National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for global land cover

  1. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  2. Land Use and Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daniel; Polsky, Colin; Bolstad, Paul V.; Brody, Samuel D.; Hulse, David; Kroh, Roger; Loveland, Thomas; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-05-01

    A contribution to the 3rd National Climate Assessment report, discussing the following key messages: 1. Choices about land-use and land-cover patterns have affected and will continue to affect how vulnerable or resilient human communities and ecosystems are to the effects of climate change. 2. Land-use and land-cover changes affect local, regional, and global climate processes. 3. Individuals, organizations, and governments have the capacity to make land-use decisions to adapt to the effects of climate change. 4. Choices about land use and land management provide a means of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels.

  3. Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Cultural Organization, United Nations Environment Programme, International Council for Science, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Land, Climate Focus...

  4. Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-06-05

    Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

  5. USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    USGS currently houses the institute at the Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The LCI will address land cover topics from...

  6. LandScan 2003 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-01-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  7. LandScan 2000 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-12-31

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" X 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. The LandScan data set was developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient populations at risk.

  8. LandScan 2002 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-01-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  9. LandScan 2013 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-07-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30"x30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on land cover, slope, road proximity, high-resolution imagery, and other data sets. The LandScan data set was developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient populations at risk.

  10. LandScan 2009 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-07-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  11. LandScan 2007 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-01-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  12. LandScan 2010 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  13. LandScan 2005 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-01-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  14. LandScan 2011 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-11-19

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  15. LandScan 2008 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  16. LandScan 2006 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-01-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  17. LandScan 2004 High Resolution Global Population Data Set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-01-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  18. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES earth system modeling; climate change; land use Word Cloud More ...

  19. Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Biofuels Modeling and Land Use DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Strategic Analysis & Cross-cutting Sustainability March 25 2015 Gbadebo Oladosu (PI) Oak Ridge National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information GOAL STATEMENT * Primary goal of the project is to demonstrate the viability of biofuels in the context of the national/global economy. * Metrics include: - Cost effectiveness:

  20. LandScan 2001 High-Resolution Global Population Data Set

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-01-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on proximity to roads, slope, land cover, nighttime lights, and other data sets. LandScan 2001 has been developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient population risk.

  1. LandScan 2014 High-Resolution Global Population Data Set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-01-01

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30" X 30" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts (at sub-national level) were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on land cover, slope, road proximity, high-resolution imagery, and other data sets. The LandScan data set was developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient populations at risk.

  2. EVALUATION OF LAND USE/LAND COVER DATASETS FOR URBAN WATERSHED MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.J. BURIAN; M.J. BROWN; T.N. MCPHERSON

    2001-08-01

    Land use/land cover (LULC) data are a vital component for nonpoint source pollution modeling. Most watershed hydrology and pollutant loading models use, in some capacity, LULC information to generate runoff and pollutant loading estimates. Simple equation methods predict runoff and pollutant loads using runoff coefficients or pollutant export coefficients that are often correlated to LULC type. Complex models use input variables and parameters to represent watershed characteristics and pollutant buildup and washoff rates as a function of LULC type. Whether using simple or complex models an accurate LULC dataset with an appropriate spatial resolution and level of detail is paramount for reliable predictions. The study presented in this paper compared and evaluated several LULC dataset sources for application in urban environmental modeling. The commonly used USGS LULC datasets have coarser spatial resolution and lower levels of classification than other LULC datasets. In addition, the USGS datasets do not accurately represent the land use in areas that have undergone significant land use change during the past two decades. We performed a watershed modeling analysis of three urban catchments in Los Angeles, California, USA to investigate the relative difference in average annual runoff volumes and total suspended solids (TSS) loads when using the USGS LULC dataset versus using a more detailed and current LULC dataset. When the two LULC datasets were aggregated to the same land use categories, the relative differences in predicted average annual runoff volumes and TSS loads from the three catchments were 8 to 14% and 13 to 40%, respectively. The relative differences did not have a predictable relationship with catchment size.

  3. Application of satellite and GIS technologies for land-cover and land-use mapping at the rural-urban fringe - A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treitz, P.M.; Howarth, P.J.; Gong, Peng )

    1992-04-01

    SPOT HRV multispectral and panchromatic data were recorded and coregistered for a portion of the rural-urban fringe of Toronto, Canada. A two-stage digital analysis algorithm incorporating a spectral-class frequency-based contextual classification of eight land-cover and land-use classes resulted in an overall Kappa coefficient of 82.2 percent for training-area data and a Kappa coefficient of 70.3 percent for test-area data. A matrix-overlay analysis was then performed within the geographic information system (GIS) to combine the land-cover and land-use classes generated from the SPOT digital classification with zoning information for the area. The map that was produced has an estimated interpretation accuracy of 78 percent. Global Positioning System (GPS) data provided a positional reference for new road networks. These networks, in addition to the new land-cover and land-use map derived from the SPOT HRV data, provide an up-to-date synthesis of change conditions in the area. 51 refs.

  4. The LandScan Global Population Distribution Project: Current State of the Art and Prospective Innovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Amy N; Bright, Eddie A

    2014-01-01

    Advances in remote sensing, dasymetric mapping techniques, and the ever-increasing availability of spatial datasets have enhanced global human population distribution databases. These datasets demonstrate an enormous improvement over the conventional use of choropleth maps to represent population distribution and are vital for analysis and planning purposes including humanitarian response, disease mapping, risk analysis, and evacuation modeling. Dasymetric mapping techniques have been employed to address spatial mismatch, but also to develop finer resolution population distributions in areas of the world where subnational census data are coarse or non-existent. One such implementation is the LandScan Global model which provides a 30 arc-second global population distribution based on ancillary datasets such as land cover, slope, proximity to roads, and settlement locations. This work will review the current state of the LandScan model, future innovations aimed at increasing spatial and demographic resolution, and situate LandScan within the landscape of other global population distribution datasets.

  5. NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Since 1901 Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 September 9, 2013 Contact: Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, 510-486-5849 campo.jpg These maps show the changes in air temperatures over land as measured using thermometers (left side) and as calculated by the 20th Century Reanalysis project (left side). While more than 80 percent of the observed variation is captured by

  6. Impact of mesophyll diffusion on estimated global land CO2 fertilizati...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Impact of mesophyll diffusion on estimated global land CO2 fertilization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Impact of mesophyll diffusion on estimated global land CO2 ...

  7. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Vittorio, Alan; Chini, Louise M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John E.; Craig, Anthony P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter E.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-11-27

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). To facilitate consistency, CMIP5 used a novel land use harmonization to provide ESMs with seamless, 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. However, we have identified and partially addressed a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design. The CMIP5 Community ESM (CESM) global afforestation is only 22% of RCP4.5 afforestation from 2005 to 2100. Likewise, only 17% of the Global Change Assessment Models (GCAMs) 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation signal, and none of the pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within a newly integrated model. This is a critical problem because afforestation is necessary for achieving the RCP4.5 climate stabilization. We attempted to rectify this problem by modifying only the ESM component of the integrated model, enabling CESM to simulate 66% of GCAMs afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAMs pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Similar inconsistencies likely exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models, with possible contributions from afforestation exceeding model-specific, potentially viable forest area. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to adequately rectify this problem.

