which must be determined by fitting the models to process data. Since the data contain random and systematic measurement errors, some of which may be large (gross errors), they must be reconciled to obtain reliable estimates of equipment parameters. The problem thus involves parameter estimation coupled with gross error detection and data reconciliation. MacDonald and Howat (1988) studied the above problem for a single-stage flash distillation process. Their analysis was based on the definition of stage efficiency due to Hausen, which has some significant disadvantages in this context, as discussed below. In addition, they considered only data sets which contained no gross errors. The purpose of this article is to extend the above work by considering alternative definitions of state efficiency and efficiency estimation in the presence of gross errors.

  8. Prospects for the medium- and long-term development of China`s electric power industry and analysis of the potential market for superconductivity technology

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.

    1998-05-01

    First of all, overall economic growth objectives in China are concisely and succinctly specified in this report. Secondly, this report presents a forecast of energy supply and demand for China`s economic growth for 2000--2050. In comparison with the capability of energy construction in China in the future, a gap between supply and demand is one of the important factors hindering the sustainable development of Chain`s economy. The electric power industry is one of China`s most important industries. To adopt energy efficiency through high technology and utilizing energy adequately is an important technological policy for the development of China`s electric power industry in the future. After briefly describing the achievements of China`s electric power industry, this report defines the target areas and policies for the development of hydroelectricity and nuclear electricity in the 2000s in China, presents the strategic position of China`s electric power industry as well as objectives and relevant plans of development for 2000--2050. This report finds that with the discovery of superconducting electricity, the discovery of new high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, and progress in materials techniques, the 21st century will be an era of superconductivity. Applications of superconductivity in the energy field, such as superconducting storage, superconducting transmission, superconducting transformers, superconducting motors, its application in Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD), as well as in nuclear fusion, has unique advantages. Its market prospects are quite promising. 12 figs.

  9. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendices F-H, Volume 2, Part 4

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.; Holmes, B.

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

  10. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Main report and appendices, Volume 6, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.D.; Kmetyk, L.N.; Whitehead, D.; Miller, L.; Forester, J.; Johnson, J.

    1995-03-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAS) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Recent studies and operational experience have, however, implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. In response to this concern, in 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The program consists of two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (Surry) and Sandia National Laboratories (Grand Gulf). The program objectives include assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing the estimated risks with the risk associated with accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program is that of a Level-3 PRA. The subject of this report is the PRA of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit 1. The Grand Gulf plant utilizes a 3833 MWt BUR-6 boiling water reactor housed in a Mark III containment. The Grand Gulf plant is located near Port Gibson, Mississippi. The regime of shutdown analyzed in this study was plant operational state (POS) 5 during a refueling outage, which is approximately Cold Shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications. The entire PRA of POS 5 is documented in a multi-volume NUREG report (NUREG/CR-6143). The internal events accident sequence analysis (Level 1) is documented in Volume 2. The Level 1 internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Vols 3 and 4, respectively.

  11. Gaussian-type light bullet solutions of the (3+1)-dimensional Schrödinger equation with cubic and power-law nonlinearities in PT-symmetric potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hai-Ping; Dai, Chao-Qing

    2014-12-15

    Two kinds of Gaussian-type light bullet (LB) solutions of the (3+1)-dimensional Schrödinger equation with cubic and power-law nonlinearities in PT-symmetric potentials are analytically obtained. The phase switches, powers and transverse power-flow densities of these solutions in homogeneous media are studied. The linear stability analysis of these LB solutions and the direct numerical simulation indicate that LB solutions are stable below some thresholds for the imaginary part of PT-symmetric potentials in the defocusing cubic and focusing power-law nonlinear medium, while they are always unstable for all parameters in other media. Moreover, the broadened and compressed behaviors of LBs in the exponential periodic amplification system and diffraction decreasing system are discussed. Results indicate that LB is more stable for the sign-changing nonlinearity in the exponential periodic amplification system than for the non-sign-changing nonlinearity in the diffraction decreasing system at the same propagation distances.

  12. PowerPoint Presentation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Power Overview Unique Capabilities * SEAWOLF laboratoryfield oscillatory-flow sediment transport testing * Sandia Lake Facility - potential for large scale wave testing * ...

  13. J.S. 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; VECTORS; ELECTRIC...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    power and power factor of instantaneous phasors Hsu, J.S. 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; VECTORS; ELECTRIC CURRENTS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; MONITORING; POWER SYSTEMS;...

  14. U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Offshore (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gross Withdrawals Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3,932,196 5,111,413 5,603,025 1980's 5,650,097 5,693,432 5,466,050 4,734,843 5,220,061 4,631,756 4,588,565 5,078,178 5,180,875 5,231,028 1990's 5,509,312 5,308,457 5,324,039 5,373,300 5,700,666 5,431,665 5,843,661 5,906,329 5,800,561 5,689,438 2000's 5,699,377 5,815,542 5,312,348 5,215,683 4,736,252

  15. New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 149 147 143 142 138 137 156 155 158 167 172 175 2007 146 144 141 139 136 135 153 152 155 164 169 172 2008 134 128 129 128 124 123 140 139 142 150 155 157 2009 119 118 115 114 111 110 125 124 127 134 138 140 2010 95 94 92 91 89 88 99 99 101 107 110 112 2011 83 82 80 79 77 76 86 86 88 93 96 97 2012 73 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72

  16. South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 31 32 31 26 29 29 28 28 28 30 29 28 2007 29 29 31 31 32 32 31 31 37 34 37 36 2008 34 31 32 34 17 34 36 37 37 36 34 32 2009 35 36 37 37 38 38 35 34 33 33 34 35 2010 33 36 35 34 35 34 33 33 43 35 32 29 2011 28 29 29 31 29 32 36 37 37 39 40 41 2012 41 42 43 43 45 43 42 40 40 39 41 35 2013 42 43 44 46

  17. West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 588 611 599 584 608 616 606 654 628 622 645 652 2007 617 615 609 619 626 631 635 629 662 628 673 657 2008 662 676 663 662 658 670 674 678 657 692 681 657 2009 679 695 712 724 731 735 733 741 751 743 742 706 2010 702 711 708 714 717 727 729 730 738 751 754 737 2011 884 935 976 1,016 1,030 1,078 1,135 1,118 1,211 1,180

  18. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Cubic Feet per Day) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 7,927 7,675 7,768 7,985 8,290 8,296 8,302 8,121 7,992 7,849 7,894 7,685 2007 7,628 7,682 7,741 7,786 7,857 7,672 7,490 7,395 7,410 7,720 7,778 8,322 2008 7,815 7,916 7,757 7,010 6,762 7,339 7,468 6,868 2,100 4,368 5,297 5,672 2009

  19. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risk during mid-loop operations. Main report. Volume 6. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, J.; Lin, C.C.; Neymotin, L.

    1995-05-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1 which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis including internal fire and flood was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The results of the phase 2 level 2/3 study are the subject of this volume of NUREG/CR-6144, Volume 6.

  20. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices E (Sections E.1--E.8). Volume 2, Part 3A

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. The authors recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful.

  1. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices A--D. Volume 2, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the Potential risks during low Power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the Plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. We recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful. This document, Volume 2, Pt. 2 provides appendices A through D of this report.

  2. Wind power soars

    SciTech Connect

    Flavin, C.

    1996-12-31

    Opinions on the world market for wind power are presented in this paper. Some data for global wind power generating capacity are provided. European and other markets are discussed individually. Estimated potential for wind power is given for a number of countries. 3 figs.

