National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for great miami aquifer

  1. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River. Annual report, September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Stocker, L.E.; Miller, M.C.; Engman, J.; Evans, R.L.; Koch, R.W.; Brence, W.A.

    1994-01-01

    Fish sampling by electroshocking in the Great Miami River above and below the Fernald sit was designed to determine changes in the health of the fish community compared to the previous nine years and to collect samples for uranium analysis in fish filets. This document contains information describing the findings of this program. Topics discussed include: physical and chemical parameters, species richness, species diversity, and water analysis.

  2. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River, September 1992. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.C.; Bixby, R.; Engman, J.; Ross, L.; Stocker, L.

    1993-03-01

    At the end of summer in 1992 the fishery of the Great Miami River took an unexpected deviation from the stasis of past years as an intense suspended algal bloom decreased the compositional diversity found at the lower GMR stations. Daytime supersaturation of oxygen and elevated pHs, reaching 9 by midday during the month of August, undoubtedly caused severe deficits of oxygen at night. Despite the aeration at every riffle, the intensities of the biological processes in the water were sufficient to cause very high positive and negative excursions of oxygen over the day and night cycle. This report documents a fish harvest that was conducted as part of the oxygen excess/deficit study.

  3. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River. Annual report, September 7, 1995--September 8, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.L.; Miller, M.C.; Moller, B.J.; Marsh, S.L.

    1996-03-01

    Fish were collected, using electroshocking techniques, from three sites in the Great Miami River (GMR) (September 7 and 8, 1995) as part of an annual survey for Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO). The objective was to collect fish fillets for uranium analysis and examine the health of the fish community in comparison to data collected during the past eleven years. Samples were taken from upstream (river mile = RM; RM 38) and downstream (RM 19) of the Fernald site as well as from near the Fernald effluent line (RM 24). RM 38 is isolated from upstream fish migration by two dams located near Hamilton, Ohio and fish collected from this site should not be influenced by processes at the downstream sites. Samples of 549 fish from 29 species belonging to nine families provided seventy-two samples for uranium analysis by an independent laboratory. Chemical analysis of water samples collected at each site was used to determine the effect of chemical parameters on the fish community. This study focused on comparison of the density, biomass and diversity of the fish community between sites and between years.

  4. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River, September 17--18, 1996. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, B.; Miller, M.C.; Buschelmann, F.; Evans, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    The electrofishing survey of fish from the Great Miami River at RM 19, 24 and 38 from late summer 1996 demonstrated the sensitivity of the fish community to microhabitat variation. The variation was particularly clear between the pooled, low flow sections of the river and the runs, where fast current habitats occurred. In 1996, like most recent years, the differences were obvious between Rm 24 and RM 19 and RM 38. River Mile 24 was characterized by a fish community of current-loving fish, dominated by Catastomidae (suckers), and Ictaluridae (catfish). In contrast, samples from pooled stations at RM 19 and 38 were dominated by Centrarchidae, Clupeidae and Cyprinidae, particularly the carp. The microhabitats sampled around the abutments of bridges at RM 19 and 38 where fast current and physical structure occurred, both resembled the community at RM 24. Changes in the fish communities associated with the upstream/downstream changes in stream volume, channel size, morphology, etc., were evidenced by the community coefficients which showed least similarity between the most distant sites.

  5. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River, September 1994 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stocker, L.E.; Miller, M.C.; Evans, R.L.; Koch, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Fish sampling by electroshocking in the Great Miami River upstream and downstream the Fernald site (September 25 and 26, 1994) was designed to determine changes in the health of the fish community compared to the previous ten years and to collect samples for uranium analyses in fish fillets. Samples of 853 fish, from 27 species, eight families and three sites at river mile (RM) 38, RM 24, and RM 19 provided seventy-eight samples for uranium analyses by an independent laboratory. The biomass of fish caught per hour was greatest at RM 24 > RM 19 > RM 3 8. The diversity index and the heaviest fish community was RM 24 > RM 38 > RM 19. The pooled site at RM 38 near Hamilton was diagnostically separated from the other sites by the young-of-the-year (YOY) golden redhorse, smallmouth bass and golden shiner. The darns at Hamilton acted as an effective barrier against fish migration upriver. Larger freshwater drum, gizzard shad, channel catfish and flathead catfish, which might be expected in rapid current reaches of mid-sized rivers characterize RM 24. The pool at RM 19 was distinguished from the others by YOY gizzard shad, bluegill, and longear sunfish. Thus the fish community in 1994 was separated ecologically by the physical features of the habitat more than by water quality differences between sites. These data suggest that the Fernald effluents in September were having no detectable effects on the distribution of fishes, independent of changes in habitat quality separated on physical attributes of the river channel at each site.

  6. Miami International Airport stormwater NPDES plan

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, A.I.; Goldman, J.Z.; Schmidt, M.F.; Clark, E.E.

    1994-12-31

    Miami International Airport (MIA) is endeavoring to essentially double its traffic volume by the turn of the century. This is a great challenge since the site is already highly developed. Space, safety and other constraints make it difficult to implement conventional detention/retention stormwater practices. Other practices were evaluated to control stormwater quantity/quality, since some of the downstream bodies of water are flood-prone or environmentally sensitive.

  7. Category:Miami, FL | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Miami FL Florida Power & Light Co..png SVFullServiceRestauran... 77 KB SVHospital Miami FL Florida Power & Light...

  8. Miami2010_miniboone_hray.pptx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    .JOJPP& ) 3BZ H. Ray, University of Florida Miami 2010 *OUSJHVF JO 0TDJMMBUJPO ... JOUFSBDUJPO F Q F O &YDFTT )JHIMZ DPOUSPWFSTJBM SFTVMU H. Ray, University of Florida ...

  9. Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Resource Recovery Fac Biomass Facility Facility Miami Dade County Resource Recovery Fac Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Miami-Dade County, Florida...

  10. Miami-Dade County- Sustainable Buildings Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In 2005, the Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners passed a resolution to incorporate sustainable building measures into county facilities. In 2007, Ordinance 07-65 created the Sustainable...

  11. EECBG Success Story: Keeping Sustainability on Track in Miami...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Keeping Sustainability on Track in Miami EECBG Success Story: Keeping Sustainability on Track in Miami June 24, 2010 - 3:46pm Addthis Ajani Stewart was close to losing his job as ...

  12. West Miami, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. West Miami is a city in Miami-Dade County, Florida. It falls under Florida's 18th...

  13. President Highlights Smart Energy Training at U. of Miami | Department...

    Energy Saver

    Highlights Smart Energy Training at U. of Miami President Highlights Smart Energy Training ... manufacturers reduce their energy costs. | Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy. ...

  14. EECBG Success Story: How Miami, Florida is Turning Waste Into...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    In Miami, Florida, methane gas captured from a regional landfill will be used to provide ... courtesy of the City of Ormond Beach, Florida. EECBG Success Story: Ormond Beach ...

  15. Keeping Sustainability on Track in Miami | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Sustainability on Track in Miami Keeping Sustainability on Track in Miami June 24, 2010 - 3:46pm Addthis Ajani Stewart was close to losing his job as environmental coordinator for the city of Miami before a change to the city's EECBG allowed Stewart to retain his position. | Photo courtesy Ajani Stewart Ajani Stewart was close to losing his job as environmental coordinator for the city of Miami before a change to the city's EECBG allowed Stewart to retain his position. | Photo courtesy Ajani

  16. Miami-Dade County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    in Miami-Dade County, Florida Biodiesel of South Florida LLC Biofuels Digest Cambridge Project Development Car Charging Group Inc Caribbean Energy Resources Corp ClimeCo...

  17. Miami Beach, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Florida. It falls under Florida's 18th congressional district and Florida's 20th congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Miami Beach, Florida Car...

  18. Breaking Ground in Miami-Dade

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Officials from Miami-Dade County and the U.S. Department of Energy were on hand Wednesday, October 13th to formally break ground on an innovative project that will help improve the energy efficiency of one of the county’s major water treatment facilities.   The project will upgrade and expand the existing power generation system at the water plant which generates electricity from digester gas produced at the plant.  Landfill gas, which is produced from the Solid Waste Department’s South Dade Landfill, will be collected and piped across a canal to the water plant where it will be mixed with digester gases.  By combining landfill and digester gases, the county will increase the amount of self-generated electricity, and reduce the county's consumption of electricity generated from fossil fuels.  

  19. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity...

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of Miami - FL...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Miami , Florida FL.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 FL.0-01-1 Site Operations: ...

  1. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami Low Plug Load Baseline | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGeneralMerchLPLbaseline.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  2. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami High Plug Load 50% Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGeneralMerchHPL50percent.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  3. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami High Plug Load Baseline |...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGeneralMerchHPLbaseline.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  4. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

  5. Miami County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ohio Pleasant Hill, Ohio Potsdam, Ohio Tipp City, Ohio Troy, Ohio Union, Ohio West Milton, Ohio Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMiamiCounty,Ohio&oldid...

  6. Miami-Dade County- Expedited Green Buildings Process

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In an effort to promote environmentally sensitive design and construction, the Miami-Dade County Commissioners passed an ordinance in June 2005 to expedite the permitting process for “green”...

  7. Miami-Cass REMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Miami-Cass Rural Electric Membership Cooperative (MCREMC) is a member-owned electric distribution cooperative serving customers in central Indiana.  MCREMC offers energy efficiency rebates to its...

  8. Cutting Electricity Costs in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    ScienceCinema

    Alvarez, Carlos; Oliver, LeAnn; Kronheim, Steve; Gonzalez, Jorge; Woods-Richardson, Kathleen

    2016-07-12

    Miami-Dade County, Florida will be piping methane gas from their regional landfill to the adjacent wastewater plant to generate a significant portion of the massive facility's future electricity needs.

  9. Grocery 2009 TSD Miami Baseline | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Jump to: navigation, search Model Name Grocery 2009 TSD Miami Baseline Building Type Food Sales Model Type Baseline Model Target Type ASHRAE 90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file...

  10. Grocery 2009 TSD Miami 50% Energy Savings | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Savings Model Target Type ASHRAE 90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGrocery50percent.idf XML file...

  11. New Miami, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. New Miami is a village in Butler County, Ohio. It falls under Ohio's 8th congressional district.12 References ...

  12. Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, R.C.; Green, T.S.; Hull, L.C.

    2001-02-28

    A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

  13. Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, Robert Charles; Green, Timothy Scott; Hull, Laurence Charles

    2001-02-01

    A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

  14. Miami-Cass County Rural E M C | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Name: Miami-Cass County Rural E M C Place: Indiana Phone Number: 765-473-6668 or toll free 800-844-6668 Website: www.mcremc.coop Twitter: @MiamiCassREMC Outage Hotline:...

  15. Energy efficiency at the University of Miami

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, V.; Anzoategui, F.

    1996-07-01

    The University of Miami (UM) has embarked on a very important and worthwhile mission: ``To make UM one of the most energy efficient universities in the nation by the year 2000``. In order for the University to meet this goal the authors knew they would need to take advantage of all the available technologies and address the freon issues. In June 1990 the Coral Gables Campus had five chilled Water Production Plants, each representing small independent systems serving from four to ten buildings. Because of energy conservation measures of the past, each plant had excess capacity. At that time they also had identified about 600 tons of old falling-apart air conditioning equipment. The Capital Construction Program was beginning design efforts for a new Music Recital Hall and an addition to the Law Library. With all this considered it made sense to develop a common chilled water loop to connect these plants and provide a vehicle to capitalize on available capacity. In early 1991 Florida Power and Light offered a new CILC rate with criteria that the chilled water plants met. It allowed them to produce air conditioning at 5.8 cents a kWh, compared to 7.5 cents a kWh, at the buildings. This, added to the reality of not having to maintain or replace the old systems, made this the number 1 priority project. They were convinced that this could give them a competitive edge over other institutions because it insured that they could produce air conditioning at the least cost per square foot.

  16. Energy conservation at The University of Miami

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, V.; Anzoategui, F.

    1995-06-01

    The University of Miami (UM) has embarked on a very important and worthwhile mission: {open_quotes}To make UM one of the most energy efficient Universities in the Nation by the year 2000.{close_quotes} In order for the University to meet this goal we knew we would need to take advantage of all the available technologies and address the freon issues. In June 1990 the Coral Gables Campus had five chilled Water Production Plants, each representing small independent systems serving from four to ten buildings. Because of energy conservation measures of the past (i.e. elimination, reheat, first generation lighting retrofits, and some diversity), each plant had excess capacity. At that time we also had identified about 600 tons of old falling apart air conditioning equipment. Our Capital Construction Program was beginning design efforts for a new Music Recital Hall and an addition to the Law Library. With all this considered it made sense to develop a common chilled water loop to connect these plants and provide a vehicle to capitalize on available capacity. As this concept took shape it became evident that a master chilled water loop encircling the entire campus would address the next 20 years of campus development. This 20 year plan would require various phases of development. Phase I would connect three chilled water production plants and enable us to supply chilled water to seven existing facilities with approximately 600 tons of old inefficient air conditioning equipment and supply chilled water to the new Law and Music facilities, (approximately 400 tons) without buying any additional chillers.

  17. NREL: Transportation Research - Miami-Dade County Hydraulic Hybrid Refuse

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Truck Testing Miami-Dade County Hydraulic Hybrid Refuse Truck Testing Photo of garbage truck with view of lake and city in background. As part of its overall strategy to reduce emissions and fuel use, Miami-Dade County currently operates 35 hydraulic hybrid refuse vehicles, with 29 more on order. Photo courtesy of Parker Hannifin NREL is evaluating the in-service performance of 10 next-generation (model year 2015) hydraulic hybrid refuse vehicles (HHVs), 8 previous-generation (model year

  18. Focused risk assessment: Mound Plant, Miami-Erie Canal Operable Unit 4

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, D.R.; Dunning, D.F.

    1994-09-29

    In 1969, an underground waste line at Mound Plant ruptured and released plutonium-238 in a dilute nitric acid solution to the surrounding soils. Most of the acid was neutralized by the native soils. The plutonium, which in a neutral solution is tightly sorbed onto clay particles, remained within the spill area. During remediation, a severe storm eroded some of the contaminated soil. Fine grained plutonium-contaminated clay particles were carried away through the natural drainage courses to the remnants of the Miami-Erie Canal adjacent to Mound Plant, and then into the Great Miami River. This focused risk assessment considers exposure pathways relevant to site conditions, including incidental ingestion of contaminated soils, ingestion of drinking water and fish, and inhalation of resuspended soils and sediments. For each potential exposure pathway, a simplified conceptual model and exposure scenarios have been used to develop conservative estimates of potential radiation dose equivalents and health risks. The conservatism of the dose and risk estimates provides a substantive margin of safety in assuring that the public health is protected.

  19. EECBG Success Story: Breaking Ground in Miami-Dade

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Officials from Miami-Dade County and the U.S. Department of Energy were on hand Wednesday, October 13th to formally break ground on an innovative project that will help improve the energy efficiency of one of the county’s major water treatment facilities. Learn more.

  20. How Miami, Florida is Turning Waste Into Cash | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Miami, Florida is Turning Waste Into Cash How Miami, Florida is Turning Waste Into Cash April 7, 2011 - 3:43pm Addthis Miami-Dade officials talk about using EECBG grant funds for their Methane Sequestration Project. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Methane gas captured from a landfill will provide 30 percent of the electricity used at an adjacent wastewater plant. The project will upgrade and expand the existing

  1. Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer LANL maintains an ... August 1, 2013 Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National ...

  2. General Merchandise 2009 TSD Miami Low Plug Load 50% Energy Savings...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    90.1 2004 Model Year 2009 IDF file http:apps1.eere.energy.govbuildingsenergyplusmodelsMiami2009TSDGeneralMerchLPL50percent.idf XML file http:apps1.eere.energy.gov...

  3. THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    aquifer THE INL & THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER THE SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER underneath the Idaho National Laboratory is one of the most productive groundwater resources in the U.S. Each year about 2 million acre-feet of water is drawn from the aquifer. Approximately 95 percent of the water withdrawn from the aquifer is used for irrigation, 3 per- cent for domestic water, and 2 percent for industrial purposes. The aquifer is the primary water source for more than 280,000 people in

  4. High Throughput Combinatorial Screening of Biometic Metal-Organic Materials for Military Hydrogen-Storage Materials (New Joint Miami U/NREL DoD/DLA Project) (presentation)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Miami University/NREL DoD/DLA Project High throughput combinatorial screening of biomimetic metal-organic materials for military hydrogen-storage applications Philip Parilla - NREL Joe Zhou, Dan Zhao - Miami U, Ohio Jeff Blackburn, Kevin O'Neill, Lin Simpson, Mike Heben - NREL Outline * Miami/NREL Project - Synthesis (Miami) - High Throughput Characterization (NREL) - Other Characterization * Other High Throughput Activities (NREL) - Parallel Sieverts - Parallel Gravimetric * Final Comments

  5. Microsoft Word - S08542_Aquifer

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Work Plan for the Enhanced Characterization of the Surficial Aquifer Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site June 2012 LMS/RVT/S08542 This page intentionally left blank LMS/RVT/S08542 Work Plan for the Enhanced Characterization of the Surficial Aquifer Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site June 2012 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Work Plan for the Enhanced Characterization of the Surficial Aquifer, Riverton, Wyoming June 2012 Doc. No. S08542 Page i Contents Abbreviations

  6. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Aquifer Storage Reservoir Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting ... Aquifer Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Aquifer Underground ...

  7. Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer LANL maintains an extensive groundwater monitoring and surveillance program through sampling. August 1, 2013 Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National Laboratory Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National Laboratory RELATED IMAGES http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3749/9827580556_473a91fd78_t.jpg Enlarge http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2856/9804364405_b25f74cbb2_t.jpg En

  8. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Website: http:www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains ... Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy ... and their daughters Allison Moore (husband ...

  9. The Great Marble Drop

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Great Marble Drop Learning objective: for students to analyze a problem, and test and refine solutions. This will demonstrate a key skill needed in engineering and scientific...

  10. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ANLEVSNL-06-04 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http:www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains...

  11. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    at the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) site has helped to correct problems related to signal interference. The WACR is a 95-GHz system designed for a unique purpose -...

  12. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... His impromptu visits to our desks always lifted spirits. He was everything a good dog should be and took care of his people. His physical presence will be greatly missed, but he ...

  13. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    African Researcher Visits Oklahoma As a follow-up to the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) ... Niamey, Niger, to the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) site near Lamont, Oklahoma. Dr. ...

  14. The Great Marble Drop

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Volunteers - Sign Up About Science Bowl Curriculum and Activities How to Build a Motor The Great Marble Drop How to Build a Turbine How to Build a Tower Classroom...

  15. Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    govSitesSouthern Great Plains SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Summer Training SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Southern Great Plains SGP Central Facility, Lamont, OK 36° 36' 18.0" N, 97° 29' 6.0" W Altitude: 320 meters

  16. An evaluation of aquifer intercommunication between the unconfined and Rattlesnake Ridge aquifers on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, E.J.

    1987-10-01

    During 1986, Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a study of a portion of the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer (confined aquifer) that lies beneath the B Pond - Gable Mountain Pond area of the Hanford Site. The purpose was to determine the extent of intercommunication between the unconfined aquifer and the uppermost regionally extensive confined aquifer, referred to as the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer. Hydraulic head data and chemical data were collected from the ground water in the study area during December 1986. The hydraulic head data were used to determine the effects caused by water discharged to the ground from B Pond on both the water table of the unconfined aquifer and the potentiometric surface of the confined aquifer. The chemical data were collected to determine the extent of chemical constituents migrating from the unconfined aquifer to the confined aquifer. Analysis of chemical constituents in the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer demonstrated that communication between the unconfined and confined aquifers had occurred. However, the levels of contaminants found in the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer during this study were below the DOE Derived Concentration Guides.

  17. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Configuration Aquifer Storage Reservoir Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Aquifer Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Aquifer Underground Natural Gas Well

  18. Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-04 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Site Operations Manager to Retire Southern Great Plains (SGP) site operations manager Jim Teske has announced that he will retire in October

  19. Solar-energy workshops held at Miami-Dade Public Libraries, 1981-1982. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Over a two year period, the Miami-Dade Public Library System gave 12 free solar energy programs throughout Dade County in its various branches; Solar Water Heater Workshops, where registered participants actually took part in building or putting together a solar water heater. Kick-off programs were also given free-of-charge by a number of local solar companies, to inform the audience about solar energy in general and the solar workshops in particular. Average registered attendance at these workshops was twenty, not including the crowds of onlookers at the outdoor building sessions or the earlier kick-off programs, which often had an audience of sixty or more. A later phone check of ten workshop participants picket at random revealed four who had built or were building their own solar systems, three who were considering the purchase of -or had already bought - a domestic solar water heater, one who was reported to be no longer interested by his son, and two who could not be reached. One of the completed heaters has been donated to a local Girl Scout troop, where it is on permanent exhibit; another will be placed in a new library branch, with appropriate publicity about its source. Florida Power and Light, which formerly viewed our early workshops with suspicion, sent a speaker to our final program to announce financial assistance to those who wanted to buy a solar hot water heater.

  20. Great Lakes Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J. Iwan

    2012-11-18

    The vision of the Great Lakes Energy Institute is to enable the transition to advanced, sustainable energy generation, storage, distribution and utilization through coordinated research, development, and education. The Institute will place emphasis on translating leading edge research into next generation energy technology. The Institute’s research thrusts focus on coordinated research in decentralized power generation devices (e.g. fuel cells, wind turbines, solar photovoltaic devices), management of electrical power transmission and distribution, energy storage, and energy efficiency.

  1. Field testing of a high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, R.L.; Hoyer, M.C.

    1989-03-01

    The University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) System has been operated as a field test facility for the past six years. Four short-term and two long-term cycles have been completed to data providing a greatly increased understanding of the efficiency and geochemical effects of high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. A third long-term cycle is currently being planned to operate the ATES system in conjunction with a real heating load and to further study the geochemical impact on the aquifer from heated waste storage cycles. The most critical activities in the preparation for the next cycle have proved to be the applications for the various permits and variances necessary to conduct the third cycle and the matching of the characteristics of the ATES system during heat recovery with a suitable adjacent building thermal load.

  2. Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-07 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Global Dimming: A Hot Climate Topic Global dimming, also referred to as solar dimming, is a new buzz word in the scientific community. Coined

  3. Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-03 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. 2004 ARM Science Team Meeting Sets Attendance Record A record-breaking 316 scientists and researchers from 22 different

  4. Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-11 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Flare Field Campaign Aims to Rid Data of Clutter A series of aircraft flares were ignited on the ground at the SGP on October 19 and 20,

  5. Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-09 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. ARM Mobile Facility Will Explore New Locales For some time, scientists have wanted to expand the reach of the ARM Program to additional

  6. Southern Great Plains

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Southern Great Plains Climate C hange a nd t he U .S. E nergy S ector: Regional v ulnerabilities a nd r esilience s olutions Summary i n B rief The S outhern G reat P lains r egion, c omprising K ansas, O klahoma, and T exas, c ontains o il a nd g as i nfrastructure c ritical t o t he nation's e nergy s upply, i ncluding n umerous o ffshore p latforms, onshore o il a nd g as w ells, o il r efineries, n atural g as p rocessing plants, p ipelines, a nd s hipping t erminals. M any o f t hese a

  7. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    5 ANL/ER/NL-05-08 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. SGP Hosts Instrument Team Meeting The SGP central facility hosted the biennial ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Instrument Team Meeting on August 2-4, 2005. Almost 50 instrument mentors, site

  8. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ANL/EVS/NL-06-12 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Diffuse Irradiance Study Works to Set Measurement Standard The ACRF sites have many instruments that measure and collect data on atmospheric conditions,

  9. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    5 ANL/ER/NL-05-02 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. ARM Mobile Facility Begins First Field Deployment The new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is in place at its first field research site in scenic Point

  10. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Feb./Mar. 2006 ANL/EVS/NL-06-02 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. New Shipping and Receiving Building Dedicated The SGP central facility is operating more efficiently with a newly completed Shipping and Receiving building. The SGP Shipping and

  11. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-09 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Multifilter Radiometer Added to Cessna Payload Downward-facing multifilter radiometers (MFRs) are instruments used to measure the

  12. Angola: a great future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The companies represented in Angola and their concessions by area are tabulated, including offshore leases. The government of this only recently independent country puts great emphasis on petroleum development and welcomes foreign companies. The major portion of the production comes from the fields in the Cabinda area. In the future, the reserves in the Congo basin will become more important. Exploration activity is intense and concentrated on the near offshore area of the country. The gas reserves are still not entirely known; present production serves only the needs of petroleum production, including a gas injection project in the Cabinda area and the production of LPG. A map of the offshore concession blocks also is shown.

  13. 30 TAC 213 - Edwards Aquifer | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    13 - Edwards Aquifer Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: 30 TAC 213 - Edwards AquiferLegal Published NA Year...

  14. Aquifer thermal energy storage. International symposium: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Aquifers have been used to store large quantities of thermal energy to supply process cooling, space cooling, space heating, and ventilation air preheating, and can be used with or without heat pumps. Aquifers are used as energy sinks and sources when supply and demand for energy do not coincide. Aquifer thermal energy storage may be used on a short-term or long-term basis; as the sole source of energy or as a partial storage; at a temperature useful for direct application or needing upgrade. The sources of energy used for aquifer storage are ambient air, usually cold winter air; waste or by-product energy; and renewable energy such as solar. The present technical, financial and environmental status of ATES is promising. Numerous projects are operating and under development in several countries. These projects are listed and results from Canada and elsewhere are used to illustrate the present status of ATES. Technical obstacles have been addressed and have largely been overcome. Cold storage in aquifers can be seen as a standard design option in the near future as it presently is in some countries. The cost-effectiveness of aquifer thermal energy storage is based on the capital cost avoidance of conventional chilling equipment and energy savings. ATES is one of many developments in energy efficient building technology and its success depends on relating it to important building market and environmental trends. This paper attempts to provide guidance for the future implementation of ATES. Individual projects have been processed separately for entry onto the Department of Energy databases.

  15. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the third long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Uebel, M.H.; Delin, G.N.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Sterling, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system has been operated as a field test facility (FTF) since 1982. The objectives were to design, construct, and operate the facility to study the feasibility of high-temperature ATES in a confined aquifer. Four short-term and two long-term cycles were previously conducted, which provided a greatly increased understanding of the efficiency and geochemical effects of high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. The third long-term cycle (LT3) was conducted to operate the ATES system in conjunction with a real heating load and to further study the geochemical impact that heated water storage had on the aquifer. For LT3, the source and storage wells were modified so that only the most permeable portion, the Ironton-Galesville part, of the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville aquifer was used for storage. This was expected to improve storage efficiency by reducing the surface area of the heated volume and simplify analysis of water chemistry results by reducing the number of aquifer-related variables which need to be considered. During LT3, a total volume of 63.2 {times} 10{sup 3} m {sup 3} of water was injected at a rate of 54.95 m{sup 3}/hr into the storage well at a mean temperature of 104.7{degrees}C. Tie-in to the reheat system of the nearby Animal Sciences Veterinary Medicine (ASVM) building was completed after injection was completed. Approximately 66 percent (4.13 GWh) of the energy added to the aquifer was recovered. Approximately 15 percent (0.64 GWh) of the usable (10 building. Operations during heat recovery with the ASVM building`s reheat system were trouble-free. Integration into more of the ASVM (or other) building`s mechanical systems would have resulted in significantly increasing the proportion of energy used during heat recovery.

  16. A great place to work

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    A great place to work Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit A great place to work The Laboratory's diversity officer sheds some light on the hiring process. July 6, 2016 Los Alamos National Laboratory: now hiring. Apply online at lanl.gov/careers. Los Alamos National Laboratory: now hiring. Apply online at lanl.gov/careers. Contacts Director, Community Partnerships Office Kathy

  17. On parameterization of the inverse problem for estimating aquifer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: On parameterization of the inverse problem for estimating aquifer properties using tracer data Authors: Kowalsky, M. B. ; Finsterle, S. ; Commer, M. ; Williams, K. H. ; ...

  18. Sole Source Aquifer Demonstration Program | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Demonstration Program Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Sole Source Aquifer Demonstration ProgramLegal...

  19. Chemical and Isotopic Prediction of Aquifer Temperatures in the...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    of Aquifer Temperatures in the Geothermal System at Long Valley, California Authors R.O. Fournier, Michael L. Sorey, Robert H. Mariner and Alfred H. Truesdell Published Journal...

  20. Great Plains Coal Gasification Project:

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-29

    This progress report on the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project discusses Lignite coal, natural gas, and by-products production as well as gas quality. A tabulation of raw material, product and energy consumption is provided for plant operations. Capital improvement projects and plant maintenance activities are detailed and summaries are provided for environmental, safety, medical, quality assurance, and qualtiy control activities.

  1. Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage

    SciTech Connect

    Jenne, E.A.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  2. Great Lakes Steel -- PCI facility

    SciTech Connect

    Eichinger, F.T.; Dake, S.H.; Wagner, E.D.; Brown, G.S.

    1997-12-31

    This paper discusses the planning, design, and start-up of the 90 tph PCI facility for National Steel`s Great Lakes Steel Division in River Rouge, MI. This project is owned and operated by Edison Energy Services, and was implemented on a fast-track basis by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Babcock Material Handling, and Babcock and Wilcox. This paper presents important process issues, basic design criteria, an the challenges of engineering and building a state-of-the-art PCI facility in two existing plants. Pulverized coal is prepared at the River Rouge Power Plant of Detroit Edison, is pneumatically conveyed 6,000 feet to a storage silo at Great Lakes Steel, and is injected into three blast furnaces.

  3. Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, John

    2014-05-01

    Welcome to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site is managed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). It is very important that all visitors comply with all DOE and ANL safety requirements, as well as those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the National Fire Protection Association, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and with other requirements as applicable.

  4. Aquifer Sampling Tube Results for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Mary J.; Peterson, Robert E.

    2003-10-27

    This report presents and discusses results of the fiscal year 2003 sampling event associated with aquifer tubes along the Columbia River in the northern Hanford Site. Aquifer tube data help define the extent of groundwater contamination near the river, determine vertical variations in contamination, monitor the performance of interim remedial actions near the river, and support impact studies.

  5. Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole

    DOEpatents

    Burklund, Patrick W.

    1985-10-22

    A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

  6. Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole

    DOEpatents

    Burklund, P.W.

    1984-01-20

    A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole is disclosed. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

  7. Tracer advection by steady groundwater flow in a stratified aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Sposito, Garrison; Weeks, Scott W.

    1997-01-02

    The perfectly stratified aquifer has often been investigated as a simple, tractable model for exploring new theoretical issues in subsurface hydrology. Adopting this approach, we show that steady groundwater flows in the perfectly stratified aquifer are always confined to a set of nonintersecting permanent surfaces, on which both streamlines and vorticity lines lie. This foliation of the flow domain exists as well for steady groundwater flows in any isotropic, spatially heterogeneous aquifer. In the present model example it is a direct consequence of the existence of a stream function, we then demonstrate that tracer plume advection by steady groundwater flow in a perfectly stratified aquifer is never ergodic, regardless of the initial size of the tracer plume. This nonergodicity, which holds also for tracer advection in any isotropic, spatially heterogeneous aquifer, implies that stochastic theories of purely advective tracer plume movement err in assuming ergodic behavior to simplify probabilistic calculations of plume spatial concentration moments.

  8. Optimizing multiphase aquifer remediation using ITOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Pruess, K.

    1994-06-01

    The T2VOC computer model for simulating the transport of organic chemical contaminants in non-isothermal multiphase systems has been coupled to the ITOUGH2 code which solves parameter optimization problems. This allows one to use nonlinear programming and simulated annealing techniques to solve groundwater management problems, i.e. the optimization of multiphase aquifer remediation. This report contains three illustrative examples to demonstrate the optimization of remediation operations by means of simulation-minimization techniques. The code iteratively determines an optimal remediation strategy (e.g. pumping schedule) which minimizes, for instance, pumping and energy costs, the time for cleanup, and residual contamination. While minimizing the objective function is straightforward, the relative weighting of different performance measures--e.g. pumping costs versus cleanup time versus residual contaminant content--is subject to a management decision process. The intended audience of this report is someone who is familiar with numerical modeling of multiphase flow of contaminants, and who might actually use T2VOC in conjunction with ITOUGH2 to optimize the design of aquifer remediation operations.

  9. Great Plains Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Plains Wind Farm Facility Great Plains Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  10. Great Basin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Great Basin Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Great Basin Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  11. Modeling cross-hole slug tests in an unconfined aquifer

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Malama, Bwalya; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Brauchler, Ralf; Bayer, Peter

    2016-06-28

    Cross-hole slug test date are analyzed with an extended version of a recently published unconfined aquifer model accounting for waterable effects using the linearized kinematic condition. The use of cross-hole slug test data to characterize aquifer heterogeneity and source/observation well oscillation parameters is evaluated. The data were collected in a series of multi-well and multi-level pneumatic slug tests conducted at a site in Widen, Switzerland. Furthermore, the tests involved source and observation well pairs separated by distances of up to 4 m, and instrumented with pressure transducers to monitor aquifer response in discrete intervals.

  12. Underground helium travels to the Earth's surface via aquifers...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Tweet EmailPrint Before it can put the party in party balloons, helium is carried from deep within the Earth's crust to the surface via aquifers, according to new research...

  13. Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho-Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Simulation analysis of the...

  14. Field Evaluation of the Restorative Capacity of the Aquifer Downgradie...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mining Site Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Field Evaluation of the Restorative Capacity of the Aquifer Downgradient of a Uranium In-Situ Recovery Mining Site A ...

  15. FEWA: a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1983-11-01

    This report documents the implementation and demonstration of a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers (FEWA). The particular features of FEWA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Point as well as distributed sources/sinks are included to represent recharges/pumpings and rainfall infiltrations. All sources/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed hydraulic head on the Dirichlet boundaries and fluxes on Neumann or Cauchy boundaries can be time-dependent or constant. Source/sink strength over each element and node, hydraulic head at each Dirichlet boundary node, and flux at each boundary segment can vary independently of each other. Either completely confined or completely unconfined aquifers, or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. Discretization of a compound region with very irregular curved boundaries is made easy by including both quadrilateral and triangular elements in the formulation. Large-field problems can be solved efficiently by including a pointwise iterative solution strategy as an optional alternative to the direct elimination solution method for the matrix equation approximating the partial differential equation of groundwater flow. FEWA also includes transient flow through confining leaky aquifers lying above and/or below the aquifer of interest. The model is verified against three simple cases to which analytical solutions are available. It is then demonstrated by two examples of how the model can be applied to heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers with transient boundary conditions, time-dependent sources/sinks, and confining aquitards for a confined aquifer of variable thickness and for a free surface problem in an unconfined aquifer, respectively. 20 references, 25 figures, 8 tables.

  16. Analysis of Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, M.; Rago, F.M.; Ohkuma, H.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Peters, E.; Dorfman, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal aquifer, located southeast of Lake Charles, Louisiana, is an aquifer modeled by a two-dimensional geopressured-geothermal simulator. This aquifer is a sandstone within the Frio formation at depths between 15,000 to 15,640 ft with a net porous thickness of 250 ft, a calculated in-situ permeability (from drawdown data) of 17 md, an estimated porosity of 24 percent, a uniaxial compaction coefficient of 4.5 x 10/sup -7/ psi/sup -1/ and a solution gas-water ratio of 11 SCF/STB all at the initial reservoir pressure of 12,060 psi. These parameters are typically pressure sensitive in geopressured-geothermal aquifers and are critically important to aquifer performance. Several simulation experiments are conducted which investigate the effects of varying initial values for these parameters with the experimentally determined values as means. The simulations give both optimistic and pessimistic expectations for aquifer performance. The expected life of the geopressured-geothermal well is reported for each simulation.

  17. Great Lakes Energy Coop | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Logo: Great Lakes Energy Coop Name: Great Lakes Energy Coop Address: PO Box 70 Place: Boyne City, MI Zip: 49712 Service Territory: Michigan Phone Number: 1-800-678-0411 Website:...

  18. ITC Great Plains, LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    ITC Great Plains, LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: ITC Great Plains, LLC Place: Kansas Phone Number: Topeka (785) 783-2226 or Dodge City (620) 371-6534 or (785) 783-2226...

  19. Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  20. Analysis of Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, M.; Rago, F.; Ohkuma, H.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Peters, E.; Dorfman, M.

    1982-01-01

    The Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal aquifer, located southeast of Lake Charles, Louisiana, is modeled by a two-dimensional geopressured-geothermal simulator. This aquifer is a sandstone within the Frio formation at depths between 15,000 to 15,640 ft with a net porous thickness of 250 ft, a calculated in-situ permeability (from drawdown data) of 17 md, an estimated porosity of 24%, a uniaxial compaction coefficient of 4.5 x 10/sup -7/ psi/sup -1/ and a solution gas-water ratio of 11 SCF/STB all at the initial reservoir pressure of 12,060 psi. These parameters are typically pressure sensitive in geopressured-geothermal aquifers and are critically important to aquifer performance. Several simulation experiments are conducted which investigate the effects of varying initial values for these parameters with the experimentally determined values as means. The simulations give both optimistic and pessimistic expectations for aquifer performance. The expected life of the geopressured-geothermal well is reported for each simulation.

  1. FEMA: a Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report documents the construction, verification, and demonstration of a Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers (FEMA). The particular features of FEMA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Mechanisms included in FEMA are: carrier fluid advection, hydrodynamic dispersion and molecular diffusion, radioactive decay, sorption, source/sinks, and degradation due to biological, chemical as well as physical processes. Three optional sorption models are embodied in FEMA. These are linear isotherm and Freundlich and Langmuir nonlinear isotherms. Point as well as distributed source/sinks are included to represent artificial injection/withdrawals and natural infiltration of precipitation. All source/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed concentration on the Dirichlet boundary, given gradient on the Neumann boundary segment, and flux at each Cauchy boundary segment can vary independently of each other. The aquifer may consist of as many formations as desired. Either completely confined or completely unconfined or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. FEMA also includes transient leakage to or from the aquifer of interest through confining beds from or to aquifers lying below and/or above.

  2. Great Plains Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Plains Ethanol Place: Chancellor, South Dakota Zip: 57015 Product: Limited liability company owned by its 500 members which owns and...

  3. Great Valley Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Valley Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Valley Ethanol LLC Place: Bakersfield, California Product: Developing a 63m gallon ethanol plant in Hanford, CA...

  4. Great Lakes Biofuels LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Great Lakes Biofuels LLC Place: Madison, Wisconsin Zip: 53704 Sector: Services Product: Biodiesel research, consulting, management distribution and services company. Coordinates:...

  5. GreatPoint Energy | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: GreatPoint Energy Address: 222 Third Street Place: Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip: 02142 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Biomass Product:...