  8. Accounting for radiative forcing from albedo change in future global land-use scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew D.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of a new method for quantifying radiative forcing from land use and land cover change (LULCC) within an integrated assessment model, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The method relies on geographically differentiated estimates of radiative forcing from albedo change associated with major land cover transitions derived from the Community Earth System Model. We find that conversion of 1 km² of woody vegetation (forest and shrublands) to non-woody vegetation (crops and grassland) yields between 0 and –0.71 nW/m² of globally averaged radiative forcing determined by the vegetation characteristics, snow dynamics, and atmospheric radiation environment characteristic within each of 151 regions we consider globally. Across a set of scenarios designed to span a range of potential future LULCC, we find LULCC forcing ranging from –0.06 to –0.29 W/m² by 2070 depending on assumptions regarding future crop yield growth and whether climate policy favors afforestation or bioenergy crops. Inclusion of this previously uncounted forcing in the policy targets driving future climate mitigation efforts leads to changes in fossil fuel emissions on the order of 1.5 PgC/yr by 2070 for a climate forcing limit of 4.5 Wm–2, corresponding to a 12–67 % change in fossil fuel emissions depending on the scenario. Scenarios with significant afforestation must compensate for albedo-induced warming through additional emissions reductions, and scenarios with significant deforestation need not mitigate as aggressively due to albedo-induced cooling. In all scenarios considered, inclusion of albedo forcing in policy targets increases forest and shrub cover globally.

  9. Land cover classification in multispectral imagery using clustering of sparse approximations over learned feature dictionaries

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Moody, Daniela I.; Brumby, Steven P.; Rowland, Joel C.; Altmann, Garrett L.

    2014-12-09

    We present results from an ongoing effort to extend neuromimetic machine vision algorithms to multispectral data using adaptive signal processing combined with compressive sensing and machine learning techniques. Our goal is to develop a robust classification methodology that will allow for automated discretization of the landscape into distinct units based on attributes such as vegetation, surface hydrological properties, and topographic/geomorphic characteristics. We use a Hebbian learning rule to build spectral-textural dictionaries that are tailored for classification. We learn our dictionaries from millions of overlapping multispectral image patches and then use a pursuit search to generate classification features. Land cover labelsmore » are automatically generated using unsupervised clustering of sparse approximations (CoSA). We demonstrate our method on multispectral WorldView-2 data from a coastal plain ecosystem in Barrow, Alaska. We explore learning from both raw multispectral imagery and normalized band difference indices. We explore a quantitative metric to evaluate the spectral properties of the clusters in order to potentially aid in assigning land cover categories to the cluster labels. In this study, our results suggest CoSA is a promising approach to unsupervised land cover classification in high-resolution satellite imagery.« less

  10. Land cover change and remote sensing: Examples of quantifying spatiotemporal dynamics in tropical forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krummel, J.R.; Su, Haiping; Fox, J.; Yarnasan, S.; Ekasingh, M.

    1995-06-01

    Research on human impacts or natural processes that operate over broad geographic areas must explicitly address issues of scale and spatial heterogeneity. While the tropical forests of Southeast Asia and Mexico have been occupied and used to meet human needs for thousands of years, traditional forest management systems are currently being transformed by rapid and far-reaching demographic, political, economic, and environmental changes. The dynamics of population growth, migration into the remaining frontiers, and responses to national and international market forces result in a demand for land to produce food and fiber. These results illustrate some of the mechanisms that drive current land use changes, especially in the tropical forest frontiers. By linking the outcome of individual land use decisions and measures of landscape fragmentation and change, the aggregated results shows the hierarchy of temporal and spatial events that in summation result in global changes to the most complex and sensitive biome -- tropical forests. By quantifying the spatial and temporal patterns of tropical forest change, researchers can assist policy makers by showing how landscape systems in these tropical forests are controlled by physical, biological, social, and economic parameters.

  11. LandUse/Land Cover Map of the CF of ARM in the SGP Site Using DOE's Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) Satellite Images

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Use/Land Cover Map of the Central Facility of ARM in the Southern Great Plains Site Using DOE's Multi-Spectral Thermal Imager Satellite Images S. E. Báez Cazull Pre-Service Teacher Program University of Puerto Rico Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico A. Cialla Brookhaven National Laboratory Department of Environmental Sciences Upton, New York Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a multi-laboratory, interagency program that was created with funding from the U.S.

  12. Can land management and biomass utilization help mitigate global warming?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlamadinger, B.; Lauer, M.

    1996-12-31

    With rising concern about the increase of the CO{sub 2} concentration in the earth`s atmosphere there is considerable interest in various land-use based mitigation options, like afforestation of surplus agricultural land with or without subsequent harvest; improved forest management; strategies that rely on wood plantations managed in short rotation or agricultural crops with high yields to produce bioenergy, timber and other biomass products. In the first step of this study, the net carbon benefits of such strategies will be calculated per unit of land, i.e., per hectare, because it is assumed that land is the limiting resource for such strategies in the future, and thus, the benefits per unit land need to be optimized. For these calculations a computer model has been developed. The results take into account the time dependence of carbon storage in the biosphere and are shown graphically both for land and for plantation systems with constant output of biomass over time. In the second step, these results will be combined with data on available land for Austria. The potential contribution of each of the above strategies towards mitigating the Austrian CO{sub 2} emissions will be demonstrated. A comparison to other renewable mitigation options, like solar thermal or photovoltaics, will be drawn in terms of available land resources and overall CO{sub 2} reductions.

  13. LandScan 2012 High Resolution Global Population DataSet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-17

    The LandScan data set is a worldwide population database compiled on a 30"x20" latitude/longitude grid. Census counts at sub-national level were apportioned to each grid cell based on likelihood coefficients, which are based on land cover, slope, road proximity, high-resolution imagery, and other data sets.

  14. Celebrating the Curiosity Rover's Killer Mars Landing | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Celebrating the Curiosity Rover's Killer Mars Landing Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Celebrating the Curiosity Rover's Killer Mars Landing Adam Rasheed 2012.08.07 Wow! What an entrance! I'd have to say that screaming in at 6 km/s (13400 mph), while glowing a red-hot 2400 K (3800 F), followed by a Mach 2

  15. Agriculture, Land Use, Energy and Carbon Emission Impacts of Global Biofuel Mandates to Mid-Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

    2014-02-01

    Three potential future scenarios of expanded global biofuel production are presented here utilizing the GCAM integrated assessment model. These scenarios span a range that encompasses on the low end a continuation of existing biofuel production policies to two scenarios that would require an expansion of current targets as well as an extension of biofuels targets to other regions of the world. Conventional oil use is reduced by 4-8% in the expanded biofuel scenarios, which results in a decrease of in CO2 emissions on the order of 1-2 GtCO2/year by mid-century from the global transportation sector. The regional distribution of crop production is relatively unaffected, but the biofuels targets do result in a marked increase in the production of conventional crops used for energy. Producer prices of sugar and corn reach levels about 12% and 7% above year 2005 levels, while the increased competition for land causes the price of food crops such as wheat, although not used for bioenergy in this study, to increase by 1 to 2%. The amount of land devoted to growing all food crops and dedicated bioenergy crops is increased by about 10% by 2050 in the High biofuel case, with concurrent decreases in other uses of land such as forest and pasture. In both of the expanded biofuels cases studied, there is an increase in net cumulative carbon emissions for the first couple of decades due to these induced land use changes. However, the difference in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels expansion decline by about 2035 as the reductions in energy system emissions exceed further increases in emissions from land use change. Even in the absence of a policy that would limit emissions from land use change, the differences in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels scenarios reach zero by 2050, and are decreasing further over time in both cases.