  3. Catalog of DC Appliances and Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Garbesi, Karina; Vossos, Vagelis; Shen, Hongxia

    2010-10-13

    This document catalogs the characteristics of current and potential future DC products and power systems.

  4. Active Power Control from Wind Power (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Ela, E.; Brooks, D.

    2011-04-01

    In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

  5. Geothermal Power Generation Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196°F resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  6. ,"Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Offshore (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","na1090_sak_2a.xls"

  7. ,"California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Offshore (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","na1090_sca_2a.xls"

  8. ,"Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2015,"06/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  9. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2015,"06/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  10. ,"Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2015,"06/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  11. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2015,"06/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  12. ,"Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2015,"06/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  13. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2015,"06/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  14. ,"Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2015,"06/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  15. ,"Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2015,"06/30/1991" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  16. ,"Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","8/2016" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  17. ,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2015,"06/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  18. ,"Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","8/2016" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  19. ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2015,"06/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  20. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Annual",2015,"06/30/1967" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  1. ,"Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Offshore (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","na1090_stx_2a.xls"

  2. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Offshore (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Offshore (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Offshore (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","na1090_nus_2a.xls" ,"Available

  3. WATER POWER SOLAR POWER WIND POWER

    Energy Saver

    coloring book get curren WATER POWER SOLAR POWER WIND POWER Be part of the Clean Energy Generation YOUR HOUSE BIOMASS ENERGY GEOTHERMAL ENERGY Clean energy can come from the sun. ...

  4. Water Power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary PowerEnergy Conversion EfficiencyWater Power Water Power Tara Camacho-Lopez 2016-06-01T22:32:54+00:00 Enabling a successful water power industry. Hydropower ...

  5. New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 4,406 4,418 4,460 4,393 4,430 4,456 4,463 4,466 4,505 4,473 4,447 4,327 2007 4,201 4,250 4,287 4,273 4,345 4,341 4,323 4,217 4,363 4,284 4,262 3,997 2008 3,820 3,958 4,128 4,157 4,170 3,975 4,179 4,092 4,069 4,168 4,078 3,957 2009 3,968 4,063 4,018 3,979 3,960 3,857 3,863 3,927 3,818 3,914 3,865 3,635 2010 3,630 3,650 3,630

  6. High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants DOE ...

  7. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Power Annual 1997, Volume 2 contains annual summary statistics at national, regional, and state levels for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; power transactions; and demand-side management. Also included are data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity; gross generation; emissions; and supply and disposition of energy. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. 15 figs., 62 tabs.

  8. Fuel Cycle Comparison for Distributed Power Technologies

    Publication and Product Library

    This report examines backup power and prime power systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental effects of substituting fuel cells for existing combustion technologies based on microtur

  9. NREL: Water Power Research - Projects

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects NREL's water power R&D projects support industry efforts to develop and deploy cost-effective water power technologies and to better understand the value and potential of...

  10. Markets for concentrating solar power

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-04-01

    The report describes the markets for concentrating solar power. As concentrating solar power technologies advance into the early stages of commercialization, their economic potential becomes more sharply defined and increasingly tangible.

  11. U.S. Forward Operating Base Applications of Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, George W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a high level overview of current nuclear power technology and the potential use of nuclear power at military bases. The size, power ranges, and applicability of nuclear power units for military base power are reviewed. Previous and current reactor projects are described to further define the potential for nuclear power for military power.

  12. Wide Bandgap Power Electronics

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Wide Bandgap Power Electronics 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ............................................................................................... 1 4 2. Technology Assessment and Potential ................................................................................................. 3 5 2.1 Performance advances in SiC ........................................................................................................ 3 6 2.2

  13. Power Sector Modeling 101

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Erin Boyd Department of Energy - Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis erin.boyd@hq.doe.gov DOE's Technical Assistance Website www.energy.gov/ta Power Sector Modeling 101 2 Presentation Description - DOE Power Sector Modeling 101 With increased energy planning needs and new regulations, environmental agencies, state energy offices and others have expressed more of an interest in electric power sector models, both for (a) interpreting the results and potential applications of modeling from

  14. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    SciTech Connect

    Jose, Zayas; Michael, Derby; Patrick, Gilman; Ananthan, Shreyas; Lantz, Eric; Cotrell, Jason; Beck, Fredic; Tusing, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Leveraging this experience, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Wind and Water Power Technologies Office has evaluated the potential for wind power to generate electricity in all 50 states. This report analyzes and quantifies the geographic expansion that could be enabled by accessing higher above ground heights for wind turbines and considers the means by which this new potential could be responsibly developed.

  15. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 0

    from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next

  16. Potential for seasonal power oversupply in 2013

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Columbia Generating Station, and the inclusion of non-Treaty storage in the HYDSIM rate case study. The non-Treaty assumptions reduced regional hydro generation by hundreds of...

  17. Maibarara Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    1 Avg. Annual Gross Operating Capacity(MW) Summer Peak Net Capacity (MW) Winter Peak Net Capacity (MW) Avg. Annual GenerationConsumption Gross Generation (MWh) 60 1...

  18. 1990 yearly calibration of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's gross-gamma borehole geophysical logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, R.J.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the 1990 yearly calibration of a gross-gamma geophysical pulse logging system owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The calibration was conducted to permit the continued use of this system for geological and hydrologic studies associated with remedial investigation at the Hanford Site. Primary calibrations to equivalent uranium units were conducted in borehole model standards that were recently moved to the Hanford Site from the DOE field calibration facility in Spokane, Washington. The calibrations were performed in borehole models SBL/SBH and SBA/SBB, which contain low equivalent-uranium concentrations. The integrity of the system throughout the previous year from gamma-ray monitoring was demonstrated using the before- and after-logging field calibration readings with the field source in calibration Positions 1 and 2. Most of the Position 1 readings are within an 8% limit that is set by the governing PNL technical reference procedure as a critical value above which the instrument is considered suspect. Many of the Position 2 readings exceed the 8% limit; however, the fluctuation was traced to field-source geometry variability that affected Position 1 count rates by up to 6% and Position 2 count rates by as much as 16%. Correlations were established based on two similar approaches for relating observed count rate in before- and after-logging field calibrations to equivalent uranium concentrations. The temperature drift of the gamma-ray probe was documented and amounts to less than 0.1%/{degree}C within the temperature range 0{degree}C to 42{degree}C. The low-energy cutoff for the gross gamma-ray probe was determined to be between 46.5 and 59.5 keV. 10 refs., 4 figs., 13 tabs.

  19. WINDExchange: Potential Wind Capacity

    WindExchange

    Potential Wind Capacity Potential wind capacity maps are provided for a 2014 industry standard wind turbine installed on a 110-m tower, which represents plausible current technology options, and a wind turbine on a 140-m tower, which represents near-future technology options. For more detailed information regarding the assumptions and calculations behind the wind potential capacity maps, see the Energy Department's Enabling Wind Power Nationwide report. Enlarge image This map shows the wind

  20. Perovskite Power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Perovskite Power 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:October 2015 past issues All Issues submit Perovskite Power A breakthrough in the production of...

  1. first power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    first power - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy ... Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water ...

  2. clean power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    clean power - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy ... Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water ...

  3. Water Power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Power bernadette Permalink Gallery Bernie Hernandez-Sanchez wins HENAAC Award for outstanding technical achievement News, Water Power Bernie Hernandez-Sanchez wins HENAAC ...