  6. Legal and regulatory issues affecting aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1981-10-01

    This document updates and expands the report with a similar title issued in October 1980. This document examines a number of legal and regulatory issues that potentially can affect implementation of the aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) concept. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

  7. Anaerobic biodegradation of BTEX in aquifer material. Environmental research brief

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, R.C.; Hunt, M.J.; Shafer, M.B.; Barlaz, M.A.

    1997-08-01

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted in two petroleum-contaminated aquifers to examine the anaerobic biodegradation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene isomers (BTEX) under ambient conditions. Aquifer material was collected from locations at the source, mid-plume and end-plume at both sites, incubated under ambient conditions, and monitored for disappearance of the test compounds. In the mid-plume location at the second site, in-situ column experiments were also conducted for comparison with the laboratory microscosm and field-scale results. In the end-plume microcosms, biodegradation was variable with extensive biodegradation in some microcosms and little or no biodegradation in others.

  8. Geochemical detection of carbon dioxide in dilute aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S; Hao, Y; Aines, R

    2009-03-27

    Carbon storage in deep saline reservoirs has the potential to lower the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted to the atmosphere and to mitigate global warming. Leakage back to the atmosphere through abandoned wells and along faults would reduce the efficiency of carbon storage, possibly leading to health and ecological hazards at the ground surface, and possibly impacting water quality of near-surface dilute aquifers. We use static equilibrium and reactive transport simulations to test the hypothesis that perturbations in water chemistry associated with a CO{sub 2} gas leak into dilute groundwater are important measures for the potential release of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Simulation parameters are constrained by groundwater chemistry, flow, and lithology from the High Plains aquifer. The High Plains aquifer is used to represent a typical sedimentary aquifer overlying a deep CO{sub 2} storage reservoir. Specifically, we address the relationships between CO{sub 2} flux, groundwater flow, detection time and distance. The CO{sub 2} flux ranges from 10{sup 3} to 2 x 10{sup 6} t/yr (0.63 to 1250 t/m{sup 2}/yr) to assess chemical perturbations resulting from relatively small leaks that may compromise long-term storage, water quality, and surface ecology, and larger leaks characteristic of short-term well failure.

  9. AUTOMATED WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS IN SMALL-DIAMETER AQUIFER TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSEN SW; EDRINGTON RS; MAHOOD RO; VANMIDDLESWORTH PE

    2011-01-14

    Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium, strontium-90, and uranium discharges into the Columbia River along approximately 16 km (10 mi) of the shoreline. Various treatment systems have and will continue to be implemented to eliminate the impact of Hanford Site contamination to the river. To optimize the various remediation strategies, it is important to understand interactions between groundwater and the surface water of the Columbia River. An automated system to record water levels in aquifer sampling tubes installed in the hyporheic zone was designed and tested to (1) gain a more complete understanding of groundwater/river water interactions based on gaining and losing conditions ofthe Columbia River, (2) record and interpret data for consistent and defensible groundwater/surface water conceptual models that may be used to better predict subsurface contaminant fate and transport, and (3) evaluate the hydrodynamic influence of extraction wells in an expanded pump-and-treat system to optimize the treatment system. A system to measure water levels in small-diameter aquifer tubes was designed and tested in the laboratory and field. The system was configured to allow manual measurements to periodically calibrate the instrument and to permit aquifer tube sampling without removing the transducer tube. Manual measurements were collected with an e-tape designed and fabricated especially for this test. Results indicate that the transducer system accurately records groundwater levels in aquifer tubes. These data are being used to refine the conceptual and numeric models to better understand interactions in the hyporheic zone of the Columbia River and the adjacent river water and groundwater, and changes in hydrochemistry relative to groundwater flux as river water recharges the aquifer and then drains back out in response to changes in the river level.

  10. Ground-water hydraulics of the deep-basin brine aquifer, Palo Duro Basin, Texas panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Deep-Basin Brine aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin (Texas Panhandle) underlies thick Permian bedded evaporites that are being evaluated as a potential high-level nuclear waste isolation repository. Potentiometric surface maps of 5 units of the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer were drawn using drill-stem test (DST) pressure data, which were analyzed by a geostatistical technique (kriging) to smooth the large variation in the data. The potentiometric surface maps indicate that the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer could be conceptually modeled as 5 aquifer units; a Lower Permian (Wolfcamp) aquifer, upper and lower Pennsylvanian aquifers, a pre-Pennsylvanian aquifer, and a Pennsylvanian to Wolfcampian granite-wash aquifer. The hydraulic head maps indicate that ground-water flow in each of the units is west to east with a minor northerly component near the Amarillo Uplift, the northern structural boundary of the basin. The Wolfcamp potentiometric surface indicates the strongest component of northerly flow. Inferred flow direction in Pennsylvanian aquifers is easterly, and in the pre-Pennsylvanian aquifer near its pinch-out in the basin center, flow is inferred to be to the north. In the granite-wash aquifer the inferred flow direction is east across the northern edge of the basin and southeast along the Amarillo Uplift.

  11. ARM - Lesson Plans: Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Southern Great Plains Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Southern Great Plains The educational outreach efforts at the SGP site have been aimed at supporting the K-12 educational outreach web pages of the Oklahoma Climatological Survey. As part of the Oklahoma

  12. Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothermal Resources Project Officer: Eric Hass Total Project Funding: $1.2 million April 24, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Principal Investigator Stuart F Simmons Colorado School of Mines 2 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov Relevance/Impact of Research * Determine fundamental controls on fluid-mineral equilibria in six geothermal systems across the Great Basin to

  13. Energy and water in the Great Lakes.

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll

    2011-11-01

    The nexus between thermoelectric power production and water use is not uniform across the U.S., but rather differs according to regional physiography, demography, power plant fleet composition, and the transmission network. That is, in some regions water demand for thermoelectric production is relatively small while in other regions it represents the dominate use. The later is the case for the Great Lakes region, which has important implications for the water resources and aquatic ecology of the Great Lakes watershed. This is today, but what about the future? Projected demographic trends, shifting lifestyles, and economic growth coupled with the threat of global climate change and mounting pressure for greater U.S. energy security could have profound effects on the region's energy future. Planning for such an uncertain future is further complicated by the fact that energy and environmental planning and regulatory decisionmaking is largely bifurcated in the region, with environmental and water resource concerns generally taken into account after new energy facilities and technologies have been proposed, or practices are already in place. Based on these confounding needs, the objective of this effort is to develop Great Lakes-specific methods and tools to integrate energy and water resource planning and thereby support the dual goals of smarter energy planning and development, and protection of Great Lakes water resources. Guiding policies for this planning are the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The desired outcome of integrated energy-water-aquatic resource planning is a more sustainable regional energy mix for the Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

  14. Using Pressure and Volumetric Approaches to Estimate CO2 Storage Capacity in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Thibeau, Sylvain; Bachu, Stefan; Birkholzer, Jens; Holloway, Sam; Neele, Filip; Zhou, Quanlin

    2014-12-31

    Various approaches are used to evaluate the capacity of saline aquifers to store CO2, resulting in a wide range of capacity estimates for a given aquifer. The two approaches most used are the volumetric open aquifer and closed aquifer approaches. We present four full-scale aquifer cases, where CO2 storage capacity is evaluated both volumetrically (with open and/or closed approaches) and through flow modeling. These examples show that the open aquifer CO2 storage capacity estimation can strongly exceed the cumulative CO2 injection from the flow model, whereas the closed aquifer estimates are a closer approximation to the flow-model derived capacity. An analogy to oil recovery mechanisms is presented, where the primary oil recovery mechanism is compared to CO2 aquifer storage without producing formation water; and the secondary oil recovery mechanism (water flooding) is compared to CO2 aquifer storage performed simultaneously with extraction of water for pressure maintenance. This analogy supports the finding that the closed aquifer approach produces a better estimate of CO2 storage without water extraction, and highlights the need for any CO2 storage estimate to specify whether it is intended to represent CO2 storage capacity with or without water extraction.

  15. Microsoft Word - Chap3 5-16-05.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Three May 2005 2004 Site Environmental Report 3-1 Results in Brief: 2004 Groundwater Pathway Groundwater Remedy - At the start of 2004, active restoration of the Great Miami Aquifer continued at the following five groundwater restoration modules: * South Plume Module, which became operational on August 27, 1993 * South Field Extraction (Phase I) Module, which became operational on July 13, 1998 * South Plume Optimization Module, which became operational on August 9, 1998 * Re-injection Module,

  16. http://emdev.apps.em.doe.gov/EMDEV/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Management Plume Name: Great Miami Aquifer Remediation Contractor: Unknown Report Last Updated: Unknown Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement TCE 58 No carbon disulfide 6 No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? Yes Metal Name Metal Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement Mn 2000 No Mo 200 No U 845 No Ni 1540 No Zn 30 No Isotopes Present? Yes Isotope Name Isotope Activity (pCi/l) Regulatory

  17. Stormwater runoff policy on the Spokane/Rathdrum Prairie Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, E.O.

    1990-01-01

    The Panhandle Health District, in conjunction with the Idaho Department of Water Resources, is developing a stormwater runoff control program under the US EPA Wellhead Protection Program. The goal of the project is to protect the Spokane Valley/Rathdrum Prairie Aquifer from widespread subsurface disposal of stormwater runoff via shallow injection wells. Studies conducted by the health district in 1976 and 1977 established that areas downgradient from urban land uses had elevated nitrate level sand that the aquifer is vulnerable to contamination from surface activities. The stormwater runoff controls are being developed in conjunction with similar programs, such as chemical storage and use, solid waste and subsurface sewage disposal. The expected result will be a groundwater management system that protects the resource by preventing contamination rather than a program that responds to poor water quality with costly remedial action.

  18. ARM - Southern Great Plains Newsletter Archive

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    HomeroomPublicationsSouthern Great Plains Newsletter Archive Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Southern Great Plains Newsletter Archive 2011 March PDF - 2.7MB 2010 September PDF - 1.6MB 2009 January PDF - 472KB February PDF - 472KB 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 January PDF - 7.4MB

  19. Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.

    1983-11-01

    Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

  20. Use of natural radionuclides to predict the behavior of radwaste radionuclides in far-field aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, N.; Laul, J.C.; Perkins, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    In appropriate aquifers the natural radionuclides of the U and Th decay series are important sources of information about the behavior of radwaste radionuclides in far-field aquifers. The Wolfcamp Carbonate, Pennsylvanian Carbonate and Granite Wash aquifers in the Palo Duro Basin of the Texas Panhandle are prime examples of such aquifers. Sampling and analysis for key radionuclides in the ground waters of these aquifers are quite feasible and have been accomplished. Key early results are: (1) Ra does not appear to be retarded by sorption, (2) Th appears to be strongly sorbed, (3) kinetics seem to be different on time scales of days to months than on ones of hundreds of thousands of years, and (4) U and Th behave similarly when the time scales (half-lives) are similar, leading to the suggestion that uranium is in the +4 valence state in these aquifers. 10 references, 3 figures.

  1. SE Great Basin Play Fairway Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    Within this submission are multiple .tif images with accompanying metadata of magnetotelluric conductor occurrence, fault critical stress composite risk segment (CRS), permeability CRS, Quaternary mafic extrusions, Quaternary fault density, and Quaternary rhyolite maps. Each of these contributed to a final play fairway analysis (PFA) for the SE Great Basin study area.

  2. Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells | Department of Energy Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the

  3. Preliminary potentiometric map and flow dynamic characteristics for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, F.A. Jr.; Raymond, R.G.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the first comprehensive Hanford Site-wide potentiometric map for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system (i.e., the upper Saddle Mountains Basalt). In constructing the potentiometric map, over forty on-site and off-site monitoring wells and boreholes were used. The potentiometric map developed for the upper-basalt confined aquifer is consistent with the areal head pattern indicated for the Mabton interbed, which is a deeper and more areally extensive confined aquifer underlying the Hanford Site. Salient features for the upper-basalt confined aquifer system potentiometric map are described.

  4. SE Great Basin Play Fairway Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a Na/K geothermometer probability greater than 200 deg C map, as well as two play fairway analysis (PFA) models. The probability map acts as a composite risk segment for the PFA models. The PFA models differ in their application of magnetotelluric conductors as composite risk segments. These PFA models map out the geothermal potential in the region of SE Great Basin, Utah.

  5. HUBZone, Great Opportunity for Small Businesses

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    For Immediate Release HUBZone, Great Opportunity for Small Businesses CARLSBAD, N.M., March 25, 2003 - To help the region's small businesses attract federal and state work, Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS) will offer a Small Business Fair on May 2 in Carlsbad to introduce the U.S. Small Business Administration's (SBA) HUBZone concept and other socioeconomic programs. WTS is the prime contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A HUBZone

  6. Geothermal fluid genesis in the Great Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.K.

    1990-01-01

    Early theories concerning geothermal recharge in the Great Basin implied recharge was by recent precipitation. Physical, chemical, and isotopic differences between thermal and non-thermal fluids and global paleoclimatic indicators suggest that recharge occurred during the late Pleistocene. Polar region isotopic studies demonstrate that a depletion in stable light-isotopes of precipitation existed during the late Pleistocene due to the colder, wetter climate. Isotopic analysis of calcite veins and packrat midden megafossils confirm the depletion event occurred in the Great Basin. Isotopic analysis of non-thermal springs is utilized as a proxy for local recent precipitation. Contoured plots of deuterium concentrations from non-thermal and thermal water show a regional, systematic variation. Subtracting contoured plots of non-thermal water from plots of thermal water reveals that thermal waters on a regional scale are generally isotopically more depleted. Isolated areas where thermal water is more enriched than non-thermal water correspond to locations of pluvial Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville, suggesting isotopically enriched lake water contributed to fluid recharge. These anomalous waters also contain high concentrations of sodium chloride, boron, and other dissolved species suggestive of evaporative enrichment. Carbon-age date and isotopic data from Great Basin thermal waters correlate with the polar paleoclimate studies. Recharge occurred along range bounding faults. 151 refs., 62 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. Potential Risks of Freshwater Aquifer Contamination with Geosequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Robert

    2013-09-30

    Substantial leakage of CO{sub 2} from deep geological strata to shallow potable aquifers is likely to be rare, but chemical detection of potential leakage nonetheless remains an integral component of any safe carbon capture and storage system. CO{sub 2} that infiltrates an unconfined freshwater aquifer will have an immediate impact on water chemistry by lowering pH in most cases and by altering the concentration of total dissolved solids. Chemical signatures in affected waters provide an important opportunity for early detection of leaks. In the presence of CO{sub 2}, trace elements such as Mn, Fe, and Ca can increase by an order of magnitude or more above control concentrations within 100 days. Therefore, these and other elements should be monitored along with pH as geochemical markers of potential CO{sub 2} leaks. Dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity can also be rapidly responsive to CO{sub 2} and are stable indicators of a leak. Importantly, such changes may be detectable long before direct changes in CO{sub 2} are observed. The experimental results also suggest that the relative severity of the impact of leaks on overlying drinking-water aquifers should be considered in the selection of CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. One primary selection criteria should be metal and metalloid availability, such as uranium and arsenic abundance, to carefully monitor chemical species that could trigger changes above maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Overall, the risks of leakage from underground CO{sub 2} storage are real but appear to be manageable if systems are closely monitored.

  8. Appendix B Surface Infiltration and Aquifer Test Data

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    B Surface Infiltration and Aquifer Test Data This page intentionally left blank Infiltration Tests This page intentionally left blank 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 TIME (MIN) 200 250 TIME (MIN) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 TIME (MIN) zoo 800 1000 TIME (MIN) 0 150 300 450 600 750 , 900 1050 1200 1350 1500 1650 1800 TIME (MIN) TIME (MIN) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 TIME (MIN) INF-8 TEST I 300 400 TIME (MIN) INF-8 TEST 2 200 250

  9. Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Julio Enrique

    2003-12-18

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} will induce a variety of coupled physical and chemical processes, including multiphase fluid flow, fluid pressurization and changes in effective stress, solute transport, and chemical reactions between fluids and formation minerals. This work addresses some of these issues with special emphasis given to the physics of fluid flow in brine formations. An investigation of the thermophysical properties of pure carbon dioxide, water and aqueous solutions of CO{sub 2} and NaCl has been conducted. As a result, accurate representations and models for predicting the overall thermophysical behavior of the system CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-NaCl are proposed and incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH2/ECO{sub 2}. The basic problem of CO{sub 2} injection into a radially symmetric brine aquifer is used to validate the results of TOUGH2/ECO2. The numerical simulator has been applied to more complex flow problem including the CO{sub 2} injection project at the Sleipner Vest Field in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea and the evaluation of fluid flow dynamics effects of CO{sub 2} injection into aquifers. Numerical simulation results show that the transport at Sleipner is dominated by buoyancy effects and that shale layers control vertical migration of CO{sub 2}. These results are in good qualitative agreement with time lapse surveys performed at the site. High-resolution numerical simulation experiments have been conducted to study the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers. The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO{sub 2}) the viscosity of carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous

  10. Effects of surfactants on the desorption of organic contaminants from aquifer materials. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brickell, J.L.

    1989-08-01

    The efficiency of removing organic contaminants from groundwater aquifers by the pump and treat process is adversely affected by the retardation of the contaminant's mobility due to adsorption onto aquifer material. The use of surfactants in conjunction with the pump and treat process has the potential for improving contaminant mobility by solubilizing the adsorbed contaminant.

  11. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

  12. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal energy storage. Volume 1. Regions 1 through 6

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: the Western Mountains; Alluvial Basins; Columbia LAVA Plateau; Colorado Plateau; High Plains; and Glaciated Central Region. (LCL)

  13. Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative | Department of Energy Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative October 28, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The White House Council on Environmental Quality and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a workshop with the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative in Chicago on October 26 - 27, 2010, focused on the

  14. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technique, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main source of drinking water. The in situ arsenic removal technique was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions., Its effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The mechanism of arsenic removal by the iron coating was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, an electron microprobe, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. A 4-step alternative cycle aquifer iron coating method was developed. A continuous injection of 5 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 hours can create a uniform coating of crystalline goethite on the surface of quartz sand in the columns without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 0.45 cm/min of the injection reagents (vi), the time for arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column was approximately 35 hours, which was much longer than that for tracer fluorescein sodium (approximately 2 hours). The retardation factor of arsenic was 23, and its adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe, leading to an excellent arsenic removal. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As (V) and Fe (II) reagents. When the arsenic content in the groundwater was 233 ?g/L, the aqueous phase arsenic was completely removed with an arsenic adsorption of 0.05 mol As per mol Fe. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation, in which arsenic and iron likely formed the arsenic-bearing iron mineral phases with poor crystallinity by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Thus, the high arsenic removal efficiency of the technique likely resulted from the

  15. Naturener USA LLC formerly Great Plains Wind Energy | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    USA LLC formerly Great Plains Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Naturener USA, LLC (formerly Great Plains Wind & Energy) Place: San Francisco, California Zip: 94111...

  16. Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Map: Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment...

  17. Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes Offshore Regions Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes Offshore Regions October 1, 2013 - ...

  18. Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and...

  19. Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and the United ... Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and the United ...

  20. Great Lakes Science Center Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Science Center Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Lakes Science Center Wind Farm Facility Great Lakes Science Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind...

  1. The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) field test facility -- system description, aquifer characterization, and results of short-term test cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, M.; Hoyer, M.C.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Holm, N.L.; Holm, T.R.; Kanivetsky, R.; Jirsa, M.A.; Lee, H.C.; Lauer, J.L.; Miller, R.T.; Norton, J.L.; Runke, H. )

    1991-06-01

    Phase 1 of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) Project at the University of Minnesota was to test the feasibility, and model, the ATES concept at temperatures above 100{degrees}C using a confined aquifer for the storage and recovery of hot water. Phase 1 included design, construction, and operation of a 5-MW thermal input/output field test facility (FTF) for four short-term ATES cycles (8 days each of heat injection, storage, and heat recover). Phase 1 was conducted from May 1980 to December 1983. This report describes the FTF, the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville (FIG) aquifer used for the test, and the four short-term ATES cycles. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are all included. The FTF consists of monitoring wells and the source and storage well doublet completed in the FIG aquifer with heat exchangers and a fixed-bed precipitator between the wells of the doublet. The FIG aquifer is highly layered and a really anisotropic. The upper Franconia and Ironton-Galesville parts of the aquifer, those parts screened, have hydraulic conductivities of {approximately}0.6 and {approximately}1.0 m/d, respectively. Primary ions in the ambient ground water are calcium and magnesium bicarbonate. Ambient temperature FIG ground water is saturated with respect to calcium/magnesium bicarbonate. Heating the ground water caused most of the dissolved calcium to precipitate out as calcium carbonate in the heat exchanger and precipitator. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water, suggesting dissolution of some constituents of the aquifer during the cycles. Further work on the ground water chemistry is required to understand water-rock interactions.

  2. Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

    2012-06-09

    In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task 3, the

  3. Generalized thickness and configuration of the top of the intermediate aquifer, West-Central Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Corral, M.A. Jr.; Wolansky, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The water-bearing units of the intermediate aquifer consist of discontinuous sand, gravel, shell, and limestone and dolomite beds in the Tamiami Formation of late Miocene age and the Hawthorn Formation of middle Miocene age. Within parts of Polk, Manatee, Hardee, De Soto, Sarasota, and Charlotte Counties, sand and clay beds within the Tampa Limestone that are hydraulically connected to the Hawthorn Formation are also included in the intermediate aquifer. 15 refs.

  4. Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy hosted a workshop with the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative in Chicago on October 26 - 27, 2010, focused on the siting of offshore wind power in the Great Lakes. ...

  5. Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Basin. Development of this database is one of the first steps in understanding the nature of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Of particular importance in the Great Basin...

  6. JW Great Lakes Wind LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    JW Great Lakes Wind LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: JW Great Lakes Wind LLC Place: Cleveland, Ohio Zip: 44114-4420 Sector: Wind energy Product: Ohio based subsidiary of Juwi...

  7. WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE April 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis An operator uses ...

  8. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    ScienceCinema

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2016-07-12

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  9. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2012-10-10

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  10. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, R D; Wolery, T J; Bourcier, W L; Wolfe, T; Haussmann, C

    2010-02-19

    Can we use the pressure associated with sequestration to make brine into fresh water? This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). Possible products are: Drinking water, Cooling water, and Extra aquifer space for CO{sub 2} storage. The conclusions are: (1) Many saline formation waters appear to be amenable to largely conventional RO treatment; (2) Thermodynamic modeling indicates that osmotic pressure is more limiting on water recovery than mineral scaling; (3) The use of thermodynamic modeling with Pitzer's equations (or Extended UNIQUAC) allows accurate estimation of osmotic pressure limits; (4) A general categorization of treatment feasibility is based on TDS has been proposed, in which brines with 10,000-85,000 mg/L are the most attractive targets; (5) Brines in this TDS range appear to be abundant (geographically and with depth) and could be targeted in planning future CCS operations (including site selection and choice of injection formation); and (6) The estimated cost of treating waters in the 10,000-85,000 mg/L TDS range is about half that for conventional seawater desalination, due to the anticipated pressure recovery.

  11. Evaluating impacts of CO2 gas intrusion into a confined sandstone aquifer: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However, the

  12. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Gas Intrusion Into a Confined Sandstone aquifer: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However, the

  13. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Gas Intrusion Into a Confined Sandstone aquifer: Experimental Results

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnershipmore » Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However

  14. Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Technology Marketing Summaries -

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Technology Marketing Summaries Here you'll find marketing summaries for technologies available for licensing from the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC). The summaries provide descriptions of the technologies including their benefits, applications and industries, and development stage. Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center 43 Technology Marketing Summaries Category Title and Abstract Laboratories Date Biomass and

  15. NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Comments of Great River Energy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Great River Energy NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Comments of Great River Energy Great River Energy has deployed a fully integrated IP network to 750 remote sites of our electric system, 18 remote offices and 11 electric generating facilities. The IP network transports data information for SCADA, mobile radio voice traffic, metering information, corporate data and voice traffic between office sites, protection operations for power lines, and video surveillance.

  16. Two-phase convective CO2 dissolution in saline aquifers

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Martinez, Mario J.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    Geologic carbon storage in deep saline aquifers is a promising technology for reducing anthropogenic emissions into the atmosphere. Dissolution of injected CO2 into resident brines is one of the primary trapping mechanisms generally considered necessary to provide long-term storage security. Given that diffusion of CO2 in brine is woefully slow, convective dissolution, driven by a small increase in brine density with CO2 saturation, is considered to be the primary mechanism of dissolution trapping. Previous studies of convective dissolution have typically only considered the convective process in the single-phase region below the capillary transition zone and have either ignored the overlyingmore » two-phase region where dissolution actually takes place or replaced it with a virtual region with reduced or enhanced constant permeability. Our objective is to improve estimates of the long-term dissolution flux of CO2 into brine by including the capillary transition zone in two-phase model simulations. In the fully two-phase model, there is a capillary transition zone above the brine-saturated region over which the brine saturation decreases with increasing elevation. Our two-phase simulations show that the dissolution flux obtained by assuming a brine-saturated, single-phase porous region with a closed upper boundary is recovered in the limit of vanishing entry pressure and capillary transition zone. For typical finite entry pressures and capillary transition zone, however, convection currents penetrate into the two-phase region. As a result, this removes the mass transfer limitation of the diffusive boundary layer and enhances the convective dissolution flux of CO2 more than 3 times above the rate assuming single-phase conditions.« less

  17. Using Pressure and Volumetric Approaches to Estimate CO2 Storage Capacity in Deep Saline Aquifers

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Thibeau, Sylvain; Bachu, Stefan; Birkholzer, Jens; Holloway, Sam; Neele, Filip; Zhou, Quanlin

    2014-12-31

    Various approaches are used to evaluate the capacity of saline aquifers to store CO2, resulting in a wide range of capacity estimates for a given aquifer. The two approaches most used are the volumetric “open aquifer” and “closed aquifer” approaches. We present four full-scale aquifer cases, where CO2 storage capacity is evaluated both volumetrically (with “open” and/or “closed” approaches) and through flow modeling. These examples show that the “open aquifer” CO2 storage capacity estimation can strongly exceed the cumulative CO2 injection from the flow model, whereas the “closed aquifer” estimates are a closer approximation to the flow-model derived capacity. Anmore » analogy to oil recovery mechanisms is presented, where the primary oil recovery mechanism is compared to CO2 aquifer storage without producing formation water; and the secondary oil recovery mechanism (water flooding) is compared to CO2 aquifer storage performed simultaneously with extraction of water for pressure maintenance. This analogy supports the finding that the “closed aquifer” approach produces a better estimate of CO2 storage without water extraction, and highlights the need for any CO2 storage estimate to specify whether it is intended to represent CO2 storage capacity with or without water extraction.« less

  18. Water Influx, and Its Effect on Oil Recovery: Part 1. Aquifer Flow, SUPRI TR-103

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, William E.

    1999-08-09

    Natural water encroachment is commonly seen in many oil and gas reservoirs. In fact, overall, there is more water than oil produced from oil reservoirs worldwide. Thus it is clear that an understanding of reservoir/aquifer interaction can be an important aspect of reservoir management to optimize recovery of hydrocarbons. Although the mathematics of these processes are difficult, they are often amenable to analytical solution and diagnosis. Thus this will be the ultimate goal of a series of reports on this subject. This first report deals only with aquifer behavior, so it does not address these important reservoir/aquifer issues. However, it is an important prelude to them, for the insight gained gives important clues on how to address reservoir/aquifer problems. In general when looking at aquifer flow, there are two convenient inner boundary conditions that can be considered; constant pressure or constant flow rate. There are three outer boundary conditions that are convenient to consider; infinite, closed and constant pressure. And there are three geometries that can be solved reasonably easily; linear, radial and spherical. Thus there are a total of eighteen different solutions that can be analyzed.

  19. Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, John

    2014-10-21

    This is the final technical report for the Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstrationn Project, outlining the technical aspects of the User Group System.

  20. Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  1. North Great River, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Great River, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.756272, -73.170087 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  2. Great River, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Great River, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.7212097, -73.1576139 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  3. Great Plains The Camelina Company | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    The Camelina Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Plains (The Camelina Company) Place: Montana Zip: MT 59911 Product: Manufacturer and marketer of biodiesel from...

  4. Great Bend, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Great Bend, North Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.1538473, -96.8020228 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  5. Lanzhou Great Wall Development Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Wall Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lanzhou Great Wall Development Co., Ltd. Place: Lanzhou, Gansu Province, China Zip: 730000 Sector: Hydro Product:...

  6. EIS-0499: Great Northern Transmission Line Project, Minnesota...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    EIS-0499: Great Northern Transmission Line Project, Minnesota Summary This EIS will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to grant a Presidential permit to ...

  7. Great China New Energy Technology Services Co Ltd GCNETS | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    New Energy Technology Services Co Ltd GCNETS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great China New Energy Technology Services Co Ltd (GCNETS) Place: China Product: China-based...

  8. Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plains: Diagnosis of Mechanisms from SGP ARM Data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains: Diagnosis of ...

  9. The Great Lakes Insitute for Energy Innovation | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Insitute for Energy Innovation Jump to: navigation, search Name: The Great Lakes Insitute for Energy Innovation Place: Cleveland, Ohio Zip: 44106 Website: energy.case.edu...

  10. Great Northern Transmission Line Floodplain and Wetland Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Floodplain and Wetland Assessment Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability January 2016 Great Northern Transmission Line Floodplain and Wetland Assessment Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability January 2016 i Great Northern Transmission Line Floodplain and Wetland Assessment January 2016 Contents 1.0 Introduction

  11. Apparatus and method for extraction of chemicals from aquifer remediation effluent water

    DOEpatents

    McMurtrey, Ryan D.; Ginosar, Daniel M.; Moor, Kenneth S.; Shook, G. Michael; Moses, John M.; Barker, Donna L.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for extraction of chemicals from an aquifer remediation aqueous effluent are provided. The extraction method utilizes a critical fluid for separation and recovery of chemicals employed in remediating aquifers contaminated with hazardous organic substances, and is particularly suited for separation and recovery of organic contaminants and process chemicals used in surfactant-based remediation technologies. The extraction method separates and recovers high-value chemicals from the remediation effluent and minimizes the volume of generated hazardous waste. The recovered chemicals can be recycled to the remediation process or stored for later use.

  12. Field Evaluation of the Restorative Capacity of the Aquifer Downgradient of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a Uranium In-Situ Recovery Mining Site (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Field Evaluation of the Restorative Capacity of the Aquifer Downgradient of a Uranium In-Situ Recovery Mining Site Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Field Evaluation of the Restorative Capacity of the Aquifer Downgradient of a Uranium In-Situ Recovery Mining Site A two-part field study was conducted in Smith Ranch-Highland in-situ recovery (ISR) near Douglas, Wyoming, to evaluate the

  13. Title Geology of the Great Basin. Copyright Issue Entire Book

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Fiero, B. 101084 Document Date 1186 Document Type Book ERC Index number 05.09.128 Box Number 1672-1 Recipients Unversity of Nevada Reno Press ADI " Geology of the Great...

  14. Changing Weather and Climate in the Great Lakes Region

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 4-week course will feature a new season each week through short lectures and activities covering Great Lakes weather, observed changes in the climate, and societal impacts of climate change....

  15. Nanoparticle Research Creates Great Contrast | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoparticle Research Creates Great Contrast Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) ...

  16. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Great Plains

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on the Great Plains impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations...

  17. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Great Plains

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy (MIE) Initiative is hosting a webinar on the Great Plains impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by nationally recognized policymakers, researchers, and educators.

  18. Great Falls, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Great Falls is a census-designated place in Fairfax County, Virginia.1 Registered Energy...

  19. Magnitude of Crustal Extension in the Southern Great Basin |...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Magnitude of Crustal Extension in the Southern Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Magnitude of Crustal Extension in the...

  20. Great Power Battery Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Battery Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Power Battery Co., Ltd Place: China Product: Guangzhou - based maker of Li-Ion, Li-Polymer, LiFePO4, NiCd, and NiMH...

  1. EIS-0106: Great Falls-Conrad Transmission Line Project, Montana

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Western Area Power Administration prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of the construction and operation of a 230-kilovolt transmission line from Great Falls, Montana, to Conrad, Montana.

  2. A quantitative analysis of hydraulic interaction processes in stream-aquifer systems

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Wang, Wenke; Dai, Zhenxue; Zhao, Yaqian; Li, Junting; Duan, Lei; Wang, Zhoufeng; Zhu, Lin

    2016-01-28

    The hydraulic relationship between the stream and aquifer can be altered from hydraulic connection to disconnection when the pumping rate exceeds the maximum seepage flux of the streambed. This study proposes to quantitatively analyze the physical processes of stream-aquifer systems from connection to disconnection. A free water table equation is adopted to clarify under what conditions a stream starts to separate hydraulically from an aquifer. Both the theoretical analysis and laboratory tests have demonstrated that the hydraulic connectedness of the stream-aquifer system can reach a critical disconnection state when the horizontal hydraulic gradient at the free water surface is equalmore » to zero and the vertical is equal to 1. A boundary-value problem for movement of the critical point of disconnection is established for an analytical solution of the inverted water table movement beneath the stream. The result indicates that the maximum distance or thickness of the inverted water table is equal to the water depth in the stream, and at a steady state of disconnection, the maximum hydraulic gradient at the streambed center is 2. In conclusion, this study helps us to understand the hydraulic phenomena of water flow near streams and accurately assess surface water and groundwater resources.« less

  3. Evaluating the impact of aquifer layer properties on geomechanical response during CO2 geological sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Lin, Guang; Fang, Yilin

    2013-04-01

    Numerical models play an essential role in understanding the facts of carbon dioxide (CO2) geological sequestration in the life cycle of a storage reservoir. We present a series of test cases that reflect a broad and realistic range of aquifer reservoir properties to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts on the geomechanical response to CO2 injection. In this study, a coupled hydro-mechanical model was introduced to simulate the sequestration process, and a quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was introduced to efficiently sample the value of aquifer properties and geometry parameters. Aquifer permeability was found to be of significant importance to the geomechanical response to the injection. To study the influence of uncertainty of the permeability distribution in the aquifer, an additional series of tests is presented, based on a default permeability distribution site sample with various distribution deviations generated by the Monte Carlo sampling method. The results of the test series show that different permeability distributions significantly affect the displacement and possible failure zone.

  4. Modeling the Impact of Carbon Dioxide Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Diana H.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Dai, Zhenxue; Keating, Elizabeth; Brown, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    Multiphase, reactive transport modeling was used to identify the mechanisms controlling trace metal release under elevated CO2 conditions from a well-characterized carbonate aquifer. Modeling was conducted for two experimental scenarios: batch experiments to simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived release of CO2 as would occur in the case of well failure during injection, and column experiments to simulate more gradual leaks such as those occurring along undetected faults, fractures, or well linings. Observed and predicted trace metal concentrations are compared to groundwater concentrations from this aquifer to determine the potential for leaking CO2 to adversely impact drinking water quality. Finally, a three-dimensional multiphase flow and reactive-transport simulation of CO2 leakage from an abandoned wellbore into a generalized model of the shallow, unconfined portion of the aquifer is used to determine potential impacts on groundwater quality. As a measure of adverse impacts on groundwater quality, both the EPAs MCL limits and the maximum trace metal concentration observed in the aquifer were used as threshold values.

  5. Great opportunity for Native American-owned businesses

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Great opportunity for Native American-owned businesses Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Great opportunity for Native American-owned businesses Proposals for Native American Venture Acceleration Fund due October 18. September 1, 2016 Phoebe Suina of High Water Mark, LLC, was a Native American VAF winner in 2015. Phoebe Suina of High Water Mark, LLC, was a Native American VAF

  6. Tectonic & Structural Controls of Great Basin Geothermal Systems:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Developing Successful Exploration Strategies | Department of Energy Tectonic & Structural Controls of Great Basin Geothermal Systems: Developing Successful Exploration Strategies Tectonic & Structural Controls of Great Basin Geothermal Systems: Developing Successful Exploration Strategies Keeping Nevada in Hot Water presentation by James Faulds of University of Nevada, Reno at the 2013 Annual Peer Review meeting in Colorado. nevada_hotwater_peerreview2013.pdf (6.81 MB) More Documents

  7. COLLOQUIUM: Ocean Acoustic Ecology: Great Whales, Ocean Scales, Big Data |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab March 23, 2016, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Ocean Acoustic Ecology: Great Whales, Ocean Scales, Big Data Dr. Christopher Clark Cornell University Empirical evidence shows that great whale singers can be heard across an ocean basin, there are no known deaf marine vertebrates, and sounds from human activities impose acute and chronic costs over enormous areas of the marine acoustic environment for large portions of the year. The dramatic

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Southern Great Plains

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (SGP) Site () | Data Explorer Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site Title: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To

  9. Organic and Elemental Carbon Aerosol Particulates at the Southern Great

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plains Site Field Campaign Report (Program Document) | SciTech Connect Program Document: Organic and Elemental Carbon Aerosol Particulates at the Southern Great Plains Site Field Campaign Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Organic and Elemental Carbon Aerosol Particulates at the Southern Great Plains Site Field Campaign Report The purpose of this study was to measure the organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) fractions of PM2.5 particulate matter at the U.S. Department

  10. Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to Unconfined and Confined Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Wang, Guohui; Sullivan, E. C.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Harvey, Omar R.; Bowden, Mark

    2013-04-15

    Experimental research work has been conducted and is undergoing at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to address a variety of scientific issues related with the potential leaks of the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from deep storage reservoirs. The main objectives of this work are as follows: • Develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption and redox reactions) in the aquifer sediments. • Identify prevailing environmental conditions that would dictate one geochemical outcome over another. • Gather useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geological carbon sequestration. In this report, we present results from experiments conducted at PNNL to address research issues related to the main objectives of this effort. A series of batch and column experiments and solid phase characterization studies (quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions with a concentrated acid) were conducted with representative rocks and sediments from an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer, i.e., Edwards aquifer in Texas, and a confined aquifer, i.e., the High Plains aquifer in Kansas. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream simulating CO2 gas leaking scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in liquid and effluent samples collected at pre-determined experimental times. Additional research to be conducted during the current fiscal year will further validate these results and will address other important remaining issues. Results from these experimental efforts will provide valuable insights for the development of site-specific, generation III reduced order models. In addition, results will initially serve as input parameters during model calibration runs and, ultimately, will be used to test model predictive capability and

  11. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Intrusion into an Unconsolidated Aquifer. I. Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect

    Lawter, Amanda R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Wang, Guohui; Shao, Hongbo; Brown, Christopher F.