  16. Structural analysis of three global land models on carbon cycle simulations using a traceability framework

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Rafique, R.; Xia, J.; Hararuk, O.; Luo, Y.

    2014-06-27

    Modeled carbon (C) storage capacity is largely determined by the C residence time and net primary productivity (NPP). Extensive research has been done on NPP dynamics but the residence time and their relationships with C storage are much less studied. In this study, we implemented a traceability analysis to understand the modeled C storage and residence time in three land surface models: CSIRO's Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) with 9 C pools, Community Land Model (version 3.5) combined with Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CLM3.5-CASA) with 12 C pools and Community Land Model (version 4) (CLM4) with 26 C pools. The globally averagedmoreC storage and residence time was computed at both individual pool and total ecosystem levels. The spatial distribution of total ecosystem C storage and residence time differ greatly among the three models. The CABLE model showed a closer agreement with measured C storage and residence time in plant and soil pools than CLM3.5-CASA and CLM4. However, CLM3.5-CASA and CLM4 were close to each other in modeled C storage but not with measured data. CABLE stores more C in root whereas CLM3.5-CASA and CLM4 store more C in woody pools, partly due to differential NPP allocation in respective pools. The C residence time in individual C pools is greatly different among models, largely because of different transfer coefficient values among pools. CABLE had higher bulk residence time for soil C pools than the other two models. Overall, the traceability analysis used in this study can help fully characterizes the behavior of complex land models.less

  17. Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

    2011-08-08

    In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

  18. Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 1025% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

  19. The GEWEX LandFlux project: Evaluation of model evaporation using tower-based and globally gridded forcing data

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    McCabe, M. F.; Ershadi, A.; Jimenez, C.; Miralles, D. G.; Michel, D.; Wood, E. F.

    2016-01-26

    Determining the spatial distribution and temporal development of evaporation at regional and global scales is required to improve our understanding of the coupled water and energy cycles and to better monitor any changes in observed trends and variability of linked hydrological processes. With recent international efforts guiding the development of long-term and globally distributed flux estimates, continued product assessments are required to inform upon the selection of suitable model structures and also to establish the appropriateness of these multi-model simulations for global application. In support of the objectives of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Exchanges (GEWEX) LandFlux project, fourmore » commonly used evaporation models are evaluated against data from tower-based eddy-covariance observations, distributed across a range of biomes and climate zones. The selected schemes include the Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) approach, the Priestley–Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) model, the Penman–Monteith-based Mu model (PM-Mu) and the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM). Here we seek to examine the fidelity of global evaporation simulations by examining the multi-model response to varying sources of forcing data. To do this, we perform parallel and collocated model simulations using tower-based data together with a global-scale grid-based forcing product. Through quantifying the multi-model response to high-quality tower data, a better understanding of the subsequent model response to the coarse-scale globally gridded data that underlies the LandFlux product can be obtained, while also providing a relative evaluation and assessment of model performance. Using surface flux observations from 45 globally distributed eddy-covariance stations as independent metrics of performance, the tower-based analysis indicated that PT-JPL provided the highest overall statistical performance (0.72; 61 W m–2; 0.65), followed closely by GLEAM

  20. Sensitivity of Global Terrestrial Gross Primary Production to Hydrologic States Simulated by the Community Land Model Using Two Runoff Parameterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Huimin; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Dawen; Shi, Xiaoying; Mao, Jiafu; Hayes, Daniel J.; Schwalm, C.; Wei, Yaxing; Liu, Shishi

    2014-09-01

    The terrestrial water and carbon cycles interact strongly at various spatio-temporal scales. To elucidate how hydrologic processes may influence carbon cycle processes, differences in terrestrial carbon cycle simulations induced by structural differences in two runoff generation schemes were investigated using the Community Land Model 4 (CLM4). Simulations were performed with runoff generation using the default TOPMODEL-based and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model approaches under the same experimental protocol. The comparisons showed that differences in the simulated gross primary production (GPP) are mainly attributed to differences in the simulated leaf area index (LAI) rather than soil moisture availability. More specifically, differences in runoff simulations can influence LAI through changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and their seasonality that affect the onset of the growing season and the subsequent dynamic feedbacks between terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles. As a result of a relative difference of 36% in global mean total runoff between the two models and subsequent changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and LAI, the simulated global mean GPP differs by 20.4%. However, the relative difference in the global mean net ecosystem exchange between the two models is small (2.1%) due to competing effects on total mean ecosystem respiration and other fluxes, although large regional differences can still be found. Our study highlights the significant interactions among the water, energy, and carbon cycles and the need for reducing uncertainty in the hydrologic parameterization of land surface models to better constrain carbon cycle modeling.

  1. Impact of modern climate change on the intercommunication: Global ocean-land (Northern Hemisphere)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobanova, H.V.; Lobanov, V.A.; Stepanenko, S.R.

    1996-12-31

    Two main temperature gradients define the synoptic and climatic conditions on the earth in general: equator-pole gradient and ocean-land gradient. The analysis of temperature on the basis of new cyclic-different-scales conception has been fulfilled in every important part of the climatic system in the Northern Hemisphere for assessment of their vulnerability to modern climate change. Historical time series of monthly surface temperature have been used for this aim in the points of regular grid over the Northern Hemisphere from 1891 to 1992. The main feature of the temperature in main climatic parts of the earth is a complexity of its spatial structure. New methods of spatial decomposition have been developed for the division of this complex fields structure into characteristics of mean value of the field and index of its non-homogeneity or spatial variation. It has been established, that the temperature gradient between ocean and land is increasing that is characterized of the increasing of an intensity of synoptic processes, their spatial non-homogeneity and more frequent appearance of the extreme synoptic events. The models of intercommunications between coefficients of temperature spatial decomposition over the ocean and land have been developed for two time period and the increasing of the relationships closeness has been established between ocean and land as well as the decrease of main planet gradient: the pole(the Polar ocean)-equator.