  4. Application Power Signature Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Chung-Hsing; Combs, Jacob; Nazor, Jolie; Santiago, Fabian; Thysell, Rachelle; Rivoire, Suzanne; Poole, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    The high-performance computing (HPC) community has been greatly concerned about energy efficiency. To address this concern, it is essential to understand and characterize the electrical loads of HPC applications. In this work, we study whether HPC applications can be distinguished by their power-consumption patterns using quantitative measures in an automatic manner. Using a collection of 88 power traces from 4 different systems, we find that basic statistical measures do a surprisingly good job of summarizing applications' distinctive power behavior. Moreover, this study opens up a new area of research in power-aware HPC that has a multitude of potential applications.

  5. Concentrating Solar Power: Power Towers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This video provides an overview of the principles, applications, and benefits of generating electricity using power towers, a concentrating solar power (CSP) technology. A brief animation explains...

  6. Suppressed gross erosion of high-temperature lithium via rapid deuterium implantation

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Abrams, T.; Jaworski, M. A.; Chen, M.; Carter, E. A.; Kaita, R.; Stotler, D. P.; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, T. W.; van den Berg, M. A.; van der Meiden, H. J.

    2015-12-17

    Lithium-coated high-Z substrates are planned for use in the NSTX-U divertor and are a candidate plasma facing component (PFC) for reactors, but it remains necessary to characterize the gross Li erosion rate under high plasma fluxes (>1023 m-2 s-1), typical for the divertor region. In this work, a realistic model for the compositional evolution of a Li/D layer is developed that incorporates first principles molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of D diffusion in liquid Li. Predictions of Li erosion from a mixed Li/D material are also developed that include formation of lithium deuteride (LiD). The erosion rate of Li from LiDmore » is predicted to be significantly lower than from pure Li. This prediction is tested in the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device at ion fluxes of 1023-1024 m-2 s-1 and Li surface temperatures. ≤800 °C. Li/LiD coatings ranging in thickness from 0.2 to 500 μm are studied. The dynamic D/Li concentrations are inferred via diffusion simulations. The pure Li erosion rate remains greater than Langmuir Law evaporation, as expected. For mixed-material Li/LiD surfaces, the erosion rates are reduced, in good agreement with modelling in almost all cases. Lastly, these results imply that the temperature limit for a Li-coated PFC may be significantly higher than previously imagined.« less

  7. Failure of the gross theory of beta decay in neutron deficient nuclei

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Firestone, R. B.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The neutron deficient isotopes 117-121Xe, 117-124Cs, and 122-124Ba were produced by a beam of 28Si from the LBNL SuperHILAC on a target of natMo. The isotopes were mass separated and their beta decay schemes were measured with a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS). The beta strengths derived from these data decreased dramatically to levels above ≈1 MeV for the even-even decays; 3–4 MeV for even-Z, odd-N decays; 4–5 MeV for the odd-Z, even-N decays; and 7–8 MeV for the odd-Z, odd-N decays. The decreasing strength to higher excitation energies in the daughters contradicts the predictions of the Gross Theory of Betamore » Decay. The integrated beta strengths are instead found to be consistent with shell model predictions where the single-particle beta strengths are divided amoung many low-lying levels. The experimental beta strengths determined here have been used calculate the half-lives of 143 neutron deficient nuclei with Z=51–64 to a precision of 20% with respect to the measured values.« less

  8. Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected vs. Actual

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected vs. Actual Projected Real GDP Growth Trend (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 3.09 3.15 2.86 2.78 2.73 2.65 2.62 2.60 2.56 2.53 2.52 2.49 2.45 2.41 2.40 2.36 2.32 2.29 AEO 1995 3.66 2.77 2.53 2.71 2.67 2.61 2.55 2.48 2.46 2.45 2.45 2.43 2.39 2.35 2.31 2.27 2.24 AEO 1996 2.61

  9. Failure of the gross theory of beta decay in neutron deficient nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R. B.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The neutron deficient isotopes 117-121Xe, 117-124Cs, and 122-124Ba were produced by a beam of 28Si from the LBNL SuperHILAC on a target of natMo. The isotopes were mass separated and their beta decay schemes were measured with a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS). The beta strengths derived from these data decreased dramatically to levels above ≈1 MeV for the even-even decays; 3–4 MeV for even-Z, odd-N decays; 4–5 MeV for the odd-Z, even-N decays; and 7–8 MeV for the odd-Z, odd-N decays. The decreasing strength to higher excitation energies in the daughters contradicts the predictions of the Gross Theory of Beta Decay. The integrated beta strengths are instead found to be consistent with shell model predictions where the single-particle beta strengths are divided amoung many low-lying levels. The experimental beta strengths determined here have been used calculate the half-lives of 143 neutron deficient nuclei with Z=51–64 to a precision of 20% with respect to the measured values.

  10. Weak decay processes in pre-supernova core evolution within the gross theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, R. C.; Dimarco, A. J.; Samana, A. R.; Barbero, C. A.

    2014-03-20

    The beta decay and electron capture rates are of fundamental importance in the evolution of massive stars in a pre-supernova core. The beta decay process gives its contribution by emitting electrons in the plasma of the stellar core, thereby increasing pressure, which in turn increases the temperature. From the other side, the electron capture removes free electrons from the plasma of the star core contributing to the reduction of pressure and temperature. In this work we calculate the beta decay and electron capture rates in stellar conditions for 63 nuclei of relevance in the pre-supernova stage, employing Gross Theory as the nuclear model. We use the abundances calculated with the Saha equations in the hypothesis of nuclear statistical equilibrium to evaluate the time derivative of the fraction of electrons. Our results are compared with other evaluations available in the literature. They have shown to be one order less or equal than the calculated within other models. Our results indicate that these differences may influence the evolution of the star in the later stages of pre-supernova.

  11. Fusion Power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Power www.pppl.gov FACT SHEET FUSION POWER Check us out on YouTube. http:www.youtube.comppplab Find us on Facebook. http:www.facebook.comPPPLab Follow us on Twitter. @PPPLab ...

  12. Western Area Power Administration. Combined power system financial statements

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-26

    This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Western Area Power Administration`s combined power system statements of assets, Federal investment and liabilities, and the related combined statements of revenues, expenses and accumulated net revenues, and cash flows. The auditors` report on Westerns internal control structure disclosed three new reportable conditions concerning the lack of: (1) a reconciliation of stores inventory from subsidiary ledgers to summary financial information, (2) communication of interest during construction and related adjustments to interest on Federal investment, and (3) a system to prevent and detect power billing errors. None of the conditions were considered to be material weaknesses. Western provided concurrence and corrective action plans. The auditors` report on Western`s compliance with laws and regulations also disclosed two new instances of noncompliance. Western failed to calculate nonreimbursable expenses in accordance with the Grand Canyon Protection Act and had an unexplained difference in gross Federal investment balances used to calculate interest on Federal investment. Western provided concurrence and corrective action plans for the instances.

  13. Power supply

    DOEpatents

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Hamilton, Pamela Jane; Brubaker, Michael Allen

    2007-12-04

    A modular, low weight impedance dropping power supply with battery backup is disclosed that can be connected to a high voltage AC source and provide electrical power at a lower voltage. The design can be scaled over a wide range of input voltages and over a wide range of output voltages and delivered power.

  14. Southwestern Power Administration

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Business USA FedBizOpps FedConnect Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) System for Award Management (SAM) Items Southwestern Buys Southwestern buys the following types of office equipment, field equipment, and services to support its mission of marketing and delivering Federal hydroelectric power: 15/69/138/161-kV field equipment such as circuit breakers, coupling capacitor potential devices, current transformers, disconnect switches, microprocessor relays, power transformers, surge arresters,

  15. Reactive power compensator

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.; Chen, Mingliang; Andexler, George; Huang, Tony

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  16. Reactive Power Compensator.