    2015-08-04

    Capture and deep subsurface sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Batch and column experiments combined with wet chemical extractions were conducted to evaluate these risks to groundwater quality and to understand effects of CO2 leakage on aquifer chemistry and mineralogy. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, a confined sandstone aquifer, were used to study time-dependent release of major, minor and trace elements when exposed to CO2 gas. Results showed that Ca, Ba, Si, Mg, Sr, Na, and K increased either instantaneously or followed nonlinear increasing trends with time, indicating dissolution and/or desorption reactions controlled their release. Other elements, such as Mn and Fe, were also released from all sediments, creating a potential for redox reactions to occur. Results from acid extractions confirmed sediments had appreciable amounts of contaminants that may potentially be released into the aqueous phase. However, results from the batch and column experiments demonstrated that only a few trace elements (e.g., As, Cu, Cr, Pb) were released, indicating the risk of groundwater quality degradation due to exposure to leakage of sequestered CO2 is low. Concentrations of Mo were consistently higher in the control experiments (absence of CO2) and were below detection in the presence of CO2 indicating a possible benefit of CO2 in groundwater aquifers. These investigations will provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological CO2 storage and sequestration.

  12. Geologic Controls of Hydraulic Conductivity in the Snake River Plain Aquifer At and Near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    S. R. Anderson; M. A. Kuntz; L. C. Davis

    1999-02-01

    The effective hydraulic conductivity of basalt and interbedded sediment that compose the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) ranges from about 1.0x10 -2 to 3.2x10 4 feet per day (ft/d). This six-order-of-magnitude range of hydraulic conductivity was estimated from single-well aquifer tests in 114 wells, and is attributed mainly to the physical characteristics and distribution of basalt flows and dikes. Hydraulic conductivity is greatest in thin pahoehoe flows and near-vent volcanic deposits. Hydraulic conductivity is least in flows and deposits cut by dikes. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity at and near the INEEL are similar to those measured in similar volcanic settings in Hawaii. The largest variety of rock types and the greatest range of hydraulic conductivity are in volcanic rift zones, which are characterized by numerous aligned volcanic vents and fissures related to underlying dikes. Three broad categories of hydraulic conductivity corresponding to six general types of geologic controls can be inferred from the distribution of wells and vent corridors. Hydraulic conductivity of basalt flows probably is increased by localized fissures and coarse mixtures of interbedded sediment, scoria, and basalt rubble. Hydraulic conductivity of basalt flows is decreased locally by abundant alteration minerals of probable hydrothermal origin. Hydraulic conductivity varies as much as six orders of magnitude in a single vent corridor and varies from three to five orders of magnitude within distances of 500 to 1,000 feet. Abrupt changes in hydraulic conductivity over short distances suggest the presence of preferential pathways and local barriers that may greatly affect the movement of ground water and the dispersion of radioactive and chemical wastes downgradient from points of waste disposal.

  13. Determination of the original-gas-in-place and aquifer properties in a water-drive reservoir by optimization technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.L.; Lin, Z.S.; Chen, Y.L.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the original-gas-in-place (OGIP) of a water-drive reservoir using optimization algorithm for Port Arthur field, Texas, US. The properties of the associate aquifer were also obtained. The good agreement, between the results from this study and those from simulation study, would be demonstrated in this paper. In this study, material balance equation for a gas reservoir and van Everdingen-Hurst model for an aquifer were solved simultaneously to calculate cumulative gas production. The result was then compared with cumulative gas production measured in the field that observed at each pressure. The following parameters were manually adjusted to obtain: OGIP, thickness of the aquifer, water encroachment angle, ratio of aquifer to reservoir radius, and aquifer`s permeability. The procedure was then applied with simplex technique, an optimization algorithm, to adjust parameters automatically. When the difference between cumulative gas production calculated and observed was minimal, the parameters used in the model would be the results obtained. A water-drive gas reservoir, ``C`` sand gas reservoir in Port Arthur field, which had produced for about 12 years, was analyzed successfully. The results showed that the OGIP of 60.6 BCF estimated in this study was favorably compared with 56.2 BCF obtained by a numerical simulator in other study. In addition, the aquifer properties that were unavailable from the conventional plotting method can be estimated from this study. The estimated aquifer properties from this study were compared favorably with the core data.

  14. Proceedings of the Great Lakes Solar Greenhouse Conference V

    SciTech Connect

    Currin, C.G. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    Proceedings of the Fifth Great Lakes Greenhouse Conference are presented. Topics included are: a review of a greenhouses, greenhouses as integral part of an earth-sheltered home, solar architecture, design criteria, heat contribution for solar greenhouses, and the future of solar greenhouses.

  15. Proceedings of the Great Lakes Solar Greenhouse Conference V

    SciTech Connect

    Currin, C.G. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    Proceedings of the Fifth Great Lakes Solar Greenhouse Conference are presented. Topics included are a review of greenhouses, greenhouses as integral part of an earth-sheltered house, solar architecture, design criteria, heat contribution from solar greenhouses, and the future for solar greenhouses.

  16. Changing Weather and Climate in the Great Lakes Region Webinar

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Offered by the University of Wisconsin-Madison through Coursera, this four-week course will feature a new season each week through short lectures and activities covering Great Lakes weather, observed changes in the climate, and societal impacts of climate change.

  17. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527

  18. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527

  19. Geostatistical Simulation of Hydrofacies Heterogeneity of the West Thessaly Aquifer Systems in Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Modis, K. Sideri, D.

    2013-06-15

    Integrating geological properties, such as relative positions and proportions of different hydrofacies, is of highest importance in order to render realistic geological patterns. Sequential indicator simulation (SIS) and Plurigaussian simulation (PS) are alternative methods for conceptual and deterministic modeling for the characterization of hydrofacies distribution. In this work, we studied the spatial differentiation of hydrofacies in the alluvial aquifer system of West Thessaly basin in Greece. For this, we applied both SIS and PS techniques to an extensive set of borehole data from that basin. Histograms of model versus experimental hydrofacies proportions and indicative cross sections were plotted in order to validate the results. The PS technique was shown to be more effective in reproducing the spatial characteristics of the different hydrofacies and their distribution across the study area. In addition, the permeability differentiations reflected in the PS model are in accordance to known heterogeneities of the aquifer capacity.

  20. Summary of three dimensional pump testing of a fractured rock aquifer in the western Siberian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, R.L.; Looney, B.B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.; Drozhko, E.G.; Glalolenko, Y.V.; Mokrov, Y.G.; Ivanov, I.A.; Glagolev, A.V.; Vasil`kova, N.A.

    1996-10-30

    A group of scientists from the Savannah River Technology Center and Russia successfully completed a 17 day field investigation of a fractured rock aquifer at the MAYAK PA nuclear production facility in Russia. The test site is located in the western Siberian Basin near the floodplain of the Mishelyak river. The fractured rock aquifer is composed of orphyrites, tuff, tuffbreccia and lava and is overlain by 0.5--12 meters of elluvial and alluvial sediments. A network of 3 uncased wells (176, 1/96, and 2/96) was used to conduct the tests. Wells 176 and 2/96 were used as observation wells and the centrally located well 1/96 was used as the pumping well. Six packers were installed and inflated in each of the observation wells at a depth of up to 85 meters. The use of 6 packers in each well resulted in isolating 7 zones for monitoring. The packers were inflated to different pressures to accommodate the increasing hydrostatic pressure. A straddle packer assembly was installed in the pumping well to allow testing of each of the individual zones isolated in the observation wells. A constant rate pumping test was run on each of the 7 zones. The results of the pumping tests are included in Appendix A. The test provided new information about the nature of the fractured rock aquifers in the vicinity of the Mishelyak river and will be key information in understanding the behavior of contaminants originating from process wastes discharged to Lake Karachi. Results from the tests will be analyzed to determine the hydraulic properties of different zones within the fractured rock aquifer and to determine the most cost effective clean-up approach for the site.

  1. Optimization of Geological Environments for Carbon Dioxide Disposan in Saline Aquifers in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, Susan

    1999-02-01

    Recent research and applications have demonstrated technologically feasible methods, defined costs, and modeled processes needed to sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline-water-bearing formations (aquifers). One of the simplifying assumptions used in previous modeling efforts is the effect of real stratigraphic complexity on transport and trapping in saline aquifers. In this study we have developed and applied criteria for characterizing saline aquifers for very long-term sequestration of CO{sub 2}. The purpose of this pilot study is to demonstrate a methodology for optimizing matches between CO{sub 2} sources and nearby saline formations that can be used for sequestration. This project identified 14 geologic properties used to prospect for optimal locations for CO{sub 2} sequestration in saline-water-bearing formations. For this demonstration, we digitized maps showing properties of saline formations and used analytical tools in a geographic information system (GIS) to extract areas that meet variably specified prototype criteria for CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. Through geologic models, realistic aquifer properties such as discontinuous sand-body geometry are determined and can be used to add realistic hydrologic properties to future simulations. This approach facilitates refining the search for a best-fit saline host formation as our understanding of the most effective ways to implement sequestration proceeds. Formations where there has been significant drilling for oil and gas resources as well as extensive characterization of formations for deep-well injection and waste disposal sites can be described in detail. Information to describe formation properties can be inferred from poorly known saline formations using geologic models in a play approach. Resulting data sets are less detailed than in well-described examples but serve as an effective screening tool to identify prospects for more detailed work.

  2. Estimating Plume Volume for Geologic Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Christine

    2008-07-11

    Typically, when a new subsurface flow and transport problem is first being considered, very simple models with a minimal number of parameters are used to get a rough idea of how the system will evolve. For a hydrogeologist considering the spreading of a contaminant plume in an aquifer, the aquifer thickness, porosity, and permeability might be enough to get started. If the plume is buoyant, aquifer dip comes into play. If regional groundwater flow is significant or there are nearby wells pumping, these features need to be included. Generally, the required parameters tend to be known from pre-existing studies, are parameters that people working in the field are familiar with, and represent features that are easy to explain to potential funding agencies, regulators, stakeholders, and the public. The situation for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline aquifers is quite different. It is certainly desirable to do preliminary modeling in advance of any field work since geologic storage of CO{sub 2} is a novel concept that few people have much experience with or intuition about. But the parameters that control CO{sub 2} plume behavior are a little more daunting to assemble and explain than those for a groundwater flow problem. Even the most basic question of how much volume a given mass of injected CO{sub 2} will occupy in the subsurface is non-trivial. However, with a number of simplifying assumptions, some preliminary estimates can be made, as described below. To make efficient use of the subsurface storage volume available, CO{sub 2} density should be large, which means choosing a storage formation at depths below about 800 m, where pressure and temperature conditions are above the critical point of CO{sub 2} (P = 73.8 bars, T = 31 C). Then CO{sub 2} will exist primarily as a free-phase supercritical fluid, while some CO{sub 2} will dissolve into the aqueous phase.

  3. Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.E.; Londergan, J.T.; Pickens, J.F.

    1995-10-01

    Many DOE facilities are situated in areas of sand and gravel which have become polluted with dense, non-aqueous phase liquids or DNAPLs, such as chlorinated solvents, from the various industrial operations at these facilities. The presence of such DNAPLs in sand and gravel aquifers is now recognized as the principal factor in the failure of standard ground-water remediation methods. The principal objective of this study, as stated in the Statement of Work of the contract (DE-AC21-92MC29111), is to demonstrate that multi-component DNAPLs can be readily solubilized in sand and gravel aquifers by dilute surfactant solutions. The specific objectives of the contract are: to identify dilute surfactants or blends of surfactants in the laboratory that will efficiently extract multi-component DNAPLs from sand and gravel aquifers by micellar solubilization (Phase 1); 2. to test the efficacy of the identified surfactants or blends of surfactants to solubilize in situ perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) DNAPLs by the injection and the subsequent extraction through an existing well or wells at a government-owned contaminated site (Phase 1); and 3. to demonstrate the full-scale operation of this remedial technology at a government-owned contaminated site (Phase 2). Specific objective number 1 has been completed and reported to DOE. However, the results of the test referred to in specific objective number 2, conducted at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in 1994, were inconclusive. Following this first test, it was decided by DOE and INTERA to move the test site elsewhere due to difficulties with obtaining core samples of the sand and gravel aquifer containing the DNAPL and with ascertaining the location of the DNAPL relative to the injection well. The solubilization test at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) will constitute the second test of Phase 1 of this contract.

  4. Underground Thermal Energy Storage (UTES) Via Borehole and Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (BTES/ATES) Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Underground Thermal Energy Storage (UTES) Via Borehole and Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (BTES/ATES) Systems Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 3-4, 2015 Houston, TX Presented By: Chuck Hammock, PE, CGD, LEED AP BD+C, Andrews, Hammock & Powell, Inc. Consulting Engineers Macon, GA www.ahpengr.com * "Direct-Use" (American) Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) architecture vs. Geothermal designed for true Thermal Energy Storage (mostly European applications)

  5. Water-supply potential of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the vicinity of Savannah, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Garza, R.; Krause, R.E. )

    1993-03-01

    The Upper Floridan aquifer is the primary source of freshwater in coastal Georgia. Groundwater withdrawal in the area of Savannah and in the adjacent coastal areas in Georgia and South Carolina has resulted in large regional water-level declines and a reversal of the hydraulic gradient that existed prior to development. Changes in gradient and decreasing water levels are causing lateral encroachment of seawater into the Upper Floridan aquifer at the northern end of Hilton Head Island, SC, and vertical intrusion of saltwater into the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers in the Brunswick, GA., area. Concerns about future water-supply demands prompted the US Geological Survey and the Chatham County-Savannah Metropolitan Planning Commission to undertake a cooperative study to evaluate the ground-water resources in the Savannah, GA, area. A numerical ground-water flow model was developed and used in conjunction with other previously calibrated models in the coastal areas of Georgia and South Carolina to simulate the effects of additional ground-water withdrawal on water levels. Based on model simulations and the constraint of preventing additional water-level declines at the locations of encroachment and intrusion, the potential of the Upper Floridan aquifer to supply additional water in the Savannah area is limited under present hydrologic conditions. The potential for additional withdrawal in the vicinity of Savannah, GA, ranges from less than 1 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) to about 5 Mgal/d. Because of the limited water-supply potential, hypothetical alternatives of ground-water withdrawal were simulated to determine the effects on water levels. These simulations indicate that reduction and redistribution of ground-water withdrawal would not adversely affect water levels at the locations of encroachment and intrusion.

  6. Flow and Transport in the Hanford 300 Area Vadose Zone-Aquifer-River System

    SciTech Connect

    Waichler, Scott R.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2005-07-13

    Contaminant migration in the 300 Area unconfined aquifer is strongly coupled to fluctuations in the Columbia River stage. To better understand the interaction between the river, aquifer, and vadose zone, a 2-D saturated-unsaturated flow and transport model was developed for a vertical cross-section aligned west-east across the Hanford Site 300 Area, nearly perpendicular to the river. The model was used to investigate water flow and tracer transport in the vadose zone-aquifer-river flow system, in support of the ongoing study of the 300 Area uranium plume. The STOMP simulator was used to model 1-year from 3/1/92 to 2/28/93, a period when hourly data were available for both groundwater and river levels. Net water flow to the river (per 1-meter width of shoreline) was 182 m3/y in the base case, but the cumulative exchange or total flow back and forth across the riverbed was 30 times greater. The low river case had approximately double the net water and Groundwater tracer flux into the river as compared to the base case.

  7. Metabolic interdependencies between phylogenetically novel fermenters and respiratory organisms in an unconfined aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Wrighton, Kelly C.; Castelle, Cindy; Wilkins, Michael J.; Hug, Laura A.; Sharon, I.; Thomas, Brian C.; Handley, Kim M.; Mullin, Sean W.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Singh, Andrea; Lipton, Mary S.; Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2014-07-08

    Fermentation-based metabolism is an important ecosystem function often associated with environments rich in organic carbon, such as wetlands, sewage sludge, and the mammalian gut. The diversity of microorganisms and pathways involved in carbon and hydrogen cycling in sediments and aquifers and the impacts of these processes on other biogeochemical cycles remain poorly understood. Here we used metagenomics and proteomics to characterize microbial communities sampled from an aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River at Rifle, Colorado, USA, and document interlinked microbial roles in geochemical cycling. The organic carbon content in the aquifer was elevated via two acetate-based biostimulation treatments. Samples were collected at three time points, with the objective of extensive genome recovery to enable metabolic reconstruction of the community. Fermentative community members include genomes from a new phylum (ACD20), phylogenetically novel members of the Chloroflexi and Bacteroidetes, as well as candidate phyla genomes (OD1, BD1-5, SR1, WWE3, ACD58, TM6, PER, and OP11). These organisms have the capacity to produce hydrogen, acetate, formate, ethanol, butyrate, and lactate, activities supported by proteomic data. The diversity and expression of hydrogenases suggests the importance of hydrogen currency in the subsurface. Our proteogenomic data further indicate the consumption of fermentation intermediates by Proteobacteria can be coupled to nitrate, sulfate, and iron reduction. Thus, fermentation carried out by previously unstudied members of sediment microbial communities may be an important driver of diverse subsurface biogeochemical cycles.

  8. Exposure of a food crop to trichloroethylene from a contaminated aquifer. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    This research developed a methodology for assessment of the exposure of a mature corn crop to trichloroethylene from a contaminated aquifer. The methodology was then applied to the case of Hill AFB to determine the ability of the methodology to provide information about a specific exposure. Current procedures sample for food contamination but do not attempt to predict exposure problems. A review of the potential exposure pathways from the aquifer to the crop was conducted. Based on this review, the exposures due to soil gas and irrigation were modeled. Empirical estimated were used to approximate the expected flux of soil gas vaporizing directly from the aquifer. On the basis of this approximation, the exposure the air of the crop canopy was mathematically estimated. Analytical models were developed to simulate the amount of the contaminant reaching the crop from two different means of irrigation. The subsequent exposure once the contaminated irrigation water had reached the crop was modeled both in the air of the crop canopy and the soil phase near the root system. The methodology provided insights into which exposure pathways are more important than others and which environmental parameters most influence the amount of exposure.

  9. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along‐fault and fault‐to‐fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault‐to‐fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson‐Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin

  10. Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to an Unconfined Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guohui; Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Harvey, Omar; Sullivan, E. C.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2015-07-15

    A series of batch and column experiments combined with solid phase characterization studies (i.e., quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions) were conducted to address a variety of scientific issues and evaluate the impacts of the potential leakage of carbon dioxide (CO2) from deep subsurface storage reservoirs. The main objective was to gain an understanding of how CO2 gas influences: 1) the aqueous phase pH; and 2) mobilization of major, minor, and trace elements from minerals present in an aquifer overlying potential CO2 sequestration subsurface repositories. Rocks and slightly weathered rocks representative of an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer within the continental US, i.e., the Edwards aquifer in Texas, were used in these studies. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream or were leached with a CO2-saturated influent solution to simulate different CO2 gas leakage scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in the liquid samples collected at pre-determined experimental times (batch experiments) or continuously (column experiments). The results from the strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the Edward aquifer samples contain As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which may potentially be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. The results from the batch and column experiments confirmed the release of major chemical elements into the contacting aqueous phase (such as Ca, Mg, Ba, Sr, Si, Na, and K); the mobilization and possible rapid immobilization of minor elements (such as Fe, Al, and Mn), which are able to form highly reactive secondary phases; and sporadic mobilization of only low concentrations of trace elements (such as As, Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, Mo, etc.). The results from this experimental research effort will help in developing a systematic understanding of how CO2

  11. Interactive Maps from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The interactive maps are built with layers of spatial data that are also available as direct file downloads (see DDE00299). The maps allow analysis of these many layers, with various data sets turned on or off, for determining potential areas that would be favorable for geothermal drilling or other activity. They provide information on current exploration projects and leases, Bureau of Land Management land status, and map presentation of each type of scientific spatial data: geothermal, geophysical, geologic, geodetic, groundwater, and geochemical.

  12. Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Chen, Zizhong; Kazemi, Hossein; Yin, Xiaolong; Pruess, Karsten; Oldenburg, Curt; Winterfeld, Philip; Zhang, Ronglei

    2014-09-30

    This report is the final scientific one for the award DE- FE0000988 entitled “Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers.” The work has been divided into six tasks. In task, “Development of a Three-Phase Non-Isothermal CO2 Flow Module,” we developed a fluid property module for brine-CO2 mixtures designed to handle all possible phase combinations of aqueous phase, sub-critical liquid and gaseous CO2, supercritical CO2, and solid salt. The thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of brine-CO2 mixtures (density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases; partitioning of mass components among the different phases) use the same correlations as an earlier fluid property module that does not distinguish between gaseous and liquid CO2-rich phases. We verified the fluid property module using two leakage scenarios, one that involves CO2 migration up a blind fault and subsequent accumulation in a secondary “parasitic” reservoir at shallower depth, and another investigating leakage of CO2 from a deep storage reservoir along a vertical fault zone. In task, “Development of a Rock Mechanical Module,” we developed a massively parallel reservoir simulator for modeling THM processes in porous media brine aquifers. We derived, from the fundamental equations describing deformation of porous elastic media, a momentum conservation equation relating mean stress, pressure, and temperature, and incorporated it alongside the mass and energy conservation equations from the TOUGH2 formulation, the starting point for the simulator. In addition, rock properties, namely permeability and porosity, are functions of effective stress and other variables that are obtained from the literature. We verified the simulator formulation and numerical implementation using analytical solutions and example problems from the literature. For

  13. Geothermal resources of the Washakie and Great Divide basins, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    The geothermal resources of the Great Divide and Washakie Basins of southern Wyoming are described. Oil well bottomhole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data were interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. It was concluded large areas in Wyoming are underlain by water hotter than 120{sup 0}F. Isolated areas with high temperature gradients exist within each basin. 68 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  14. Great Western Malting Company geothermal project, Pocatello, Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, N.T.; McGeen, M.A.; Corlett, D.F.; Urmston, R.

    1981-12-23

    The Great Western Malting Company recently constructed a barley malting facility in Pocatello, Idaho, designed to produce 6.0 million bushels per year of brewing malt. This facility uses natural gas to supply the energy for germination and kilning processes. The escalating cost of natural gas has prompted the company to look at alternate and more economical sources of energy. Trans Energy Systems has investigated the viabiity of using geothermal energy at the new barley processing plant. Preliminary investigations show that a geothermal resource probably exists, and payback on the installation of a system to utilize the resource will occur in under 2 years. The Great Western Malting plant site has geological characteristics which are similar to areas where productive geothermal wells have been established. Geological investigations indicate that resource water temperatures will be in the 150 to 200/sup 0/F range. Geothermal energy of this quality will supply 30 to 98% of the heating requirements currently supplied by natural gas for this malting plant. Trans Energy Systems has analyzed several systems of utilizing the geothermal resource at the Great Western barley malting facility. These systems included: direct use of geothermal water; geothermal energy heating process water through an intermediary heat exchanger; coal or gas boosted geothermal systems; and heat pump boosted geothermal system. The analysis examined the steps that are required to process the grain.

  15. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to...

  16. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as joint lead agencies, prepared a programmatic EIS that evaluates issues and potential environmental impacts associated with wind energy development within Western’s Upper Great Plains Customer Service Region (Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota) and upon the Service’s landscape-level grassland and wetland easements. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects.

  17. Federal interagency ecosystem management initiative: Great Lakes ecosystem case study

    SciTech Connect

    Cordle, S.

    1995-12-01

    In August 1994 a team of representatives from six Federal agencies conducted a case study of ecosystem management practices in the Great Lakes. Its report was based on interviews carried out in Chicago, Illinois, and Ann Arbor, Michigan; on phone interviews; and on written materials provided by Federal and State officials as well as representatives of Tribal organizations, non-governmental organizations, academia, industry, and the International Joint Commission. The report describes mainly what the participants told or provided to the survey team, with a few explicit conclusions and recommendations from the team. The issues covered by the survey included Legal, Institutional, Science and Information, Budget, and Public Participation.

  18. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Interim Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, R D; Wolery, T J; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W L

    2009-07-22

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine would be reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction. This process provides additional storage space (capacity) in the aquifer, reduces operational risks by relieving overpressure in the aquifer, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations for brines typical of CCS sites. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. This progress report deals mainly with our geochemical modeling of high-salinity brines and covers the first six months of project execution (September, 2008 to March, 2009). Costs and implementation results will be presented in the annual report. The brines typical of sequestration sites can be several times more concentrated than seawater, requiring specialized modeling codes typical of those developed for nuclear waste disposal calculations. The osmotic pressure developed as the brines are concentrated is of particular concern, as are precipitates that can cause fouling of reverse osmosis membranes and other types of membranes (e.g., NF). We have now completed the development associated with tasks (1) and (2) of the work plan. We now have a contract with Perlorica, Inc., to provide support to the cost analysis and nanofiltration evaluation. We have also conducted several preliminary analyses of the pressure effect in the reservoir in order to confirm that reservoir

  19. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Applicaiton from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to Canada. Federal Register Notice. EA-389 Great Bay Energy (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export...

  20. Bicarbonate Impact on U(VI) Bioreduction in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, L.; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al. 2003, Williams et al. 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al. 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, that the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ~3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in aquifers.

  1. Electrodic voltages accompanying stimulated bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.H.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Druhan, J.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Lovley, D.R.; Banfield, J.F.

    2009-11-15

    The inability to track the products of subsurface microbial activity during stimulated bioremediation has limited its implementation. We used spatiotemporal changes in electrodic potentials (EP) to track the onset and persistence of stimulated sulfate-reducing bacteria in a uranium-contaminated aquifer undergoing acetate amendment. Following acetate injection, anomalous voltages approaching -900 mV were measured between copper electrodes within the aquifer sediments and a single reference electrode at the ground surface. Onset of EP anomalies correlated in time with both the accumulation of dissolved sulfide and the removal of uranium from groundwater. The anomalies persisted for 45 days after halting acetate injection. Current-voltage and current-power relationships between measurement and reference electrodes exhibited a galvanic response, with a maximum power density of 10 mW/m{sup 2} during sulfate reduction. We infer that the EP anomalies resulted from electrochemical differences between geochemically reduced regions and areas having higher oxidation potential. Following the period of sulfate reduction, EP values ranged from -500 to -600 mV and were associated with elevated concentrations of ferrous iron. Within 10 days of the voltage decrease, uranium concentrations rebounded from 0.2 to 0.8 {mu}M, a level still below the background value of 1.5 {mu}M. These findings demonstrate that EP measurements provide an inexpensive and minimally invasive means for monitoring the products of stimulated microbial activity within aquifer sediments and are capable of verifying maintenance of redox conditions favorable for the stability of bioreduced contaminants, such as uranium.

  2. Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP)

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzel, Frederic

    2009-09-01

    The Council of Great Lakes Governors administered the Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). This Partnership grew out of the existing Regional Biomass Energy Program which the Council had administered since 1983. The GLBSRP includes the States of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin. The GLBSRP's overall goal is to facilitate the increased production and use of bioenergy and biobased products throughout the region. The GLBSRP has traditionally addressed its goals and objectives through a three-pronged approach: providing grants to the States; undertaking region-wide education, outreach and technology transfer projects; and, providing in-house management, support and information dissemination. At the direction of US Department of Energy, the primary emphasis of the GLBSRP in recent years has been education and outreach. Therefore, most activities have centered on developing educational materials, hosting workshops and conferences, and providing technical assistance. This report summarizes a selection of activities that were accomplished under this cooperative agreement.

  3. Structural investigations of Great Basin geothermal fields: Applications and implications

    SciTech Connect

    Faulds, James E; Hinz, Nicholas H.; Coolbaugh, Mark F

    2010-11-01

    Because fractures and faults are commonly the primary pathway for deeply circulating hydrothermal fluids, structural studies are critical to assessing geothermal systems and selecting drilling targets for geothermal wells. Important tools for structural analysis include detailed geologic mapping, kinematic analysis of faults, and estimations of stress orientations. Structural assessments are especially useful for evaluating geothermal fields in the Great Basin of the western USA, where regional extension and transtension combine with high heat flow to generate abundant geothermal activity in regions having little recent volcanic activity. The northwestern Great Basin is one of the most geothermally active areas in the USA. The prolific geothermal activity is probably due to enhanced dilation on N- to NNE-striking normal faults induced by a transfer of NW-directed dextral shear from the Walker Lane to NW-directed extension. Analysis of several geothermal fields suggests that most systems occupy discrete steps in normal fault zones or lie in belts of intersecting, overlapping, and/or terminating faults. Most fields are associated with steeply dipping faults and, in many cases, with Quaternary faults. The structural settings favoring geothermal activity are characterized by subvertical conduits of highly fractured rock along fault zones oriented approximately perpendicular to the WNW-trending least principal stress. Features indicative of these settings that may be helpful in guiding exploration for geothermal resources include major steps in normal faults, interbasinal highs, groups of relatively low discontinuous ridges, and lateral jogs or terminations of mountain ranges.

  4. Numerical simulation studies of the long-term evolution of a CO2 plume in a saline aquifer with a sloping caprock

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Nordbotten, J.

    2010-12-28

    We have used the TOUGH2-MP/ECO2N code to perform numerical simulation studies of the long-term behavior of CO{sub 2} stored in an aquifer with a sloping caprock. This problem is of great practical interest, and is very challenging due to the importance of multi-scale processes. We find that the mechanism of plume advance is different from what is seen in a forced immiscible displacement, such as gas injection into a water-saturated medium. Instead of pushing the water forward, the plume advances because the vertical pressure gradients within the plume are smaller than hydrostatic, causing the groundwater column to collapse ahead of the plume tip. Increased resistance to vertical flow of aqueous phase in anisotropic media leads to reduced speed of updip plume advancement. Vertical equilibrium models that ignore effects of vertical flow will overpredict the speed of plume advancement. The CO{sub 2} plume becomes thinner as it advances, yet the speed of advancement remains constant over the entire simulation period of up to 400 years, with migration distances of more than 80 km. Our simulations include dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the aqueous phase and associated density increase, and molecular diffusion. However, no convection develops in the aqueous phase because it is suppressed by the relatively coarse (sub-) horizontal gridding required in a regional-scale model. A first crude sub-grid-scale model was developed to represent convective enhancement of CO{sub 2} dissolution. This process is found to greatly reduce the thickness of the CO{sub 2} plume, but, for the parameters used in our simulations, does not affect the speed of plume advancement.

  5. Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores | U.S. DOE

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Science (SC) Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: Email Us More Information » 10.01.12 Sleuthing the Fate of

  6. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Annual Report FY09

    SciTech Connect

    Wolery, T; Aines, R; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W; Wolfe, T; Haussman, C

    2009-11-25

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine is reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction, such that the volume of fresh water extracted balances the volume of CO{sub 2} injected into the formation. This process provides additional CO{sub 2} storage capacity in the aquifer, reduces operational risks (cap-rock fracturing, contamination of neighboring fresh water aquifers, and seismicity) by relieving overpressure in the formation, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. This multi-faceted project combines elements of geochemistry, reservoir engineering, and water treatment engineering. The range of saline formation waters is being identified and analyzed. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the storage aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. Water treatment costs are being evaluated by comparing the necessary process facilities to those in common use for seawater RO. There are presently limited brine composition data available for actual CCS sites by the site operators including in the U.S. the seven regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (CSPs). To work around this, we are building a 'catalog' of compositions representative of 'produced' waters (waters produced in the course of seeking or producing oil and gas), to which we are adding data from actual CCS sites as they become available. Produced waters comprise the most common examples of saline

  7. Application of three aquifer test methods for estimating hydraulic properties within the 100-N Area

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, T.J.; Spane, F.A. Jr.; Newcomer, D.R.; Sherwood, C.R.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose if this study was to better define the range of saturated horizontal hydraulic conductivities in the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington for use in a numerical groundwater model. Three methods were used for determining aquifer properties and are discussed within this report (1) reanalysis of past pumping test data using a pressure derivative method to identify the data in the radial flow regime for analysis by traditional graphical techniques, (2) sinusoidal analysis techniques described in Ferris that utilize water-table responses to river-level variations, and (3) the basic flow equation for groundwater.

  8. Groundwaters of Florence (Italy): Trace element distribution and vulnerability of the aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Bencini, A.; Ercolanelli, R.; Sbaragli, A.

    1993-11-01

    Geochemical and hydrogeological research has been carried out in Florence, to evaluate conductivity and main chemistry of groundwaters, the pattern of some possible pollutant chemical species (Fe, Mn, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}), and the vulnerability of the aquifers. The plain is made up of Plio-Quaternary alluvial and lacustrine sediments for a maximum thickness of 600 m. Silts and clays, sometimes with lenses of sandy gravels, are dominant, while considerable deposits of sands, pebbles, and gravels occur along the course of the Arno river and its tributary streams, and represent the most important aquifer of the plain. Most waters show conductivity values around 1000-1200 {mu}S, and almost all of them have an alkaline-earth-bicarbonate chemical character. In western areas higher salt content of the groundwaters is evident. Heavy metal and NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3} analyses point out that no important pollution phenomena affect the groundwaters; all mean values are below the maximum admissible concentration (MAC) for drinkable waters. Some anomalies of NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}, Fe, Mn, and Zn are present. The most plausible causes can be recognized in losses of the sewage system; use of nitrate compounds in agriculture; oxidation of well pipes. All the observations of Cr, Cu, and Pb are below the MAC; the median values of <3, 3.9, and 1.1 {mu}g/l, respectively, could be considered reference concentrations for groundwaters in calcareous lithotypes, under undisturbed natural conditions. Finally, a map of vulnerability shows that the areas near the Arno river are highly vulnerable, for the minimum thickness (or lacking) of sediments covering the aquifer. On the other hand, in the case of pollution, several factors not considered could significantly increase the self-purification capacity of the aquifer, such asdilution of groundwaters, bacteria oxidation of nitrogenous species, and sorption capacity of clay minerals and organic matter. 31 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Geostatistical analysis of potentiometric data in Wolfcamp aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, W.V.; Furr, J.M.

    1986-04-01

    This report details a geostatistical analysis of potentiometric data from the Wolfcamp aquifer in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas. Such an analysis is a part of an overall uncertainty analysis for a high-level waste repository in salt. Both an expected potentiometric surface and the associated standard error surface are produced. The Wolfcamp data are found to be well explained by a linear trend with a superimposed spherical semivariogram. A cross-validation of the analysis confirms this. In addition, the cross-validation provides a point-by-point check to test for possible anomalous data.

  10. Thermophysical behavior of St. Peter sandstone: application to compressed air energy storage in an aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Erikson, R.L.

    1983-12-01

    The long-term stability of a sandstone reservoir is of primary importance to the success of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in aquifers. The purpose of this study was to: develop experimental techniques for the operation of the CAES Porous Media Flow Loop (PMFL), an apparatus designed to study the stability of porous media in subsurface geologic environments, conduct experiments in the PMFL designed to determine the effects of temperature, stress, and humidity on the stability of candidate CAES reservoir materials, provide support for the CAES field demonstration project in Pittsfield, Illinois, by characterizing the thermophysical stability of Pittsfield reservoir sandstone under simulated field conditions.

  11. Prickett and Lonnquist aquifer simulation program for the Apple II minicomputer

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, L.C.

    1983-02-01

    The Prickett and Lonnquist two-dimensional groundwater model has been programmed for the Apple II minicomputer. Both leaky and nonleaky confined aquifers can be simulated. The model was adapted from the FORTRAN version of Prickett and Lonnquist. In the configuration presented here, the program requires 64 K bits of memory. Because of the large number of arrays used in the program, and memory limitations of the Apple II, the maximum grid size that can be used is 20 rows by 20 columns. Input to the program is interactive, with prompting by the computer. Output consists of predicted lead values at the row-column intersections (nodes).

  12. Total Reducing Capacity in Aquifer Minerals and Sediments: Quantifying the Potential to Attenuate Cr(VI) in Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Sisman, S. Lara

    2015-07-20

    Hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), is present in the environment as a byproduct of industrial processes. Due to its mobility and toxicity, it is crucial to attenuate or remove Cr(VI) from the environment. The objective of this investigation was to quantify potential natural attenuation, or reduction capacity, of reactive minerals and aquifer sediments. Samples of reduced-iron containing minerals such as ilmenite, as well as Puye Formation sediments representing a contaminated aquifer in New Mexico, were reacted with chromate. The change in Cr(VI) during the reaction was used to calculate reduction capacity. This study found that minerals that contain reduced iron, such as ilmenite, have high reducing capacities. The data indicated that sample history may impact reduction capacity tests due to surface passivation. Further, this investigation identified areas for future research including: a) refining the relationships between iron content, magnetic susceptibility and reduction capacity, and b) long term kinetic testing using fresh aquifer sediments.

  13. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Bacon, Diana H.; Dai, Zhenxue; Zheng, Liange

    2014-12-31

    An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater quality impacts. As part of a system to assess the potential for these impacts a geochemical scaling function has been developed, based on a detailed reactive transport model of CO2 and brine leakage into an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer. Stochastic simulations varying a number of geochemical parameters were used to generate a response surface predicting the volume of aquifer that would be impacted with respect to regulated contaminants. The brine was assumed to contain several trace metals and organic contaminants. Aquifer pH and TDS were influenced by CO2more » leakage, while trace metal concentrations were most influenced by the brine concentrations rather than adsorption or desorption on calcite. Organic plume sizes were found to be strongly influenced by biodegradation.« less

  14. Miami Power Corporation | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Data Utility Id 12323 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Transmission Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  15. Miami Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    85 2.597 2.588 2.575 2.559 2.542 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.585 2.597 2.588 2.575 2.559 2.542 2003-2016 Regular 2.423 2.439 2.429 2.414 2.397 2.382 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.423 2.439 2.429 2.414 2.397 2.382 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.710 2.717 2.712 2.705 2.691 2.677 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.710 2.717 2.712 2.705 2.691 2.677 2003-2016 Premium 3.020 3.020 3.015 3.004 2.987 2.967 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 3.020 3.020 3.015 3.004 2.987 2.967 2003

  16. ARM - Campaign Instrument - mmcr94miami

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    MArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) IOP Download Data Point Reyes CA, USA; Mobile Facility (MASRAD), 2005.03.14 - 2005.09.14 Spring Cloud IOP Download Data ...

  17. Miami, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    of South Florida LLC Biofuels Digest Cambridge Project Development Caribbean Energy Resources Corp ClimeCo Corporation Electron Solar Energy Formerly Envigra Inc Enventure...

  18. Summertime Low-Level Jets over the Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Stensrud, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    The sky over the southern Great Plains Cloud and Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (CART) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program during the predawn and early morning hours often is partially obstructed by stratocumulus, stratus fractus, or cumulus fractus that are moving rapidly to the north, even through the surface winds are weak. This cloud movement is evidence of the low-level jet (LLJ), a wind speed maximum that occurs in the lowest few kilometers of the atmosphere. Owing to the wide spacing between upper-air sounding sites and the relatively infrequent sounding launches, LLJ evolution has been difficult to observe adequately, even though the effects of LLJs on moisture flux into North America are large. Model simulation of the LLJ is described.