  2. Impact of mesophyll diffusion on estimated global land CO2 fertilization

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Sun, Ying; Gu, Lianhong; Dickinson, Robert E.; Norby, Richard J.; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    2014-10-13

    In C3 plants, CO2 concentrations drop considerably along mesophyll diffusion pathways from substomatal cavities to chloroplasts where CO2 assimilation occurs. Global carbon cycle models have not explicitly represented this internal drawdown and so overestimate CO2 available for carboxylation and underestimate photosynthetic responsiveness to atmospheric CO2. An explicit consideration of mesophyll diffusion increases the modeled cumulative CO2 fertilization effect (CFE) for global gross primary production (GPP) from 915 PgC to 1057 PgC for the period of 1901 to 2010. This increase represents a 16% correction, large enough to explain the persistent overestimation of growth rates of historical atmospheric CO2 by Earthmore » System Models. Without this correction, the CFE for global GPP is underestimated by 0.05 PgC yr-1ppm-1. This finding implies that the contemporary terrestrial biosphere is more CO2-limited than previously thought.« less

  3. Final Report for ''SOURCES AND SINKS OF CARBON FROM LAND-USE CHANGE AND MANAGEMENT: A GLOBAL SYNTHESIS'' Project Period September 15, 2001--September 14, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houghton, R.A.

    2003-12-12

    Land management and land-use change can either release carbon (as CO{sub 2}) to the atmosphere, for example when forests are converted to agricultural lands, or withdraw carbon from the atmosphere as forests grow on cleared lands or as management practices sequester carbon in soil. The purpose of this work was to calculate the annual sources and sinks of carbon from changes in land use and management, globally and for nine world regions, over the period 1850 to 2000. The approach had three components. First, rates of land-use change were reconstructed from historical information on the areas of croplands, pastures, forests, and other lands and from data on wood harvests. In most regions, land-use change included the conversion of natural ecosystems to cultivated lands and pastures, including shifting cultivation, harvest of wood (for timber and fuel), and the establishment of tree plantations. In the U.S., woody encroachment and woodland thickening as a result of fire suppression were also included. Second, the amount of carbon per hectare in vegetation and soils and changes in that carbon as a result of land-use change were determined from data obtained in the ecological and forestry literature. These data on land-use change and carbon stocks were then used in a bookkeeping model (third component) to calculate regional and global changes in terrestrial carbon. The results indicate that for the period 1850-2000 the net flux of carbon from changes in land use was 156 PgC. For comparison, emissions of carbon from combustion of fossil fuels were approximately 280 PgC during the same interval. Annual emissions from land-use change exceeded emissions from fossil fuels before about 1920. Somewhat more that half (60%) of the long-term flux was from the tropics. Average annual fluxes during the 1980s and 1990s were 2.0 and 2.2 ({+-}0.8) PgC yr{sup -1} (30-40% of fossil fuel emissions), respectively. In these decades, the global sources of carbon were almost entirely from

  4. ``White Land``...new Russian closed-cycle nuclear technology for global deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1996-07-01

    A Russian technology called ``White Land`` is being pursued which is based on their heavy-metal-cooled fast spectrum reactor technology developed to power their super-fast Alpha Class submarines. These reactors have important safety advantages over the more conventional sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors but preserve some of the attractive operational features of the fast spectrum systems. Perhaps chief among these advantages in the current political milieu is their ability to generate energy from any nuclide heavier than thorium including HEU, weapons plutonium, commercial plutonium, neptunium, americium, and curium. While there are several scenarios for deployment of these systems, the most attractive perhaps is containment in submarine-like enclosures to be placed underwater near a coastal population center. A Russian organization named the Alphabet Company would build the reactors and maintain title to them. The company would be paid on the basis of kilowatt-hours delivered. The reactors would not require refueling for 10--15 years and no maintenance violating the radiation containment would be required or would be carried out at the deployment site. The host country need not develop any nuclear technology or accept any nuclear waste. When the fuel load has been burned, the entire unit would be towed to Archangel, Russia for refueling. The fission product would be removed from the fuel by ``dry`` molten salt technology to minimize the waste stream and the fissile material would be returned to the reactor for further burning. The fission product waste would be stored at New Land Island, their current nuclear test site in the Arctic. If concerns over fission product justify it, the long-lived species will be transmuted in an accelerator-driven system. Apparently this project is backed at the highest levels of MINATOM and the Alphabet Company has the funding to proceed.

  5. Divergent predictions of carbon storage between two global land models: attribution of the causes through traceability analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafique, Rashid; Xia, Jianyang; Hararuk, Oleksandra; Asrar, Ghassem R.; Wang, Yingping; Luo, Yiqi

    2015-08-27

    Representations of the terrestrial carbon cycle in land models are becoming increasingly complex. It is crucial to develop approaches for critical assessment of the complex model properties in order to understand key factors contributing to models’ performance. In this study, we applied a traceability analysis, which decomposes carbon cycle models into traceable components, to two global land models (CABLE and CLM-CASA’) to diagnose the causes of their differences in simulating ecosystem carbon storage capacity. Driven with similar forcing data, the CLM-CASA’ model predicted ~31% larger carbon storage capacity than the CABLE model. Since ecosystem carbon storage capacity is a product of net primary productivity (NPP) and ecosystem residence time (τE), the predicted difference in the storage capacity between the two models results from differences in either NPP or τE or both. Our analysis showed that CLM-CASA’ simulated 37% higher NPP than CABLE due to higher rates of carboxylation (Vcmax) in CLM-CASA’. On the other hand, τE , which was a function the baseline carbon residence time (τ´E) and environmental effect on carbon residence time, was on average 11 years longer in CABLE than CLM-CASA’. The difference in τE was mainly found to be caused by longer τ´E in CABLE than CLM-CASA’. This difference in τE was mainly caused by longer τ´E of woody biomass (23 vs. 14 years in CLM-CASA’) and higher proportion of NPP allocated to woody biomass (23% vs. 16%). Differences in environmental effects on carbon residence times had smaller influences on differences in ecosystem carbon storage capacities compared to differences in NPP and τ´E. Overall; the traceability analysis is an effective method for identifying sources of variations between the two models.

  6. Real-time global flood estimation using satellite-based precipitation and a coupled land surface and routing model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Huan; Adler, Robert F.; Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George J.; Li, Hongyi; Wang, JianJian

    2014-03-01

    A widely used land surface model, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, is coupled with a newly developed hierarchical dominant river tracing-based runoff-routing model to form the Dominant river tracing-Routing Integrated with VIC Environment (DRIVE) model, which serves as the new core of the real-time Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS). The GFMS uses real-time satellite-based precipitation to derive flood monitoring parameters for the latitude band 50°N–50°S at relatively high spatial (~12 km) and temporal (3 hourly) resolution. Examples of model results for recent flood events are computed using the real-time GFMS (http://flood.umd.edu). To evaluate the accuracy of the new GFMS, the DRIVE model is run retrospectively for 15 years using both research-quality and real-time satellite precipitation products. Evaluation results are slightly better for the research-quality input and significantly better for longer duration events (3 day events versus 1 day events). Basins with fewer dams tend to provide lower false alarm ratios. For events longer than three days in areas with few dams, the probability of detection is ~0.9 and the false alarm ratio is ~0.6. In general, these statistical results are better than those of the previous system. Streamflow was evaluated at 1121 river gauges across the quasi-global domain. Validation using real-time precipitation across the tropics (30°S–30°N) gives positive daily Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficients for 107 out of 375 (28%) stations with a mean of 0.19 and 51% of the same gauges at monthly scale with a mean of 0.33. Finally, there were poorer results in higher latitudes, probably due to larger errors in the satellite precipitation input.