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

    1992-07-28

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

  17. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage

    SciTech Connect

    Budnitz, R.J.; Davis, P.R.; Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H.

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf), and the other at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1). Both the Sandia and Brookhaven projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults---so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling outage conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Grand Gulf. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human effort rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Grand Gulf have been adopted here, so that the results of the study can be as comparable as possible. Both the Sandia study and this study examine only one shutdown plant operating state (POS) at Grand Gulf, namely POS 5 representing cold shutdown during a refueling outage. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POS 5. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency for earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 5 is found to be quite low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}7}/year.

  18. Gross Alpha Beta Radioactivity in Air Filters Measured by Ultra Low Level alpha/beta Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Cfarku, Florinda; Bylyku, Elida; Bakiu, Erjona; Perpunja, Flamur; Deda, Antoneta; Dhoqina, Polikron

    2010-01-21

    Study of radioactivity in air as very important for life is done regularly using different methods in every country. As a result of nuclear reactors, atomic centrals, institutions and laboratories, which use the radioactivity substances in open or closed sources, there are a lot radioactive wastes. Mixing of these wastes after treatment with rivers and lakes waters makes very important control of radioactivity. At the other side nuclear and radiological accidents are another source of the contamination of air and water. Due to their radio toxicity, especially those of Sr{sup 90}, Pu{sup 239}, etc. a contamination hazard for human begins exist even at low concentration levels. Measurements of radioactivity in air have been performed in many parts of the world mostly for assessment of the doses and risk resulting from consuming air. In this study we present the results of international comparison organized by IAEA Vienna, Austria for the air filters spiked with unknown Alpha and Beta Activity. For the calibration of system we used the same filters spiked: a) with Pu-239 as alpha source; b) Sr-90 as beta source and also the blank filter. The measurements of air filter samples after calibration of the system are done with Ultra Low Level alpha/beta Counter (MPC 9604) Protean Instrument Corporation. The high sensitivity of the system for the determination of the Gross Alpha and Beta activity makes sure detection of low values activity of air filters. Our laboratory results are: Aalpha = (0.19+-0.01) Bq/filter and Aalpha(IAEA) = (0.17+-0.009) Bq/filter; A{sub b}eta = (0.33+-0.009) Bq/filter and A{sub b}eta (IAEA) = (0.29+-0.01) Bq/filter. As it seems our results are in good agreement with reference values given by IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency).

  19. Suppressed gross erosion of high-temperature lithium via rapid deuterium implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, T.; Jaworski, M. A.; Chen, M.; Carter, E. A.; Kaita, R.; Stotler, D. P.; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, T. W.; van den Berg, M. A.; van der Meiden, H. J.

    2015-12-17

    Lithium-coated high-Z substrates are planned for use in the NSTX-U divertor and are a candidate plasma facing component (PFC) for reactors, but it remains necessary to characterize the gross Li erosion rate under high plasma fluxes (>1023 m-2 s-1), typical for the divertor region. In this work, a realistic model for the compositional evolution of a Li/D layer is developed that incorporates first principles molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of D diffusion in liquid Li. Predictions of Li erosion from a mixed Li/D material are also developed that include formation of lithium deuteride (LiD). The erosion rate of Li from LiD is predicted to be significantly lower than from pure Li. This prediction is tested in the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device at ion fluxes of 1023-1024 m-2 s-1 and Li surface temperatures. ≤800 °C. Li/LiD coatings ranging in thickness from 0.2 to 500 μm are studied. The dynamic D/Li concentrations are inferred via diffusion simulations. The pure Li erosion rate remains greater than Langmuir Law evaporation, as expected. For mixed-material Li/LiD surfaces, the erosion rates are reduced, in good agreement with modelling in almost all cases. Lastly, these results imply that the temperature limit for a Li-coated PFC may be significantly higher than previously imagined.

  20. Concentrated Thermoelectric Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This fact sheet describes a concentrated solar hydroelectric power project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by MIT, is working to demonstrate concentrating solar thermoelectric generators with >10% solar-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency while limiting optical concentration to less than a factor of 10 and potentially less than 4. When combined with thermal storage, CSTEGs have the potential to provide electricity day and night using no moving parts at both the utility and distributed scale.

  1. Power LCAT

    ScienceCinema

    Drennen, Thomas

    2016-07-12

    POWER LCAT is a software tool used to compare elements of efficiency, cost, and environmental effects between different sources of energy.

  2. Power LCAT

    SciTech Connect

    Drennen, Thomas

    2012-08-15

    POWER LCAT is a software tool used to compare elements of efficiency, cost, and environmental effects between different sources of energy.

  3. Water Power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management ... D.C. Vince Neary gave an overview of Sandia's facilities, ...

  4. Water Power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 ... Geochemistry Geoscience SubTER Carbon Sequestration Program Leadership EnergyWater Nexus ...

  5. Stationary Power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management ...

  6. EIS-0215: Pinon Pine Power Project, Tracy Station, NV

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this statement to assess the environmental and human health issues associated with the Pinon Pine Power Project, a proposed demonstration project that would be cost-shared by DOE and the Sierra Pacific Power Company (SPPCo.) under DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program. The proposed Federal action is for DOE to provide cost-shared funding support for the construction and operation of the Pinon Pine Power Project, a coal-fired power generating facility, which would be a nominal, 800-ton-per-day (104 megawatt (MW) gross generation) air-blown, Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle plant proposed by SPPCo. at its Tracy Power Station near Reno, Nevada.

  7. Reactive Power Compensating System.

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1985-01-04

    The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

  8. Some social and economic problems, tasks and purposes of nuclear power in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Adamov, E.O.; Bryunin, S.V.; Orlov, V.V.

    1996-08-01

    The complicated economic situation in Russia in power generation is manifested in a low efficiency of power utilization and in reduction of its generation and mining of energy resources. Primary energy production per capita in Russia is approximately 50% higher than on the average for Western Europe and approximately the same amount of electric power is generated. But per unit value of gross domestic product (GDP) its consumption is 3.0 and 2.7 times higher, respectively. Amount of diverse pollutants release to the atmosphere per GDP unit value is about 3.0 times higher. Restructuring of Russian economy and modernization of its power generation, which is also a matter of international community concern, will improve these indices, though it will require a lot of time and expenses. A number of aspects should be emphasized: (1) energy policy is to be considered in the context of general economic situation, as well as a key element for solving long-term social problems and base of Russia integration into the world economy; (2) comparatively large resources of fossil fuel are to be considered as national wealth and, strategically, reduction of their consumption for energy generation and export purposes should be envisaged; (3) reactor technologies, that do not rule out potentiality of recurrence of the gravest accidents (reactivity type accidents and the ones involving loss of coolant), can not be put at the foundation of large-scale NP; (4) conditions of nonproliferation that are in use now failed to prevent nuclear weapons propagation to new states and should be replaced by more effective ones; (5) for a country, where NP share in fuel and energy balance is slightly above 3%, not solely evolutionary course of development is feasible; (6) expanding scale of high-level wastes disposal is unacceptable in principle; (7) radical solution of growing ecological problems all over the world, including global warming of climate, is unthinkable without NP development.