  19. Transport and biogeochemical reaction of metals in a physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Fang, Yilin; Murray, Christopher J; Roden, Eric E; Chen, Jinsong; Chien, Yi-Ju; Brooks, Scott C; Hubbard, Susan S

    2006-01-01

    Biologically mediated reductive dissolution and precipitation of metals and radionuclides play key roles in their subsurface transport. Physical and chemical properties of natural aquifer systems, such as reactive iron-oxide surface area and hydraulic conductivity, are often highly heterogeneous in complex ways that can exert significant control on transport, natural attenuation, and active remediation processes. Typically, however, few data on the detailed distribution of these properties are available for incorporation into predictive models. In this study, we integrate field-scale geophysical, hydrologic, and geochemical data from a well-characterized site with the results of laboratory batch-reaction studies to formulate two-dimensional numerical models of reactive transport in a heterogeneous granular aquifer. The models incorporate several levels of coupling, including effects of ferrous iron sorption onto (and associated reduction of reactive surface area of) ferric iron surfaces, microbial growth and transport dynamics, and cross-correlation between hydraulic conductivity and initial ferric iron surface area. These models are then used to evaluate the impacts of physical and chemical heterogeneity on transport of trace levels of uranium under natural conditions, as well as the effectiveness of uranium reduction and immobilization upon introduction of a soluble electron donor (a potential biostimulation remedial strategy).

  20. Transport and biogeochemical reaction of metals in a physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Fang, Yilin; Murray, Christopher J.; Roden, Eric E.; Chen, Jinsong; Chien, Yi-Ju; Brooks, Scott C.; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2006-06-01

    Biologically-mediated reductive dissolution and precipitation of metals and radionuclides plays a key role in their subsurface transport. Physical and chemical properties of natural aquifer systems, such as reactive iron oxide surface area and hydraulic conductivity, are often highly heterogeneous in complex ways that can exert significant control on transport, natural attenuation, and active remediation processes. Typically, however, few data on the detailed distribution of these properties are available for incorporation into predictive models. In this study, we integrate field-scale geophysical, hydrologic, and geochemical data from a well-characterized site with the results of laboratory batch reaction studies to formulate numerical models of reactive transport in a heterogeneous granular aquifer. The models incorporate several levels of coupling, including effects of ferrous iron sorption onto (and associated reduction of reactive surface area of) ferric iron surfaces, microbial growth and transport dynamics, and cross-correlation between hydraulic conductivity and initial ferric iron surface area. These models are then used to evaluate the impacts of physical and chemical heterogeneity on transport of trace levels of uranium under natural conditions, as well as the effectiveness of uranium reduction and immobilization upon introduction of a soluble electron donor (a potential biostimulation remedial strategy).

  1. Analysis of temperatures and water levels in wells to estimatealluvial aquifer hydraulic conductivities

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Grace W.; Jasperse, James; Seymour, Donald; Constantz, Jim

    2003-06-19

    Well water temperatures are often collected simultaneously with water levels; however, temperature data are generally considered only as a water quality parameter and are not utilized as an environmental tracer. In this paper, water levels and seasonal temperatures are used to estimate hydraulic conductivities in a stream-aquifer system. To demonstrate this method, temperatures and water levels are analyzed from six observation wells along an example study site, the Russian River in Sonoma County, California. The range in seasonal ground water temperatures in these wells varied from <0.28C in two wells to {approx}88C in the other four wells from June to October 2000. The temperature probes in the six wells are located at depths between 3.5 and 7.1 m relative to the river channel. Hydraulic conductivities are estimated by matching simulated ground water temperatures to the observed ground water temperatures. An anisotropy of 5 (horizontal to vertical hydraulic conductivity) generally gives the best fit to the observed temperatures. Estimated conductivities vary over an order of magnitude in the six locations analyzed. In some locations, a change in the observed temperature profile occurred during the study, most likely due to deposition of fine-grained sediment and organic matter plugging the streambed. A reasonable fit to this change in the temperature profile is obtained by decreasing the hydraulic conductivity in the simulations. This study demonstrates that seasonal ground water temperatures monitored in observation wells provide an effective means of estimating hydraulic conductivities in alluvial aquifers.

  2. Chlorinated degreasing solvents: Physical-chemical properties affecting aquifer contamination and remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.E.; Dwarakanath, V.

    1999-09-30

    Chlorinated degreasing solvents are multicomponent liquids containing not only the chlorinated hydrocarbons with which their name is associated (e.g., trichloroethylene or [TCE], perchloroethylene or [PCE], 1,1,1-trichloroethane [TCA]) but also a number of organic additives included as corrosion inhibitors and antioxidants. The additives, such as 1,4-dioxane, are likely to be of significant public-health importance as ground water contaminants due to their toxicity, solubility, and mobility. Following their use in vapor degreasing systems by industry, chlorinated degreasing solvents will also contain about 25% solubilized oil and grease. A number of physical-chemical properties become especially important in the light of the multicomponent nature of these solvents. First, the higher aqueous solubility and lower sorption of the additives makes it reasonable to expect that faster moving plumes of these solvent additives will precede plumes of the chlorinated hydrocarbons. Second, due to high losses of chlorinated hydrocarbons by volatilization from vapor degreasers during years in the middle of the century, it is probable that background concentrations of these hydrocarbons are present in ground water flow systems due to their downwind washout. Finally, the solubilized oil and grease may cause profound changes to the wettability of aquifer materials contacted by the solvents during their subsurface migration. It is argued, therefore, that the wettability of aquifer materials contaminated by chlorinated degreasing solvents needs to be experimentally determined before remediation of DNAPL at each site, rather than being simply assumed as water wet.

  3. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakagemore » assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.« less

  4. Regional setting of Niobrara Formation in Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Shurr, G.W.

    1984-05-01

    Natural gas is currently produced from the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation in northeastern Colorado, northwestern Kansas, and several small fields in Nebraska. As a part of studies of low-permeability gas reservoirs in the northern Great Plains, the regional geologic setting of the Niobrara has been investigated in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska. Structural contours of the Ardmore Bentonite Bed suggest that the area of thin Niobrara strata presently approximates the south flank of the Williston basin and north flank of the Denver and Kennedy basins. Chalk tongues are interpreted as low-angle shelf surfaces, known as carbonate ramps, which sloped gently to the northwest and southeast off a paleotectonic high. The paleotectonic high cut obliquely across the seaway and was close to the position of the Transcontinental arch that influenced Paleozoic sedimentation. As a result, the present-day stratigraphy and structural setting of the Niobrara are different north and south of the arch crest. 58 references, 13 figures, 1 table.

  5. DRAMATIC CHANGE IN JUPITER'S GREAT RED SPOT FROM SPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.; De Pater, Imke; Rogers, John H.; Orton, Glenn S.; Carlson, Robert W.; Asay-Davis, Xylar; Marcus, Philip S.

    2014-12-20

    Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) is one of its most distinct and enduring features. Since the advent of modern telescopes, keen observers have noted its appearance and documented a change in shape from very oblong to oval, confirmed in measurements from spacecraft data. It currently spans the smallest latitude and longitude size ever recorded. Here we show that this change has been accompanied by an increase in cloud/haze reflectance as sensed in methane gas absorption bands, increased absorption at wavelengths shorter than 500nm, and increased spectral slope between 500 and 630nm. These changes occurred between 2012 and 2014, without a significant change in internal tangential wind speeds; the decreased size results in a 3.2day horizontal cloud circulation period, shorter than previously observed. As the GRS has narrowed in latitude, it interacts less with the jets flanking its north and south edges, perhaps allowing for less cloud mixing and longer UV irradiation of cloud and aerosol particles. Given its long life and observational record, we expect that future modeling of the GRS's changes, in concert with laboratory flow experiments, will drive our understanding of vortex evolution and stability in a confined flow field crucial for comparison with other planetary atmospheres.

  6. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakage assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.

  7. Building Conceptual Models of Field-Scale Uranium Reactive Transport in a Dynamic Vadose Zone-Aquifer-River System

    SciTech Connect

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.

    2008-12-04

    Subsurface simulation is being used to build, test, and couple conceptual process models to better understand controls on a 0.4 km by 1.0 km uranium plume that has persisted above the drinking water standard in the groundwater of the Hanford 300 Area over the last 15 years. At this site, uranium-contaminated sediments in the vadose zone and aquifer are subject to significant variations in water levels and velocities driven by the diurnal, weekly, seasonal, and episodic Columbia River stage dynamics. Groundwater flow reversals typically occur twice a day with significant exchange of river water and groundwater in the near-river aquifer. Mixing of the dilute solution chemistry of the river with the groundwater complicates the uranium sorption behavior as the mobility of U(VI) has been shown experimentally to be a function of pH, carbonate, calcium, and uranium. Furthermore, uranium mass transfer between solid and aqueous phases has been observed to be rate-limited in the context of the high groundwater velocities resulting from the river stage fluctuations and the highly transmissive sediments (hydraulic conductivities ~1500 m/d). One- and two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional simulations of variably-saturated flow and reactive transport, based on laboratory-derived models of distributed rate mass transfer and equilibrium multicomponent surface complexation, are used to assess uranium transport at the dynamic vadose zone aquifer interface as well as changes to uranium mobility due to incursions of river water into the aquifer.

  8. Analysis of mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

    2001-07-20

    CO{sub 2} disposal into deep aquifers has been suggested as a potential means whereby atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases may be reduced. However, our knowledge of the geohydrology, geochemistry, geophysics, and geomechanics of CO{sub 2} disposal must be refined if this technology is to be implemented safely, efficiently, and predictably. As a prelude to a fully coupled treatment of physical and chemical effects of CO{sub 2} injection, we have analyzed the impact of CO{sub 2} immobilization through carbonate precipitation. A survey of all major classes of rock-forming minerals, whose alteration would lead to carbonate precipitation, indicated that very few minerals are present in sufficient quantities in aquifer host rocks to permit significant sequestration of CO{sub 2}. We performed batch reaction modeling of the geochemical evolution of three different aquifer mineralogies in the presence of CO{sub 2} at high pressure. Our modeling considered (1) redox processes that could be important in deep subsurface environments, (2) the presence of organic matter, (3) the kinetics of chemical interactions between the host rock minerals and the aqueous phase, and (4) CO{sub 2} solubility dependence on pressure, temperature and salinity of the system. The geochemical evolution under both natural background and CO{sub 2} injection conditions was evaluated. In addition, changes in porosity were monitored during the simulations. Results indicate that CO{sub 2} sequestration by matrix minerals varies considerably with rock type. Under favorable conditions the amount of CO{sub 2} that may be sequestered by precipitation of secondary carbonates is comparable with and can be larger than the effect of CO{sub 2} dissolution in pore waters. The precipitation of ankerite and siderite is sensitive to the rate of reduction of ferric mineral precursors such as glauconite, which in turn is dependent on the reactivity of associated organic material. The accumulation of carbonates in

  9. Possible Impacts of Global Warming on Hydrology of the Ogallala Aquifer Region

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Norman J. ); Epstein, Daniel J. ); Wang, Dahong; Vail, Lance W. ); Srinivasan, Ragahvan; Arnold, J G.

    1998-12-01

    The Ogallala or High Plains aquifer provides water for about 20% of the irrigated land in the United States. About 20 km{sup 3} (16.6 million acre-feet) of water are withdrawn annually from this aquifer. In general, recharge has not compensated for withdrawals since major irrigation development began in this region in the 1940s. The mining of the Ogallala has been pictured as an analogue to climate change in that many GCMs predict a warmer and drier future for this region. We anticipate the possible impacts of climate change on the sustainability of the aquifer as a source of water for irrigation and other purposes in the region. We have applied HUMUS, the Hydrologic Unit Model of the U.S. to the Missouri and Arkansas-White-Red water resource regions that overlie the Ogallala. We have imposed three general circulation model (GISS, UKTR and BMRC) projections of future climate change on this region and simulated the changes that may be induced in water yields (runoff plus lateral flow) and ground water recharge. Each GCM was applied to HUMUS at three levels of global mean temperature (GMT) to represent increasing severity of climate change (a surrogate for time). HUMUS was also run at three levels of atmospheric CO2 concentration (hereafter denoted by[CO2]) in order to estimate the impacts of direct CO2 effects on photosynthesis and evapotranspiration. Since the UKTR and GISS GCMs project increased precipitation in the Missouri basin, water yields increase there. The BMRC GCM predicts sharply decreased precipitation and, hence, reduced water yields. Precipitation reductions are even greater in the Arkansas basin under BMRC as are the consequent water yield losses. GISS and UKTR climates lead to only moderate yield losses in the Arkansas. CO2-fertilization reverses these losses and yields increase slightly. CO2 fertilization increases recharge in the base (no climate change) case in both basins. Recharge is reduced under all three GCMs and severities of climate change.

  10. Aquifer Characteristics Data Report for the Weldon Spring Site chemical plant/raffinate pits and vicinity properties for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This report describes the procedures and methods used, and presents the results of physical testing performed, to characterize the hydraulic properties of the shallow Mississippian-Devonian aquifer beneath the Weldon Spring chemical plant, raffinate pits, and vicinity properties. The aquifer of concern is composed of saturated rocks of the Burlington-Keokuk Limestone which constitutes the upper portion of the Mississippian-Devonian aquifer. This aquifer is a heterogeneous anisotropic medium which can be described in terms of diffuse Darcian flow overlain by high porosity discrete flow zones and conduits. Average hydraulic conductivity for all wells tested is 9.6E-02 meters/day (3.1E-01 feet/day). High hydraulic conductivity values are representative of discrete flow in the fractured and weathered zones in the upper Burlington-Keokuk Limestone. They indicate heterogeneities within the Mississippian-Devonian aquifer. Aquifer heterogeneity in the horizontal plane is believed to be randomly distributed and is a function of fracture spacing, solution voids, and preglacial weathering phenomena. Relatively high hydraulic conductivities in deeper portions of the aquifer are though to be due to the presence of widely spaced fractures. 44 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Determining flow, recharge, and vadose zonedrainage in anunconfined aquifer from groundwater strontium isotope measurements, PascoBasin, WA

    SciTech Connect

    mjsingleton@lbl.gov

    2004-06-29

    Strontium isotope compositions (87Sr/86Sr) measured in groundwater samples from 273 wells in the Pasco Basin unconfined aquifer below the Hanford Site show large and systematic variations that provide constraints on groundwater recharge, weathering rates of the aquifer host rocks, communication between unconfined and deeper confined aquifers, and vadose zone-groundwater interaction. The impact of millions of cubic meters of wastewater discharged to the vadose zone (103-105 times higher than ambient drainage) shows up strikingly on maps of groundwater 87Sr/86Sr. Extensive access through the many groundwater monitoring wells at the site allows for an unprecedented opportunity to evaluate the strontium geochemistry of a major aquifer, hosted primarily in unconsolidated sediments, and relate it to both long term properties and recent disturbances. Groundwater 87Sr/86Sr increases systematically from 0.707 to 0.712 from west to east across the Hanford Site, in the general direction of groundwater flow, as a result of addition of Sr from the weathering of aquifer sediments and from diffuse drainage through the vadose zone. The lower 87Sr/86Sr groundwater reflects recharge waters that have acquired Sr from Columbia River Basalts. Based on a steady-state model of Sr reactive transport and drainage, there is an average natural drainage flux of 0-1.4 mm/yr near the western margin of the Hanford Site, and ambient drainage may be up to 30 mm/yr in the center of the site assuming an average bulk rock weathering rate of 10-7.5 g/g/yr.

  12. Contaminant transport in unconfined aquifer, input to low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, A.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-14

    This report describes briefly the Hanford sitewide groundwater model and its application to the Low-Level Tank Waste Disposal (LLTWD) interim Performance Assessment (PA). The Well Intercept Factor (WIF) or dilution factor from a given areal flux entering the aquifer released from the LLTWD site are calculated for base case and various sensitivity cases. In conjunction with the calculation for released fluxes through vadose zone transport,the dose at the compliance point can be obtained by a simple multiplication. The relative dose contribution from the upstream sources was also calculated and presented in the appendix for an equal areal flux at the LLTWD site. The results provide input for management decisions on remediation action needed for reduction of the released fluxes from the upstream facilities to the allowed level to meet the required dose criteria.

  13. Abiotic/Biotic Degradation and Mineralization of N-Nitrosodimethylamine in Aquifer Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; McKinley, James P.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Crocker, Fiona H.

    2008-10-14

    The N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) degradation rate and mineralization rate were measured in two aquifer sediments that received treatments to create oxic, reducing, and sequential reducing/oxic environments. Chemically reduced sediments rapidly abiotically degraded NDMA to nontoxic dimethylamine (DMA) to parts per trillion levels, then degraded to further products. NDMA was partially mineralized in reduced sediments (6 to 28 percent) at a slow rate (half-life 3,460 h) by an unknown abiotic/biotic pathway. In contrast, NDMA was mineralized more rapidly (half-life 342 h) and to a greater extent (30 to 81 percent) in oxic sediments with propane addition, likely by a propane monooxygenase pathway. NDMA mineralization in sequential reduced sediment followed by oxic sediment treatment did result in slightly more rapid mineralization and a greater mineralization extent relative to reduced systems. These increases were minor, so aerobic NDMA mineralization with oxygen and propane addition was the most viable in situ NDMA mineralization strategy.

  14. Comparison of Caprock Mineral Characteristics at Field Demonstration Sites for Saline Aquifer Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, C.A.; Lowry, G. (Carnegie Mellon University); Dzombak, D. (Carnegie Mellon University); Soong, Yee; Hedges, S.W.

    2008-10-01

    In 2003 the U.S Department of Energy initiated regional partnership programs to address the concern for rising atmospheric CO2. These partnerships were formed to explore regional and economical means for geologically sequestering CO2 across the United States and to set the stage for future commercial applications. Several options exist for geological sequestration and among these sequestering CO2 into deep saline aquifers is one of the most promising. This is due, in part, to the possibility of stabilized permanent storage through mineral precipitation from chemical interactions of the injected carbon dioxide with the brine and reservoir rock. There are nine field demonstration sites for saline sequestration among the regional partnerships in Phase II development to validate the overall commercial feasibility for CO2 geological sequestration. Of the nine sites considered for Phase II saline sequestration demonstration, seven are profiled in this study for their caprock lithologic and mineral characteristics.

  15. Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

  16. Geophysical Monitoring of Ground Surface Deformation Associated with a Confined Aquifer Storage and Recovery Operation

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Bonneville, Alain; Heggy, Essam; Strickland, Christopher E.; Normand, Jonathan; Dermond, Jeffrey A.; Fang, Yilin; Sullivan, E. C.

    2015-08-11

    A main issue in the storage of large volumes of fluids, mainly water and CO2, in the deep subsurface is to determine their field-scale-induced displacements and consequences on the mechanical behavior of the storage reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost-effective, and repeatable geophysical techniques of micro-gravimetry, differential global positioning system (DGPS), and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR). These techniques were field tested and evaluated in an active large-volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project in Pendleton, Oregon, USA, where three ASR wells are injecting up to 1.9 million m3/yr-1more » into basalt aquifers to a depth of about 150 m. Injection and recovery of water at the wells was accompanied by significant gravity anomalies and vertical deformation of the ground surface localized to the immediate surroundings of the injection wells as evidenced by DGPS and gravity measurements collected in 2011. At a larger scale, and between 2011 and 2013, DInSAR monitoring of the Pendleton area suggests the occurrence of sub-centimetric deformation in the western part of the city and close to the injection locations associated with the ASR cycle. A numerical simulation of the effect of the water injection gives results in good agreement with the observations and confirms the validity of the approach, which could be deployed in similar geological contexts to look at the mechanical effects of water and gas injections. The gravity signal reflects deep phenomena and gives additional insight into the repartition of fluids in the subsurface.« less

  17. Geophysical Monitoring of Ground Surface Deformation Associated with a Confined Aquifer Storage and Recovery Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonneville, Alain; Heggy, Essam; Strickland, Christopher E.; Normand, Jonathan; Dermond, Jeffrey A.; Fang, Yilin; Sullivan, E. C.

    2015-08-11

    A main issue in the storage of large volumes of fluids, mainly water and CO2, in the deep subsurface is to determine their field-scale-induced displacements and consequences on the mechanical behavior of the storage reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost-effective, and repeatable geophysical techniques of micro-gravimetry, differential global positioning system (DGPS), and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR). These techniques were field tested and evaluated in an active large-volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project in Pendleton, Oregon, USA, where three ASR wells are injecting up to 1.9 million m3/yr-1 into basalt aquifers to a depth of about 150 m. Injection and recovery of water at the wells was accompanied by significant gravity anomalies and vertical deformation of the ground surface localized to the immediate surroundings of the injection wells as evidenced by DGPS and gravity measurements collected in 2011. At a larger scale, and between 2011 and 2013, DInSAR monitoring of the Pendleton area suggests the occurrence of sub-centimetric deformation in the western part of the city and close to the injection locations associated with the ASR cycle. A numerical simulation of the effect of the water injection gives results in good agreement with the observations and confirms the validity of the approach, which could be deployed in similar geological contexts to look at the mechanical effects of water and gas injections. The gravity signal reflects deep phenomena and gives additional insight into the repartition of fluids in the subsurface.

  18. Modeling CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir To Evaluate Regional CO2 Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Watney, W. Lynn; Rush, Jason; Raney, Jennifer

    2014-09-30

    1. Drilled, cored, and logged three wells to the basement and collecting more than 2,700 ft of conventional core; obtained 20 mi2 of multicomponent 3D seismic imaging and merged and reprocessed more than 125 mi2 of existing 3D seismic data for use in modeling CO2- EOR oil recovery and CO2 storage in five oil fields in southern Kansas. 2. Determined the technical feasibility of injecting and sequestering CO2 in a set of four depleted oil reservoirs in the Cutter, Pleasant Prairie South, Eubank, and Shuck fields in southwest Kansas; of concurrently recovering oil from those fields; and of quantifying the volumes of CO2 sequestered and oil recovered during the process. 3. Formed a consortium of six oil operating companies, five of which own and operate the four fields. The consortium became part of the Southwest Kansas CO2-EOR Initiative for the purpose of sharing data, knowledge, and interest in understanding the potential for CO2-EOR in Kansas. 4. Built a regional well database covering 30,000 mi2 and containing stratigraphic tops from ~90,000 wells; correlated 30 major stratigraphic horizons; digitized key wells, including wireline logs and sample logs; and analyzed more than 3,000 drill stem tests to establish that fluid levels in deep aquifers below the Permian evaporites are not connected to the surface and therefore pressures are not hydrostatic. Connectivity with the surface aquifers is lacking because shale aquitards and impermeable evaporite layers consist of both halite and anhydrite. 5. Developed extensive web applications and an interactive mapping system that do the following: a. Facilitate access to a wide array of data obtained in the study, including core descriptions and analyses, sample logs, digital (LAS) well logs, seismic data, gravity and magnetics maps, structural and stratigraphic maps, inferred fault traces, earthquakes, Class I and II disposal wells, and surface lineaments. b. Provide real-time analysis of the project dataset, including

  19. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment Final Campaign Summary

    SciTech Connect

    DeMott, PJ; Suski, KJ; Hill, TCJ; Levin, EJT

    2015-03-01

    The first ever ice nucleating particle (INP) measurements to be collected at the Southern Great Plains site were made during a period from late April to June 2014, as a trial for possible longer-term measurements at the site. These measurements will also be used to lay the foundation for understanding and parameterizing (for cloud resolving modeling) the sources of these climatically important aerosols as well as to augment the existing database containing this knowledge. Siting the measurements during the spring was intended to capture INP sources in or to this region from plant, soil, dust transported over long distances, biomass burning, and pollution aerosols at a time when they may influence warm-season convective clouds and precipitation. Data have been archived of real-time measurements of INP number concentrations as a function of processing conditions (temperature and relative humidity) during 18 days of sampling that spanned two distinctly different weather situations: a warm, dry and windy period with regional dust and biomass burning influences in early May, and a cooler period of frequent precipitation during early June. Precipitation delayed winter wheat harvesting, preventing intended sampling during that perturbation on atmospheric aerosols. INP concentrations were highest and most variable at all temperatures in the dry period, where we attribute the INP activity primarily to soil dust emissions. Additional offline INP analyses are underway to extend the characterization of INP to cover the entire mixed phase cloud regime from -5°C to -35°C during the full study. Initial comparisons between methods on four days show good agreement and excellent future promise. The additional offline immersion freezing data will be archived as soon as completed under separate funding. Analyses of additional specialized studies for specific attribution of INP to biological and smoke sources are continuing via the National Science Foundation and National Aeronautics

  20. EERE Success Story-Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines EERE Success Story-Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in ...

  1. AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont Title: AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for ...

  2. EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Rescission of export authorization to export electric energy to Canada. EA-389-A Great Bay ... Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-342-A Royal Bank of Canada

  3. Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines February ...

  4. Numerical modeling of regional ground-water flow in the deep-basin brine aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas Panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Wirojanagud, P.; Kreitler, C.W.; Smith, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Bedded Permian-age evaporite sequences in the Palo Duro Basin are being considered for a permanent nuclear waste repository by the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of this modeling study is to provide an understanding of regional ground-water flow in the formations beneath the Permian evaporite section. From this understanding, more detailed, smaller scale studies can be designed. This study is also intended to provide a better understanding of the boundary conditions and permeabilities of the aquifer and aquitard system as well as provide estimates of ground-water travel times across the basin. Numerical simulations were made of the Wolfcamp aquifer modeled as a single layer and of the entire Deep-Basin Brine aquifer system, including the Wolfcamp aquifer, modeled as a single layer.

  5. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    VI, LLC | Department of Energy 89 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to Canada. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, (CN).pdf (579.86 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-327-A DC Energy,

  6. Optimal pulsed pumping for aquifer remediation when contaminant transport is affected by rate-limited sorption: A calculus of variation approach. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, R.T.

    1994-09-01

    The remediation of groundwater contamination continues to persist as a social and economic problem due to increased governmental regulations and public health concerns. Additionally, the geochemistry of the aquifer and the contaminant transport within the aquifer complicates the remediation process to restore contaminated aquifers to conditions compatible with health-based standards. Currently, the preferred method for aquifer cleanup (pump-and-treat) has several limitations including, the persistence of sorbed chemicals on soil matrix and the long term operation and maintenance expense. The impetus of this research was to demonstrate that a calculus of variations approach could be applied to a pulsed pumping aquifer remediation problem where contaminant transport was affected by rate-limited sorption and generalized to answer several management objectives. The calculus of variation approach produced criteria for when the extraction pump is turned on and off. Additionally, the analytic solutions presented in this research may be useful in verifying numerical codes developed to solve optimal pulsed pumping aquifer remediation problems under conditions of rate-limited sorption.

  7. Water geochemistry and hydrogeology of the shallow aquifer at Roosevelt Hot Springs, southern Utah: A hot dry rock prospect

    SciTech Connect

    Vuataz, F.D.; Goff, F.

    1987-12-01

    On the western edge of the geothermal field, three deep holes have been drilled that are very hot but mostly dry. Two of them (Phillips 9-1 and Acord 1-26 wells) have been studied by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) resources evaluation program. A review of data and recommendations have been formulated to evaluate the HDR geothermal potential at Roosevelt. The present report is directed toward the study of the shallow aquifer of the Milford Valley to determine if the local groundwater would be suitable for use as make-up water in an HDR system. This investigation is the result of a cooperative agreement between Los Alamos and Phillips Petroleum Co., formerly the main operator of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Unit. The presence of these hot dry wells and the similar setting of the Roosevelt area to the prototype HDR site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, make Roosevelt a very good candidate site for creation of another HDR geothermal system. This investigation has two main objectives: to assess the water geochemistry of the valley aquifer, to determine possible problems in future make-up water use, such as scaling or corrosion in the wells and surface piping, and to assess the hydrogeology of the shallow groundwaters above the HDR zone, to characterize the physical properties of the aquifer. These two objectives are linked by the fact that the valley aquifer is naturally contaminated by geothermal fluids leaking out of the hydrothermal reservoir. In an arid region where good-quality fresh water is needed for public water supply and irrigation, nonpotable waters would be ideal for an industrial use such as injection into an HDR energy extraction system. 50 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Water/rock interaction efficiency and seawater dolomitization in the Eocene Avon Park Formation, Floridan Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Cander, H.S. )

    1990-05-01

    The Floridan aquifer has often been proposed as a system of extensive meteoric carbonate diagenesis and mixing zone dolomitization. However, the dominance of marine isotope (C, O, {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) and trace element (Sr, Fe, Mn) compositions in dolomites and limestones in the Eocene Avon Park Formation, Floridan aquifer, suggests that the very active low temperature meteoric groundwater system has, over the past 40 m.y., been an inefficient mechanism of diagenesis. {delta}{sup 18}O values of all but two replacement dolomites sampled range from +2.0 to +5.1 (PDB) with high Sr concentrations (90-325 ppm), indicating dolomitization by near-normal marine water involving no significant interaction with meteoric groundwater. The two {delta}{sup 18}O-depleted (0.0 {plus minus} 1) dolomites have low Sr concentrations ({approximately}100 ppm) suggesting limited recrystallization in meteoric water. Several dolomite samples have radiogenic {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr compositions (0.70810-0.70883 {plus minus} 2), but have heavy oxygen isotope compositions (> +2.0) and high Sr concentrations (<200 ppm) suggesting precipitation from cold Miocene age or younger seawater that circulated through the Florida platform. Most limestone stable isotope compositions cluster around marine values (({delta}{sup 18}O = {minus}1 to +1, PDB) {delta}{sup 13}C = +0.5 to +2.5) and have Eocene seawater {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr compositions (0.70775 {plus minus} 2 to 0.70779 {plus minus} 2) with 400 to 500 ppm Sr. Isotopic compositions of limestones from the east coast of Florida are all within these ranges. Only some limestones from central Florida and the west coast contain depleted stable isotopic compositions and low Sr concentrations. The sample with the most depleted stable isotope values has a radiogenic {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr composition (0.70870 {plus minus} 2), suggesting that diagenetic meteoric water migrated through post-Miocene strata.

  9. A controlled in situ field evaluation of a new dynamic vacuum slug test method in unconfined aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Lauctes, B.A.; Schleyer, C.A.

    1995-09-01

    Most ground water site characterizations require initial estimates of the ground water flow velocity and potential downgradient extent of ground water contamination. The fundamental aquifer property, hydraulic conductivity, must be determined to make these essential estimates. Highly contaminated ground water often precludes conducting multi-well aquifer tests to evaluate hydraulic conductivity due to potential human health risks and ground water storage/treatment/disposal costs and logistics. Consequently, single-well slug tests are often sued, but the widely used pressure slug test method is not suitable for water table monitoring wells. As a result, a new slug test method was developed by GCL for unconfined aquifers. The new method was benchmarked against the widely used solid slug test method in a series of rising-head and falling-head slug tests. A statistical evaluation indicated no statistical difference (alpha = 0.05) between hydraulic conductivity values calculated from each method. The new dynamic vacuum method, designed specifically for use in water table monitoring wells, uses a continuous vacuum to draw air through the well screen exposed above the water table. The vacuum induces upwelling as air pressure inside the well casing drops below atmospheric pressure. Once upwelling equilibrates with the applied vacuum, the vacuum is released allowing the water to recover and the air pressure inside the casing to return to atmospheric pressure.

  10. Death Valley Lower Carbonate Aquifer Monitoring Program Wells Down gradient of the Proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Inyo County

    2006-07-26

    Inyo County has participated in oversight activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository since 1987. The overall goal of these studies are the evaluation of far-field issues related to potential transport, by ground water, or radionuclides into Inyo County, including Death Valley, and the evaluation of a connection between the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) and the biosphere. Our oversight and completed Cooperative Agreement research, and a number of other investigators research indicate that there is groundwater flow between the alluvial and carbonate aquifers both at Yucca Mountain and in Inyo County. In addition to the potential of radionuclide transport through the LCA, Czarnecki (1997), with the US Geological Survey, research indicate potential radionuclide transport through the shallower Tertiary-age aquifer materials with ultimate discharge into the Franklin Lake Playa in Inyo County. The specific purpose of this Cooperative Agreement drilling program was to acquire geological, subsurface geology, and hydrologic data to: (1) establish the existence of inter-basin flow between the Amargosa Basin and Death Valley Basin; (2) characterize groundwater flow paths in the LCA through Southern Funeral Mountain Range, and (3) Evaluation the hydraulic connection between the Yucca Mountain repository and the major springs in Death Valley through the LCA.

  11. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the second long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Lauer, J.L.; Walton, M.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Howe, J.T.; Splettstoesser, J.F.

    1991-12-01

    The technical feasibility of high-temperature [>100{degrees}C (>212{degrees}F)] aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota`s St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the second long-term cycle (LT2), which was conducted from October 1986 through April 1987. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are reported. Approximately 61% of the 9.21 GWh of energy added to the 9.38 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored during LT2 was recovered. Temperatures of the water stored and recovered averaged 118{degrees}C (244{degrees}F) and 85{degrees}C (185{degrees}F), respectively. Results agreed with previous cycles conducted at the FTF. System operation during LT2 was nearly as planned. Operational experience from previous cycles at the FTF was extremely helpful. Ion-exchange softening of the heated and stored aquifer water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well, and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Sodium bicarbonate replaced magnesium and calcium bicarbonate as primary ions in the softened water. Water recovered form storage was approximately at equilibrium with respect to dissolved ions. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water. Sodium was significantly lower in water recovered than in water stored.

  12. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the second long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Lauer, J.L.; Walton, M.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Howe, J.T.; Splettstoesser, J.F. )

    1991-12-01

    The technical feasibility of high-temperature (>100{degrees}C (>212{degrees}F)) aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota's St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the second long-term cycle (LT2), which was conducted from October 1986 through April 1987. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are reported. Approximately 61% of the 9.21 GWh of energy added to the 9.38 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored during LT2 was recovered. Temperatures of the water stored and recovered averaged 118{degrees}C (244{degrees}F) and 85{degrees}C (185{degrees}F), respectively. Results agreed with previous cycles conducted at the FTF. System operation during LT2 was nearly as planned. Operational experience from previous cycles at the FTF was extremely helpful. Ion-exchange softening of the heated and stored aquifer water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well, and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Sodium bicarbonate replaced magnesium and calcium bicarbonate as primary ions in the softened water. Water recovered form storage was approximately at equilibrium with respect to dissolved ions. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water. Sodium was significantly lower in water recovered than in water stored.

  13. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Intrusion into an Unconsolidated Aquifer: II. Modeling Results

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Liange; Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Wang, Guohui; Shao, Hongbo; Brown, Christopher F.

    2015-08-04

    Large scale deployment of CO2 geological sequestration requires the assessment of the risks. One of the potential risks is the impact of CO2 leakage on shallow groundwater overlying the sequestration site.The understanding of the key chemical processes and parameters are critical for building numerical models for risk assessment. Model interpretation of laboratory and field tests is an effective way to enhance such understanding. Column experiments in which CO2 charged synthetic groundwater flowed through a column packed with material from High Plains aquifer was conducted and concentration of several constituents in the effluent water was analyzed. In this paper, reactive transport model was developed to interpret the observed concentration changes, attempting to shed light on the chemical reactions and key parameters that control the concentration changes of these constituents. The reactive transport model catches the concentration changes of pH, Ca, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cs, As and Pb fairly well. Calcite dissolution and Ca-driven cation exchange reactions are the major drivers for the concentration changes of Ca, Ba, Sr, and Cs. The pH-driven adsorption/desorption reactions lead to a concentration increase of As and Pb. The volume fraction and reactive surface area of calcite, CEC and sorption capacity are key parameters in determining the magnitude of concentration increase. Model results also show that the dissolution of calcite with Ba impurity could be an alternative explanation of the increase in Ba concentration.

  14. Sensitivity study of CO2 storage capacity in brine aquifers withclosed boundaries: Dependence on hydrogeologic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.

    2007-02-07

    In large-scale geologic storage projects, the injected volumes of CO{sub 2} will displace huge volumes of native brine. If the designated storage formation is a closed system, e.g., a geologic unit that is compartmentalized by (almost) impermeable sealing units and/or sealing faults, the native brine cannot (easily) escape from the target reservoir. Thus the amount of supercritical CO{sub 2} that can be stored in such a system depends ultimately on how much pore space can be made available for the added fluid owing to the compressibility of the pore structure and the fluids. To evaluate storage capacity in such closed systems, we have conducted a modeling study simulating CO{sub 2} injection into idealized deep saline aquifers that have no (or limited) interaction with overlying, underlying, and/or adjacent units. Our focus is to evaluate the storage capacity of closed systems as a function of various reservoir parameters, hydraulic properties, compressibilities, depth, boundaries, etc. Accounting for multi-phase flow effects including dissolution of CO{sub 2} in numerical simulations, the goal is to develop simple analytical expressions that provide estimates for storage capacity and pressure buildup in such closed systems.

  15. Guidelines for conceptual design and evaluation of aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, C.F.; Hauz, W.

    1980-10-01

    Guidelines are presented for use as a tool by those considering application of a new technology, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). The guidelines will assist utilities, municipalities, industries, and other entities in the conceptual design and evaluation of systems employing ATES. The potential benefits of ATES are described, an overview is presented of the technology and its applications, and rules of thumb are provided for quickly judging whether a proposed project has sufficient promise to warrant detailed conceptual design and evaluation. The characteristics of sources and end uses of heat and chill which are seasonally mismatched and may benefit from ATES (industrial waste heat, cogeneration, solar heat, and winter chill, for space heating and air conditioning) are discussed. Storage and transport subsystems and their expected performance and cost are described. A 10-step methodology is presented for conceptual design of an ATES system and evaluation of its technical and economic feasibility in terms of energy conservation, cost savings, fuel substitution, improved dependability of supply, and abatement of pollution, with examples, and the methodology is applied to a hypothetical proposed ATES system, to illustrate its use.

  16. Fractured rock aquifer tests in the Western Siberian Basin, Ozyorsk, Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, R.L.; Looney, B.B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1997-10-01

    A series of multi-zone pumping tests was conducted in a contaminated fractured rock aquifer in the Western Siberian Basin, Ozyorsk, Russia. The tests were conducted adjacent to the Mishelyak River floodplain in fractured Paleozoic porphyrites, tufts, tuff breccia, and lava typical of the Ural mountain complex. Geophysical logs, borehole photography, core samples, and results from previous borehole contamination studies were used to identify the zones to be tested. A network of three uncased wells was tested using a system of inflatable packers, pressure transducers and data loggers. Seven zones were isolated and monitored in two of the uncased wells. A straddle packer assembly was used to isolate individual zones within the pumping well. Eight constant rate pumping tests were conducted. Results of the testing indicate that shallow groundwater migrates primarily in two intervals that are separated by an interval with low lateral conductivity. The water bearing intervals have moderate to high specific capacities (1.3 and 30 L/min/m). Several processes are responsible for fracturing present in the lower interval. The network of compound fractures produced a complex array of fracture intersections yielding a fractured media with hydraulic behavior similar to porous media. Models used for the analysis of pumping tests in porous media provide a good estimation of the hydraulic response of the lower interval to pumping. Future work will include more complex analysis of the data to determine hydraulic conductivity ellipses.