  7. front cover

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    care. Also, this Medical Program does not cover services received outside the United States, unless there is an emergency. Most preauthorizations may be requested over...

  8. front cover

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... This Medical Program does not cover hypnosis or services related to hypnosis, whether for medical or anesthetic purposes. - Infertility ServicesArtificial Conception This Medical ...

  9. front cover

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Preferred Provider Option (PPO) Medical Program For Active Employees and Their Covered Family Members and Non- Medicare Eligible Retirees and Their Covered Family Members Administered by: N113794 01/15 CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE Customer Service: Medical/Surgical Claims and Prescription Drugs-The 24/7 Nurseline can help when you have a health problem or concern. The 24/7 Nurseline is staffed by registered nurses who are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 24/7 Nurseline toll-free telephone number:

  10. NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 NERSC Calculations Provide Independent Confirmation of Global Land Warming Since 1901 September 9, ...

  11. Using reactive transport codes to provide mechanistic biogeochemistry representations in global land surface models: CLM-PFLOTRAN 1.0

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Tang, G.; Yuan, F.; Bisht, G.; Hammond, G. E.; Lichtner, P. C.; Kumar, J.; Mills, R. T.; Xu, X.; Andre, B.; Hoffman, F. M.; et al

    2015-12-17

    We explore coupling to a configurable subsurface reactive transport code as a flexible and extensible approach to biogeochemistry in land surface models; our goal is to facilitate testing of alternative models and incorporation of new understanding. A reaction network with the CLM-CN decomposition, nitrification, denitrification, and plant uptake is used as an example. We implement the reactions in the open-source PFLOTRAN code, coupled with the Community Land Model (CLM), and test at Arctic, temperate, and tropical sites. To make the reaction network designed for use in explicit time stepping in CLM compatible with the implicit time stepping used in PFLOTRAN,more » the Monod substrate rate-limiting function with a residual concentration is used to represent the limitation of nitrogen availability on plant uptake and immobilization. To achieve accurate, efficient, and robust numerical solutions, care needs to be taken to use scaling, clipping, or log transformation to avoid negative concentrations during the Newton iterations. With a tight relative update tolerance to avoid false convergence, an accurate solution can be achieved with about 50 % more computing time than CLM in point mode site simulations using either the scaling or clipping methods. The log transformation method takes 60–100 % more computing time than CLM. The computing time increases slightly for clipping and scaling; it increases substantially for log transformation for half saturation decrease from 10−3 to 10−9 mol m−3, which normally results in decreasing nitrogen concentrations. The frequent occurrence of very low concentrations (e.g. below nanomolar) can increase the computing time for clipping or scaling by about 20 %; computing time can be doubled for log transformation. Caution needs to be taken in choosing the appropriate scaling factor because a small value caused by a negative update to a small concentration may diminish the update and result in false convergence even with very

  12. Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses April 2001, Discussion Paper 01-19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedjo, Roger; Sohngen, Brent; Mendelsohn, Robert

    2001-04-05

    This study develops cumulative carbon ''supply curves'' for global forests utilizing a dynamic timber supply model for sequestration of forest carbon. Because the period of concern is the next century, and particular time points within that century, the curves are not traditional Marshallian supply curves or steady-state supply curves. Rather, the focus is on cumulative carbon cost curves (quasi-supply curves) at various points in time over the next 100 years. The research estimates a number of long-term, cumulative, carbon quasi-supply curves under different price scenarios and for different time periods. The curves trace out the relationship between an intertemporal price path for carbon, as given by carbon shadow prices, and the cumulative carbon sequestered from the initiation of the shadow prices, set at 2000, to a selected future year (2010, 2050, 2100). The timber supply model demonstrates that cumulative carbon quasi-supply curves that can be generated through forestry significantly depend on initial carbon prices and expectations regarding the time profile of future carbon prices. Furthermore, long-run quasi-supply curves generated from a constant price will have somewhat different characteristics from quasi-supply curves generated with an expectation of rising carbon prices through time.The ?least-cost? curves vary the time periods under consideration and the time profile of carbon prices. The quasi-supply curves suggest that a policy of gradually increasing carbon prices will generate the least costly supply curves in the shorter periods of a decade or so. Over longer periods of time, however, such as 50 or 100 years, these advantages appear to dissipate.

  13. Comparison of Global Model Results from the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) with Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) Manipulation Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M; Randerson, Jim; Fung, Inez; Thornton, Peter E; Covey, Curtis; Bonan, Gordon; Running, Steven; Norby, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) manipulation experiments have been carried out at a handful of sites to gauge the response of the biosphere to significant increases in atmospheric [CO{sub 2}]. Early synthesis results from four temperate forest sites suggest that the response of net primary productivity (NPP) is conserved across a broad range of productivity with a stimulation at the median of 23 {+-} 2% when the surrounding air [CO{sub 2}] was raised to 550{approx}ppm. As a part of the Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP), a community-based model-data comparison activity, the authors have performed a global FACE modeling experiment using two terrestrial biogeochemistry modules, CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN, coupled to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate System Model (CCSM). The two models were forced with an improved NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set and reconstructed atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] and N deposition data through 1997. At the beginning of 1997 in the transient simulations, global atmospheric [CO{sub 2}] was abruptly raised to 550{approx}ppm, the target value used at the FACE sites. In the control runs, [CO{sub 2}] continued to rise following observations until 2004, after which it was held constant out to year 2100. In both simulations, the last 25 years of reanalysis forcing and a constant N deposition were applied after year 2004. Across all forest biomes, the NPP responses from both models are weaker than those reported for the four FACE sites. Moreover, model responses vary widely geographically with a decreasing trend of NPP increases from 40{sup o}N to 70{sup o}N. For CLM3-CASA, the largest responses occur in arid regions of western North America and central Asia, suggesting that responses are most strongly influenced by increased water use efficiency for this model. CLM3-CN exhibits consistently weaker responses than CLM3-CASA' with the strongest responses in central Asia, but significantly constrained by N

  14. Ecological Principles and Guidelines for Managing the Use of Land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Brown, Sandra; Haeuber, R A; Hobbs, N T; Huntly, N; Naiman, R J; Riebsame, W E; Turner, M G; Valone, T J