  9. Power system

    DOEpatents

    Hickam, Christopher Dale

    2008-03-18

    A power system includes a prime mover, a transmission, and a fluid coupler having a selectively engageable lockup clutch. The fluid coupler may be drivingly connected between the prime mover and the transmission. Additionally, the power system may include a motor/generator drivingly connected to at least one of the prime mover and the transmission. The power-system may also include power-system controls configured to execute a control method. The control method may include selecting one of a plurality of modes of operation of the power system. Additionally, the control method may include controlling the operating state of the lockup clutch dependent upon the mode of operation selected. The control method may also include controlling the operating state of the motor/generator dependent upon the mode of operation selected.

  10. A power beaming based infrastructure for space power

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, J.A.

    1991-08-01

    At present all space mission power requirements are met by integral, on-board, self-contained power systems. To provide needed flexibility for space exploration and colonization, an additional approach to on-board, self-contained power systems is needed. Power beaming, an alternative approach to providing power, has the potential to provide increased mission flexibility while reducing total mass launched into space. Laser-power beaming technology provides a viable power and communication infrastructure that can be developed sequentially as it is applied to power satellite constellations in Earth orbit and to orbital transport vehicles transferring satellites and cargos to geosynchronous orbit and beyond. Coupled with nuclear electric propulsion systems for cargo transport, the technology can be used to provide global power to the Lunar surface and to Mars' surface and moons. The technology can be developed sequentially as advances in power system and propulsion system technology occur. This paper presents stepwise development of an infrastructure based on power beaming that can support the space development and exploration goals of the Space Exploration Initiative. Power scenarios based on commonality of power systems hardware with cargo transport vehicles are described. Advantages of this infrastructure are described. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production and Concentrating Solar Power: A Systems Analysis U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office January ...

  12. EIS-0102: Bonneville Power Administration's 1983 Wholesale Power Rate

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration prepared this EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with an increase in wholesale power rates that would become effective on November 1, 1983, including the effects of rate hikes in that year and the cumulative effects of previous rate hikes.

  13. EIS-0076: Bonneville Power Administration Alumax

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) developed this EIS for the proposed Alumax primary aluminum reduction plant to determine the environmental, economic and social impacts of plant construction, as well as potential power supply alternatives for BPA.

  14. Fuel Cycle Comparison for Distributed Power Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.

    2008-11-15

    This report examines backup power and prime power systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental effects of substituting fuel cells for existing combustion technologies based on microturbines and internal combustion engines.

  15. solar power

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9%2A en Solar power purchase for DOE laboratories http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasessolarpower

  16. Feasibility Study of Biopower in East Helena, Montana. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, K.

    2013-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to reuse contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The former American Smelting and Refining Company (Asarco) smelter in East Helena, Montana, was selected for a feasibility study under the initiative. Biomass was chosen as the renewable energy resource based on the wood products industry in the area. Biopower was selected as the technology based on Montana's renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requiring utilities to purchase renewable power.

  17. Power combiner

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Mobius; Ives, Robert Lawrence

    2006-09-05

    A power combiner for the combining of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy comprises a feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for reflecting launched wave energy, and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of launched wave energy. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which comprises a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which comprises a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

  18. Webinar November 19: Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Webinar November 19: Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production and Concentrating Solar Power: A Systems Analysis Webinar November 19: Potential Strategies for...

  19. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Supporting MELCOR calculations, Volume 6, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetyk, L.N.; Brown, T.D.

    1995-03-01

    To gain a better understanding of the risk significance of low power and shutdown modes of operation, the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research at the NRC established programs to investigate the likelihood and severity of postulated accidents that could occur during low power and shutdown (LP&S) modes of operation at commercial nuclear power plants. To investigate the likelihood of severe core damage accidents during off power conditions, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) were performed for two nuclear plants: Unit 1 of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, which is a BWR-6 Mark III boiling water reactor (BWR), and Unit 1 of the Surry Power Station, which is a three-loop, subatmospheric, pressurized water reactor (PWR). The analysis of the BWR was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories while the analysis of the PWR was performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This multi-volume report presents and discusses the results of the BWR analysis. The subject of this part presents the deterministic code calculations, performed with the MELCOR code, that were used to support the development and quantification of the PRA models. The background for the work documented in this report is summarized, including how deterministic codes are used in PRAS, why the MELCOR code is used, what the capabilities and features of MELCOR are, and how the code has been used by others in the past. Brief descriptions of the Grand Gulf plant and its configuration during LP&S operation and of the MELCOR input model developed for the Grand Gulf plant in its LP&S configuration are given.

  20. Electric power annual 1994. Volume 2, Operational and financial data

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-28

    This year, the annual is published in two volumes. Volume I focused on US electric utilities and contained final 1994 data on net generation, fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost. This Volume II presents annual 1994 summary statistics for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are preliminary data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on form EIA-861) and for electric utility financial statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, and demand- side management. Final 1994 data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity and gross generation, as well as supply and disposition information, are also provided in Volume II. Technical notes and a glossary are included.

  1. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of a Hydroelectric Installation at the Jeddo Mine Drainage Tunnel. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J. O.; Mosey, G.

    2013-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Jeddo Tunnel discharge site for a feasibility study of renewable energy potential. The purpose of this report is to assess technical and economic viability of the site for hydroelectric and geothermal energy production. In addition, the report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system.

  2. Emerging Technologies: Energy Storage for PV Power

    SciTech Connect

    Ponoum, Ratcharit; Rutberg, Michael; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-11-30

    The article discusses available technologies for energy storage for photovoltaic power systems, and also addresses the efficiency levels and market potential of these strategies.

  3. and the Western Area Power Administration...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    ... resources is the potential for distortion of pricing. ... power is not part of WAPA's historical mission. Nevertheless, WAPA has made substantial efforts to integrate renewable energy. ...

  4. SunLab: Advancing Concentrating Solar Power Technology

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-24

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies, including parabolic troughs, power towers, and dish/engines, have the potential to provide the world with tens of thousands of megawatts of clean, renewable, cost-competitive power.

  5. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Geothermal Power Generation at the Lakeview Uranium Mill Site in Lakeview, Oregon. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hillesheim, M.; Mosey, G.

    2013-11-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Lakeview Uranium Mill site in Lakeview, Oregon, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The EPA contracted with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to provide technical assistance for the project. The purpose of this report is to describe an assessment of the site for possible development of a geothermal power generation facility and to estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts for the facility. In addition, the report recommends development pathways that could assist in the implementation of a geothermal power system at the site.

  6. Power inverters

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David H.; Korich, Mark D.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2011-11-15

    Power inverters include a frame and a power module. The frame has a sidewall including an opening and defining a fluid passageway. The power module is coupled to the frame over the opening and includes a substrate, die, and an encasement. The substrate includes a first side, a second side, a center, an outer periphery, and an outer edge, and the first side of the substrate comprises a first outer layer including a metal material. The die are positioned in the substrate center and are coupled to the substrate first side. The encasement is molded over the outer periphery on the substrate first side, the substrate second side, and the substrate outer edge and around the die. The encasement, coupled to the substrate, forms a seal with the metal material. The second side of the substrate is positioned to directly contact a fluid flowing through the fluid passageway.

  7. Cleco Power- Power Miser New Home Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Louisiana's Cleco Power offers energy efficiency incentives to eligible customers. Cleco Power offers a rate discount for residential customers building homes that meet the Power Miser Program...

  8. Self-powered microthermionic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Albert C.; King, Donald B.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2004-08-10

    A self-powered microthermionic converter having an internal thermal power source integrated into the microthermionic converter. These converters can have high energy-conversion efficiencies over a range of operating temperatures. Microengineering techniques are used to manufacture the converter. The utilization of an internal thermal power source increases potential for mobility and incorporation into small devices. High energy efficiency is obtained by utilization of micron-scale interelectrode gap spacing. Alpha-particle emitting radioisotopes can be used for the internal thermal power source, such as curium and polonium isotopes.