  17. Uncertainty analyses of CO2 plume expansion subsequent to wellbore CO2 leakage into aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Bacon, Diana H.; Engel, David W.; Lin, Guang; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Fang, Zhufeng

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we apply an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to CO2 sequestration problems. In one scenario, we look at the risk of wellbore leakage of CO2 into a shallow unconfined aquifer in an urban area; in another scenario, we study the effects of reservoir heterogeneity on CO2 migration. We combine various sampling approaches (quasi-Monte Carlo, probabilistic collocation, and adaptive sampling) in order to reduce the number of forward calculations while trying to fully explore the input parameter space and quantify the input uncertainty. The CO2 migration is simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). For computationally demanding simulations with 3D heterogeneity fields, we combined the framework with a scalable version module, eSTOMP, as the forward modeling simulator. We built response curves and response surfaces of model outputs with respect to input parameters, to look at the individual and combined effects, and identify and rank the significance of the input parameters.

  18. Single-cell genomics reveal metabolic strategies for microbial growth and survival in an oligotrophic aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Kennedy, David W.; Castelle, Cindy; Field, Erin; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

    2014-02-01

    Bacteria from the genus Pedobacter are a major component of microbial assemblages at Hanford Site and have been shown to significantly change in abundance in response to the subsurface intrusion of Columbia River water. Here we employed single cell genomics techniques to shed light on the physiological niche of these microorganisms. Analysis of four Pedobacter single amplified genomes (SAGs) from Hanford Site sediments revealed a chemoheterotrophic lifestyle, with the potential to exist under both aerobic and microaerophilic conditions via expression of both aa3?type and cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidases. These SAGs encoded a wide-range of both intra-and extra-cellular carbohydrate-active enzymes, potentially enabling the degradation of recalcitrant substrates such as xylan and chitin, and the utilization of more labile sugars such as mannose and fucose. Coupled to these enzymes, a diversity of transporters and sugar-binding molecules were involved in the uptake of carbon from the extracellular local environment. The SAGs were enriched in TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs), which play a key role in uptake of substrates resulting from degradation of recalcitrant carbon. CRISPR-Cas mechanisms for resisting viral infections were identified in all SAGs. These data demonstrate the potential mechanisms utilized for persistence by heterotrophic microorganisms in a carbon-limited aquifer, and hint at potential linkages between observed Pedobacter abundance shifts within the 300 Area subsurface and biogeochemical shifts associated with Columbia River water intrusion.

  19. Petrology of lower and middle Eocene carbonate rocks, Floridan aquifer, central Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, P.A.; Miller, J.A.

    1984-09-01

    Study of cores from a US Geological Survey test well near Polk City, Florida, indicates that the Avon Park-Lake City (Claibornian) and Oldsmar (Sabinian) Limestones, which comprise most of the Floridan aquifer in central Florida, can be divided into six microfacies: foraminiferal mudstone, foraminiferal wackestone-packstone, foraminiferal grainstone, nodular anhydrite, laminated dolomicrite, and replacement dolomite. Dolomite containing variable amounts of nodular anhydrite forms more than 90% of the Avon Park-Lake city interval, whereas thte Oldsmar is chiefly limestone. Several episodes of dolomite formation are recognized. Laminated dolomicrite formed syngenetically in a supratidal-sabhka environment. Crystalline dolomite with nodular anhydrite formed early by replacement of limestone through reflux of dense, magnesium-rich brines. Replacement dolomite not associated with evaporites and containing limpid crystals probably formed later by a mixed-water process in the subsurface environment. Late diagenetic processes affecting crystalline dolomites include hydration of anhydrite to gypsum, partial dissolution of gypsum, minor alteration of gypsum to calcite, and dissolution of calcian dolomite cores in stoichiometric crystals. Crystalline dolomite and grainstone are the only rock types that have high enough porosities and permeabilities to provide significant yields of water. Medium and finely crystalline dolomites show best values of porosity and permeability because they have high percentages of intercrystal and moldic pores that are well connected. Filling of pores by anhydrite or gypsum can significantly reduce porosity and permeability.

  20. An example of mixing-zone dolomite, Middle Eocene Avon Park Formation, Floridan aquifer system

    SciTech Connect

    Cander, H.S. )

    1994-07-01

    A late-formed dolomite cement in a core of the Middle Eocene Avon Park Formation, peninsular Florida, provides an example of dolomite cement from a mixing zone and illustrates how dolomite textural alteration and stabilization can occur at earth-surface conditions. The Avon Park Formation is a pervasively dolomitized peritidal platform carbonate 400 m thick in the Florida aquifer system. Typical Avon Park dolomite is inclusion-rich, fine-grained (< 40 mm), noncathodoluminescent, highly porous (average, 20%), and formed during the Eocene by normal to hypersaline seawater ([delta][sup 18]O = + 3.7[per thousand] PDB; [delta][sup 13]C = + 2.0[per thousand]; [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr = 0.70778; Sr = 167 ppm). In a 20 m interval in a core from southwest Florida, inclusion-free, cathodoluminescent dolomite overgrows the early-formed noncathodoluminescent marine dolomite. The cathodoluminescent dolomite cement profoundly alters the texture of Avon Park dolomite from typical Cenozoic-like porous, poorly crystalline dolomite to hard, dense, low-porosity, highly crystalline Paleozoic-like dolomite. The dolomite cement is not a replacement of limestone but an overgrowth of early-formed marine dolomite and pore-occluding cement. This study demonstrates that: (1) dolomite precipitated from a 75% seawater mixing-zone fluid that was both calcite saturated and sulfate-rich, and (2) dramatic textural maturation and stabilization in dolomite can occur in the near surface environment, without elevated temperature and burial conditions.

  1. Mobilization of trace elements in aquifers by biodegradation of hydrocarbon contaminants. Master Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, S.L.

    1997-12-01

    This study had two objectives: (1) to determine the extent of metal mobility within petroleum-contaminated aquifers, (2) to determine if biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons can explain metal mobility. The approach reviewed analytical results from 2305 groundwater sampling events, taken from 958 wells, located at 136 sites found at 53 Air Force installations. The study showed that high levels of metals are present at petroleum hydrocarbon sites where metals would not generally be expected. Of the metals with drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs), mercury and silver were detected the least frequently. Barium and copper were detected at the sites, but fewer than 2.5 percent of the samples exceeded their MCLs. All other metals exceeded their MCLs in at least 2.5 percent of the samples, with antimony and lead exceeding their MCLs in 19 percent and 10 percent of samples, respectively. Higher concentrations of barium and manganese were most strongly correlated with petroleum hydrocarbon contamination, and relatively strong correlations also existed for aluminum, arsenic, iron, and lead. Major cations such as calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium were least affected by petroleum hydrocarbons concentrations.

  2. AmeriFlux US-ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont (Dataset) | Data

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Explorer ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont Title: AmeriFlux US-ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont. Site Description - Central facility tower crop field Authors: Torn, Margaret [1] + Show Author Affiliations Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Publication Date: 2016-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1246027 Resource Type: Dataset Data Type: Specialized Mix Research Org:

  3. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-398 Minnesota Power- Great Northern Transmission Line

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Application from Great Northern  (GNTL) to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border.

  4. Executive Order 13547: Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great Lakes

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This order establishes a national policy to ensure the protection, maintenance, and restoration of the health of ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes ecosystems and resources, enhance the sustainability...

  5. File:EIA-Eastern-GreatBasin-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    applicationpdf) Description Eastern Great Basin By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F....

  6. EO 13547: Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great Lakes (2010)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This order establishes a national policy to ensure the protection, maintenance, and restoration of the health of ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes ecosystems and resources, enhance the sustainability...

  7. Regulatory impact analysis of the proposed great lakes water quality guidance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Raucher, R.; Dixon, A.; Trabka, E.

    1993-04-15

    The Regulatory Impact Analysis provides direction to the Great Lakes States and Tribes on minimum water quality standards and contains numerical water quality criteria for 32 pollutants as well as methodologies for the development of water quality criteria for additional pollutants discharged to these waters. It also provides guidance to the Great Lakes States and Tribes on antidegradation policies and standards and implementation procedures.

  8. Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) for the proposed Great Lakes water quality guidance (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The Regulatory Impact Analysis provides direction to the Great Lakes states and Tribes on minimum water quality standards and contains numerical water quality criteria for 32 pollutants as well as methodologies for the development of water quality criteria for additional pollutants discharged to these waters. It also provides guidance to the Great Lakes States and Tribes on antidegradation policies and standards and implementation procedures.

  9. Two-phase convective CO2 dissolution in saline aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mario J.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    Geologic carbon storage in deep saline aquifers is a promising technology for reducing anthropogenic emissions into the atmosphere. Dissolution of injected CO2 into resident brines is one of the primary trapping mechanisms generally considered necessary to provide long-term storage security. Given that diffusion of CO2 in brine is woefully slow, convective dissolution, driven by a small increase in brine density with CO2 saturation, is considered to be the primary mechanism of dissolution trapping. Previous studies of convective dissolution have typically only considered the convective process in the single-phase region below the capillary transition zone and have either ignored the overlying two-phase region where dissolution actually takes place or replaced it with a virtual region with reduced or enhanced constant permeability. Our objective is to improve estimates of the long-term dissolution flux of CO2 into brine by including the capillary transition zone in two-phase model simulations. In the fully two-phase model, there is a capillary transition zone above the brine-saturated region over which the brine saturation decreases with increasing elevation. Our two-phase simulations show that the dissolution flux obtained by assuming a brine-saturated, single-phase porous region with a closed upper boundary is recovered in the limit of vanishing entry pressure and capillary transition zone. For typical finite entry pressures and capillary transition zone, however, convection currents penetrate into the two-phase region. As a result, this removes the mass transfer limitation of the diffusive boundary layer and enhances the convective dissolution flux of CO2 more than 3 times above the rate assuming single-phase conditions.

  10. Great Lakes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... to a changing global environment; (v) support sustainable, safe, secure, and ... uses, and preserve critical ecosystem services to meet economic, environmental, ...

  11. A preliminary sub-basin scale evaluation framework of site suitability for onshore aquifer-based CO{sub 2} storage in China

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Ning; Li, Xiaochun; Wang, Ying; Dahowski, Robert T; Davidson, Casie L; Bromhal, Grant S

    2013-01-01

    Development of a reliable, broadly applicable framework for the identification and suitability evaluation of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites is essential before large-scale deployment of carbon dioxide capture and geological storage (CCS) can commence. In this study, a sub-basin scale evaluation framework was developed to assess the suitability of potential onshore deep saline aquifers for CO{sub 2} storage in China. The methodology, developed in consultation with experts from the academia and the petroleum industry in China, is based on a multi-criteria analysis (MCA) framework that considers four objectives: (1) storage optimization, in terms of storage capacity and injectivity; (2) risk minimization and storage security; (3) environmental restrictions regarding surface and subsurface use; and (4) economic considerations. The framework is designed to provide insights into both the suitability of potential aquifer storage sites as well as the priority for early deployment of CCS with existing CO{sub 2} sources. Preliminary application of the framework, conducted using GIS-based evaluation tools revealed that 18% of onshore aquifer sites with a combined CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 746 gigatons are considered to exhibit very high suitability, and 11% of onshore aquifer sites with a total capacity of 290 gigatons exhibit very high priority opportunities for implementation. These onshore aquifer sites may provide promising opportunities for early large-scale CCS deployment and contribute to CO{sub 2} mitigation in China for many decades.

  12. A preliminary sub-basin scale evaluation framework of site suitability for onshore aquifer-based CO2 storage in China

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Ning; Li, Xiaochun; Wang, Ying; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.; Bromhal, Grant

    2013-01-30

    Development of a reliable, broadly applicable framework for the identification and suitability evaluation of potential CO2 storage sites is essential before large scale deployment of carbon dioxide capture and geological storage (CCS) can commence. In this study, a sub-basin scale evaluation framework was developed to assess the suitability of potential onshore deep saline aquifers for CO2 storage in China. The methodology, developed in consultation with experts from the academia and the petroleum industry in China, is based on a multi-criteria analysis (MCA) framework that considers four objectives: (1) storage optimization, in terms of storage capacity and injectivity; (2) risk minimization and storage security; (3) environmental restrictions regarding surface and subsurface use; and (4) economic considerations. The framework is designed to provide insights into both the suitability of potential aquifer storage sites as well as the priority for early deployment of CCS with existing CO2 sources. Preliminary application of the framework, conducted using GIS-based evaluation tools revealed that 18% of onshore aquifer sites with a combined CO2 storage capacity of 746 gigatons are considered to exhibit very high suitability, and 11% of onshore aquifer sites with a total capacity of 290 gigatons exhibit very high priority opportunities for implementation. These onshore aquifer sites may provide promising opportunities for early large-scale CCS deployment and contribute to CO2 mitigation in China for many decades.

  13. Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics of sediment from a naturally reduced zone in a uranium-contaminated aquife

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K M; K Kukkadapu, R K; Qafoku, N P; Peacock, A D; Lesher, E; Williams, K H; Bargar, J R; Wilkins, M J; Figueroa, L; Ranville, J; Davis, J A; Long, P E

    2012-05-23

    Localized zones or lenses of naturally reduced sediments have the potential to play a significant role in the fate and transport of redox-sensitive metals and metalloids in aquifers. To assess the mineralogy, microbiology and redox processes that occur in these zones, several cores from a region of naturally occurring reducing conditions in a U-contaminated aquifer (Rifle, CO) were examined. Sediment samples from a transect of cores ranging from oxic/suboxic Rifle aquifer sediment to naturally reduced sediment were analyzed for U and Fe content, oxidation state, and mineralogy; reduced S phases; and solid-phase organic C content using a suite of analytical and spectroscopic techniques on bulk sediment and size fractions. Solid-phase U concentrations were higher in the naturally reduced zone, with a high proportion of the U present as U(IV). The sediments were also elevated in reduced S phases and Fe(II), indicating it is very likely that U(VI), Fe(III), and SO4 reduction has occurred or is occurring in the sediment. The microbial community was assessed using lipid- and DNA-based techniques, and statistical redundancy analysis was performed to determine correlations between the microbial community and the geochemistry. Increased concentrations of solid-phase organic C and biomass in the naturally reduced sediment suggests that natural bioreduction is stimulated by a zone of increased organic C concentration associated with fine-grained material and lower permeability to groundwater flow. Characterization of the naturally bioreduced sediment provides an understanding of the natural processes that occur in the sediment under reducing conditions and how they may impact natural attenuation of radionuclides and other redox sensitive materials. Results also suggest the importance of recalcitrant organic C for maintaining reducing conditions and U immobilization.

  14. Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco, A. Flores; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; Hubbard, S.S.; Kemna, A.

    2011-04-01

    Experiments at the Department of Energy's Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer - a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

  15. Using complex resistivity imaging to infer biogeochemical processes associated with bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Orozco, Adrian; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Kemna, Andreas

    2011-07-07

    Experiments at the Department of Energys Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site near Rifle, Colorado (USA) have demonstrated the ability to remove uranium from groundwater by stimulating the growth and activity of Geobacter species through acetate amendment. Prolonging the activity of these strains in order to optimize uranium bioremediation has prompted the development of minimally-invasive and spatially-extensive monitoring methods diagnostic of their in situ activity and the end products of their metabolism. Here we demonstrate the use of complex resistivity imaging for monitoring biogeochemical changes accompanying stimulation of indigenous aquifer microorganisms during and after a prolonged period (100+ days) of acetate injection. A thorough raw-data statistical analysis of discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements and incorporation of a new power-law phase-error model in the inversion were used to significantly improve the quality of the resistivity phase images over those obtained during previous monitoring experiments at the Rifle IRFC site. The imaging results reveal spatiotemporal changes in the phase response of aquifer sediments, which correlate with increases in Fe(II) and precipitation of metal sulfides (e.g., FeS) following the iterative stimulation of iron and sulfate reducing microorganism. Only modest changes in resistivity magnitude were observed over the monitoring period. The largest phase anomalies (>40 mrad) were observed hundreds of days after halting acetate injection, in conjunction with accumulation of Fe(II) in the presence of residual FeS minerals, reflecting preservation of geochemically reduced conditions in the aquifer a prerequisite for ensuring the long-term stability of immobilized, redox-sensitive contaminants, such as uranium.

  16. Permeability, geochemical, and water quality tests in support of an aquifer thermal energy storage site in Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, S.C.; Deutsch, W.J.; Mitchell, P.J.

    1985-04-01

    This report describes the Underground Energy Storage Program's efforts to characterize physicochemical processes at DOE's ATES Field Test Facility (FTF) located on the University of Minnesota campus at St. Paul, Minnesota. Experimental efforts include: field tests at the St. Paul FTF to characterize fluid injectability and to evaluate the effectiveness of fluid-conditioning equipment, geochemical studies to investigate chemical reactions resulting from alterations to the aquifer's thermal regime, and laboratory tests on sandstone core from the site. Each experimental area is discussed and results obtained thus far are reported. 23 refs., 39 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Field Evaluation of the Restorative Capacity of the Aquifer Downgradient of a Uranium In-Situ Recovery Mining Site

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, Paul William

    2015-05-22

    A two-part field study was conducted in Smith Ranch-Highland in-situ recovery (ISR) near Douglas, Wyoming, to evaluate the restorative capacity of the aquifer downgradient (i.e., hydrologically downstream) of a Uranium ISR mining site with respect to the transport of uranium and other potential contaminants in groundwater after mining has ceased. The study was partially conducted by checking the Uranium content and the alkalinity of separate wells, some wells had been restored and others had not. A map and in-depth procedures of the study are included.

  18. Stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone and the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.R.; Liszewski, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    The unsaturated zone and the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are made up of at least 178 basalt-flow groups, 103 sedimentary interbeds, 6 andesite-flow groups, and 4 rhyolite domes. Stratigraphic units identified in 333 wells in this 890-mile{sup 2} area include 121 basalt-flow groups, 102 sedimentary interbeds, 6 andesite-flow groups, and 1 rhyolite dome. Stratigraphic units were identified and correlated using the data from numerous outcrops and 26 continuous cores and 328 natural-gamma logs available in December 1993. Basalt flows make up about 85% of the volume of deposits underlying the area.

  19. /sup 234/U//sup 230/Th ratio as an indicator of redox state, and U, Th and Ra behavior in briney aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.; Smith, M.R.; Hubbard, N.

    1985-06-01

    The /sup 234/U//sup 230/Th ratio serves as an in-situ indicator of the redox state in groundwater aquifers. The higher this ratio, the more U there is in the +6 state and thus a lesser reducing environment. Radium is retarded in the shallow aquifer and its sorption is dependent on the CaSO/sub 4/ content and redox state. Relative to Ra, U and Th are highly sorbed. The total retardation factor for Th is approx.1400 and mean sorption time for /sup 228/Th is approx.10 days in the shallow zone. The desorption rate of Ra is significantly slower in the shallow than in the deep aquifer. There is no effect of colloids in brines. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. /sup 234/U//sup 230/Th ratio as an indicator of redox state, and U/sub 2/, Th, and Ra behavior in Briney aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.; Smith, M.R.; Hubbard, N.

    1986-01-01

    The /sup 234/U//sup 230/Th ratio serves as an in-situ indicator of the redox state in groundwater aquifers. The higher this ratio, the more U there is in the +6 valance state and thus a less reducing environment. Radium sorption is retarded in the shallow aquifer and is dependent on the CaSO/sub 4/ content and the redox state. Relative to Ra, U and Th are highly sorbed. The total retardation factor for Th is approx. 1400 and mean sorption time for /sup 228/Th is approx. 10 days in the shallow zone. The desorption rate of Ra is significantly slower in the shallow than in the deep aquifer. There is no effect of colloids in brines.

  1. AmeriFlux US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont (Dataset) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Data Explorer ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont Title: AmeriFlux US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont. Site Description - The ARM SGP Burn site is located in the native tallgrass prairies of the USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory near El Reno, OK. One of two adjacent 35 ha plots, the US-ARb plot was burned on 2005/03/08. The second plot, US-ARc,

  2. AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont (Dataset) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Data Explorer ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont Title: AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont. Site Description - The ARM SGP Control site is located in the native tallgrass prairies of the USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory near El Reno, OK. One of two adjacent 35 ha plots with identical towers, measurements at the US-ARc

  3. 1,"Coal Creek","Coal","Great River Energy",1144.5 2,"Antelope...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Utilities Co",192.3 8,"Stanton","Coal","Great River Energy",189.5 9,"Tatanka Wind Power LLC","Wind","Acciona Wind Energy USA LLC",180 10,"Langdon Wind LLC","Wind","FPL ...

  4. AmeriFlux US-ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont

    SciTech Connect

    Torn, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARM ARM Southern Great Plains site- Lamont. Site Description - Central facility tower crop field

  5. Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas Consumption After Energy Assessment (October 2007) (497.87 KB) More Documents & Publications J.R. Simplot: ...

  6. Have a great idea about how to cut the cost of solar panel installatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Have a great idea about how to cut the cost of solar panel installation? Home > Groups > Buildings Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(266) Contributor 7 November, 2014 - 12:13 As prices...

  7. FIA-14-0066- In the Matter of Great Lakes Wind Truth

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    On November 7,  2014, OHA issued a decision granting an Appeal filed by Great Lakes Wind Truth (the Appellant) of a determination that the DOE’s Golden Field Office issued to it regarding the...

  8. Y-12 and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park ? a grand partnershi...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    having hiked every one of the 900 miles of trails in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. When he first arrived at Y-12, I gave him a trail map of the Smokies. A few years...

  9. Analysis of Aquifer Response, Groundwater Flow, and PlumeEvolution at Site OU 1, Former Fort Ord, California

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Preston D.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Su, Grace W.

    2005-02-24

    This report presents a continuation from Oldenburg et al. (2002) of analysis of the hydrogeology, In-Situ Permeable Flow Sensor (ISPFS) results, aquifer response, and changes in the trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume at Operational Unit 1 (OU 1) adjacent to the former Fritzsche Army Airfield at the former Fort Ord Army Base, located on Monterey Bay in northern Monterey County. Fuels and solvents were burned on a portion of OU 1 called the Fire Drill Area (FDA) during airport fire suppression training between 1962 and 1985. This activity resulted in soil and groundwater contamination in the unconfined A-aquifer. In the late 1980's, soil excavation and bioremediation were successful in remediating soil contamination at the site. Shortly thereafter, a groundwater pump, treat, and recharge system commenced operation. This system has been largely successful at remediating groundwater contamination at the head of the groundwater plume. However, a trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume extends approximately 3000 ft (900 m) to the northwest away from the FDA. In the analyses presented here, we augment our prior work (Oldenburg et al., 2002) with new information including treatment-system totalizer data, recent water-level and chemistry data, and data collected from new wells to discern trends in contaminant migration and groundwater flow that may be useful for ongoing remediation efforts. Some conclusions from the prior study have been modified based on these new analyses, and these are pointed out clearly in this report.

  10. Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    the United States Department of Energy for the Exchange of Information and Co-operation in the Area of Nuclear Safety Matters | Department of Energy Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and the United States Department of Energy for the Exchange of Information and Co-operation in the Area of Nuclear Safety Matters Arrangement between the Office for Nuclear Regulation of Great Britain and the United States Department of Energy for the Exchange of Information

  11. Surface-Based Remote Sensing of the Aerosol Indirect Effect at Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface-Based Remote Sensing of the Aerosol Indirect Effect at Southern Great Plains G. Feingold and W. L. Eberhard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. E. Vernon and M. Previdi Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey Abstract We have demonstrated first measurements of the aerosol indirect effect using ground-based remote sensors at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The response of non-precipitating, ice-free clouds to

  12. Five Things That Make a Good Tribal Energy Project Great | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Five Things That Make a Good Tribal Energy Project Great Five Things That Make a Good Tribal Energy Project Great May 10, 2016 - 4:00pm Addthis Solar installation supervisors (blue shirts) from GRID worked with tribal volunteers (white shirts) to complete five residential solar PV system installations on the Bishop Paiute Reservation in March 2016. Photo from Gary Bacock, Bishop Paiute Tribe. Solar installation supervisors (blue shirts) from GRID worked with tribal volunteers (white

  13. Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels December 5, 2011 - 5:44pm Addthis Idaho National Laboratory describes R&D efforts to transform raw biomass into quality feedstocks for the production of renewable fuels, power and bioproducts. Aaron Crowell Senior Technical Research Analyst What does this project do? Develops and utilizes domestically produced biofuels to make our military and the nation more secure. From

  14. Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Consumption After Energy Assessment | Department of Energy Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas Consumption After Energy Assessment Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant Greatly Reduces Natural Gas Consumption After Energy Assessment This case study describes how Terra Nitrogen Company saved 497,000 MMBtu and $3.5 million yearly after upgrading the steam system in its ammonia plant in Verdigris, Oklahoma. Terra Nitrogen Company, L.P.: Ammonia Plant

  15. Great science information is just a tweet away | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information Great science information is just a tweet away Back to the OSTI News Listing for 2012 Keep up with DOE, U.S. and worldwide government science information by following @ostigov , @sciencegov , and @worldwidescienc on Twitter. Get the latest research and development info in a wide range of scientific disciplines from authoritative national and international databases. Great science info is just a tweet away

  16. Ground-water geochemistry and radionuclide activity in the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer of Dodge and Fond du Lac counties, Wisconsin. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, T.R.; Bahr, J.M.; Anderson, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of groundwater from wells in the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer of eastern Wisconsin indicate that regions of the aquifer contain elevated concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride and sulfate. Groundwater from several wells in the area also approach or exceed the current drinking water standard for combined radium activity. Significant changes in groundwater chemistry occur where the aquifer becomes confined by the Maquoketa shale. Concentrations of Cl(-), SO4(2-) and Na(+) increase in the confined region, and the highest combined radium activities are typically observed in the area. Geochemical modeling implies that the observed changes in major ion groundwater chemistry occur in response to the presence of the confining unit which may act as a source of SO4(2-), through gypsum dissolution, and Na(+), through cation exchange. A finite difference groundwater flow model was linked to a particle tracking routine to determine groundwater flow paths and residence times in the aquifer near the boundary between unconfined and confined conditions. Results suggest that the presence of the confining unit produces a vertically stratified flow regime in the confined region.

  17. Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell, Kevin R

    2011-05-01

    This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds

  18. Impact of sedimentary provenance and weathering on arsenic distribution in aquifers of the Datong basin, China: Constraints from elemental geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Ellis, Andre; Liu, Chongxuan; Duan, Mengyu; Li, Junxia

    2014-11-01

    Arsenic (As)-contaminated aquifer sediments from Datong basin, China have been analyzed to infer the provenance and depositional environment related to As distribution in the aquifer sediments. The As content in the sediments ranged from 2.45 to 27.38 mg/kg with an average value of 9.54 mg/kg, which is comparable to the average value in modern unconsolidated sediments. However, minor variation in As concentration with depth has been observed in the core. There was a significant correlation between Fe, and Al and As, which was attributed to the adsorption or co-precipitation of As onto/with Fe oxides/hydroxides and/or Fe-coated clay minerals. Post-Archean Australian Shale (PAAS)-normalized REEs patterns of sediment samples along the borehole were constant, and the sediments had a notably restricted range of La-N/Yb-N ratios from 0.7 to 1.0. These results suggested that the provenance of the Datong basin remained similar throughout the whole depositional period. The analysis of major geochemical compositions confirmed that all core sediments were from the same sedimentary source and experienced significant sedimentary recycling. The co-variation of As, V/Al, Ni/Al and chemical index of alteration (CIA) values in the sediments along the borehole suggested that As distribution in the sediments was primarily controlled by weathering processes. The calculated CIA values of the sediments along the borehole indicate that a relative strong chemical weathering occurred during the deposition of sediments at depths of similar to 35 to 88 m, which was corresponding to the depth at which high As groundwater was observed at the site. Strong chemical weathering favored the deposition of Fe-bearing minerals including poorly crystalline and crystalline Fe oxide mineral phases and concomitant co-precipitation of As with these minerals in the sediments. Subsequent reductive dissolution of As-bearing poorly crystalline and crystalline Fe oxides would result in the enrichment of As in

  19. Great circle solution to polarization-based quantum communication (QC) in optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth; Peterson, Charles Glen; Newell, Raymond Thorson; Hughes, Richard John

    2016-03-15

    Birefringence in optical fibers is compensated by applying polarization modulation at a receiver. Polarization modulation is applied so that a transmitted optical signal has states of polarization (SOPs) that are equally spaced on the Poincare sphere. Fiber birefringence encountered in propagation between a transmitter and a receiver rotates the great circle on the Poincare sphere that represents the polarization bases used for modulation. By adjusting received polarizations, polarization components of the received optical signal can be directed to corresponding detectors for decoding, regardless of the magnitude and orientation of the fiber birefringence. A transmitter can be configured to transmit in conjugate polarization bases whose SOPs can be represented as equidistant points on a great circle so that the received SOPs are mapped to equidistant points on a great circle and routed to corresponding detectors.

  20. Great Basin semi-arid woodland dynamics during the late quaternary

    SciTech Connect

    Wigand, P.E.; Hemphill, M.L.; Sharpe, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Semi-arid woodlands have dominated the middle elevations of Great Basin mountain ranges during the Holocene where subalpine woodlands prevailed during the Pleistocene. Ancient woodrat middens, and in a few cases pollen records indicate in the late Pleistocene and early Holocene woodland history lowered elevation of subalpine woodland species. After a middle Holocene retrenchment at elevations in excess of 500 meters above today, Juniper-dominated semi-arid woodland reached its late Holocene maximum areal extent during the Neoglacial (2 to 4 ka). These records, along with others indicate contracting semi-arid woodland after the Neoglacial about 1.9 ka. Desert shrub community expansion coupled with increased precariousness of wetland areas in the southern Great Basin between 1.9 and 1.5 ka coincide with shrinking wet-lands in the west-central and northern Great Basin. Coincident greater grass abundance in northern Great Basin sagebrush steppe, reaching its maximum between 1.5 and 1.2 ka, corresponds to dramatic increases in bison remains in the archaeological sites of the northern Intermontane West. Pollen and woodrat midden records indicate that this drought ended about 1.5 ka. Succeeding ameliorating conditions resulted in the sudden northward and downward expansion of pinon into areas that had been dominated by juniper during the Neoglacial. Maximum areal extent of pinon dominated semi-arid woodland in west-central Nevada was centered at 1.2 ka. This followed by 100 years the shift in dominance from juniper to pinon in southern Nevada semi-arid woodlands. Great Basin woodlands suffered from renewed severe droughts between .5 to .6 ka. Effectively wetter conditions during the {open_quotes}Little Ice Age{close_quotes} resulted in re-expansion of semi-arid woodland. Activities related to European settlement in the Great Basin have modified prehistoric factors or imposed new ones that are affecting woodland response to climate.

  1. HYDROGEL TRACER BEADS: THE DEVELOPMENT, MODIFICATION, AND TESTING OF AN INNOVATIVE TRACER FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING LNAPL TRANSPORT IN KARST AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect

    Amanda Laskoskie, Harry M. Edenborn, and Dorothy J. Vesper

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this specific research task is to develop proxy tracers that mimic contaminant movement to better understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in karst aquifers. Hydrogel tracer beads are transported as a separate phase than water and can used as a proxy tracer to mimic the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). They can be constructed with different densities, sizes & chemical attributes. This poster describes the creation and optimization of the beads and the field testing of buoyant beads, including sampling, tracer analysis, and quantitative analysis. The buoyant beads are transported ahead of the dissolved solutes, suggesting that light NAPL (LNAPL) transport in karst may occur faster than predicted from traditional tracing techniques. The hydrogel beads were successful in illustrating this enhanced transport.

  2. New CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil New CO2 Enhanced Recovery Technology Could Greatly Boost U.S. Oil March 3, 2006 - 11:40am Addthis WASHINGTON , D.C. - The Department of Energy (DOE) released today reports indicating that state-of-the-art enhanced oil recovery techniques could significantly increase recoverable oil resources of the United States in the future. According to the findings, 89 billion barrels or more could eventually be added to

  3. Y-12 completes 20th year of volunteering at Great Smoky Mountains National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Park | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) completes 20th year of volunteering at Great Smoky Mountains National Park Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 9:43am Tom Richey of the Y-12 National Security Complex, left, and his son Austin put a bench in place at the Elkmont Campground amphitheater as project leader Al Roberson and Scott Underwood, both of Y-12, look on. The groups recent refurbishment of the amphitheater carries on a 20-year tradition of supporting the Great Smoky

  4. EERE Success Story-Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines | Department of Energy Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines EERE Success Story-Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines February 26, 2015 - 11:47am Addthis Multi-mode RCCI (Reactivity-Controlled Compression Ignition), a promising advanced combustion process, has the potential to improve fuel economy of passenger cars by at least 15%, according to a recent

  5. SuomiNet efforts in the U. S. Southern Great Plains.

    SciTech Connect

    Peppler, R. A.; Carr, F. H.; Ahern, J. L.; Liljegren, J. C.; Eagan, R. C.; Smith, J. J.

    2000-10-10

    SuomiNet provides great promise for advancing research at the University of Oklahoma in numerical weather prediction and plate tectonics studies, and will further help the U.S. DOE ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Program better specify the measurement of water vapor over the Southern Great Plains. The SuomiNet program is also allowing ARM to upgrade its data collection infrastructure to provide more reliable and near real-time observations not only to SuomiNet but also to other researchers.

  6. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plains Site (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Accepted Manuscript: Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Title: Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41-SG (4th generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity and pressure. Thus, in order to

  7. Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, Peter J.

    2013-06-13

    Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

  8. Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2004-09-14

    Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

  9. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 and CH4 Gas Intrusion into an Unconsolidated Aquifer: Fate of As and Cd

    SciTech Connect

    Lawter, Amanda R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Shao, Hongbo; Bacon, Diana H.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2015-07-10

    Abstract The sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in deep underground reservoirs has been identified as an important strategy to decrease atmospheric CO2 levels and mitigate global warming, but potential risks on overlying aquifers currently lack a complete evaluation. In addition to CO2, other gases such as methane (CH4) may be present in storage reservoirs. This paper explores for the first time the combined effect of leaking CO2 and CH4 gasses on the fate of major, minor and trace elements in an aquifer overlying a potential sequestration site. Emphasis is placed on the fate of arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) released from the sediments or present as soluble constituents in the leaking brine. Results from macroscopic batch and column experiments show that the presence of CH4 (at a concentration of 1 % in the mixture CO2/CH4) does not have a significant effect on solution pH or the concentrations of most major elements (such as Ca, Ba, and Mg). However, the concentrations of Mn, Mo, Si and Na are inconsistently affected by the presence of CH4 (i.e., in at least one sediment tested in this study). Cd is not released from the sediments and spiked Cd is mostly removed from the aqueous phase most likely via adsorption. The fate of sediment associated As [mainly sorbed arsenite or As(III) in minerals] and spiked As [i.e., As5+] is complex. Possible mechanisms that control the As behavior in this system are discussed in this paper. Results are significant for CO2 sequestration risk evaluation and site selection and demonstrate the importance of evaluating reservoir brine and gas stream composition during site selection to ensure the safest site is being chosen.

  10. Weather pattern climatology of the Great Plains and the related wind regime

    SciTech Connect

    Barchet, W.R.

    1982-11-01

    The meteorology of the Great Plains can be described as a constant progression of air masses, fronts and cyclonic storm systems. Each of these meteorological conditions can be characterized by identifiable isobaric and related weather parameter patterns. Nine such patterns have been defined to type the weather patterns in the Great Plains. Time series of weather pattern types were produced for 62 stations on the Great Plains. Statistical analyses of these time series produced annual and seasonal frequencies of occurrence of the weather pattern types. Maps of the annual and seasonal frequency of occurrence of weather pattern type are presented for the Great Plains. Persistence and alternation frequencies match what is expected for traveling temperate latitude cyclones, anticyclones and fronts. The wind regime for stations at which the anemometer height and location was constant (and known) for a minimum of three consecutive years was stratified by weather pattern type. Statistical analyses were made to show the response of the wind to the large-scale distribution of air pressure associated with a weather pattern type. The response of the wind to the weather pattern is a site-specific result of the interaction of the large-scale meteorology with local terrain, surface roughness and atmospheric stability. Mean wind speed discriminates between pairs of weather pattern types with better than 75% confidence for more than two-thirds of the possible pairs of weather pattern types.

  11. Timing of representation on key panels not great | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information Timing of representation on key panels not great Back to the OSTI News Listing for 2006 (Knoxville News-Sentinel) Tennessee has a U.S. senator and member of Congress on the committees that control federal spending, but the timing of that tag team arrangement is not so good. ...12/22 [Registration Required]

  12. Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes Offshore Regions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Environmental consulting and engineering firm Stantec is observing patterns in offshore bat activity and species composition in the Gulf of Maine, Great Lakes, and Mid-Atlantic coastal states regions to inform efforts to mitigate potential impacts associated with offshore wind energy development in these regions.

  13. Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

    1987-04-01

    Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  14. Shallow Water Offshore Wind Optimization for the Great Lakes (DE-FOA-0000415) Final Report: A Conceptual Design for Wind Energy in the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Wissemann, Chris; White, Stanley M

    2014-02-28

    The primary objective of the project was to develop a innovative Gravity Base Foundation (GBF) concepts, including fabrication yards, launching systems and installation equipment, for a 500MW utility scale project in the Great Lakes (Lake Erie). The goal was to lower the LCOE by 25%. The project was the first to investigate an offshore wind project in the Great Lakes and it has furthered the body of knowledge for foundations and installation methods within Lake Erie. The project collected historical geotechnical information for Lake Erie and also used recently obtained data from the LEEDCo Icebreaker Project (FOA DE-EE0005989) geotechnical program to develop the conceptual designs. Using these data-sets, the project developed design wind and wave conditions from actual buoy data in order to develop a concept that would de-risk a project using a GBF. These wind and wave conditions were then utilized to create reference designs for various foundations specific to installation in Lake Erie. A project partner on the project (Weeks Marine) provided input for construction and costing the GBF fabrication and installation. By having a marine contractor with experience with large marine projects as part of the team provides credibility to the LCOE developed by NREL. NREL then utilized the design and construction costing information as part of the LCOE model. The report summarizes the findings of the project. • Developed a cost model and “baseline” LCOE • Documented Site Conditions within Lake Erie • Developed Fabrication, Installation and Foundations Innovative Concept Designs • Evaluated LCOE Impact of Innovations • Developed Assembly line “Rail System” for GBF Construction and Staging • Developed Transit-Inspired Foundation Designs which incorporated: Semi-Floating Transit with Supplemental Pontoons Barge mounted Winch System • Developed GBF with “Penetration Skirt” • Developed Integrated GBF with Turbine Tower • Developed Turbine, Plant

  15. ALCOHOL FLUSHING FOR REMOVING DNAPL'S FROM CLAY AND SAND LAYERED AQUIFER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    N.J. Hayden; P. Padgett; C. Farrell; J. Diebold; X. Zhou; M. Hood

    1999-08-01

    Alcohol flushing, also called cosolvent flushing, is a relatively new in-situ remediation technology that shows promise for removing organic solvents from the soil and groundwater. Soil and groundwater contamination from organic solvents and petroleum products is one of the most serious and widespread environmental problems of our time. Most of the DOE facilities and inactive sites are experiencing soil and groundwater contamination from organic solvents. These water immiscible solvents have entered the subsurface from leaking underground storage tanks and piping, and from past waste handling and disposal practices such as leaking lagoons, holding ponds and landfills. In many cases, they have traveled hundreds of feet down into the saturated zone. If left in the soil, these chemicals may pose a significant environmental and human health risk. Alcohol flushing has potential for application to spilled solvents located deep within the saturated zone which are difficult if not impossible to remove by current remediation strategies, thus, greatly expediting restoration time, reducing total remediation cost and reducing risk.