    2014-01-01

    The many ways that people have used and managed land throughout history has emerged as a primary cause of land-cover change around the world. Thus, land use and land management increasingly represent a fundamental source of change in the global environment. Despite their global importance, however, many decisions about the management and use of land are made with scant attention to ecological impacts. Thus, ecologists' knowledge of the functioning of Earth's ecosystems is needed to broaden the scientific basis of decisions on land use and management. In response to this need, the Ecological Society of America established a committee to examine the ways that land-use decisions are made and the ways that ecologists could help inform those decisions. This paper reports the scientific findings of that committee. Five principles of ecological science have particular implications for land use and can assure that fundamental processes of Earth's ecosystems are sustained. These ecological principles deal with time, species, place, dis- turbance, and the landscape. The recognition that ecological processes occur within a temporal setting and change over time is fundamental to analyzing the effects of land use. In addition, individual species and networks of interacting species have strong and far-reaching effects on ecological processes. Furthermore, each site or region has a unique set of organisms and abiotic conditions influencing and constraining ecological processes. Distur- bances are important and ubiquitous ecological events whose effects may strongly influence population, com- munity, and ecosystem dynamics. Finally, the size, shape, and spatial relationships of habitat patches on the landscape affect the structure and function of ecosystems. The responses of the land to changes in use and management by people depend on expressions of these fundamental principles in nature. These principles dictate several guidelines for land use. The guidelines give practical

  15. A global map of urban extent from nightlights

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yuyu; Smith, Steven J.; Zhao, Kaiguang; Imhoff, Marc L.; Thomson, Allison M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Asrar, Ghassem R.; Zhang, Xuesong; He, Chunyang; Elvidge, Christopher

    2015-05-13

    Urbanization, one of the major human induced land-cover and land-use changes, has a profound impact on the Earth system including biodiversity, the cycling of water and carbon and exchange of energy and water between Earth’s surface and atmosphere, all affecting weather and climate. Accurate information on urban areas and their spatial distribution at the regional and global scales is important for scientific understanding of their contribution to the changing Earth system, and for practical management and policy decisions. We developed a method to map the urban extent from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) nighttime stable-light data atmore » the global level and derived a new global map of 1-km urban extent for year 2000. Based on this map, we found that globally, urban land area is about 0.5% of total land area but ranges widely at regional level from 0.1% in Oceania to 2.3% in Europe. At the country level, urban land area varies from lower than 0.01% to higher than 10%, but is lower than 1% for most (70%) countries. Urbanization follows land mass distribution, as anticipated, with the highest concentration found between 30°N to 45°N latitude and the largest longitudinal peak around 80°W. Based on a sensitivity analysis and comparison with other global urban area products, we found that our global product of urban area provides a reliable estimate of global urban areas and offer the potential of capturing more accurately their spatial and temporal dynamics.« less

  16. A global map of urban extent from nightlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Smith, Steven J.; Zhao, Kaiguang; Imhoff, Marc L.; Thomson, Allison M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Asrar, Ghassem R.; Zhang, Xuesong; He, Chunyang; Elvidge, Christopher

    2015-05-13

    Urbanization, one of the major human induced land-cover and land-use changes, has a profound impact on the Earth system including biodiversity, the cycling of water and carbon and exchange of energy and water between Earth’s surface and atmosphere, all affecting weather and climate. Accurate information on urban areas and their spatial distribution at the regional and global scales is important for scientific understanding of their contribution to the changing Earth system, and for practical management and policy decisions. We developed a method to map the urban extent from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) nighttime stable-light data at the global level and derived a new global map of 1-km urban extent for year 2000. Based on this map, we found that globally, urban land area is about 0.5% of total land area but ranges widely at regional level from 0.1% in Oceania to 2.3% in Europe. At the country level, urban land area varies from lower than 0.01% to higher than 10%, but is lower than 1% for most (70%) countries. Urbanization follows land mass distribution, as anticipated, with the highest concentration found between 30°N to 45°N latitude and the largest longitudinal peak around 80°W. Based on a sensitivity analysis and comparison with other global urban area products, we found that our global product of urban area provides a reliable estimate of global urban areas and offer the potential of capturing more accurately their spatial and temporal dynamics.

  17. Global carbon budget 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Boden, T. A.; Bopp, L.; Bozec, Y.; Canadell, J. G.; Chini, L. P.; Chevallier, F.; Cosca, C. E.; Harris, I.; Hoppema, M.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Jain, A. K.; Johannessen, T.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landa, C. S.; Landschützer, P.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Marland, G.; Mathis, J. T.; Metzl, N.; Nojiri, Y.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Peng, S.; Peters, W.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, P.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Salisbury, J. E.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Segschneider, J.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Werf, G. R.; Viovy, N.; Wang, Y.-P.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zeng, N.

    2015-05-08

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates, consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, respectively, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover-change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models forced by observed climate, CO2, and land-cover-change (some including nitrogen–carbon interactions). We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from

  18. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J. G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J. I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Keeling, R. F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L. P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A. K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S. K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D. R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J. E. M. S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F. F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; van Heuven, S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-12-07

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We also discuss changes compared to previous estimates as well as consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover-change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. Moreover, the mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models forced by observed climate, CO2, and land-cover change (some including nitrogen–carbon interactions). We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three

  19. LandCast 2050 High-Resolution Population Projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-01-01

    The LandCast 2050 data set is an empirically-informed spatial distribution of projected population of the contiguous U.S. for 2050 compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Population projections of county level numbers were developed using a modified version of the U.S. Census's projection methodology - with the U.S. Census's official projection as the benchmark. Projected census counts were apportioned to each grid cell based on locally adaptive likelihood coefficients, which are based on land cover, slope, road proximity, distances to larger cities, a moving average of current population, and other data sets. The LandCast data set was developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient populations at risk.

  20. LandCast 2030 High-Resolution Population Projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-01-01

    The LandCast 2030 data set is an empirically-informed spatial distribution of projected population of the contiguous U.S. for 2030 compiled on a 30" x 30" latitute/longitude grid. Population projections of county level numbers were developed using a modified version of the U.S. Census's projection methodology - with the U.S. Census's official projection as the benchmark. Projected census counts were apportioned to each grid cell based on locally adaptive likelihood coefficients, which are based on land cover, slope, road proximity, distances to larger cities, a moving average of current population, and other data sets. The LandCast 2030 data set was developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient populations at risk.

  1. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrell, James J.; Donohoe, Anthony J.

    1981-11-03

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  2. Disentangling climatic and anthropogenic controls on global terrestrial evapotranspiration trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Wei, Yaxing; Thornton, Peter E.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Fu, Wenting; Fisher, Joshua B.; Dickinson, Robert E.; Shem, Willis; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Kaicun; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Tian, Hanqin; Mu, Mingquan; Arain, Altaf; Ciais, Philippe; Cook, Robert; Dai, Yongjiu; Hayes, Daniel; Huang, Maoyi; Huang, Suo; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Ito, Akihiko; Jain, Atul; King, Anthony W.; Lei, Huimin; Lu, Chaoqun; Michalak, Anna M.; Parazoo, Nicholas; Peng, Changhui; Peng, Shushi; Poulter, Benjamin; Schaefer, Kevin; Jafarov, Elchin; Wang, Weile; Zeng, Ning; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Zhao, Fang; Zhu, Qiuan; Zhu, Zaichun

    2015-09-08

    Here, we examined natural and anthropogenic controls on terrestrial evapotranspiration (ET) changes from 1982-2010 using multiple estimates from remote sensing-based datasets and process-oriented land surface models. A significant increased trend of ET in each hemisphere was consistently revealed by observationally-constrained data and multi-model ensembles that considered historic natural and anthropogenic drivers. The climate impacts were simulated to determine the spatiotemporal variations in ET. Globally, rising CO2 ranked second in these models after the predominant climatic influences, and yielded a decreasing trend in canopy transpiration and ET, especially for tropical forests and high-latitude shrub land. Increased nitrogen deposition slightly amplified global ET via enhanced plant growth. Land-use-induced ET responses, albeit with substantial uncertainties across the factorial analysis, were minor globally, but pronounced locally, particularly over regions with intensive land-cover changes. Our study highlights the importance of employing multi-stream ET and ET-component estimates to quantify the strengthening anthropogenic fingerprint in the global hydrologic cycle.