  9. Power line detection system

    DOEpatents

    Latorre, V.R.; Watwood, D.B.

    1994-09-27

    A short-range, radio frequency (RF) transmitting-receiving system that provides both visual and audio warnings to the pilot of a helicopter or light aircraft of an up-coming power transmission line complex. Small, milliwatt-level narrowband transmitters, powered by the transmission line itself, are installed on top of selected transmission line support towers or within existing warning balls, and provide a continuous RF signal to approaching aircraft. The on-board receiver can be either a separate unit or a portion of the existing avionics, and can also share an existing antenna with another airborne system. Upon receipt of a warning signal, the receiver will trigger a visual and an audio alarm to alert the pilot to the potential power line hazard. 4 figs.

  10. Power line detection system

    DOEpatents

    Latorre, Victor R.; Watwood, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    A short-range, radio frequency (RF) transmitting-receiving system that provides both visual and audio warnings to the pilot of a helicopter or light aircraft of an up-coming power transmission line complex. Small, milliwatt-level narrowband transmitters, powered by the transmission line itself, are installed on top of selected transmission line support towers or within existing warning balls, and provide a continuous RF signal to approaching aircraft. The on-board receiver can be either a separate unit or a portion of the existing avionics, and can also share an existing antenna with another airborne system. Upon receipt of a warning signal, the receiver will trigger a visual and an audio alarm to alert the pilot to the potential power line hazard.

  11. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Biomass Power Generation at the Former Farmland Industries Site in Lawrence, Kansas. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Tomberlin, G.; Mosey, G.

    2013-03-01

    Under the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provided funding to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to support a feasibility study of biomass renewable energy generation at the former Farmland Industries site in Lawrence, Kansas. Feasibility assessment team members conducted a site assessment to gather information integral to this feasibility study. Information such as biomass resources, transmission availability, on-site uses for heat and power, community acceptance, and ground conditions were considered.

  12. POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS  Bio-fuel production  Hydrogen generation  Direct coal liquefaction  Oil refining TECHNOLOGICAL BENEFITS  Uniformly allows specially tunable reactions  The next generation of fuel cell synthesis points towards growing trend in these "workhorse" catalysts  Provides greater efficiency through nanomaterials Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for

  13. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia CSP-ELEMENTS Award # DE-EE0006536 July 1, 2014 - September 30, 2016 Project Budget: $1,478,588 PI: Adrienne Lavine, Professor UCLA Other Contributors: Keith Lovegrove (IT Power Australia), Hamarz Aryafar, Abdon Sepulveda, Dante Simonetti, Richard Wirz, Pirouz Kavehpour energy.gov/sunshot energy.gov/sunshot CSP Program Summit 2016 2 * Ammonia-based thermochemical energy storage is a well- developed technology that has the potential to meet the

  14. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Validation of Hydrogen Exchange Methodology on Molecular Sieves for Tritium Removal from Contaminated Water Gregg A. Morgan Fall 2014 Tritium Focus Group, Idaho Falls, ID September 23-25, 2014 SRNL-STI-2014-00422-S 2 Background * Tritium contaminated water is a critical issue for nuclear power reactors, especially when ground water becomes contaminated. * Planned tritium plants for ITER and other fusion energy applications will have large volumes of tritium contaminated water - potentially

  15. Star Power

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  16. Star Power

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  17. Feasibility Study of Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste in St. Bernard, Louisiana. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, K.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to re-use contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The former Kaiser Aluminum Landfill in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana, was selected for a feasibility study under the program. Preliminary work focused on selecting a biomass feedstock. Discussions with area experts, universities, and the project team identified food wastes as the feedstock and anaerobic digestion (AD) as the technology.

  18. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  19. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-06-10

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  20. SunLab: Concentrating Solar Power Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-24

    DOE's Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) program is collaborating with its partners in the private sector to develop two new solar technologies -- power towers and dish/engines -- to meet the huge commercial potential for solar power. Concentrating solar power plants produce electric power by first converting the sun's energy into heat, and then to electricity in a conventional generator.

  1. Power supply

    DOEpatents

    Hart, Edward J.; Leeman, James E.; MacDougall, Hugh R.; Marron, John J.; Smith, Calvin C.

    1976-01-01

    An electric power supply employs a striking means to initiate ferroelectric elements which provide electrical energy output which subsequently initiates an explosive charge which initiates a second ferroelectric current generator to deliver current to the coil of a magnetic field current generator, creating a magnetic field around the coil. Continued detonation effects compression of the magnetic field and subsequent generation and delivery of a large output current to appropriate output loads.

  2. Energy Department Report Finds Major Potential to Increase Clean

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydroelectric Power | Department of Energy Report Finds Major Potential to Increase Clean Hydroelectric Power Energy Department Report Finds Major Potential to Increase Clean Hydroelectric Power April 17, 2012 - 12:39pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- As part of President Obama's all-out, all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Energy Department today released a renewable energy resource assessment detailing the potential to develop electric power generation at existing dams across the United

  3. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Enabling Wind Power Nationwide Enabling Wind Power Nationwide The cover of the 2015 report Enabling Wind Power Nationwide with a wind turbine on the right side, surrounded by trees. This report shows how the United States can unlock the vast potential for wind energy deployment in all 50 states-made possible through the next-generation of larger wind turbines. It highlights wind energy's potential to generate electricity even in states with no utility-scale wind energy development today. Through

  4. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs. Cormos, C. C. Agachi, P. S.

    2015-12-23

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO{sub 2} emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  5. Net energy analysis - powerful tool for selecting elective power options

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, S.

    1995-12-01

    A number of net energy analysis studies have been conducted in recent years for electric power production from coal, oil and uranium fuels; synthetic fuels from coal and oil shale; and heat and electric power from solar energy. This technique is an excellent indicator of investment costs, environmental impact and potential economic competitiveness of alternative electric power systems for energy planners from the Eastern European countries considering future options. Energy conservation is also important to energy planners and the net energy analysis technique is an excellent accounting system on the extent of energy resource conservation. The author proposes to discuss the technique and to present the results of his studies and others in the field. The information supplied to the attendees will serve as a powerful tool to the energy planners considering their electric power options in the future.

  6. Active Power Controls from Wind Power: Bridging the Gaps | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Active Power Controls from Wind Power: Bridging the Gaps Active Power Controls from Wind Power: Bridging the Gaps This report evaluates how wind power can support power system ...

  7. Pre-Feasibility Analysis of Pellet Manufacturing on the Former Loring Air Force Base Site. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsberger, R.; Mosey, G.

    2014-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Lands initiative, engaged the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct feasibility studies to assess the viability of developing renewable energy generating facilities on contaminated sites. This site, in Limestone, Maine -- formerly the location of the Loring Air Force Base but now owned by the Aroostook Band of Micmac -- was selected for the potential to produce heating pellets from woody feedstock. Biomass was chosen as the renewable energy resource to evaluate based on abundant woody-biomass resources available in the area. NREL also evaluates potential savings from converting existing Micmac property from oil-fired heating to pellet heating.

  8. The geothermal power organization

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, K.L.