  16. Field-Derived Hydraulic Properties for Perched-Water Aquifer Wells 299-E33-350 and 299-E33-351, Hanford Site B-Complex Area

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2014-07-01

    During February and March 2014, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted hydraulic (slug) tests at 200-DV-1 Operable Unit wells 299-E33-350 (C8914) and 299-E33-351 (C8915) as part of B-Complex Area Perched-Water characterization activities at the Hanford Site 200-East Area. During the construction/completion phase of each well, two overlapping depth intervals were tested within the unconfined perched-water aquifer contained in the silty-sand subunit of the Cold Creek Unit. The purpose of the slug-test characterization was to provide estimates of transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity for the perched-water aquifer at these selected well locations.

  17. Water-quality data for aquifers, streams, and lakes in the vicinity of Keechi, Mount Sylvan, Oakwood, and Palestine salt domes, northeast Texas salt-dome basin

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J.E.; Halasz, S.J.; Liscum, F.

    1980-11-01

    This report contains water-quality data for aquifers, streams, and lakes in the vicinity of Keechi, Mount Sylvan, Oakwood, and Palestine Salt Domes in the northeast Texas salt-dome basin. Water-quality data were compiled for aquifers in the Wilcox Group, the Carrizo Sand, and the Queen City Sand. The data include analyses for dissolved solids, pH, temperature, hardness, calcium, magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate, chloride, and sulfate. Water-quality and streamflow data were obtained from 63 surface-water sites in the vicinity of the domes. These data include water discharge, specific conductance, pH, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen. Samples were collected at selected sites for analysis of principal and selected minor dissolved constituents.

  18. Subsurface Biogeochemical Heterogeneity (Field-scale removal of U(VI) from groundwater in an alluvial aquifer by electron donor amendment)

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.; N'Guessan, A. L.; Nevin, Kelly; Resch, C. T.; Arntzen, Evan; Druhan, Jenny; Peacock, Aaron; Baldwin, Brett; Dayvault, Dick; Holmes, Dawn; Williams, Ken; Hubbard, Susan; Yabusaki, Steve; Fang, Yilin; White, D. C.; Komlos, John; Jaffe, Peter

    2006-06-01

    Determine if biostimulation of alluvial aquifers by electron donor amendment can effectively remove U(VI) from groundwater at the field scale. Uranium contamination in groundwater is a significant problem at several DOE sites. In this project, the possibility of accelerating bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) as a means of decreasing U(VI) concentrations in groundwater is directly addressed by conducting a series of field-scale experiments. Scientific goals include demonstrating the quantitative linkage between microbial activity and U loss from groundwater and relating the dominant terminal electron accepting processes to the rate of U loss. The project is currently focused on understanding the mechanisms for unexpected long-term ({approx}2 years) removal of U after stopping electron donor amendment. Results obtained in the project successfully position DOE and others to apply biostimulation broadly to U contamination in alluvial aquifers.

  19. Optical fiber configurations for transmission of laser energy over great distances

    DOEpatents

    Rinzler, Charles C; Zediker, Mark S

    2013-10-29

    There are provided optical fiber configurations that provide for the delivery of laser energy, and in particular, the transmission and delivery of high power laser energy over great distances. These configurations further are hardened to protect the optical fibers from the stresses and conditions of an intended application. The configurations provide means for determining the additional fiber length (AFL) need to obtain the benefits of such additional fiber, while avoiding bending losses.

  20. GPS Water Vapor Projects Within the ARM Southern Great Plains Region

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    GPS Water Vapor Projects Within the ARM Southern Great Plains Region J. Braun, T. Van Hove, S. Y. Ha, and C. Rocken GPS Science and Technology Program University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Abstract The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has a need for an improved capability to measure and characterize the four-dimensional distribution of water vapor within the atmosphere. Applications for this type of data include their use

  1. Optical fiber configurations for transmission of laser energy over great distances

    DOEpatents

    Rinzler, Charles C; Zediker, Mark S

    2014-11-04

    There are provided optical fiber configurations that provide for the delivery of laser energy, and in particular, the transmission and delivery of high power laser energy over great distances. These configurations further are hardened to protect the optical fibers from the stresses and conditions of an intended application. The configurations provide means for determining the additional fiber length (AFL) need to obtain the benefits of such additional fiber, while avoiding bending losses.

  2. DOE/SC-ARM-14-021 Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation Revised: May 2015 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

  3. Aerosol measurements at the Southern Great Plains Site: Design and surface installation

    SciTech Connect

    Leifer, R.; Knuth, R.H.; Guggenheim, S.F.; Albert, B.

    1996-04-01

    To impropve the predictive capabilities of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program radiation models, measurements of awserosol size distributions, condensation particle concentrations, aerosol scattering coefficients at a number of wavelenghts, and the aerosol absorption coefficients are needed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Alos, continuous measurements of ozone concnetrations are needed for model validation. The environmental Measuremenr Laboratory (EMK) has the responsibility to establish the surface aerosol measurements program at the SGP site. EML has designed a special sampling manifold.

  4. Great Plains Coal Gasification project. Quarterly technical progress report fourth quarter, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-31

    The operations of the Great Plains Gasification plant are reported for the fourth quarter of 1985. Contents include the following: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-stream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications - 1985; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical service; (12) environmental; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities.

  5. Great Plains Coal Gasification project. Quarterly technical progress report, third quarter 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-31

    The operations of the Great Plains Gasification Plant are reported for the third quarter of 1985. Contents include the following: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-stream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications-1985; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical services; (12) environmental; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities.

  6. 2014 Student Poster Session marks the conclusion of another great program!

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 2014 Student Poster Session marks the conclusion of another great program! September 2, 2014 As the 2014 summer student program ends, students have the opportunity to show the progress they've made this summer at the annual student poster session. On Wednesday, August 13, approximately 30 students presented their projects to attending staff at PPPL. Presented projects included (but not limited to): "Optimization of Antenna Layout for ITER Low Field Side

  7. Vertical Variability of Aerosols and Water Vapor Over the Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Vertical Variability of Aerosols and Water Vapor Over the Southern Great Plains R. A. Ferrare National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington M. Clayton and V. Brackett Science Applications International Corporation National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T. P. Tooman and J. E. M. Goldsmith Sandia National Laboratories Livermore,

  8. We create materials and energy solutions. Our 60+ year history of doing great

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    create materials and energy solutions. Our 60+ year history of doing great science has had a significant impact on our nation. Our research programs reflect our multi-disciplinary, cross-cutting approach to scientific discovery. Chemical and Biological Sciences: We conduct fundamental and applied studies of how to control and manipulate chemicals and biological materials, with expertise in developing new tools and advanced computational methods to understand what drives chemical and biological

  9. Improved Humidity Profiling by Combining Passive and Active Remote Sensors at the Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Improved Humidity Profiling by Combining Passive and Active Remote Sensors at the Southern Great Plains L. Bianco, D. Cimini, and F. Marzano Center of Excellence CETEMPS University of L'Aquila L'Aquila, Italy L. Bianco and E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado R. Ware Radiometrics Co. and University Consortium for Atmospheric Research

  10. Instrumentation for Southem Great Plains D. L. Sisterson and M. L. Wesely

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Southem Great Plains D. L. Sisterson and M. L. Wesely Environmental Research Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 accept the instrument but operates it in a degraded mode until the problems are fixed, or does not operate the instrument. Similar procedures are followed for other types of equipment and some aspects of the site data system. Central Facility Table 1 shows the progress to date on implementation of instruments, facilities, and general aspects of the site data system

  11. Stratigraphy of the unsaturated zone and uppermost part of the Snake River Plain aquifer at test area north, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.R.; Bowers, B.

    1995-06-01

    A complex sequence of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds underlies Test Area North (TAN) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in eastern Idaho. Wells drilled to depths of at least 500 feet penetrate 10 basalt-flow groups and 5 to 10 sedimentary interbeds that range in age from about 940,000 to 1.4 million years. Each basalt-flow group consists of one or more basalt flows from a brief, single or compound eruption. All basalt flows of each group erupted from the same vent, and have similar ages, paleomagnetic properties, potassium contents, and natural-gamma emissions. Sedimentary interbeds consist of fluvial, lacustrine, and eolian deposits of clay, silt, sand, and gravel that accumulated for hundreds to hundreds of thousands of years during periods of volcanic quiescence. Basalt and sediment are elevated by hundreds of feet with respect to rocks of equivalent age south and cast of the area, a relation that is attributed to past uplift at TAN. Basalt and sediment are unsaturated to a depth of about 200 feet below land surface. Rocks below this depth are saturated and make up the Snake River Plain aquifer. The effective base of the aquifer is at a depth of 885 feet below land surface. Detailed stratigraphic relations for the lowermost part of the aquifer in the depth interval from 500 to 885 feet were not determined because of insufficient data. The stratigraphy of basalt-flow groups and sedimentary interbeds in the upper 500 feet of the unsaturated zone and aquifer was determined from natural-gamma logs, lithologic logs, and well cores. Basalt cores were evaluated for potassium-argon ages, paleomagnetic properties, petrographic characteristics, and chemical composition. Stratigraphic control was provided by differences in ages, paleomagnetic properties, potassium content, and natural-gamma emissions of basalt-flow groups and sedimentary interbeds.

  12. Transient Inverse Calibration of Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts from 1943 to 1996--Alternative Conceptual Model Considering Interaction with Uppermost Basalt Confined Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Thorne, Paul D.; Wurstner, Signe K.

    2001-08-29

    The baseline three-dimensional transient inverse model for the estimation of site-wide scale flow parameters, including their uncertainties, using data on the transient behavior of the unconfined aquifer system over the entire historical period of Hanford operations, has been modified to account for the effects of basalt intercommunication between the Hanford unconfined aquifer and the underlying upper basalt confined aquifer. Both the baseline and alternative conceptual models (ACM-1) considered only the groundwater flow component and corresponding observational data in the 3-Dl transient inverse calibration efforts. Subsequent efforts will examine both groundwater flow and transport. Comparisons of goodness of fit measures and parameter estimation results for the ACM-1 transient inverse calibrated model with those from previous site-wide groundwater modeling efforts illustrate that the new 3-D transient inverse model approach will strengthen the technical defensibility of the final model(s) and provide the ability to incorporate uncertainty in predictions related to both conceptual model and parameter uncertainty. These results, however, indicate that additional improvements are required to the conceptual model framework. An investigation was initiated at the end of this basalt inverse modeling effort to determine whether facies-based zonation would improve specific yield parameter estimation results (ACM-2). A description of the justification and methodology to develop this zonation is discussed.

  13. Modeling of ground water aquifer remediation by pulsed pumping when contaminant transport is affected by physical, non-equilibrium sorption and desorption. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Caspers, J.L.

    1994-08-12

    This research postulates and demonstrates incorporating rate-limited sorption effects in the USGS SUTRA code for cleanup of a hypothetical sandy aquifer by pump-and-treat remediation methods. Contaminant transport is assumed to be affected by advection, dispersion, and rate-limited sorption/desorption. Sorption is assumed to be either equilibrium or rate-limited, with the rate-limitation described by either a first-order law, or by Fickian diffusion of contaminant through a spherical immobile pore region. Solutions are arrived at by split operator methods for the transport and one-dimensional Galerkin solutions for the solute concentration equations. The resulting model is tested against an analytical Laplace transform model for both first-order and Fickian diffusion methods in a radial pumping simulation. Model simulations are used to evaluate equilibrium, first-order and Fickian diffusion effects for pulsed and continuous pumping solutions within a hypothetical sandy aquifer. These show that equilibrium methods under-predicted rebound while first-order methods may both under and over predict rebound within the matrix for certain regions and may be equivalent to Fickian diffusion in equilibrium regimes for cleanup time prediction. Model simulations are then used to show the efficiency of pulsed pumping methods in cleanup mass extraction per pumped volume for a contaminated aquifer pump-and-treat remediation activity versus more conventional, continuous pumping methods.

  14. Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains: Diagnosis of Mechanisms from SGP ARM Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sumant Nigam

    2013-02-01

    Work reported included analysis of pentad (5 day) averaged data, proposal of a hypothesis concerning the key role of the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation in 20th century drought and wet periods over the Great Plains, analysis of recurrent super-synoptic evolution of the Great Plains low-level jet, and study of pentad evolution of the 1988 drought and 1993 flood over the Great Plains from a NARR perspective on the atmospheric and terrestrial water balance.

  15. Environmental Controls on the Activity of Aquifer Microbial Communities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Konopka, Allan; Plymale, Andrew E.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.

    2013-11-06

    Aquifer microbes in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA are periodically exposed to U(VI) concentrations that can range up to 10 ?M in small sediment fractures. Assays of 35 H-leucine incorporation indicated that both sediment-associated and planktonic microbes were metabolically active, and that organic C was growth-limiting in the sediments. Although bacteria suspended in native groundwater retained high activity when exposed to 100 ?M U(VI), they were inhibited by U(VI) < 1 ?M in synthetic groundwater that lacked added bicarbonate. Chemical speciation modeling suggested that positively-charged species and particularly (UO2)3(OH)5+ rose in concentration as more U(VI) was added to synthetic groundwater, but that carbonate complexes dominated U(VI) speciation in natural groundwater. U toxicity was relieved when increasing amounts of bicarbonate were added to synthetic groundwater containing 4.5 ?M U(VI). Pertechnetate, an oxyanion that is another contaminant of concern at the Hanford Site, was not toxic to groundwater microbes at concentrations up to 125 ?M.

  16. A comparative evaluation of conceptual models for the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, INEL

    SciTech Connect

    Prahl, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    Geologic and hydrologic data collected by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) are used to evaluate the existing ground water monitoring well network completed in the upper portion of the Snake River Plain aquifer (SRPA) beneath the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The USGS data analyzed and compared in this study include: (a) lithologic, geophysical, and stratigraphic information, including the conceptual geologic models intrawell, ground water flow measurement (Tracejector tests) and (c) dedicated, submersible, sampling group elevations. Qualitative evaluation of these data indicate that the upper portion of the SRPA is both heterogeneous and anisotropic at the scale of the ICPP monitoring well network. Tracejector test results indicate that the hydraulic interconnection and spatial configuration of water-producing zones is extremely complex within the upper portion of the SRPA. The majority of ICPP monitoring wells currently are equipped to sample ground water only the upper lithostratigraphic intervals of the SRPA, primarily basalt flow groups E, EF, and F. Depth-specific hydrogeochemical sampling and analysis are necessary to determine if ground water quality varies significantly between the various lithostratigraphic units adjacent to individual sampling pumps.

  17. Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Diana H.

    2013-03-31

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) consists of 5 U.S DOE national laboratories collaborating to develop a framework for predicting the risks associated with carbon sequestration. The approach taken by NRAP is to divide the system into components, including injection target reservoirs, wellbores, natural pathways including faults and fractures, groundwater and the atmosphere. Next, develop a detailed, physics and chemistry-based model of each component. Using the results of the detailed models, develop efficient, simplified models, termed reduced order models (ROM) for each component. Finally, integrate the component ROMs into a system model that calculates risk profiles for the site. This report details the development of the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer at PNNL. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer uses a Wellbore Leakage ROM developed at LANL as input. The detailed model, using the STOMP simulator, covers a 5x8 km area of the Edwards Aquifer near San Antonio, Texas. The model includes heterogeneous hydraulic properties, and equilibrium, kinetic and sorption reactions between groundwater, leaked CO2 gas, brine, and the aquifer carbonate and clay minerals. Latin Hypercube sampling was used to generate 1024 samples of input parameters. For each of these input samples, the STOMP simulator was used to predict the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, and the volume, length and width of the aquifer where pH was less than the MCL standard, and TDS, arsenic, cadmium and lead exceeded MCL standards. In order to decouple the Wellbore Leakage ROM from the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM, the response surface was transformed to replace Wellbore Leakage ROM input parameters with instantaneous and cumulative CO2 and brine leakage rates. The most sensitive parameters proved to be the CO2 and brine leakage rates from the well, with equilibrium coefficients for calcite and dolomite, as well as the number of illite and kaolinite

  18. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-02-12

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  19. GREAT3 results - I. Systematic errors in shear estimation and the impact of real galaxy morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Rowe, Barnaby; Armstrong, Robert; Bard, Deborah; Bertin, Emmanuel; Bosch, James; Boutigny, Dominique; Courbin, Frederic; Dawson, William A.; Donnarumma, Annamaria; Fenech Conti, Ian; Gavazzi, Raphael; Gentile, Marc; Gill, Mandeep S. S.; Hogg, David W.; Huff, Eric M.; Jee, M. James; Kacprzak, Tomasz; Kilbinger, Martin; Kuntzer, Thibault; Lang, Dustin; Luo, Wentao; March, Marisa C.; Marshall, Philip J.; Meyers, Joshua E.; Miller, Lance; Miyatake, Hironao; Nakajima, Reiko; Ngole Mboula, Fred Maurice; Nurbaeva, Guldariya; Okura, Yuki; Paulin-Henriksson, Stephane; Rhodes, Jason; Schneider, Michael D.; Shan, Huanyuan; Sheldon, Erin S.; Simet, Melanie; Starck, Jean -Luc; Sureau, Florent; Tewes, Malte; Zarb Adami, Kristian; Zhang, Jun; Zuntz, Joe

    2015-05-11

    The study present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty about a spatially varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by ~1 per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the Sérsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods’ results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.

  20. GREAT3 results - I. Systematic errors in shear estimation and the impact of real galaxy morphology

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Rowe, Barnaby; Armstrong, Robert; Bard, Deborah; Bertin, Emmanuel; Bosch, James; Boutigny, Dominique; Courbin, Frederic; Dawson, William A.; Donnarumma, Annamaria; et al

    2015-05-11

    The study present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty aboutmore » a spatially varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by ~1 per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the Sérsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods’ results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.« less

  1. GREAT3 results - I. Systematic errors in shear estimation and the impact of real galaxy morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Rowe, Barnaby; Armstrong, Robert; Bard, Deborah; Bertin, Emmanuel; Bosch, James; Boutigny, Dominique; Courbin, Frederic; Dawson, William A.; Donnarumma, Annamaria; Fenech Conti, Ian; Gavazzi, Raphael; Gentile, Marc; Gill, Mandeep S. S.; Hogg, David W.; Huff, Eric M.; Jee, M. James; Kacprzak, Tomasz; Kilbinger, Martin; Kuntzer, Thibault; Lang, Dustin; Luo, Wentao; March, Marisa C.; Marshall, Philip J.; Meyers, Joshua E.; Miller, Lance; Miyatake, Hironao; Nakajima, Reiko; Ngole Mboula, Fred Maurice; Nurbaeva, Guldariya; Okura, Yuki; Paulin-Henriksson, Stephane; Rhodes, Jason; Schneider, Michael D.; Shan, Huanyuan; Sheldon, Erin S.; Simet, Melanie; Starck, Jean -Luc; Sureau, Florent; Tewes, Malte; Zarb Adami, Kristian; Zhang, Jun; Zuntz, Joe

    2015-05-11

    The study present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty about a spatially varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by ~1 per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the Srsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.

  2. Miami County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.770099,"lon":-86.0529604,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  3. Miami-Dade County- Targeted Jobs Incentive Fund

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Targeted Jobs Incentive Fund (TJIF) provides financial incentives for select industries, including solar thermal and photovoltaic manufacturing, installation and repair companies that are...

  4. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 1A Miami, Florida

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  5. Archived Reference Climate Zone: 1A Miami, Florida

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  6. Miami Springs, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Springs, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 25.8223198, -80.289495 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  7. 3rd Miami international conference on alternative energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nejat Veziroglu, T.

    1980-01-01

    The conference includes sessions on solar energy, ocean thermal energy, wind energy, hydro power, nuclear breeders and nuclear fusion, synthetic fuels from coal or wastes, hydrogen production and uses, formulation of workable policies on energy use and energy conservation, heat and energy storage, and energy education. The volume of the proceedings presents the papers and lectures in condensed format grouped by subject under forty-two sessions for 319 presentations.

  8. 3rd Miami international conference on alternative energy sources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The conference includes sessions on solar energy, ocean thermal energy, wind energy, hydro power, nuclear breeders and nuclear fusion, synthetic fuels from coal or wastes, hydrogen ...

  9. North Miami Beach, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Florida. It falls under Florida's 17th congressional district and Florida's 20th congressional district.12 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and...

  10. Miami Shores, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Florida. It falls under Florida's 17th congressional district and Florida's 20th congressional district.12 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and...

  11. North Miami, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Florida. It falls under Florida's 17th congressional district and Florida's 20th congressional district.12 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and...

  12. Miami County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.6381689, -94.8105955 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  13. Miami Students' Solar Decathlon Design Focused on Sustainability

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2011 Florida International University Team designed their home around the ability to use adjustable panels on the outside of the home -- to protect from everything from sunshine to hurricanes.

  14. Accelerated Geothermal Resource Development in the Great Basin Through Enhanced Public Awareness and Outreach to Shareholders.

    SciTech Connect

    Taranik, James V.; Oppliger, Gary; Sawatsky, Don

    2002-04-10

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy conducted work encompassing two main tasks. We (1) produced a web-based, stakeholder geothermal information system for Nevada geothermal data relevant to assessing and developing geothermal resources, and (2) we held informational stakeholder workshops (both as part of GeoPowering the West Initiative). The objective of this grant was to conduct workshops and fund database and web development activities. This grant funds salaries for web and database developers and part of the administrative assistant who helps to coordinate and organize workshops, and maintain selected databases.

  15. Great Plains Coal Gasification Project. Quarterly technical progress report, second quarter 1986. [Lurgi process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-31

    The operations of the Great Plains coal gasification plant are reported for the second quarter of 1986. The following areas are covered: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-stream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications - 1986 budget; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical services; (12) environmental executive summary; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities. (AT)

  16. (Great Plains Coal Gasification Associates). Quarterly technical progress report. [Lurgi Process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-04-30

    The operations of the Great Plains Gasification plant are reported for the first quarter of 1986. Contents include the following: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) on-stream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications-1986 budget; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical services; (12) environmental executive summary; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities.

  17. Great Plains coal gasification project: Quarterly technical progress report, Third quarter 1986. [Lurgi process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-31

    Accomplishments for the third quarter of 1986 are presented for the Great Plains coal gasification plant. The following areas are discussed: (1) lignite coal production; (2) SNG production; (3) SNG gas quality; (4) by-products production and inventories; (5) onstream factors; (6) raw material, product and by-product consumption and energy consumption for plant operations; (7) plant modifications - 1986 budget; (8) plant maintenance; (9) safety; (10) industrial hygiene; (11) medical services; (12) environmental executive summary; and (13) quality assurance/quality control activities.

  18. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Great Lakes Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Great Lakes region.

  19. Seismicity and focal mechanisms for the southern Great Basin of Nevada and California: 1987 through 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Harmsen, S.C.; Bufe, C.G.

    1991-12-31

    For the calendar year 1987, the southern Great basin seismic network (SGBSN) recorded about 820 earthquakes in the southern Great Basin (SGB). Local magnitudes ranged from 0.2 to 4.2 (December 30, 1987, 22:50:42 UTC at Hot Creek Valley). Five earthquakes epicenters in 1987 within the detection threshold of the seismic network are at Yucca Mountain, the site of a potential national, high-level nuclear waste repository. The maximum magnitude of those five earthquakes is 1.1, and their estimated depths of focus ranged from 3.1 to 7.6 km below sea level. For the calendar year 1988, about 1280 SGB earthquakes were catalogued, with maximum magnitude-4.4 for an Owens Valley, California, earthquake on July 5, 1988. Eight earthquake epicenters in 1988 are at Yucca Mountain, with depths ranging from three to 12 km below sea level, and maximum magnitude 2.1. For the calendar year 1989, about 1190 SGB earthquakes were located and catalogued, with maximum magnitude equal to 3.5 for earthquake about ten miles north of Las Vegas, Nevada, on January 9. No Yucca Mountain earthquakes were recorded in 1989. An earthquake having a well-constrained depth of about 30 km below sea level was observed on August 21, 1989, in eastern Nevada Test Site (NTS).

  20. Groundwater Cleanup Operational Changes Are Being Implemented at Fernald Preserve

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Uranium contamination in the Great Miami Aquifer—at the Fernald Preserve, Ohio, Site—is being removed from the groundwater through a pump-and-treatment operation, which until this year, involved...

  1. Dynamics of Microbial Community Composition and Function during In Situ Bioremediation of a Uranium-Contaminated Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Van Nostrand, Dr. Joy D.; Wu, Liyou; Wu, Weimin; Huang, Zhijian; Gentry, Terry J; Deng, Ye; Carley, Jack M; Carroll, Sue L; He, Zhili; Gu, Baohua; Luo, Jian; Criddle, Craig; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James; Hazen, Terry; Zhou, Jizhong

    2011-01-01

    A pilot-scale system was established to examine the feasibility of in situ U(VI) immobilization at a highly contaminated aquifer (U.S. DOE Integrated Field Research Challenge site, Oak Ridge, TN). Ethanol was injected intermittently as an electron donor to stimulate microbial U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) concentrations fell to below the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard (0.03 mg liter 1). Microbial communities from three monitoring wells were examined during active U(VI) reduction and maintenance phases with GeoChip, a high-density, comprehensive functional gene array. The overall microbial community structure exhibited a considerable shift over the remediation phases examined. GeoChip-based analysis revealed that Fe(III)-reducing bacterial (FeRB), nitrate-reducing bacterial (NRB), and sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) functional populations reached their highest levels during the active U(VI) reduction phase (days 137 to 370), in which denitrification and Fe(III) and sulfate reduction occurred sequentially. A gradual decrease in these functional populations occurred when reduction reactions stabilized, suggesting that these functional populations could play an important role in both active U(VI) reduction and maintenance of the stability of reduced U(IV). These results suggest that addition of electron donors stimulated the microbial community to create biogeochemical conditions favorable to U(VI) reduction and prevent the reduced U(IV) from reoxidation and that functional FeRB, SRB, and NRB populations within this system played key roles in this process.

  2. Dynamics of microbial community composition and function during in-situ bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Nostrand, J.D. Van; Wu, L.; Wu, W.M.; Huang, A.; Gentry, T.J.; Deng, Y.; Carley, J.; Carrol, S.; He, Z.; Gu, B.; Luo, J.; Criddle, C.S.; Watson, D.B.; Jardine, P.M.; Marsh, T.L.; Tiedje, J.M.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2010-08-15

    A pilot-scale system was established to examine the feasibility of in situ U(VI) immobilization at a highly contaminated aquifer (U.S. DOE Integrated Field Research Challenge site, Oak Ridge, TN). Ethanol was injected intermittently as an electron donor to stimulate microbial U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) concentrations fell to below the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard (0.03 mg liter{sup -1}). Microbial communities from three monitoring wells were examined during active U(VI) reduction and maintenance phases with GeoChip, a high-density, comprehensive functional gene array. The overall microbial community structure exhibited a considerable shift over the remediation phases examined. GeoChip-based analysis revealed that Fe(III)-reducing bacterial (FeRB), nitrate-reducing bacterial (NRB), and sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) functional populations reached their highest levels during the active U(VI) reduction phase (days 137 to 370), in which denitrification and Fe(III) and sulfate reduction occurred sequentially. A gradual decrease in these functional populations occurred when reduction reactions stabilized, suggesting that these functional populations could play an important role in both active U(VI) reduction and maintenance of the stability of reduced U(IV). These results suggest that addition of electron donors stimulated the microbial community to create biogeochemical conditions favorable to U(VI) reduction and prevent the reduced U(IV) from reoxidation and that functional FeRB, SRB, and NRB populations within this system played key roles in this process.

  3. Issues Related to Seismic Activity Induced by the Injection of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Sminchak, Joel; Gupta, Neeraj; Byrer, Charles; Bergman, Perry

    2001-05-31

    Case studies, theory, regulation, and special considerations regarding the disposal of carbon dioxide (CO2) into deep saline aquifers were investigated to assess the potential for induced seismic activity. Formations capable of accepting large volumes of CO2 make deep well injection of CO2 an attractive option. While seismic implications must be considered for injection facilities, induced seismic activity may be prevented through proper siting, installation, operation, and monitoring. Instances of induced seismic activity have been documented at hazardous waste disposal wells, oil fields, and other sites. Induced seismic activity usually occurs along previously faulted rocks and may be investigated by analyzing the stress conditions at depth. Seismic events are unlikely to occur due to injection in porous rocks unless very high injection pressures cause hydraulic fracturing. Injection wells in the United States are regulated through the Underground Injection Control (UIC) program. UIC guidance requires an injection facility to perform extensive characterization, testing, and monitoring. Special considerations related to the properties of CO2 may have seismic ramifications to a deep well injection facility. Supercritical CO2 liquid is less dense than water and may cause density-driven stress conditions at depth or interact with formation water and rocks, causing a reduction in permeability and pressure buildup leading to seismic activity. Structural compatibility, historical seismic activity, cases of seismic activity triggered by deep well injection, and formation capacity were considered in evaluating the regional seismic suitability in the United States. Regions in the central, midwestern, and southeastern United States appear best suited for deep well injection. In Ohio, substantial deep well injection at a waste disposal facility has not caused seismic events in a seismically active area. Current

  4. Influence of Carbon and Microbial Community Priming on the Attenuation of Uranium in a Contaminated Floodplain Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Mouser, Paula J.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Qafoku, Nikolla; Sinha, M.; Williams, K. H.; Dangelmayr, M.; Resch, Charles T.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Wang, Zheming; Figueroa, Linda A.; Long, P. E.

    2015-07-01

    The capacity for subsurface sediments to sequester metal contaminants, such as uranium (U), and retain them after bioremediation efforts are completed is critical to site stewardship. Sediments enriched in natural organic matter are capable of sequestering significant quantities of U, but may also serve as sources to the aquifer, contributing to plume persistence. Two types of sediments were compared to better understand the mechanisms contributing to the sequestration and release of U in the presence of organic matter. Artificially bioreduced sediments were retrieved from a field experimental plot previously stimulated with acetate while naturally bioreduced sediments were collected from a location enriched in organic matter but never subject to acetate amendment. Batch incubations demonstrated that the artificially bioreduced sediments were primed to rapidly remove uranium from the groundwater whereas naturally bioreduced sediments initially released a sizeable portion of sediment U before U(VI)-removal commenced. Column experiments confirmed that U release persisted for 65 pore volumes in naturally bioreduced sediments, demonstrating the sink-source behavior of this sediment. Acetate addition to artificially bioreduced sediments shifted the microbial community from one dominated by sulfate-reducing bacteria within Desulfobacteraceae to the iron-reducing family Geobacteraceae and Firmicutes during U(VI) reduction. In contrast, initial Geobacteraceae communities innaturally reduced sediments were replaced by clone sequences with similarity to opportunistic Pseudomonas spp. during U release, while U(VI) removal occurred concurrent with enrichment of Firmicutes. These investigations stress the importance of characterizing zones with heterogeneous carbon pools at U contaminated sites prior to the determination of a remedial strategy.

  5. A one-year climatology using data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site micropulse lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, G.G.; Ackerman, T.P.; Spinhirne, J.; Scott, S.

    1996-04-01

    The micropulse lidar (MPL) has been operational at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program for the past 15 months. The compact MPL is unique among research lidar systems in that it is eye-safe and operates continuously, except during precipitation. The MPL is capable of detecting cloud base throughout the entire depth of the troposphere. The MPL data set is an unprecedented time series of cloud heights. It is a vital resource for understanding the frequency of cloud ocurrence and the impact of clouds on the surface radiation budget, as well as for large-scale model validation and satellite retrieval verification. The raw lidar data are processed for cloud base height at a temporal frequency of one minute and a vertical resolution of 270 m. The resultant time series of cloud base is used to generate histograms as a function of month and time of day. Sample results are described.

  6. Housing Archetype Analysis for Home Energy-Efficient Retrofit in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. -K.; Mrozowski, T.; Harrell-Seyburn, A.; Ehrlich, N.; Hembroff, L.; Lieburn, B.; Mazor, M.; McIntyre, A.; Mutton, C.; Parsons, G.; Syal, M. G.; Wilkinson, R.

    2014-09-01

    This project report details activities and results of the "Market Characterization" project undertaken by the Cost Effective Energy Retrofit (CEER) team targeted toward the DOE goal of achieving 30%-50% reduction in existing building energy use. CEER consists of members from the Dow Chemical Company, Michigan State University, Ferris State University, and Habitat for Humanity Kent County. The purpose of this market characterization project was to identify housing archetypes which are dominant within the Great Lakes region and therefore offer significant potential for energy-efficient retrofit research and implementation due to the substantial number of homes possessing similar characteristics. Understanding the characteristics of housing groups referred to as "archetypes" by vintage, style, and construction characteristics can allow research teams to focus their retrofit research and develop prescriptive solutions for those structure types which are prevalent and offer high potential uptake within a region or market.

  7. Elucidating geochemical response of shallow heterogeneous aquifers to CO2 leakage using high-performance computing: Implications for monitoring of CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Siirila, Erica R.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2013-03-01

    Predicting and quantifying impacts of potential carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into shallow aquifers that overlie geologic CO2 storage formations is an important part of developing reliable carbon storage techniques. Leakage of CO2 through fractures, faults or faulty wellbores can reduce groundwater pH, inducing geochemical reactions that release solutes into the groundwater and pose a risk of degrading groundwater quality. In order to help quantify this risk, predictions of metal concentrations are needed during geologic storage of CO2. Here, we present regional-scale reactive transport simulations, at relatively fine-scale, of CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers run on the PFLOTRAN platform using high-performance computing. Multiple realizations of heterogeneous permeability distributions were generated using standard geostatistical methods. Increased statistical anisotropy of the permeability field resulted in more lateral and vertical spreading of the plume of impacted water, leading to increased Pb2+ (lead) concentrations and lower pH at a well down gradient of the CO2 leak. Pb2+ concentrations were higher in simulations where calcite was the source of Pb2+ compared to galena. The low solubility of galena effectively buffered the Pb2+ concentrations as galena reached saturation under reducing conditions along the flow path. In all cases, Pb2+ concentrations remained below the maximum contaminant level set by the EPA. Results from this study, compared to natural variability observed in aquifers, suggest that bicarbonate (HCO3) concentrations may be a better geochemical indicator of a CO2 leak under the conditions simulated here.

  8. Approaches to Quantify Potential Contaminant Transport in the Lower Carbonate Aquifer from Underground Nuclear Testing at Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada - 12434

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Robert W.; Birdie, Tiraz; Wilborn, Bill; Mukhopadhyay, Bimal

    2012-07-01

    Quantitative modeling of the potential for contaminant transport from sources associated with underground nuclear testing at Yucca Flat is an important part of the strategy to develop closure plans for the residual contamination. At Yucca Flat, the most significant groundwater resource that could potentially be impacted is the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA), a regionally extensive aquifer that supplies a significant portion of the water demand at the Nevada National Security Site, formerly the Nevada Test Site. Developing and testing reasonable models of groundwater flow in this aquifer is an important precursor to performing subsequent contaminant transport modeling used to forecast contaminant boundaries at Yucca Flat that are used to identify potential use restriction and regulatory boundaries. A model of groundwater flow in the LCA at Yucca Flat has been developed. Uncertainty in this model, as well as other transport and source uncertainties, is being evaluated as part of the Underground Testing Area closure process. Several alternative flow models of the LCA in the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU have been developed. These flow models are used in conjunction with contaminant transport models and source term models and models of contaminant transport from underground nuclear tests conducted in the overlying unsaturated and saturated alluvial and volcanic tuff rocks to evaluate possible contaminant migration in the LCA for the next 1,000 years. Assuming the flow and transport models are found adequate by NNSA/NSO and NDEP, the models will undergo a peer review. If the model is approved by NNSA/NSO and NDEP, it will be used to identify use restriction and regulatory boundaries at the start of the Corrective Action Decision Document Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) phase of the Corrective Action Strategy. These initial boundaries may be revised at the time of the Closure Report phase of the Corrective Action Strategy. (authors)

  9. Modeling CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir To Evaluate Regional CO2 Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Watney, W. Lynn

    2014-09-30

    1. Drilled, cored, and logged three wells to the basement and collecting more than 2,700 ft of conventional core; obtained 20 mi2 of multicomponent 3D seismic imaging and merged and reprocessed more than 125 mi2 of existing 3D seismic data for use in modeling CO2- EOR oil recovery and CO2 storage in five oil fields in southern Kansas. 2. Determined the technical feasibility of injecting and sequestering CO2 in a set of four depleted oil reservoirs in the Cutter, Pleasant Prairie South, Eubank, and Shuck fields in southwest Kansas; of concurrently recovering oil from those fields; and of quantifying the volumes of CO2 sequestered and oil recovered during the process. 3. Formed a consortium of six oil operating companies, five of which own and operate the four fields. The consortium became part of the Southwest Kansas CO2-EOR Initiative for the purpose of sharing data, knowledge, and interest in understanding the potential for CO2-EOR in Kansas. 4. Built a regional well database covering 30,000 mi2 and containing stratigraphic tops from ~90,000 wells; correlated 30 major stratigraphic horizons; digitized key wells, including wireline logs and sample logs; and analyzed more than 3,000 drill stem tests to establish that fluid levels in deep aquifers below the Permian evaporites are not connected to the surface and therefore pressures are not hydrostatic. Connectivity with the surface aquifers is lacking because shale aquitards and impermeable evaporite layers consist of both halite and anhydrite. 5. Developed extensive web applications and an interactive mapping system that do the following: a. Facilitate access to a wide array of data obtained in the study, including core descriptions and analyses, sample logs, digital (LAS) well logs, seismic data, gravity and magnetics maps, structural and stratigraphic maps, inferred fault traces, earthquakes, Class I and II disposal wells, and

  10. Modeling CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir To Evaluate Regional CO2 Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Watney, W. Lynn

    2014-09-30

    1. Drilled, cored, and logged three wells to the basement and collecting more than 2,700 ft of conventional core; obtained 20 mi2 of multicomponent 3D seismic imaging and merged and reprocessed more than 125 mi2 of existing 3D seismic data for use in modeling CO2- EOR oil recovery and CO2 storage in five oil fields in southern Kansas. 2. Determined the technical feasibility of injecting and sequestering CO2 in a set of four depleted oil reservoirs in the Cutter, Pleasant Prairie South, Eubank, and Shuck fields in southwest Kansas; of concurrently recovering oil from those fields; and of quantifying the volumes of CO2 sequestered and oil recovered during the process. 3. Formed a consortium of six oil operating companies, five of which own and operate the four fields. The consortium became part of the Southwest Kansas CO2-EOR Initiative for the purpose of sharing data, knowledge, and interest in understanding the potential for CO2-EOR in Kansas. 4. Built a regional well database covering 30,000 mi2 and containing stratigraphic tops from ~90,000 wells; correlated 30 major stratigraphic horizons; digitized key wells, including wireline logs and sample logs; and analyzed more than 3,000 drill stem tests to establish that fluid levels in deep aquifers below the Permian evaporites are not connected to the surface and therefore pressures are not hydrostatic. Connectivity with the surface aquifers is lacking because shale aquitards and impermeable evaporite layers consist of both halite and anhydrite. 5. Developed extensive web applications and an interactive mapping system that do the following: a. Facilitate access to a wide array of data obtained in the study, including core descriptions and analyses, sample logs, digital (LAS) well logs, seismic data, gravity and magnetics maps, structural and stratigraphic maps, inferred fault traces, earthquakes, Class I and II disposal wells, and

  11. Integration of remote sensing and geographic information systems for Great Lakes water quality monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Lathrop, R.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The utility of three operational satellite remote sensing systems, namely, the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM), the SPOT High Resolution Visible (HRV) sensors and the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), were evaluated as a means of estimating water quality and surface temperature. Empirical calibration through linear regression techniques was used to relate near-simultaneously acquired satellite radiance/reflectance data and water quality observations obtained in Green Bay and the nearshore waters of Lake Michigan. Four dates of TM and one date each of SPOT and AVHRR imagery/surface reference data were acquired and analyzed. Highly significant relationships were identified between the TM and SPOT data and secchi disk depth, nephelometric turbidity, chlorophyll a, total suspended solids (TSS), absorbance, and surface temperature (TM only). The AVHRR data were not analyzed independently but were used for comparison with the TM data. Calibrated water quality image maps were input to a PC-based raster GIS package, EPPL7. Pattern interpretation and spatial analysis techniques were used to document the circulation dynamics and model mixing processes in Green Bay. A GIS facilitates the retrieval, query and spatial analysis of mapped information and provides the framework for an integrated operational monitoring system for the Great Lakes.