  3. Journal Cover Stories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Cover Stories Journal Cover Stories Here are papers authored by NERSC users that were featured on the cover of the scientific journal in which they were published. You can sort according to any of the headings below. Sort by: Default | Name | Date (low-high) | Date (high-low) | Source | Category Journ Mat Chem A Hwang Enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activities by Pt nanoclusters decorated on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons April 28, 2016 | Author(s): G. Park et al. |

  4. Shafts Temporarily Covered

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2014 Shafts Temporarily Covered Today, workers continued physical preparations for the filter replacement. The Air Intake Shaft and Salt Handling Shaft openings were temporarily covered to further reduce the amount of air entering the underground. Covering these opening helps maintain ventilation balance while continuing to draw surface air down to the waste shaft, and prevents unfiltered air from exiting the underground. Workers not directly involved in the filter replacement efforts

  5. ARM - Cover Competition Winners

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Covers were selected based on their aesthetic appeal, ability to communicate science, and impact on ARM science. The winners of these competitions are presented below. 2009 2008 ...

  6. NERSC Journal Cover Stories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    | png | 729 KB AGU-WRR2015Cover.png Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tightshale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater:...

  7. Global carbon budget 2014

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; et al

    2015-05-08

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates, consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissionsmore » from fossil fuel combustion and cement production (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, respectively, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover-change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models forced by observed climate, CO2, and land-cover-change (some including nitrogen–carbon interactions). We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three atmospheric inverse methods for three broad latitude bands. All uncertainties are reported as ±1σ;, reflecting the current capacity to characterise the annual estimates

  8. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J. G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J. I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; et al

    2015-12-07

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We also discuss changes compared to previous estimates as well as consistency within and among components, alongside methodology andmore » data limitations. CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover-change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. Moreover, the mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models forced by observed climate, CO2, and land-cover change (some including nitrogen–carbon interactions). We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three atmospheric inverse methods for three broad latitude bands. All uncertainties are reported as ±1σ, reflecting the current capacity to characterise the annual estimates of each

  9. Journal Cover Stories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    NatureCoverLarge.png High-quality electron beams from a laser wakefield accelerator using plasma-channel guiding September 30, 2004 | Author(s): C. G. R. Geddes, Cs. Toth, J. van Tilborg, E. Esarey, C. B. Schroeder, D. Bruhwiler, C. Nieter, J. Cary & W. P. Leemans | Source: Nature | Category: Fusion Energy | URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature02900 Download Image: NatureCoverLarge.png | png | 2.7 MB 30 September 2004, Vol. 431, pp. 541-544 PhysTodayCoverLarge.png Integrated Simulation of

  10. Journal Cover Stories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    CEN-Cover.png Graphene Moves Toward Applications November 21, 2011 | Author(s): Donghai Mei, et al. | Category: Chemistry | URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl203332e Download Image: CEN-Cover.png | png | 986 KB Hierarchically Porous Graphene as a Lithium-Air Battery Electrode. See also http://pubs.acs.org/NanoLett (2011) 11, 5071-5078 SotirisCoverJPCBLarge.jpg Computational Investigation of the First Solvation Shell Structure of Interfacial and Bulk Aqueous Chloride and Iodide Ions November 14,

  11. Disentangling climatic and anthropogenic controls on global terrestrial evapotranspiration trends

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Wei, Yaxing; Thornton, Peter E.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Fu, Wenting; Fisher, Joshua B.; Dickinson, Robert E.; Shem, Willis; et al

    2015-09-08

    Here, we examined natural and anthropogenic controls on terrestrial evapotranspiration (ET) changes from 1982-2010 using multiple estimates from remote sensing-based datasets and process-oriented land surface models. A significant increased trend of ET in each hemisphere was consistently revealed by observationally-constrained data and multi-model ensembles that considered historic natural and anthropogenic drivers. The climate impacts were simulated to determine the spatiotemporal variations in ET. Globally, rising CO2 ranked second in these models after the predominant climatic influences, and yielded a decreasing trend in canopy transpiration and ET, especially for tropical forests and high-latitude shrub land. Increased nitrogen deposition slightly amplified globalmore » ET via enhanced plant growth. Land-use-induced ET responses, albeit with substantial uncertainties across the factorial analysis, were minor globally, but pronounced locally, particularly over regions with intensive land-cover changes. Our study highlights the importance of employing multi-stream ET and ET-component estimates to quantify the strengthening anthropogenic fingerprint in the global hydrologic cycle.« less

  12. LandCast 2050 High-Resolution Population Projection

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-01-01

    The LandCast 2050 data set is an empirically-informed spatial distribution of projected population of the contiguous U.S. for 2050 compiled on a 30" x 30" latitude/longitude grid. Population projections of county level numbers were developed using a modified version of the U.S. Census's projection methodology - with the U.S. Census's official projection as the benchmark. Projected census counts were apportioned to each grid cell based on locally adaptive likelihood coefficients, which are based on landmore » cover, slope, road proximity, distances to larger cities, a moving average of current population, and other data sets. The LandCast data set was developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient populations at risk.« less

  13. LandCast 2030 High-Resolution Population Projection

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-01-01

    The LandCast 2030 data set is an empirically-informed spatial distribution of projected population of the contiguous U.S. for 2030 compiled on a 30" x 30" latitute/longitude grid. Population projections of county level numbers were developed using a modified version of the U.S. Census's projection methodology - with the U.S. Census's official projection as the benchmark. Projected census counts were apportioned to each grid cell based on locally adaptive likelihood coefficients, which are based on landmore » cover, slope, road proximity, distances to larger cities, a moving average of current population, and other data sets. The LandCast 2030 data set was developed as part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Global Population Project for estimating ambient populations at risk.« less

  14. Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests...