    1997-12-31

    The Geothermal Power Organization is an industry-led advisory group organized to advance the state-of-the-art in geothermal energy conversion technologies. Its goal is to generate electricity from geothermal fluids in the most cost-effective, safe, and environmentally benign manner possible. The group achieves this goal by determining the Member`s interest in potential solutions to technological problems, advising the research and development community of the needs of the geothermal energy conversion industry, and communicating research and development results among its Members. With the creation and adoption of a new charter, the Geothermal Power Organization will now assist the industry in pursuing cost-shared research and development projects with the DOE`s Office of Geothermal Technologies.

  9. Power optics

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonov, V V

    2014-02-28

    By using the theory we developed in the early 1970s, a broad range of phenomena is considered for an optical surface of a solid body that is exposed to radiation arbitrarily varying in time and producing temperature fields, thermoelastic stresses and thermal deformations on the surface layer. The examination is based on the relations (which are similar to Duhamel's integral formula from the theory of heat conduction) between the quantities characterising the thermal stress state in any nonstationary regimes of energy input into a solid. A peculiar feature of the analysis of the thermal stress state in this case consists in the fact that this relation comprises time as a parameter, which in turn is a consequence of incoherence of the quasi-stationary problem of thermoelasticity. This phenomenon is particularly important for the optics of high-power, high-pulse repetition rate lasers, which are being actively developed. In the review, we have recently published in Laser Physics, the thermal stress state of a solid is analysed. In this state, time is treated as an independent variable used in differentiation. Such an approach greatly reduces the applicability of the method. The review published contains data on the use of capillary porous structures made of various materials with different degrees of the surface development. Moreover, such structures can be efficiently employed to increase the heat exchange at a temperature below the boiling point of the coolant. In the present review we discuss the dependences of the limiting laser intensities on the duration of a pulse or a pulse train, corresponding to the three stages of the state of the reflecting surface and leading to unacceptable elastic deformations of the surface, to the plastic yield of the material accompanied by the formation of residual stresses and to the melting of the surface layer. We also analyse the problem of heat exchange in the surface layer with a liquid metal coolant pumped through it. The

  10. Power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Gitsevich, Aleksandr

    2001-01-01

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, and an impedance transformation network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and wherein the impedance transformation network is configured to protect the input of the amplifier from a destructive feedback signal. One example of the oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  11. POWER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.

    1958-07-01

    A fast nuclear reactor system ls described for producing power and radioactive isotopes. The reactor core is of the heterogeneous, fluid sealed type comprised of vertically arranged elongated tubular fuel elements having vertical coolant passages. The active portion is surrounded by a neutron reflector and a shield. The system includes pumps and heat exchangers for the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The core, primary coolant pump and primary heat exchanger are disposed within an irapenforate tank which is filled with the primary coolant, in this case a liquid metal such as Na or NaK, to completely submerge these elements. The tank is completely surrounded by a thick walled concrete shield. This reactor system utilizes enriched uranium or plutonium as the fissionable material, uranium or thorium as a diluent and thorium or uranium containing less than 0 7% of the U/sup 235/ isotope as a fertile material.

  12. Northwest, the Bonneville Power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    voltage power lines that move large amounts of power from hydroelectric projects and power plants to urban centers hundreds of miles away. To keep the electricity flowing safely...

  13. Power management system

    DOEpatents

    Algrain, Marcelo C.; Johnson, Kris W.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2007-10-02

    A method of managing power resources for an electrical system of a vehicle may include identifying enabled power sources from among a plurality of power sources in electrical communication with the electrical system and calculating a threshold power value for the enabled power sources. A total power load placed on the electrical system by one or more power consumers may be measured. If the total power load exceeds the threshold power value, then a determination may be made as to whether one or more additional power sources is available from among the plurality of power sources. At least one of the one or more additional power sources may be enabled, if available.

  14. Sensitivity of Global Terrestrial Gross Primary Production to Hydrologic States Simulated by the Community Land Model Using Two Runoff Parameterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Huimin; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Dawen; Shi, Xiaoying; Mao, Jiafu; Hayes, Daniel J.; Schwalm, C.; Wei, Yaxing; Liu, Shishi

    2014-09-01

    The terrestrial water and carbon cycles interact strongly at various spatio-temporal scales. To elucidate how hydrologic processes may influence carbon cycle processes, differences in terrestrial carbon cycle simulations induced by structural differences in two runoff generation schemes were investigated using the Community Land Model 4 (CLM4). Simulations were performed with runoff generation using the default TOPMODEL-based and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model approaches under the same experimental protocol. The comparisons showed that differences in the simulated gross primary production (GPP) are mainly attributed to differences in the simulated leaf area index (LAI) rather than soil moisture availability. More specifically, differences in runoff simulations can influence LAI through changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and their seasonality that affect the onset of the growing season and the subsequent dynamic feedbacks between terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles. As a result of a relative difference of 36% in global mean total runoff between the two models and subsequent changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and LAI, the simulated global mean GPP differs by 20.4%. However, the relative difference in the global mean net ecosystem exchange between the two models is small (2.1%) due to competing effects on total mean ecosystem respiration and other fluxes, although large regional differences can still be found. Our study highlights the significant interactions among the water, energy, and carbon cycles and the need for reducing uncertainty in the hydrologic parameterization of land surface models to better constrain carbon cycle modeling.

  15. PowerPoint Presentation

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Notes: For 2016, natural gas production represents monthly natural gas gross withdrawals estimated from data collected on the EIA-914 survey. Volumes through 2015 reflect EIA's final reported state data. Data for Arkansas, California, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wyoming, and Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico are individually collected on the EIA-914 survey. The "other states" category comprises

  16. A Potential Path to Emissions-Free Fossil Energy | Department...

    Energy Saver

    At most coal fired power plants, the coal is mixed with air so that it can burn. When it ... Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant A Potential Path ...

  17. Concentrating Solar Power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power ... Batteries Electric Drive Systems Hydrogen Materials & Components Compatibility Hydrogen ...

  18. Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power ... Sciences Applications National Solar Thermal Test Facility Nuclear Energy ...

  19. Concentrating Solar Power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power ... Sciences Applications National Solar Thermal Test Facility Nuclear Energy ...

  20. Southwestern Power Administration

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Power Operations Click to view a map of SEPA power operations. Latest Rate Schedules October 1, 2016 JW-2-F Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Duke Energy Florida System: Jim Woodruff October 1, 2016 JW-1-K Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Woodruff Preference Customer System: Jim Woodruff October 1, 2015 KP-AP-1-C Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: American Electric Power System: Kerr-Philpott More schedules Annual Reports

  1. WINDExchange: Buying Wind Power

    WindExchange

    Buying Wind Power Individuals, communities, businesses, and government entities may decide that buying wind power to supply their energy needs is the right fit. There are several ways to purchase wind power. Green Power Marketing Green power marketing refers to green power being offered by multiple suppliers in a competitive marketplace. In states that have established retail competition, customers may be able to purchase green power from a competitive supplier. Learn more about green power

  2. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  3. Power Right. Power Smart. Efficient Computer Power Supplies and Monitors.

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn about energy-efficient power supplies that can help you reduce energy consumption and lower your energy costs.