  12. The recycling of waste oxides at Great Lakes Division, National Steel Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Landow, M.P.; Martinez, M.; Barnett, T.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the design, construction, and startup operations of a briquetting plant to recycle the revert dust, sludges and other materials generated from the iron and steelmaking processes. The specific plant constructed for National Steel Corporation`s Great Lakes Division was designed to recycle 273,000 metric tons (300,000 net tons) of integrated steel plant revert materials, such as BOP dust, blast furnace flue dust and sludge, and mill scale. The majority of the briquette plant production, about 80 percent, will recycle through the blast furnace and the remaining 20 percent through the steelmaking furnaces. This paper discusses the criteria used for plant design, construction, and startup. The plant design and construction period was 12 months with construction during the last 33 week period. The startup of the plant proceeded extremely well with the ramping up of production rates faster than the proposed startup plan. In addition, the blast furnace production was initiated using a newly developed blast furnace binder.

  13. Site Scientific Mission Plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site: January--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.M.; Lamb, P.J.; Sisterson, D.L.

    1993-12-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on January 1, 1994, and also looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM Functional Teams (Management Team, Experiment Support Team, Operations Team, Data Management Team, Instrument Team, and Campaign Team), and it serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the Science Team. This document includes a description of the site`s operational status and the primary envisaged site activities, together with information concerning approved and proposed Intensive Observation Periods. Amendments will be prepared and distributed whenever the content changes by more than 30% within a six-month period. The primary users of this document are the site operator, the site scientist, the Science Team through the ARM Program Science Director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program Functional Teams. This plan is a living document that will be updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  14. A boundary-layer cloud study using Southern Great Plains Cloud and radiation testbed (CART) data

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, B.; Mace, G.; Dong, X.; Syrett, W.

    1996-04-01

    Boundary layer clouds-stratus and fairweather cumulus - are closely coupled involves the radiative impact of the clouds on the surface energy budget and the strong dependence of cloud formation and maintenance on the turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture in the boundary layer. The continuous data collection at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site provides a unique opportunity to study components of the coupling processes associated with boundary layer clouds and to provide descriptions of cloud and boundary layer structure that can be used to test parameterizations used in climate models. But before the CART data can be used for process studies and parameterization testing, it is necessary to evaluate and validate data and to develop techniques for effectively combining the data to provide meaningful descriptions of cloud and boundary layer characteristics. In this study we use measurements made during an intensive observing period we consider a case where low-level stratus were observed at the site for about 18 hours. This case is being used to examine the temporal evolution of cloud base, cloud top, cloud liquid water content, surface radiative fluxes, and boundary layer structure. A method for inferring cloud microphysics from these parameters is currently being evaluated.

  15. Best Practices for Sustainable WInd Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Great Lakes Commission; Victoria Pebbles; John Hummer; Celia Haven

    2011-07-19

    This document offers a menu of 18 different, yet complimentary preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. The practices include those that have been previously tested and proven effective, as well as new practices that were identified by experts in the field as needed for future wind developments. Each best practice includes information about the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, and federal, state and local government regulators. They were identified through a year long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors.

  16. Temporal trends in and influence of wind on PAH concentrations measured near the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes, D.R.; Basu, I.; Sweet, C.W.; Hites, R.A.

    2000-02-01

    This paper reports on temporal trends in gas- and particle-phase PAH concentrations measured at three sites in the Great Lakes' Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network: Eagle Harbor, near Lake Superior, Sleeping Bear Dunes, near Lake Michigan, and Sturgeon Point, near Lake Erie. While gas-phase concentrations have been decreasing since 1991 at all sites, particle-phase concentrations have been decreasing only at Sleeping Bear Dunes. To determine whether these results represent trends in background levels or regional emissions, the average concentrations are compared to those found in urban and rural studies. In addition, the influence of local wind direction on PAH concentrations is investigated, with the assumption that dependence on wind direction implies regional sources. Using these two methods, it is found that PAH concentrations at Eagle Harbor and Sleeping Bear Dunes represent regional background levels but that PAH from the Buffalo Region intrude on the background levels measured at the Sturgeon Point site. At this site, wind from over Lake Erie reduces local PAH concentrations.

  17. Simulation of oil-slick transport in Great Lakes connecting channels. Theory and model formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, H.T.; Yapa, P.D.; Petroski, M.E.

    1990-02-01

    Two-dimensional computer models for simulating oil slick movement in rivers and lakes were developed and then applied to the connecting channels of the upper Great Lakes. In these models the oil slick is considered to be a collection of discrete oil patches. The transformation of an oil slick due to advection, spreading, evaporation and dissolution are considered. In open-water regions the advection of oil patches in the slick are determined by the water current and wind using the drifting factor formulation. Formulas consider the balance of inertia, gravity, viscous and surface tension forces. The oil slick transformation model developed in this study contains as many processes as can be effectively and analytically modeled. The model has several special features, including the ability to model instantaneous and continuous spills, the ability to realistically describe the irregular shapes of an oil slick and the ability to account for the time-dependent variation of the flow conditions. The computer programs are designed so that it will be easy to refine the model elements and expand the model to include additional slick transformation processes.

  18. Anti-nuclear weapons activism in the United States and Great Britain: a comparative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, G.

    1987-01-01

    This study is a response to the lacuna in empirical research into political activism and the nuclear issue and seeks to ascertain the social and value characteristics, political attitudes, and political behavior of activists in the United States and Great Britain. Consideration is also given to gender differences in light of evidence of an emerging gender gap in these two countries. The study investigates the common forces cited in two sets of literature - post-industrialism and anti-nuclear weapons movements - which provide a framework for analysis. Survey research data is employed to assess cross-national similarities and differences. The findings obtained indicate that while American and British activists exhibit common social and value characteristics, British activists appear more integrated in their political opposition to nuclear weapons compared with their American counterparts. Survey results indicate that the political-action repertoire of these activists is quite diverse, suggesting a new style of politics in advanced industrial democracies. Gender-based analysis reveals two important findings. First, activist American men differ significantly from the other three social groups in their attitudes towards nuclear weapons. Second, activist women in both national settings participate at a level equal to or exceeding that of activist men.

  19. Ancient and Modern Laminated Composites - From the Great Pyramid of Gizeh to Y2K

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.; Lesuer, D.R.

    2000-03-14

    Laminated metal composites have been cited in antiquity; for example, a steel laminate that may date as far back as 2750 B.C., was found in the Great Pyramid in Gizeh in 1837. A laminated shield containing bronze, tin, and gold layers, is described in detail by Homer. Well-known examples of steel laminates, such as an Adze blade, dating to 400 B.C. can be found in the literature. The Japanese sword is a laminated composite at several different levels and Merovingian blades were composed of laminated steels. Other examples are also available, including composites from China, Thailand, Indonesia, Germany, Britain, Belgium, France, and Persia. The concept of lamination to provide improved properties has also found expression in modern materials. Of particular interest is the development of laminates including high carbon and low carbon layers. These materials have unusual properties that are of engineering interest; they are similar to ancient welded Damascus steels. The manufacture of collectable knives, labeled ''welded Damascus'', has also been a focus of contemporary knifemakers. Additionally, in the Former Soviet Union, laminated composite designs have been used in engineering applications. Each of the above areas will be briefly reviewed, and some of the metallurgical principles will be described that underlie improvement in properties by lamination. Where appropriate, links are made between these property improvements and those that may have been present in ancient artifacts.

  20. The United States after the great recession: the challenge of sustainable growth

    SciTech Connect

    Meltzer, Joshua

    2013-02-15

    The paper outlines the strengths and weaknesses of the U.S. economic growth model, assesses its’ ability to respond to the key economic, environmental and social challenges currently facing the U.S. and proposes policies that if adopted would move the U.S. onto a more sustainable growth path. The paper provides scenarios of projected future growth trajectories, as well as recommendations for specific policies in key areas: employment, infrastructure, energy and fiscal rebalancing. To reach this goal this paper focuses on four areas for action: Increasing employment, which is the most urgent priority to accelerate recovery from the Great Recession, while addressing underlying structural issues that have led to a decade of poor economic outcomes for most citizens; Investing in the future, as the key marker of whether the United States is prepared to make farsighted decisions to improve education, build new infrastructure and increase innovation; Maximizing an increased energy endowment in a way that grows the economy, while reinforcing the trend towards reducing resource demand and reducing greenhouse gas emissions; and, Fiscal rebalancing, where the United States must insulate economic recovery from the process of fiscal reform while reducing and stabilizing debt over the long term. Finally, we argue that President Obama can re-energize America’s global leadership if he builds on a platform of domestic actions that enhance the sustainability of America’s society and economy.

  1. Three-Dimensional Geothermal Fairway Mapping: Examples From the Western Great Basin, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Drew L; Faulds, James E

    2013-09-29

    Elevated permeability along fault systems provides pathways for circulation of geothermal fluids. Accurate location of such fluid flow pathways in the subsurface is crucial to future geothermal development in order to both accurately assess resource potential and mitigate drilling costs by increasing drilling success rates. Employing a variety of surface and subsurface data sets, we present detailed 3D geologic analyses of two Great Basin geothermal systems, the actively producing Brady’s geothermal system and a ‘greenfield’ geothermal prospect at Astor Pass, Nevada. 3D modeling provides the framework for quantitative structural analyses. We combine 3D slip and dilation tendency analysis along fault zones and calculations of fault intersection density in the two geothermal systems with the locations of lithologies capable of supporting dense, interconnected fracture networks. The collocation of these permeability promoting characteristics with elevated heat represent geothermal ‘fairways’, areas with ideal conditions for geothermal fluid flow. Location of geothermal fairways at high resolution in 3D space can help to mitigate the costs of geothermal exploration by providing discrete drilling targets and data-based evaluations of reservoir potential.

  2. ADVANCES IN HYDROGEOCHEMICAL INDICATORS FOR THE DISCOVERY OF NEW GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE GREAT BASIN, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Stuart F; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Dobson, Patrick

    2013-05-20

    This report summarizes the results of Phase I work for a go/no go decision on Phase II funding. In the first objective, we assessed the extent to which fluid-mineral equilibria controlled deep water compositions in geothermal systems across the Great Basin. Six systems were evaluated: Beowawe; Desert Peak; Dixie Valley; Mammoth; Raft River; Roosevelt. These represent a geographic spread of geothermal resources, in different geological settings and with a wide range of fluid compositions. The results were used for calibration/reformulation of chemical geothermometers that reflect the reservoir temperatures in producing reservoirs. In the second objective, we developed a reactive -transport model of the Desert Peak hydrothermal system to evaluate the processes that affect reservoir fluid geochemistry and its effect on solute geothermometry. This included testing geothermometry on “reacted” thermal water originating from different lithologies and from near-surface locations where the temperature is known from the simulation. The integrated multi-component geothermometer (GeoT, relying on computed mineral saturation indices) was tested against the model results and also on the systems studied in the first objective.

  3. Site scientific mission plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site: January 1997--June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Peppler, R.A.; Lamb, P.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies; Sisterson, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on January 1, 1997, and looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM functional teams (Management Team, Data and Science Integration Team [DSIT], Operations Team, Instrument Team [IT], and Campaign Team) and serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the members of the Science Team. This document includes a description of the operational status of the site and the primary site activities envisioned, together with information concerning approved and proposed intensive observation periods (IOPs). The primary users of this document are the site operator, the Site Scientist Team (SST), the Science Team through the ARM Program science director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program functional teams. This plan is a living document that is updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  4. Subtask 7.3 - The Socioeconomic Impact of Climate Shifts in the Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Jaroslav Solc; Tera Buckley; Troy Simonsen

    2007-12-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) evaluated the water demand response/vulnerability to climate change factors of regional economic sectors in the northern Great Plains. Regardless of the cause of climatic trends currently observed, the research focused on practical evaluation of climate change impact, using water availability as a primary factor controlling long-term regional economic sustainability. Project results suggest that the Upper Missouri, Red River, and Upper Mississippi Watersheds exhibit analogous response to climate change, i.e., extended drought influences water availability in the entire region. The modified trend suggests that the next period for which the Red River Basin can expect a high probability of below normal precipitation will occur before 2050. Agriculture is the most sensitive economic sector in the region; however, analyses confirmed relative adaptability to changing conditions. The price of agricultural commodities is not a good indicator of the economic impact of climate change because production and price do not correlate and are subject to frequent and irregular government intervention. Project results confirm that high water demand in the primary economic sectors makes the regional economy extremely vulnerable to climatic extremes, with a similar response over the entire region. Without conservation-based water management policies, long-term periods of drought will limit socioeconomic development in the region and may threaten even the sustainability of current conditions.

  5. Best Practices for Wind Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect

    Pebbles, Victoria; Hummer, John; Haven, Celia

    2011-07-19

    This report offers a menu of 18 different, yet complementary, preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. Each best practice describes the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, academia, and federal, state and local government regulators. The practices were identified through a year-long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors. Optimally, a suite of these best practices would be applied in an appropriate combination to fit the conditions of a particular wind project or a set of wind projects within a given locality or region.

  6. Potential Agricultural Uses of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum in the Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    DeSutter, T.M.; Cihacek, L.J.

    2009-07-15

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) is a byproduct from the combustion of coal for electrical energy production. Currently, FGDG is being produced by 15 electrical generating stations in Alabama, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Ohio, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin. Much of this byproduct is used in the manufacturing of wallboard. The National Network for Use of FGDG in Agriculture was initiated to explore alternative uses of this byproduct. In the northern Great Plains (North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana), FGDG has the potential to be used as a Ca or S fertilizer, as an acid soil ameliorant, and for reclaiming or mitigating sodium-affected soils. Greater than 1.4 million Mg of FGDG could initially be used in these states for these purposes. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum can be an agriculturally important resource for helping to increase the usefulness of problem soils and to increase crop and rangeland production. Conducting beneficial use audits would increase the public awareness of this product and help identify to coal combustion electrical generating stations the agriculturally beneficial outlets for this byproduct.

  7. Impact of early diagenesis of Eolian reservoirs, Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Krystinik, L.F.; Andrews, S.; Fryberger, S.G.

    1985-02-01

    Dune and associated alluvial and playa deposits at Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colorado, provide an excellent opportunity to study early diagenetic development of vertical and horizontal permeability barriers in recent eolian deposits (> 10 ka). Cements observed include calcite, aragonite, protodolomite(.), amorphous silica, iron hydroxide, smectite, trona, and halite. Cementation is controlled by the availability of water, with several hydrologic subenvironments producing different cements. Evaporative cementation in dunes adjacent to playas is commonly dominated by trona and halite, but calcite, aragonite, and amorphous silica also bind the sediment. These cements are generally most concentrated in fine laminations where capillary action has pulled water into dunes. Iron hydroxides, calcite, and amorphous silica precipitate at the interface between ground water and streams or lakes, where the pH gradient may exceed 5 pH units (pH 5.7-11.5). Subsequent movement of the ground-water table can result in cross-cutting cement zones. Early cementation in dunes prevents deflation and provides a mechanism for preservation of the reservoir unit. Intense cementation may permanently occlude porosity, or leaching may reestablish well-interconnected porosity. An understanding of the extent and composition of early cement zones can be used to improve hydrodynamic models for production and enhanced recovery.

  8. Review and problem definition of water/rock reactions associated with injection of spent geothermal fluids from a geothermal plant into aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Elders, W.A.

    1986-07-01

    Among the technical problems faced by the burgeoning geothermal industry is the disposal of spent fluids from power plants. Except in unusual circumstances the normal practice, especially in the USA, is to pump these spent fluids into injection wells to prevent contamination of surface waters, and possibly in some cases, to reduce pressure drawdown in the producing aquifers. This report is a survey of experience in geothermal injection, emphasizing geochemical problems, and a discussion of approaches to their possible mitigation. The extraction of enthalpy from geothermal fluid in power plants may cause solutions to be strongly supersaturated in various dissolved components such as silica, carbonates, sulfates, and sulfides. Injection of such supersaturated solutions into disposal wells has the potential to cause scaling in the well bores and plugging of the aquifers, leading to loss of injectivity. Various aspects of the geochemistry of geothermal brines and their potential for mineral formation are discussed, drawing upon a literature survey. Experience of brine treatment and handling, and the economics of mineral extraction are also addressed in this report. Finally suggestions are made on future needs for possible experimental, field and theoretical studies to avoid or control mineral scaling.

  9. Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.

    2008-01-30

    Initial scoping calculations of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site were carried out for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to investigate the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer that would result from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. Although impacts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport were quantified based on numerical simulation results, the investigation represented a qualitative assessment of the potential lateral recharge that could result in adverse effects on the aquifer. Because the magnitude of the potential leakage is unknown, hypothetical bounding calculations were performed. When a quantitative analysis of the magnitude of the potential recharge from Black Rock Reservoir is obtained, the hydrologic impacts analysis will be revisited. The analysis presented in this report represents initial bounding calculations. A maximum lateral recharge (i.e., upland flux) was determined in the first part of this study by executing steady-state flow simulations that raised the water table no higher than the elevation attained in the Central Plateau during the Hanford operational period. This metric was selected because it assumed a maximum remobilization of contaminants that existed under previous fully saturated conditions. Three steady-state flow fields were then used to analyze impacts to transient contaminant transport: a maximum recharge (27,000 acre-ft/yr), a no additional flux (365 acre-ft/yr), and an intermediate recharge case (16,000 acre-ft/yr). The transport behavior of four radionuclides was assessed for a 300 year simulation period with the three flow fields. The four radionuclides are tritium, iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium-238. Transient flow and transport simulations were used to establish hypothetical concentration distributions in the subsurface. Using the simulated concentration distributions in 2005 as initial conditions for steady-state flow runs, simulations were executed to

  10. Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.

    2007-03-09

    Initial scoping calculations of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site were carried out for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to investigate the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer that would result from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. Although impacts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport were quantified based on numerical simulation results, the investigation represented a qualitative assessment of the potential lateral recharge that could result in adverse effects on the aquifer. Because the magnitude of the potential leakage is unknown, hypothetical bounding calculations were performed. When a quantitative analysis of the magnitude of the potential recharge from Black Rock Reservoir is obtained, the hydrologic impacts analysis will be revisited. The analysis presented in this report represent initial bounding calculations. A maximum lateral recharge (i.e., upland flux) was determined in the first part of this study by executing steady-state flow simulations that raised the water table no higher than the elevation attained in the Central Plateau during the Hanford operational period. This metric was selected because it assumed a maximum remobilization of contaminants that existed under previous fully saturated conditions. Three steady-state flow fields were then used to analyze impacts to transient contaminant transport: a maximum recharge (27,000 acre-ft/yr), a no additional flux (365 acre-ft/yr), and an intermediate recharge case (16,000 acre-ft/yr). The transport behavior of four radionuclides was assessed for a 300 year simulation period with the three flow fields. The four radionuclides are current contaminants of concern (COCs) in the Central Plateau and include tritium, iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium-238. Transient flow and transport simulations were used to establish hypothetical concentration distributions in the subsurface. Using the simulated concentration distributions in 2005 as

  11. In Situ Reduction of Aquifer Sediments to Create a Permeable Reactive Barrier to Remediate Chromate (CrO4 2-): BenchScale Tests to Determine Barrier Longevity

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, Jim E.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Williams, Mark D.; Devary, Brooks J.

    2005-01-02

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine sediment geochemical properties needed to develop a design for implementation of the in-situ oxidation–reduction (redox) manipulation (ISRM) technology for chromate (CrO42–) remediation at a Superfund site and three other sites. A generalized hydrogeologic description of the Superfund site consist of a silty clay upper confining layer to a depth of ~6.71 m, the A1 unit from ~6.71 m to ~8.23 m, the A2 unit from ~8.23 m to ~10.67 m, and the A3 unit from ~10.67 m to ~12.19 m below ground surface. The A/B aquitard was encountered at a depth of ~12.19 m. The A1, A2, and A3 hydrostratigraphic units are all sandy gravels, but with considerable difference in fines content and subsequently, hydraulic conductivity. Hydraulic tests conducted in pilot test site monitoring wells indicate that the A1 unit has a 10 times lower hydraulic conductivity than the A2 unit, while the A3 unit hydraulic conductivity is significantly higher than that observed in the A2 unit (i.e., a trend of increasing permeability with depth). Calculated hydraulic conductivities, based on sieve analysis, show this same spatial trend. Results from a tracer injection test and electromagnetic borehole flow meter tests conducted at the site indicate a relatively high degree of formation heterogeneity. Laboratory experiments showed that chemical reduction yielded a redox capacity (0.26% iron(II)) that falls within the range of values observed in sediments analyzed from sites where field-scale deployment of the ISRM technology is currently in progress or being considered (0.1% Hanford 100D area, 0.24% Ft Lewis, 0.4% Moffett Federal Airfield). There was relatively little spatial variability in reducible iron (Fe) content between the three aquifer units. This mass of reducible Fe represents a sufficient quantity for a treatment zone emplaced to remain anoxic for 430 pore volumes, which would be expected to last tens of years, depending on aquifer flow rates and the

  12. Efficacy of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Under Varying Meteorological Conditions: Southern Great Plains Vs. Pt. Reyes

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, M.; Schwartz, S.; Kim, B.-G.; Miller, M.; Liu, Y.; Min, Q.

    2008-03-10

    Several studies have demonstrated that cloud dynamical processes such as entrainment mixing may be the primary modulator of cloud optical properties in certain situations. For example, entrainment of dry air alters the cloud drop size distribution by enhancing drop evaporation. However, the effect of entrainment mixing and other forms or turbulence is still quite uncertain. Although these factors and aerosol-cloud interactions should be considered together when evaluating the efficacy of aerosol indirect effects, the underlying mechanisms appear to be dependent upon each other. In addition, accounting for them is impossible with the current understanding of aerosol indirect effect. Therefore, careful objective screening and analysis of observations are needed to determine the extent to which mixing related properties affect cloud optical properties, apart from the aerosol first indirect effect. This study addresses the role of aerosol-cloud interactions in the context of varying meteorological conditions based on ARM data obtained at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma and at Pt. Reyes, California. Previous analyses of the continental stratiform clouds at the SGP site have shown that the thicker clouds of high liquid water path (LWP) tend to contain sub adiabatic LWPs. These sub adiabatic LWPs, which result from active mixing processes, correspond to a lower susceptibility of the clouds to aerosol-cloud interactions, and, hence, to reduced aerosol indirect effects. In contrast, the consistently steady and thin maritime stratus clouds observed at Pt. Reyes are much closer to adiabatic. These clouds provide an excellent benchmark for the study of the aerosol influence on modified marine clouds relative to continental clouds, since they form in a much more homogeneous meteorological environment than those at the continental site.

  13. Trends in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in the Great Lakes atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Ping Sun; Pierrette Blanchard; Kenneth A. Brice; Ronald A. Hites

    2006-10-15

    Atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) concentrations were measured in both the vapor and particle phases at seven sites near the Great Lakes as a part of the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network. Lower molecular weight PAHs, including fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthrene, and pyrene, were dominant in the vapor phase, and higher molecular weight PAHs, including chrysene, benzo(a)pyrene, and coronene, were dominant in the particle phase. The highest PAH concentrations in both the vapor and particle phases were observed in Chicago followed by the semiurban site at Sturgeon Point, NY. The major sources of PAHs in and around Chicago are vehicle emissions, coal and natural gas combustion, and coke production. The spatial difference of PAH concentrations can be explained by the local population density. Long-term decreasing trends of most PAH concentrations were observed in both the vapor and particle phases at Chicago, with half-lives ranging from 3-10 years in the vapor phase and 5-15 years in the particle phase. At Eagle Harbor, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and Sturgeon Point, total PAH concentrations in the vapor phase showed significant, but slow, long-term decreasing trends. At the Sturgeon Point site, which was impacted by a nearby city, particle-phase PAH concentrations also declined. However, most particle-phase PAH concentrations did not show significant long-term decreasing trends at the remote sites. Seasonal trends were also observed for particle-phase PAH concentrations, which were higher in the winter and lower in the summer. 36 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Housing Archetype Analysis for Home Energy-Efficient Retrofit in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. K.; Mrozowski, T.; Harrell-Seyburn, A.; Ehrlich, N.; Hembroff, L.; Bieburn, B.; Mazor, M.; McIntyre, A.; Mutton, C.; Parsons, G.; Syal, M. G.; Wilkinson, R.

    2014-09-01

    This project report details activities and results of the 'Market Characterization' project undertaken by the Cost Effective Energy Retrofit (CEER) team targeted toward the DOE goal of achieving 30%-50% reduction in existing building energy use. CEER consists of members from the Dow Chemical Company, Michigan State University, Ferris State University and Habitat for Humanity Kent County. The purpose of this market characterization project was to identify housing archetypes which are dominant within Great Lakes region and therefore offer significant potential for energy-efficient retrofit research and implementation due to the substantial number of homes possessing similar characteristics. Understanding the characteristics of housing groups referred to as 'archetypes' by vintage, style, and construction characteristics can allow research teams to focus their retrofit research and develop prescriptive solutions for those structure types which are prevalent and offer high potential uptake within a region or market. Key research activities included; literature review, statistical analysis of national and regional data of the American Housing Survey (AHS) collected by the U.S. Census Bureau, analysis of Michigan specific data, development of a housing taxonomy of architectural styles, case studies of two local markets (i.e., Ann Arbor and Grand Rapids in Michigan) and development of a suggested framework (or process) for characterizing local markets. In order to gain a high level perspective, national and regional data from the U.S. Census Bureau was analyzed using cross tabulations, multiple regression models, and logistic regression to characterize the housing stock and determine dominant house types using 21 variables.

  15. Advanced Offshore Wind Turbine/Foundation Concept for the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Afjeh, Abdollah A.; Windpower, Nautica; Marrone, Joseph; Wagner, Thomas

    2013-08-29

    This project investigated a conceptual 2-bladed rotor wind turbine design and assessed its feasibility for installation in the Great Lakes. The levelized cost of energy was used for this purpose. A location in Lake Erie near the coast of Cleveland, Ohio was selected as the application site. The loading environment was defined using wind and wave data collected at a weather station in Lake Erie near Cleveland. In addition, the probability distributions of the annual significant wave height and wind speed were determined. A model of the dependence of the above two quantities was also developed and used in the study of wind turbine system loads. Loads from ice floes and ridges were also included.The NREL 5 MW 3-bladed rotor wind turbine concept was used as the baseline design. The proposed turbine design employs variable pitch blade control with tip-brakes and a teeter mechanism. The rotor diameter, rated power and the tower dimensions were selected to closely match those of the NREL 5 MW wind turbine.A semi-floating gravity base foundation was designed for this project primarily to adapt to regional logistical constraints to transport and install the gravity base foundation. This foundation consists of, from bottom to top, a base plate, a buoyancy chamber, a taper zone, a column (with ice cone), and a service platform. A compound upward-downward ice cone was selected to secure the foundation from moving because of ice impact.The turbine loads analysis was based on International ElectroTechnical Committee (IEC) Standard 61400-1, Class III winds. The NREL software FAST was the primary computational tool used in this study to determine all design load cases. An initial set of studies of the dynamics of wind turbines using Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) demonstrated that FAST and ADAMS load predictions were comparable. Because of its relative simplicity and short run times, FAST was selected for this study. For ice load calculations, a method

  16. Behind Every Good Metabolite there is a Great Enzyme (and perhaps a structure)

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Phan, Isabelle; Cron, Lisabeth; Stacy, Robin; Stewart, Lance J.; Staker, Bart L.; Edwards, Tom E.; Varani, Gabriele; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.

    2012-11-01

    Today, due to great technological advancements, it is possible to study everything at the same time. This ability has given birth to totality studies in the fields of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. In turn, the combined study of all these global analyses gave birth to the field of systems biology. Another totality field brought to life with new emerging technologies is structural genomics, an effort to determine the three-dimensional structure of every protein encoded in a genome. The Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) is a specialized structural genomics effort composed of academic (University of Washington), government (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory), not-for-profit (Seattle BioMed), and commercial (Emerald BioStructures) institutions that is funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (Federal Contract: HHSN272200700057C and HHSN27220120025C) to apply genome-scale approaches in solving protein structures from biodefense organisms, as well as those causing emerging and re-emerging disease. In five years over 540 structures have been deposited into the Protein Data Bank (PDB) by SSGICD. About one third of all SSGCID structures contain bound ligands, many of which are metabolites or metabolite analogues present in the cell. These proteins structures are the blueprints for the structure-based design of the next generation of drugs against bacterial pathogens and other infectious diseases. Many of the selected SSGCID targets are annotated enzymes from known metabolomic pathways essential to cellular vitality since selectively knocking-out one of the enzymes in an important pathway with a drug may be fatal to the organism. One reason metabolomic pathways are important is because of the small molecules, or metabolites, produced at various steps in these pathways and identified by metabolomic studies. Unlike genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics that may be influenced by

  17. EVALUATING SHORT-TERM CLIMATE VARIABILITY IN THE LATE HOLOCENE OF THE NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph H. Hartman

    1999-09-01

    This literature study investigated methods and areas to deduce climate change and climate patterns, looking for short-term cycle phenomena and the means to interpret them. Many groups are actively engaged in intensive climate-related research. Ongoing research might be (overly) simplified into three categories: (1) historic data on weather that can be used for trend analysis and modeling; (2) detailed geological, biological (subfossil), and analytical (geochemical, radiocarbon, etc.) studies covering the last 10,000 years (about since last glaciation); and (3) geological, paleontological, and analytical (geochemical, radiometric, etc.) studies over millions of years. Of importance is our ultimate ability to join these various lines of inquiry into an effective means of interpretation. At this point, the process of integration is fraught with methodological troubles and misconceptions about what each group can contribute. This project has met its goals to the extent that it provided an opportunity to study resource materials and consider options for future effort toward the goal of understanding the natural climate variation that has shaped our current civilization. A further outcome of this project is a proposed methodology based on ''climate sections'' that provides spatial and temporal correlation within a region. The method would integrate cultural and climate data to establish the climate history of a region with increasing accuracy with progressive study and scientific advancement (e. g., better integration of regional and global models). The goal of this project is to better understand natural climatic variations in the recent past (last 5000 years). The information generated by this work is intended to provide better context within which to examine global climate change. The ongoing project will help to establish a basis upon which to interpret late Holocene short-term climate variability as evidenced in various studies in the northern Great Plains, northern

  18. GIS Regional Spatial Data from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy: Geochemical, Geodesic, Geologic, Geophysical, Geothermal, and Groundwater Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The center also makes its collections of spatial data available for direct download to the public. Data are in Lambert Conformable Conic Projection.

  19. Structural Inventory of Great Basin Geothermal Systems and Definition of Favorable Structural Settings

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Over the course of the entire project, field visits were made to 117 geothermal systems in the Great Basin region. Major field excursions, incorporating visits to large groups of systems, were conducted in western Nevada, central Nevada, northwestern Nevada, northeastern Nevada, east‐central Nevada, eastern California, southern Oregon, and western Utah. For example, field excursions to the following areas included visits of multiple geothermal systems: - Northwestern Nevada: Baltazor Hot Spring, Blue Mountain, Bog Hot Spring, Dyke Hot Springs, Howard Hot Spring, MacFarlane Hot Spring, McGee Mountain, and Pinto Hot Springs in northwest Nevada. - North‐central to northeastern Nevada: Beowawe, Crescent Valley (Hot Springs Point), Dann Ranch (Hand‐me‐Down Hot Springs), Golconda, and Pumpernickel Valley (Tipton Hot Springs) in north‐central to northeast Nevada. - Eastern Nevada: Ash Springs, Chimney Hot Spring, Duckwater, Hiko Hot Spring, Hot Creek Butte, Iverson Spring, Moon River Hot Spring, Moorman Spring, Railroad Valley, and Williams Hot Spring in eastern Nevada. - Southwestern Nevada‐eastern California: Walley’s Hot Spring, Antelope Valley, Fales Hot Springs, Buckeye Hot Springs, Travertine Hot Springs, Teels Marsh, Rhodes Marsh, Columbus Marsh, Alum‐Silver Peak, Fish Lake Valley, Gabbs Valley, Wild Rose, Rawhide‐ Wedell Hot Springs, Alkali Hot Springs, and Baileys/Hicks/Burrell Hot Springs. - Southern Oregon: Alvord Hot Spring, Antelope Hot Spring‐Hart Mountain, Borax Lake, Crump Geyser, and Mickey Hot Spring in southern Oregon. - Western Utah: Newcastle, Veyo Hot Spring, Dixie Hot Spring, Thermo, Roosevelt, Cove Fort, Red Hill Hot Spring, Joseph Hot Spring, Hatton Hot Spring, and Abraham‐Baker Hot Springs. Structural controls of 426 geothermal systems were analyzed with literature research, air photos, google‐Earth imagery, and/or field reviews (Figures 1 and 2). Of the systems analyzed, we were able to determine the structural settings

  20. Multiple new-particle growth pathways observed at the US DOE Southern Great Plains field site

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Hodshire, Anna L.; Lawler, Michael J.; Zhao, Jun; Ortega, John; Jen, Coty; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Brewer, Jared F.; Kodros, Jack K.; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Hanson, Dave R.; et al

    2016-07-28

    New-particle formation (NPF) is a significant source of aerosol particles into the atmosphere. However, these particles are initially too small to have climatic importance and must grow, primarily through net uptake of low-volatility species, from diameters  ∼  1 to 30–100 nm in order to potentially impact climate. There are currently uncertainties in the physical and chemical processes associated with the growth of these freshly formed particles that lead to uncertainties in aerosol-climate modeling. Four main pathways for new-particle growth have been identified: condensation of sulfuric-acid vapor (and associated bases when available), condensation of organic vapors, uptake of organic acids through acid–base chemistrymore » in the particle phase, and accretion of organic molecules in the particle phase to create a lower-volatility compound that then contributes to the aerosol mass. The relative importance of each pathway is uncertain and is the focus of this work. The 2013 New Particle Formation Study (NPFS) measurement campaign took place at the DOE Southern Great Plains (SGP) facility in Lamont, Oklahoma, during spring 2013. Measured gas- and particle-phase compositions during these new-particle growth events suggest three distinct growth pathways: (1) growth by primarily organics, (2) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and ammonia, and (3) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and associated bases and organics. To supplement the measurements, we used the particle growth model MABNAG (Model for Acid–Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth) to gain further insight into the growth processes on these 3 days at SGP. MABNAG simulates growth from (1) sulfuric-acid condensation (and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines), (2) near-irreversible condensation from nonreactive extremely low-volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs), and (3) organic-acid condensation and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines. MABNAG is able to corroborate the

  1. Reactive transport modeling of the enhancement of density-driven CO2 convective mixing in carbonate aquifers and its potential implication on geological carbon sequestration

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Islam, Akand; Sun, Alexander Y.; Yang, Changbing

    2016-04-20

    We study the convection and mixing of CO2 in a brine aquifer, where the spread of dissolved CO2 is enhanced because of geochemical reactions with the host formations (calcite and dolomite), in addition to the extensively studied, buoyancy-driven mixing. The nonlinear convection is investigated under the assumptions of instantaneous chemical equilibrium, and that the dissipation of carbonate rocks solely depends on flow and transport and chemical speciation depends only on the equilibrium thermodynamics of the chemical system. The extent of convection is quantified in term of the CO2 saturation volume of the storage formation. Our results suggest that the densitymore » increase of resident species causes significant enhancement in CO2 dissolution, although no significant porosity and permeability alterations are observed. Furthermore, early saturation of the reservoir can have negative impact on CO2 sequestration.« less

  2. Baseline Mapping Study of the Steed Pond Aquifer and Crouch Branch Confining Unit Beneath A/M Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    JACKSON, DENNISG.