  4. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History U.S. 2,823,398 2,682,021 2,778,526 2,634,991 2,705,744 2,739,059 1973-2016 Alaska 295,244 246,120 269,204 233,820 239,444 250,325 1991-2016 Arkansas 74,543 70,831 71,791 67,340 68,207 67,140 1991-2016 California 18,166 17,618 18,074 17,229 17,573 17,822 1991-2016 Colorado 143,636 139,949 144,657 136,813 143,188 145,323 1991-2016 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 111,315 101,883 110,027 96,330 100,027 105,189 1997-2016 Kansas 22,110 21,173

  5. Sofia Mancheno-Gross

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sofia specializes in Communications strategies on behalf of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  6. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 26,816,085 28,479,026 29,542,313 29,522,551 31,405,381 32,894,727 1936-2015 U.S. Offshore 2,875,945 2,416,644 2,044,643 1,859,469 1,804,544 1,820,202 1977-2015 U.S. State Offshore 575,601 549,151 489,505 505,318 514,291 502,425 1978-2015 Federal Offshore U.S. 2,300,344 1,867,492 1,555,138 1,354,151 1,290,253 1,317,777 1977-2015 Alaska 3,197,100 3,162,922 3,164,791 3,215,358 3,168,545 3,175,301 1967-2015 Alaska Onshore 2,826,952 2,798,220 2,857,485

  7. grossWCI.dvi

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear multifragmentation, Its relation to general physics A rich test-ground of the ... Taking this serious, fascinating perspectives open for statistical nuclear fragmentation ...

  8. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 26,816,085 28,479,026 29,542,313 ... Alabama State Offshore 101,487 84,270 87,398 75,660 70,827 1987-2014 Arizona 183 168 117 ...

  9. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 View History U.S. 2,750,252 2,817,792 2,743,783 2,823,547 2,823,205 2,668,567 1973-2016 Alaska 261,150 279,434 289,770 304,048 298,809 ...

  10. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    through 1996) in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 30,401 34,749 37,275 1970's 36,254 36,657 37,389 33,126 35,349 33,439 34,450 34,303 29,649 36,717 1980's 28,525 26,860 25,876 26,665 27,567 25,836 25,128 22,384 25,562 26,469 1990's 24,287 23,711 25,232 25,723 25,526 26,228 29,000 32,360 25,705 27,581 2000's 25,580 26,391 25,011 25,356 26,456 25,046 24,396 23,420 25,217 24,293 2010's 27,071 25,144 21,551 25,324

  11. Feasibility study on a low power vertical axis wind-powered generator. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, W.R.; Puust, T.; Robinson, M.L.; Vencel, L.J.

    1980-09-01

    Described are investigations carried out to establish a design concept for a 1 kW wind-powered generator suitable for use as an alternative power source in isolated locations. Design criteria include high power to weight ratio, simplicity of assembly and potential for fixed, mobile or portable applications. The report proposes a suitable configuration using a Darrieus straight blade rotor with a microprocessor based control system and provides information on the power output to be expected in different wind environments.

  12. Magnet Technology for Power Converters: Nanocomposite Magnet Technology for High Frequency MW-Scale Power Converters

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-27

    Solar ADEPT Project: CMU is developing a new nanoscale magnetic material that will reduce the size, weight, and cost of utility-scale PV solar power conversion systems that connect directly to the grid. Power converters are required to turn the energy that solar power systems create into useable energy for the grid. The power conversion systems made with CMUs nanoscale magnetic material have the potential to be 150 times lighter and significantly smaller than conventional power conversion systems that produce similar amounts of power.

  13. Naval Station Newport Wind Resource Assessment. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites, and The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, R.; Fields, J.; Roberts, J. O.

    2012-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage development of renewable energy (RE) on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. EPA is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate RE options at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Newport in Newport, Rhode Island where multiple contaminated areas pose a threat to human health and the environment. Designated a superfund site on the National Priorities List in 1989, the base is committed to working toward reducing the its dependency on fossil fuels, decreasing its carbon footprint, and implementing RE projects where feasible. The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) partnered with NREL in February 2009 to investigate the potential for wind energy generation at a number of Naval and Marine bases on the East Coast. NAVSTA Newport was one of several bases chosen for a detailed, site-specific wind resource investigation. NAVSTA Newport, in conjunction with NREL and NFESC, has been actively engaged in assessing the wind resource through several ongoing efforts. This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and a survey of potential wind turbine options based upon the site-specific wind resource.

  14. Village Power `97. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinal, J.; Flowers, L.; Taylor, R.; Weingart, J.

    1997-09-01

    It is estimated that two billion people live without electricity and its services. In addition, there is a sizable number of rural villages that have limited electrical service, with either part-day operation by diesel gen-sets or partial electrification (local school or community center and several nearby houses). For many villages connected to the grid, power is often sporadically available and of poor quality. The U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, has initiated a program to address these potential electricity opportunities in rural villages through the application of renewable energy (RE) technologies. The objective of this program is to develop and implement applications that demonstrate the technical performance, economic competitiveness, operational viability, and environmental benefits of renewable rural electric solutions, compared to the conventional options of line extension and isolated diesel mini-grids. These four attributes foster sustainability; therefore, the program is entitled Renewables for Sustainable Village Power (RSVP). The RSVP program is a multi-disciplinary, multi-technology, multi-application program composed of six key activities, including village application development, computer model development, systems analysis, pilot project development, technical assistance, and an Internet-based village power project database. The current program emphasizes wind, photovoltaics (PV), and their hybrids with diesel gen-sets. NREL`s RSVP team is currently involved in rural electricity projects in thirteen countries, with U.S., foreign, and internationally based agencies and institutions. This document contains reports presented at the Proceedings of Village Power, 1997. Individual projects have been processed separately for the United States Department of Energy databases.

  15. Power Services (pbl/about)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    About Power Services > About Power Services Power Services Home Page Other Related Web Sites Power Services Organization Power Services Financial Information Tribal Affairs Office...

  16. Potential Economic Impact of Constructing and Operating Solar...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    * NRELSR-550-35037 The Potential Economic Impact of Constructing and Operating Solar Power Generation Facilities in Nevada R. K. Schwer and M. Riddel Center for Business and ...

  17. Market Potential for Advanced Thermally Activated BCHP in Five...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Potential distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) applications in the United States cover a broad spectrum of market segments, from nursing homes requiring a ...

  18. Hydrogen Resource Assessment: Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    60-42773 February 2009 Hydrogen Resource Assessment Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, and Hydro Power Anelia Milbrandt and Margaret Mann National Renewable Energy...

  19. A Comprehensive View of Global Potential for Hydro-generated Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yuyu; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Smith, Steven J.; Edmonds, James A.; Li, Hongyi; Clarke, Leon E.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we assess global hydropower potential using runoff and stream flow data, along with turbine technology performance, cost assumptions, and environmental considerations. The results provide the first comprehensive quantification of global hydropower potential including gross, technical, economic, and exploitable estimates. Total global potential of gross, technical, economic, and exploitable hydropower are estimated to be approximately 128, 39, 32, and 27 petawatt hours per year, respectively. The economic and exploitable potential of hydropower are calculated at less than 9 cents/kWh. We find that hydropower has the potential to supply a significant portion of the world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region. Globally, hydropower can potentially supply about 1.5 times the total electricity demand in 2005. Estimated hydropower resources in a number of countries are sufficient to accommodate their demand for electricity in 2005, e.g., Brazil (5.6 times), Russia (4.6 times), and Canada (3.5 times). A sensitivity analysis indicates that hydropower estimates are not highly sensitive to five key parameters: design flow (varying by -2% to +1% at less than 9 cents/kWh), cost and financing options (by -7% to +6%), turbine efficiency (by -10% to +10%), stream flow (by -10% to +10%), and fixed charge rate (by -6% to 5%). This sensitivity analysis emphasizes the reliable role of hydropower for future energy systems, when compared to other renewable energy resources with larger uncertainty in their future potentials.

  20. Fuel Cell Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report examines backup power and prime power systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental effects of substituting fuel cells for existing combustion technologies based on microturbines and internal combustion engines.