    1998-09-01

    This report presents the results of a baseline mapping project conducted for the Environmental Restoration Department at Savannah River Site. The purpose of this report is to map the distribution of mud (clay and silt-sized material) within each hydrogeologic unit from the surface down to the top of the Crouch Branch aquifer beneath the A/M Area. The distribution of mud layers and variations in the percentage of clay and silt within the strata is extremely important in order to fully characterize the extent of DNAPL beneath the A/M Area and determine the geometry of the contaminant plumes emanating from them. Precision mapping of these layers can aid in locating areas where contamination is most likely to have migrated into the saturated zone. In addition, this information can be used to refine the current remediation systems or assist in designing new remedial systems.

  3. Quantitative interlake comparison of thyroid pathology in Great Lakes coho (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha) salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Moccia, R.D.; Leatherland, J.F.; Sonstegard, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from Lakes Ontario, Michigan, Erie, or Huron were found to suffer epizootics of thyroid hyperplasia and goiters which appeared to have an environmental etiology. There were 13-fold differences in goiter prevalence within the Great Lakes, and the differences in goiter frequency were correlated with the degree of thyroid hyperplasia. A means of assessing the degree of thyroid hyperplasia (thyroid index) is described, and the derived index was used to facilitate statistical interlake and interspecies comparisons. Despite the hyperplastic (or goitered) condition in all prespawning or spawning Great Lakes salmon, serum thyroid hormone levels were generally higher than in prespawning coho salmon from the Fraser River, British Columbia, indicating that the Great Lakes fish were not necessarily hypothyroid. The hyperplastic lesions appear to undergo progressive changes: (a) large follicles, partly colloid depleted, surrounded by cuboidal epithelial cells; (b) small follicles, largely colloid depleted, surrounded by columnar epithelial cells (in this form, the follicles commonly assume a trabeculate arrangement); (c) ''microfollicles'' with greatly enlarged columnar epithelial cells encompassing very small follicles; (d) apparently afollicular lesions with little or no colloid in evidence. There was some evidence of benign invasiveness, although the lesions generally resembled simple hyperplastic parenchymatous goiters seen in humans.

  4. Monitoring CO 2 sequestration into deep saline aquifer and associated salt intrusion using coupled multiphase flow modeling and time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chuan Lu; CHI Zhang; Hai Hanag; Timothy C. Johnson

    2014-04-01

    Successful geological storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) require efficient monitoring of the migration of CO2 plume during and after large-scale injection in order to verify the containment of the injected CO2 within the target formation and to evaluate potential leakage risk. Field studies have shown that surface and cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be a useful tool in imaging and characterizing solute transport in heterogeneous subsurface. In this synthetic study, we have coupled a 3-D multiphase flow model with a parallel 3-D time-lapse ERT inversion code to explore the feasibility of using time-lapse ERT for simultaneously monitoring the migration of CO2 plume in deep saline formation and potential brine intrusion into shallow fresh water aquifer. Direct comparisons of the inverted CO2 plumes resulting from ERT with multiphase flow simulation results indicate the ERT could be used to delineate the migration of CO2 plume. Detailed comparisons on the locations, sizes and shapes of CO2 plume and intruded brine plumes suggest that ERT inversion tends to underestimate the area review of the CO2 plume, but overestimate the thickness and total volume of the CO2 plume. The total volume of intruded brine plumes is overestimated as well. However, all discrepancies remain within reasonable ranges. Our study suggests that time-lapse ERT is a useful monitoring tool in characterizing the movement of injected CO2 into deep saline aquifer and detecting potential brine intrusion under large-scale field injection conditions.

  5. gottschalck(1)-99

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Macroscopic Cloud and Boundary Layer Properties for Continental Stratus at the SGP CART Site During 1997 J. C. Gottschalck and B. A. Albrecht University of Miami Miami, Florida Introduction Stratus and stratocumulus clouds are important in the regulation of the earth's radiation budget and thus play an important role in climate over both the land and ocean (Ramanathan et al. 1989). Consequently, there is a great need for accurate boundary layer cloud parameterizations in climate models (Slingo

  6. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Comparison of ECMWF

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Model and ARSCL Cloudiness at the ARM SGP site Comparison of ECMWF Model and ARSCL Cloudiness at the ARM SGP site Kollias, Pavlos RSMAS/University of Miami Albrecht, Bruce University of Miami The Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program operates a comprehensive suite of active remote sensors at Southern Great Plains (SGP) in Oklahoma since 1996 to detect all hydrometeors in the atmospheric column above. Due to its location, the ARM SGP site cloud and

  7. Quantifying differences in the impact of variable chemistry on equilibrium uranium(VI) adsorption properties of aquifer sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-09-16

    Uranium adsorption-desorption on sediment samples collected from the Hanford 300-Area, Richland, WA varied extensively over a range of field-relevant chemical conditions, complicating assessment of possible differences in equilibrium adsorption properties. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved in 500-1000 hours although dissolved uranium concentrations increased over thousands of hours owing to changes in aqueous chemical composition driven by sediment-water reactions. A non-electrostatic surface complexation reaction, >SOH + UO22+ + 2CO32- = >SOUO2(CO3HCO3)2-, provided the best fit to experimental data for each sediment sample resulting in a range of conditional equilibrium constants (logKc) from 21.49 to 21.76. Potential differences in uranium adsorption properties could be assessed in plots based on the generalized mass-action expressions yielding linear trends displaced vertically by differences in logKc values. Using this approach, logKc values for seven sediment samples were not significantly different. However, a significant difference in adsorption properties between one sediment sample and the fines (<0.063 mm) of another could be demonstrated despite the fines requiring a different reaction stoichiometry. Estimates of logKc uncertainty were improved by capturing all data points within experimental errors. The mass-action expression plots demonstrate that applying models outside the range of conditions used in model calibration greatly increases potential errors.

  8. Vulnerability of crops and native grasses to summer drying in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Raz-Yaseef, Naama; Billesbach, Dave P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Gunter, Stacey A.; Bradford, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-08-31

    The Southern Great Plains are characterized by a fine-scale mixture of different land-cover types, predominantly winter-wheat and grazed pasture, with relatively small areas of other crops, native prairie, and switchgrass. Recent droughts and predictions of increased drought in the Southern Great Plains, especially during the summer months, raise concern for these ecosystems. We measured ecosystem carbon and water fluxes with eddy-covariance systems over cultivated cropland for 10 years, and over lightly grazed prairie and new switchgrass fields for 2 years each. Growing-season precipitation showed the strongest control over net carbon uptake for all ecosystems, but with a variable effect: grasses (prairie and switchgrass) needed at least 350 mm of precipitation during the growing season to become net carbon sinks, while crops needed only 100 mm. In summer, high temperatures enhanced evaporation and led to higher likelihood of dry soil conditions. Therefore, summer-growing native prairie species and switchgrass experienced more seasonal droughts than spring-growing crops. For wheat, the net reduction in carbon uptake resulted mostly from a decrease in gross primary production rather than an increase in respiration. Flux measurements suggested that management practices for crops were effective in suppressing evapotranspiration and decomposition (by harvesting and removing secondary growth), and in increasing carbon uptake (by fertilizing and conserving summer soil water). In light of future projections for wetter springs and drier and warmer summers in the Southern Great Plains, our study indicates an increased vulnerability in native ecosystems and summer crops over time.

  9. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-24

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

  10. Analysis of Hydraulic Responses from the ER-6-1 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Ruskauff

    2005-06-01

    This report documents the interpretation and analysis of the hydraulic data collected for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test-Tracer Test (MWAT-TT) conducted at the ER-6-1 Well Cluster in Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97, on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The MWAT-TT was performed to investigate CAU-scale groundwater flow and transport processes related to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the NTS through the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) Hydrostratigraphic Unit (HSU). The ER-6-1 MWAT-TT was planned and executed by contractor participants for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project of the Environmental Restoration (ER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Participants included Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor; Bechtel Nevada (BN); the Desert Research Institute (DRI); Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center. The SNJV team consists of the S.M. Stoller Corporation, Navarro Research and Engineering, Battelle Memorial Institute, INTERA Inc., and Weston Solutions, Inc. The MWAT-TT was implemented according to the ''Underground Test Area Project, ER-6-1 Multi-Well Aquifer Test - Tracer Test Plan'' (SNJV, 2004a) issued in April 2004. The objective of the aquifer test was to determine flow processes and local hydraulic properties for the LCA through long-term constant-rate pumping at the well cluster. This objective was to be achieved in conjunction with detailed sampling of the composite tracer breakthrough at the pumping well, as well as with depth-specific sampling and logging at multiple wells, to provide information for the depth-discrete analysis of formation hydraulic properties, particularly with regard to fracture properties.

  11. Vulnerability of crops and native grasses to summer drying in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Raz-Yaseef, Naama; Billesbach, Dave P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Gunter, Stacey A.; Bradford, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-08-31

    The Southern Great Plains are characterized by a fine-scale mixture of different land-cover types, predominantly winter-wheat and grazed pasture, with relatively small areas of other crops, native prairie, and switchgrass. Recent droughts and predictions of increased drought in the Southern Great Plains, especially during the summer months, raise concern for these ecosystems. We measured ecosystem carbon and water fluxes with eddy-covariance systems over cultivated cropland for 10 years, and over lightly grazed prairie and new switchgrass fields for 2 years each. Growing-season precipitation showed the strongest control over net carbon uptake for all ecosystems, but with a variable effect: grassesmore » (prairie and switchgrass) needed at least 350 mm of precipitation during the growing season to become net carbon sinks, while crops needed only 100 mm. In summer, high temperatures enhanced evaporation and led to higher likelihood of dry soil conditions. Therefore, summer-growing native prairie species and switchgrass experienced more seasonal droughts than spring-growing crops. For wheat, the net reduction in carbon uptake resulted mostly from a decrease in gross primary production rather than an increase in respiration. Flux measurements suggested that management practices for crops were effective in suppressing evapotranspiration and decomposition (by harvesting and removing secondary growth), and in increasing carbon uptake (by fertilizing and conserving summer soil water). In light of future projections for wetter springs and drier and warmer summers in the Southern Great Plains, our study indicates an increased vulnerability in native ecosystems and summer crops over time.« less

  12. ARM Southern Great Plains Site Observations of the Smoke Pall Associated with the 1998 Central American Fires

    SciTech Connect

    Peppler, R A.; Bahrmann, C P.; Barnard, James C.); Campbell, J R.; Cheng, M.-D.; Ferrare, R. A.; Halthore, R N.; Heilman, L. A.; Laulainen, Nels S.); Lin, C.-J.; Ogren, J. A.; Poellot, M R.; Remer, L. A.; Sassen, K.; Spinhirne, J D.; Splitt, Mike E.; Turner, David D.)

    2000-11-01

    Drought-stricken areas of Central America and Mexico were victimized in 1998 by forest and brush fires that burned out of control during much of the first half of the year. Wind currents at various times during the episode helped transport smoke from these fires over the Gulf of Mexico and into portions of the U.S. Visibilities were greatly reduced during favorable flow periods from New Mexico to south Florida and northward to Wisconsin as a result of this smoke and haze. In response to the reduced visibilities and increased pollutants, public health advisories and information statements were issued by various agencies in Gulf Coast states and in Oklahoma.

  13. Preliminary seismicity and focal mechanisms for the southern Great Basin of Nevada and California: January 1992 through September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Harmsen, S.C.

    1994-06-01

    The telemetered southern Great Basin seismic network (SGBSN) is operated for the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The US Geological Survey, Branch of Earthquake and Landslide Hazards, maintained this network until September 30, 1992, at which time all operational and analysis responsibilities were transferred to the University of Nevada at Reno Seismological Laboratory (UNRSL). This report contains preliminary earthquake and chemical explosion hypocenter listings and preliminary earthquake focal mechanism solutions for USGS/SGBSN data for the period January 1, 1992 through September 30, 1992, 15:00 UTC.

  14. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-component DNAPLS with surfactant solutions. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Laboratory studies were conducted at the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY) while numerical simulation and field work were undertaken by INTERA Inc. in collaboration with Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc. at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Kentucky. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). Ten of these were capable of solubilizing TCE to concentrations greater than 15,000 mg/L, compared to its aqueous solubility of 1,100 mg/L. Four surfactants were identified as good solubilizers of all three chlorinated solvents. Of these, a secondary alcohol ethoxylate was the first choice for in situ testing because of its excellent solubilizing ability and its low propensity to sorb. However, this surfactant did not meet the Commonwealth of Kentucky`s acceptance criteria. Consequently, it was decided to use a surfactant approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration as a food-grade additive. As a 1% micellar-surfactant solution, this sorbitan monooleate has a solubilization capacity of 16,000 mg TCE/L, but has a higher propensity to sorb to clays than has the alcohol ethoxylate.

  15. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage coupled with district heating or cooling systems. Volume I. Main text

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. The AQUASTOR model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two principal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains the main text, including introduction, program description, input data instruction, a description of the output, and Appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  16. Field Test Report: Preliminary Aquifer Test Characterization Results for Well 299-W15-225: Supporting Phase I of the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit Remedial Design

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2009-09-23

    This report examines the hydrologic test results for both local vertical profile characterization and large-scale hydrologic tests associated with a new extraction well (well 299-W15-225) that was constructed during FY2009 for inclusion within the future 200-West Area Groundwater Treatment System that is scheduled to go on-line at the end of FY2011. To facilitate the analysis of the large-scale hydrologic test performed at newly constructed extraction well 299-W15-225 (C7017; also referred to as EW-1 in some planning documents), the existing 200-ZP-1 interim pump-and-treat system was completely shut-down ~1 month before the performance of the large-scale hydrologic test. Specifically, this report 1) applies recently developed methods for removing barometric pressure fluctuations from well water-level measurements to enhance the detection of hydrologic test and pump-and-treat system effects at selected monitor wells, 2) analyzes the barometric-corrected well water-level responses for a preliminary determination of large-scale hydraulic properties, and 3) provides an assessment of the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity in the vicinity of newly constructed extraction well 299-W15-225. The hydrologic characterization approach presented in this report is expected to have universal application for meeting the characterization needs at other remedial action sites located within unconfined and confined aquifer systems.

  17. Strategic Plan for Coordinating Rural Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Transit Development in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Truett, L.F.

    2002-12-19

    The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, located along the border between North Carolina and Tennessee, is the most visited national park in the United States. This rugged, mountainous area presents many transportation challenges. The immense popularity of the Smokies and the fact that the primary mode of transportation within the park is the personal vehicle have resulted in congestion, damage to the environment, impacts on safety, and a degraded visitor experience. Access to some of the Smokies historical, cultural, and recreational attractions via a mass transit system could alleviate many of the transportation issues. Although quite a few organizations are proponents of a mass transit system for the Smokies, there is a lack of coordination among all parties. In addition, many local residents are not completely comfortable with the idea of transit in the Smokies. This document provides a brief overview of the current transportation needs and limitations in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, identifies agencies and groups with particular interests in the Smokies, and offers insights into the benefits of using Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) technologies in the Smokies. Recommendations for the use of rural ITS transit to solve two major transportation issues are presented.

  18. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    accident (ARM photo). April 2005 2 Annual Quality Improvement Inspections Take Place The Continuous Quality Improvement Program (CQIP) implemented by the ARM Program in 1998...

  19. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    of science degree ("Boundary Layer Momentum Budgets as Determined by a Single Scanning Doppler Radar") at Colorado State University. Brad enjoyed a long association with the...

  20. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    SGP Site Access Roads Improved The "road" to improving the SGP site access roads was long ... The condition of the access roads to the central facility, especially the east access road...

  1. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    world, including China, Japan, Australia, Niger, Africa, France, and Germany. ... the following results: * High-quality data sets of fair-weather cumulus, stratus, and deep ...

  2. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    of rain. As the bucket tips to empty, it activates a magnetic reed switch and sends a signal to a data acquisition system that records the time of each tip. Figure 1. A...

  3. Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    uses laser technology to measure vertical profiles of atmospheric properties. The system will be out of service from late June until mid August. New signal acquisition and...

  4. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... inches of snow took aim on the SGP. This storm caused several intermittent power outages lasting 2-3 hours, affecting the Central Facility and a few northern instrument stations. ...

  5. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov ... (http:oco.jpl.nasa.gov), a satellite scheduled for launch in 2007. The ...

  6. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna ... Scientists to Validate Satellite-Based Ozone Measurements Aura, the third and final ...

  7. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna ... SGP Study Will Test Satellite-Borne Instrument The accuracy of a satellite-based carbon ...

  8. Southern Great Plains Newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    J. Prell L. R. Roeder

    2010-09-01

    This months issue contains the following articles: (1) Scientists convene at SGP site for complex convective cloud experiment; (2) VORTEX2 spins down; (3) Sunphotometer supports SPARTICUS (a Sun and Aureole Measurement imaging sunphotometer) campaign and satellite validation studies; and (4) Ceilometer represents first deployment of new ground-based instruments from Recovery Act.

  9. Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    May 2004 ANLERNL-04-05 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: ... Please visit the new ARM website at http:www.arm.gov. May 2004 2 Satellite ...

  10. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna ... Researchers will use instruments on aircraft, satellite, and enhanced surface platforms to ...

  11. Great Energy Debate

    Education - Teach & Learn

    Students evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the major energy sources in an innovative debate format.

  12. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    These particles intercept the laser light and scatter it in different directions. Some of the scattered light returns to Earth's surface. A receiver on the ground collects ...

  13. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... designated electrical equipment inspector training at Los Alamos National Laboratory. ... is constructed according to electrical code standards and is safe for site staff to operate. ...

  14. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... before they hit the surface, forming small ice pellets more commonly known as sleet. ... graupel: snowflakes that become rounded pellets as a result of riming (Typical diameters ...

  15. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... He worked closely with teams from several laboratories to develop the measurement facilities that were ultimately deployed at Manus, Papua New Guinea; Nauru Island, Republic of ...

  16. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Water Vapor Data Support Severe Weather Forecasting in Oklahoma and Kansas The ARM ... GPS receiver costs have decreased in recent years, making the technology affordable for ...

  17. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    the site (Figure 1). The term cold air funnel was introduced into the meteorology vocabulary in 1973. Although much research has focused on tornadoes and funnel clouds in...

  18. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    use in computing aerosol optical thickness from the surface up to an altitude of 7 kilometers. Figure 1. The NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-Channel Sunphotometer mounted on a...

  19. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ocean wave spray, soot from factory smokestacks or internal combustion engines, and sulfate from volcanic activity. For many years, the SGP site has been sampling atmospheric...

  20. Great River (1973)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume One Film Collection Volume Two 75th Anniversary Hydropower in the Northwest Woody Guthrie Videos Strategic Direction Branding & Logos Power of the River History Book...

  1. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    facility use by total visitor days and to track actual visitors and active user research computer accounts. Historical data show that the total number of users is related to the...

  2. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    real-time color images of daytime sky conditions, and estimates of the fraction of the sky covered by clouds (cloud fraction) and cloud type can be derived from these images. ...

  3. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    of hyperspectral imagery. The overall goal is to develop and test computer algorithms to correct for the effects of the atmosphere on remote sensing measurements. Hyperspectral ...

  4. Coal. [Great Plains Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The status of various research projects related to coal is considered: gasification (approximately 30 processes) and in-situ gasification. Methanol production, retrofitting internal combustion engines to stratified charge engines, methanation (Conoco), direct reduction of iron ores, water resources, etc. Approximately 200 specific projects related to coal are considered with respect to present status. (LTN)

  5. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Last week, scientists from across the country met in Ponca City, Oklahoma, to simulate ... For CHAPS, two aircraft will fly primarily in the plume emanating from Oklahoma City, and ...

  6. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    sessions, and one day was reserved for discussions with other functional teams. During classroom sessions, mentors presented brief overviews of their respective instrument...

  7. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Dowell and SGP assistant site scientist Daniel Hartsock, Rusk also led the group on a walking tour. The students observed a radiosonde (weather balloon) launch by SGP upper air...

  8. Northern Great Plains

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Northern G reat P lains Climate C hange a nd t he U .S. E nergy S ector: Regional v ulnerabilities a nd r esilience s olutions Summary i n B rief The N orthern G reat P lains i s h ome t o l ess t han 2 % o f t he U .S. population b ut i s a m ajor s upplier o f c ritical e nergy r esources used t hroughout t he n ation. T hese r esources i nclude c oal f rom the P owder R iver B asin, e lectricity e xported v ia i nterstate transmission l ines, a nd r apidly g rowing o il p roduction f rom t he

  9. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... MFRSR Calibration Capabilities. The SGP recently acquired from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory equipment needed to calibrate Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers ...

  10. Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    installed together at the SGP central facility (ARM photo). October 2004 3 Okmulgee Turkey Vultures Thwarted . . . Finally After years of trying to keep messy turkey vultures...

  11. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    The ACRF SGP site recently established a repair capability for its wind sensor equipment that is saving the program money and improving the availability of data. Wind sensor ...

  12. ARM Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    System Radiometer Calibration Facility Equipment Repair Lab Main Office Raman Lidar Doppler Lidar and Radar Wind Profiler Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar Ka-Zenith Radar...

  13. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    biomass burning, water treatment, waste management ... Increases in atmospheric methane roughly parallel world ... be burned via a flare or used to run electrical generators. ...

  14. Southern Great Plains

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    of DOE's funding for ACRF is to provide educational resources to anyone interested in learning more about climate sciences, weather, research techniques, or instrumentation. ACRF...

  15. Simulation of oil-slick transport in Great Lakes connecting channels. Volume 1. Theory and model formulation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, H.T.; Yapa, P.D.; Petroski, M.E.

    1986-03-01

    In this study, two computer models named as ROSS and LROSS are developed for simulating oil-slick transport in rivers and lakes, respectively. The oil slick transformation processes considered in these models include advection, spreading, evaporation, and dissolution. These models can be used for slicks of any shape originated from instantaneous or continuous spills in rivers and lakes with or without ice covers. Although developed for the need of the connecting channels in the upper Great Lakes, including the Detroit River, Lake St. Clair, St. Clair River, and St. Marys River, these models are site independent and can be used to other rivers and lakes. The programs are written in FORTRAN programming language to be compatible with FORTRAN77 compiler. The models are designed to be used on both mainframe and microcomputers.

  16. Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    SciTech Connect

    Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

    1992-03-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

  17. LIGHT ECHOES FROM η CARINAE'S GREAT ERUPTION: SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC EVOLUTION AND THE RAPID FORMATION OF NITROGEN-RICH MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Prieto, J. L.; Knapp, G. R.; Rest, A.; Walborn, N. R.; Bianco, F. B.; Matheson, T.; Smith, N.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Campillay, A.; Contreras, C.; González, C.; Morrell, N.; Phillips, M. M.; Chornock, R.; Paredes Álvarez, L.; James, D.; Smith, R. C.; Kunder, A.; Margheim, S.; Welch, D. L.; and others

    2014-05-20

    We present follow-up optical imaging and spectroscopy of one of the light echoes of η Carinae's nineteenth century Great Eruption discovered by Rest et al. By obtaining images and spectra at the same light echo position between 2011 and 2014, we follow the evolution of the Great Eruption on a 3 yr timescale. We find remarkable changes in the photometric and spectroscopic evolution of the echo light. The i-band light curve shows a decline of ∼0.9 mag in ∼1 yr after the peak observed in early 2011 and a flattening at later times. The spectra show a pure-absorption early G-type stellar spectrum at peak, but a few months after peak the lines of the Ca II triplet develop strong P-Cygni profiles and we see the appearance of [Ca II] 7291, 7324 doublet in emission. These emission features and their evolution in time resemble those observed in the spectra of some Type IIn supernovae and supernova impostors. Most surprisingly, starting ∼300 days after peak brightness, the spectra show strong molecular transitions of CN at ≳ 6800 Å. The appearance of these CN features can be explained if the ejecta are strongly nitrogen enhanced, as is observed in modern spectroscopic studies of the bipolar Homunculus nebula. Given the spectroscopic evolution of the light echo, velocities of the main features, and detection of strong CN, we are likely seeing ejecta that contributes directly to the Homunculus nebula.

  18. Computed solid phases limiting the concentration of dissolved constituents in basalt aquifers of the Columbia Plateau in eastern Washington. Geochemical modeling and nuclide/rock/groundwater interaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, W.J.; Jenne, E.A.; Krupka, K.M.

    1982-08-01

    A speciation-solubility geochemical model, WATEQ2, was used to analyze geographically-diverse, ground-water samples from the aquifers of the Columbia Plateau basalts in eastern Washington. The ground-water samples compute to be at equilibrium with calcite, which provides both a solubility control for dissolved calcium and a pH buffer. Amorphic ferric hydroxide, Fe(OH)/sub 3/(A), is at saturation or modestly oversaturated in the few water samples with measured redox potentials. Most of the ground-water samples compute to be at equilibrium with amorphic silica (glass) and wairakite, a zeolite, and are saturated to oversaturated with respect to allophane, an amorphic aluminosilicate. The water samples are saturated to undersaturated with halloysite, a clay, and are variably oversaturated with regard to other secondary clay minerals. Equilibrium between the ground water and amorphic silica presumably results from the dissolution of the glassy matrix of the basalt. The oversaturation of the clay minerals other than halloysite indicates that their rate of formation lags the dissolution rate of the basaltic glass. The modeling results indicate that metastable amorphic solids limit the concentration of dissolved silicon and suggest the same possibility for aluminum and iron, and that the processes of dissolution of basaltic glass and formation of metastable secondary minerals are continuing even though the basalts are of Miocene age. The computed solubility relations are found to agree with the known assemblages of alteration minerals in the basalt fractures and vesicles. Because the chemical reactivity of the bedrock will influence the transport of solutes in ground water, the observed solubility equilibria are important factors with regard to chemical-retention processes associated with the possible migration of nuclear waste stored in the earth's crust.

  19. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  20. System-Scale Model of Aquifer, Vadose Zone, and River Interactions for the Hanford 300 Area - Application to Uranium Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Bacon, Diana H.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Parker, Kyle R.; Waichler, Scott R.; Williams, Mark D.

    2013-10-01

    This report represents a synthesis and integration of basic and applied research into a system-scale model of the Hanford 300 Area groundwater uranium plume, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Richland Operations (DOE-RL) office. The report integrates research findings and data from DOE Office of Science (DOE-SC), Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), and DOE-RL projects, and from the site remediation and closure contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH). The three-dimensional, system-scale model addresses water flow and reactive transport of uranium for the coupled vadose zone, unconfined aquifer, and Columbia River shoreline of the Hanford 300 Area. The system-scale model of the 300 Area was developed to be a decision-support tool to evaluate processes of the total system affecting the groundwater uranium plume. The model can also be used to address “what if” questions regarding different remediation endpoints, and to assist in design and evaluation of field remediation efforts. For example, the proposed cleanup plan for the Hanford 300 Area includes removal, treatment, and disposal of contaminated sediments from known waste sites, enhanced attenuation of uranium hot spots in the vadose and periodically rewetted zone, and continued monitoring of groundwater with institutional controls. Illustrative simulations of polyphosphate infiltration were performed to demonstrate the ability of the system-scale model to address these types of questions. The use of this model in conjunction with continued field monitoring is expected to provide a rigorous basis for developing operational strategies for field remediation and for defining defensible remediation endpoints.

  1. Great Lakes water quality initiative criteria documents for the protection of wildlife (proposed): DDT, mercury 2,3,7,8-TCDD and PCBs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, S.; Nolt, C.; Goodman, B.; Stromborg, K.; Sullivan, J.

    1993-04-01

    The document outlines, for each category of contaminant listed in the title, the relevant literature, the calculation of mammalian wildlife value, the calculation of Avian Wildlife Value, and the Great Lakes Wildlife criterion.

  2. Amended Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-398 Minnesota Power- Great Northern Transmission Line: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 222- Nov. 18, 2014

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minnesota Power, Great Northern Transmission Line has submitted an amended application for a Presidential Permit to construct, operate, maintain and connect an electric transmission line across the United States border with Canada.

  3. Hunter-gatherer adaptations and environmental change in the southern Great Basin: The evidence from Pahute and Rainier mesas

    SciTech Connect

    Pippin, L.C.

    1998-06-01

    This paper reviews the evidence for fluctuations in past environments in the southern Great Basin and examines how these changes may have affected the strategies followed by past hunter and gatherers in their utilization of the resources available on a highland in this region. The evidence used to reconstruct past environments for the region include botanical remains from packrat middens, pollen spectra from lake and spring deposits, faunal remains recovered from archaeological and geologic contexts, tree-ring indices from trees located in sensitive (tree-line) environments, and eolian, alluvial and fluvial sediments deposited in a variety of contexts. Interpretations of past hunter and gatherer adaptive strategies are based on a sample of 1,311 archaeological sites recorded during preconstruction surveys on Pahute and Rainier mesas in advance of the US Department of Energy`s nuclear weapons testing program. Projectile point chronologies and available tree-ring, radiocarbon, thermoluminescence and obsidian hydration dates were used to assign these archaeological sites to specific periods of use.

  4. Characterization and classification of vegetation canopy structure and distribution within the Great Smoky Mountains National Park using LiDAR

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Jitendra; HargroveJr., William Walter; Norman, Steven P; Hoffman, Forrest M; Newcomb, Doug

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation canopy structure is a critically important habit characteristic for many threatened and endangered birds and other animal species, and it is key information needed by forest and wildlife managers for monitoring and managing forest resources, conservation planning and fostering biodiversity. Advances in Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technologies have enabled remote sensing-based studies of vegetation canopies by capturing three-dimensional structures, yielding information not available in two-dimensional images of the landscape pro- vided by traditional multi-spectral remote sensing platforms. However, the large volume data sets produced by airborne LiDAR instruments pose a significant computational challenge, requiring algorithms to identify and analyze patterns of interest buried within LiDAR point clouds in a computationally efficient manner, utilizing state-of-art computing infrastructure. We developed and applied a computationally efficient approach to analyze a large volume of LiDAR data and to characterize and map the vegetation canopy structures for 139,859 hectares (540 sq. miles) in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. This study helps improve our understanding of the distribution of vegetation and animal habitats in this extremely diverse ecosystem.

  5. Alternative energy sources. IV. Proceedings of the Fourth Miami International Conference, Miami Beach, FL, December 14-16, 1981. Volume 1 - Solar Collectors Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Veziroglu, T.N.

    1982-01-01

    Aspects of solar measurements, solar collectors, selective coatings, thermal storage, phase change storage, and heat exchangers are discussed. The analysis and testing of flat-plate solar collectors are addressed. The development and uses of plastic collectors, a solar water heating system, solar energy collecting oil barrels, a glass collector panel, and a two-phase thermosyphon system are considered. Studies of stratification in thermal storage, of packed bed and fluidized bed systems, and of thermal storage in solar towers, in wall passive systems, and in reversible chemical reactions are reported. Phase change storage by direct contact processes and in residential solar space heating and cooling is examined, as are new materials and surface characteristics for solar heat storage. The use of R-11 and Freon-113 in heat exchange is discussed.

  6. Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins. Final report, June 1989--June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R&D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ``typical`` well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic.

  7. Structural and functional diversity of soil bacterial and fungal communities following woody plant encroachment in the southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Hollister, Emily B; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Ansley, R J; Boutton, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    In the southern Great Plains (USA), encroachment of grassland ecosystems by Prosopis glandulosa (honey mesquite) is widespread. Mesquite encroachment alters net primary productivity, enhances stores of C and N in plants and soil, and leads to increased levels of soil microbial biomass and activity. While mesquite's impact on the biogeochemistry of the region is well established, it effects on soil microbial diversity and function are unknown. In this study, soils associated with four plant types (C{sub 3} perennial grasses, C{sub 4} midgrasses, C{sub 4} shortgrasses, and mesquite) from a mesquite-encroached mixed grass prairie were surveyed to in an attempt to characterize the structure, diversity, and functional capacity of their soil microbial communities. rRNA gene cloning and sequencing were used in conjunction with the GeoChip functional gene array to evaluate these potential differences. Mesquite soil supported increased bacterial and fungal diversity and harbored a distinct fungal community relative to other plant types. Despite differences in composition and diversity, few significant differences were detected with respect to the potential functional capacity of the soil microbial communities. These results may suggest that a high level of functional redundancy exists within the bacterial portion of the soil communities; however, given the bias of the GeoChip toward bacterial functional genes, potential functional differences among soil fungi could not be addressed. The results of this study illustrate the linkages shared between above- and belowground communities and demonstrate that soil microbial communities, and in particular soil fungi, may be altered by the process of woody plant encroachment.

  8. Natural Gas Aquifers Storage Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1,233,017 1,231,897 1,237,269 1,443,769 1,445,031 1,445,639 1999-2015 Alabama 0 0 0 1999-2015 Arkansas 0 0 0 1999-2015 California 0 12,000 12,000 12,000 1999-2015 Colorado 0 0 0 1999-2015 Illinois 772,381 777,294 779,862 974,362 978,624 978,155 1999-2015 Indiana 81,268 81,310 80,746 80,746 80,746 81,578 1999-2015 Iowa 288,010 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 1999-2015 Kansas 0 0 0 1999-2015 Kentucky 9,567 9,567 9,567 9,567 6,567 6,567 1999-2015 Louisiana 0 0 0 1999-2015 Michigan 0 0 0

  9. Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    64,228 363,521 367,108 453,054 452,044 452,287 2008-2015 Alabama 0 0 0 2012-2015 Arkansas 0 0 0 2012-2015 California 0 10,000 10,000 10,000 2009-2015 Colorado 0 0 0 2012-2015 Illinois 216,132 215,017 215,594 291,544 292,544 291,845 2008-2015 Indiana 19,437 19,479 19,215 19,215 19,215 20,048 2008-2015 Iowa 90,613 91,113 90,313 90,313 90,313 90,313 2008-2015 Kansas 0 0 0 2012-2015 Kentucky 6,629 6,629 6,629 6,629 4,619 4,619 2008-2015 Louisiana 0 0 0 2012-2015 Michigan 0 0 0 2012-2015 Minnesota

  10. Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    program through sampling. August 1, 2013 Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National Laboratory Conceptual model of water movement and geology at...

  11. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within

  12. A case study of the Great Plains low-level jet using wind profiler network data and a high resolution mesoscale model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, S.; Fast, J.D.; Bian, X.; Stage, S.

    1996-04-01

    The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) has important effects on the life cycle of clouds and on radiative and surface heat and moisture fluxes at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site. This diurnal phenomenon governs the transport and convergence of low-level moisture into the region and often leads to the development of clouds and precipitation. A full understanding of the life cycle of clouds at the SGP CART site and their proper representation in single column and global climate models cannot be obtained without an improved understanding of this important phenomenon.

  13. Development of Science-Based Permitting Guidance for Geological Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers Based on Modeling and Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Philippe Nicot; Renaud Bouroullec; Hugo Castellanos; Susan Hovorka; Srivatsan Lakshminarasimhan; Jeffrey Paine

    2006-06-30

    Underground carbon storage may become one of the solutions to address global warming. However, to have an impact, carbon storage must be done at a much larger scale than current CO{sub 2} injection operations for enhanced oil recovery. It must also include injection into saline aquifers. An important characteristic of CO{sub 2} is its strong buoyancy--storage must be guaranteed to be sufficiently permanent to satisfy the very reason that CO{sub 2} is injected. This long-term aspect (hundreds to thousands of years) is not currently captured in legislation, even if the U.S. has a relatively well-developed regulatory framework to handle carbon storage, especially in the operational short term. This report proposes a hierarchical approach to permitting in which the State/Federal Government is responsible for developing regional assessments, ranking potential sites (''General Permit'') and lessening the applicant's burden if the general area of the chosen site has been ranked more favorably. The general permit would involve determining in the regional sense structural (closed structures), stratigraphic (heterogeneity), and petrophysical (flow parameters such as residual saturation) controls on the long-term fate of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The state-sponsored regional studies and the subsequent local study performed by the applicant will address the long-term risk of the particular site. It is felt that a performance-based approach rather than a prescriptive approach is the most appropriate framework in which to address public concerns. However, operational issues for each well (equivalent to the current underground injection control-UIC-program) could follow regulations currently in place. Area ranking will include an understanding of trapping modes. Capillary (due to residual saturation) and structural (due to local geological configuration) trappings are two of the four mechanisms (the other two are solubility and mineral trappings), which are the most

  14. A comparison of radiometric fluxes influenced by parameterization cirrus clouds with observed fluxes at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) cloud and radiation testbed (CART) site

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, G.G.; Ackerman, T.P.; George, A.T.

    1996-04-01

    The data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program`s Southern Great plains Site (SCP) is a valuable resource. We have developed an operational data processing and analysis methodology that allows us to examine continuously the influence of clouds on the radiation field and to test new and existing cloud and radiation parameterizations.

  15. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 1A Miami, Florida

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  16. Miami-Dade County- Green Corridor Property Assessed Clean Energy District

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, directed these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes...

  17. Miami-Dade County- Voluntary Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, directed these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes...

  18. Analytical study of the effects of the Low-Level Jet on moisture convergence and vertical motion fields at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, X.; Zhong, S.; Whiteman, C.D.; Stage, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) is located in a region that is strongly affected by a prominent meteorological phenomenon--the Great Plains Low-Level Jet (LLJ). Observations have shown that the LLJ plays a vital role in spring and summertime cloud formation and precipitation over the Great Plains. An improved understanding of the LLJ characteristics and its impact on the environment is necessary for addressing the fundamental issue of development and testing of radiational transfer and cloud parameterization schemes for the general circulation models (GCMs) using data from the SGP CART site. A climatological analysis of the summertime LLJ over the SGP has been carried out using hourly observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Wind Profiler Demonstration Network and from the ARM June 1993 Intensive Observation Period (IOP). The hourly data provide an enhanced temporal and spatial resolution relative to earlier studies which used 6- and 12-hourly rawinsonde observations at fewer stations.

  19. Mineral planning in Great Britain and its relevance to the American mining industry. Final report, 1 December 1980-31 May 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Saperstein, L.W.

    1989-01-01

    In the United States, approval of surface coal mine permits became more complex with the imposition of certain additional and relatively untested requirements by the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Sections of the Act contain substantial pre-mining land-use planning requirements. The British system has been chosen for comparative study. All mining permits are granted in Great Britain within an overall land-use planning system. The British planning system is summarized with emphasis placed on minerals. Although planning systems are a well-described subject, little documentation addresses the special problems of mining companies. The first study helps to fill this gap.

  20. Recovery act. Characterizing structural controls of EGS-candidate and conventional geothermal reservoirs in the Great Basin. Developing successful exploration strategies in extended terranes

    SciTech Connect

    Faulds, James

    2015-06-25

    We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the structural controls of geothermal systems within the Great Basin and adjacent regions. Our main objectives were to: 1) Produce a catalogue of favorable structural environments and models for geothermal systems. 2) Improve site-specific targeting of geothermal resources through detailed studies of representative sites, which included innovative techniques of slip tendency analysis of faults and 3D modeling. 3) Compare and contrast the structural controls and models in different tectonic settings. 4) Synthesize data and develop methodologies for enhancement of exploration strategies for conventional and EGS systems, reduction in the risk of drilling non-productive wells, and selecting the best EGS sites.