  15. Coupling a Reactive Transport Code with a Global Land Surface Model for Mechanistic Biogeochemistry Representation: 1. Addressing the Challenge of Nonnegativity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Guoping; Yuan, Fengming; Bisht, Gautam; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Collier, Nathaniel O.; Kumar, Jitendra; Mills, Richard T.; Xu, Xiaofeng; Andre, Ben; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Painter, Scott L.; Thornton, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive transport codes (e.g., PFLOTRAN) are increasingly used to improve the representation of biogeochemical processes in terrestrial ecosystem models (e.g., the Community Land Model, CLM). As CLM and PFLOTRAN use explicit and implicit time stepping, implementation of CLM biogeochemical reactions in PFLOTRAN can result in negative concentration, which is not physical and can cause numerical instability and errors. The objective of this work is to address the nonnegativity challenge to obtain accurate, efficient, and robust solutions. We illustrate the implementation of a reaction network with the CLM-CN decomposition, nitrification, denitrification, and plant nitrogen uptake reactions and test the implementation at arctic, temperate, and tropical sites. We examine use of scaling back the update during each iteration (SU), log transformation (LT), and downregulating the reaction rate to account for reactant availability limitation to enforce nonnegativity. Both SU and LT guarantee nonnegativity but with implications. When a very small scaling factor occurs due to either consumption or numerical overshoot, and the iterations are deemed converged because of too small an update, SU can introduce excessive numerical error. LT involves multiplication of the Jacobian matrix by the concentration vector, which increases the condition number, decreases the time step size, and increases the computational cost. Neither SU nor SE prevents zero concentration. When the concentration is close to machine precision or 0, a small positive update stops all reactions for SU, and LT can fail due to a singular Jacobian matrix. The consumption rate has to be downregulated such that the solution to the mathematical representation is positive. A first-order rate downregulates consumption and is nonnegative, and adding a residual concentration makes it positive. For zero-order rate or when the reaction rate is not a function of a reactant, representing the availability limitation of each

  16. Coupling a Reactive Transport Code with a Global Land Surface Model for Mechanistic Biogeochemistry Representation: 1. Addressing the Challenge of Nonnegativity

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Tang, Guoping; Yuan, Fengming; Bisht, Gautam; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Collier, Nathaniel O.; Kumar, Jitendra; Mills, Richard T.; Xu, Xiaofeng; Andre, Ben; et al

    2016-01-01

    Reactive transport codes (e.g., PFLOTRAN) are increasingly used to improve the representation of biogeochemical processes in terrestrial ecosystem models (e.g., the Community Land Model, CLM). As CLM and PFLOTRAN use explicit and implicit time stepping, implementation of CLM biogeochemical reactions in PFLOTRAN can result in negative concentration, which is not physical and can cause numerical instability and errors. The objective of this work is to address the nonnegativity challenge to obtain accurate, efficient, and robust solutions. We illustrate the implementation of a reaction network with the CLM-CN decomposition, nitrification, denitrification, and plant nitrogen uptake reactions and test the implementation atmore » arctic, temperate, and tropical sites. We examine use of scaling back the update during each iteration (SU), log transformation (LT), and downregulating the reaction rate to account for reactant availability limitation to enforce nonnegativity. Both SU and LT guarantee nonnegativity but with implications. When a very small scaling factor occurs due to either consumption or numerical overshoot, and the iterations are deemed converged because of too small an update, SU can introduce excessive numerical error. LT involves multiplication of the Jacobian matrix by the concentration vector, which increases the condition number, decreases the time step size, and increases the computational cost. Neither SU nor SE prevents zero concentration. When the concentration is close to machine precision or 0, a small positive update stops all reactions for SU, and LT can fail due to a singular Jacobian matrix. The consumption rate has to be downregulated such that the solution to the mathematical representation is positive. A first-order rate downregulates consumption and is nonnegative, and adding a residual concentration makes it positive. For zero-order rate or when the reaction rate is not a function of a reactant, representing the availability limitation

  17. Journal Cover Gallery | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Cover Gallery [COVER]Chemistry of Materials [COVER]CHEMPHYSCHEM [COVER]Angewandte Chemie {COVER]JACS [COVER]NPR [COVER]Nanoscale [COVER]The Jounral of Physical Chemistry Letters [COVER]The Journal of Chemical Physics [COVER]ACS Catalysis [COVER]JALA [COVER]JVSTA [COVER]Journal of Materials Chemistry [COVER]The Journal of Physical Chemistry [COVER]Inorganic Chemistry [COVER]Analyst [COVER]Analytical Chemistry

  18. Reusable pipe flange covers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holden, James Elliott; Perez, Julieta

    2001-01-01

    A molded, flexible pipe flange cover for temporarily covering a pipe flange and a pipe opening includes a substantially round center portion having a peripheral skirt portion depending from the center portion, the center portion adapted to engage a front side of the pipe flange and to seal the pipe opening. The peripheral skirt portion is formed to include a plurality of circumferentially spaced tabs, wherein free ends of the flexible tabs are formed with respective through passages adapted to receive a drawstring for pulling the tabs together on a back side of the pipe flange.

  19. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International offsets are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  20. Terry Land

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    terry land Terry Land Terry Land follows the path of opportunity You came to the Lab as a postdoc after you got your PhD in physical chemistry from UC Irvine. What was your first research project? I was hired to do surface science-which was my background-and to work on high explosives which had never even contemplated working on. I had a lab set up in the basement of the biology building for these experiments. I also worked part time at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility while waiting for

  1. Journal Cover Stories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Darmon Chem Science 2015 cover page Increasing the rate of hydrogen oxidation without increasing the overpotential: a bio-inspired iron molecular electrocatalyst with an outer coordination sphere proton relay March 5, 2015 | Author(s): Jonathan M. Darmon, Neeraj Kumar, Elliott B. Hulley, Charles J. Weiss, Simone Raugei, R. Morris Bullocka and Monte L. Helm* Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57, Richland, USA

  2. PAGE Cover: Top Photo

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    PAGE Cover: Top Photo Energy Sciences Building. Elevation of the recently completed Energy Sciences Building (ESB) project at Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, Illinois. The ESB was a capital line-item project funded by the Science Laboratories Infrastructure program at a total cost of $96 million and was completed on August 6, 2014. The ESB project provided 173,000 gross square feet of interdisciplinary research and collaborative space to accommodate a range of physical sciences research

  3. Journal Cover Stories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Liu2010.jpg Methanol Synthesis from H2 and CO2 on a Mo6S8 Cluster: A Density Functional Study October 30, 2009 | Author(s): Ping Liu, YongMan Choi, Y. Yang and M. G. White | Source: J. Phys. Chem. A | Category: Chemistry | URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp906780a Download Image: Liu2010.jpg | jpg | 2.1 MB J. Phys. Chem. A, 2010, 114 (11), pp 3888-3895 ChingCoverPaper.png A Genomic Approach to the Stability, Elastic, and Electronic Properties of the MAX Phases June 24, 2014 | Author(s): S. Aryal,

  4. Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (IFPRI) * Private industry (e.g. Biodiesel Board, California Air Resources Board, ... Oil Other Services Dairy Process Public Sector Sugar Ethanol Other Food Biodiesel Animal ...

  5. ARM - Lesson Plans: When Land Ice Melts

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    When Land Ice Melts Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: When Land Ice Melts Objective The objective of this activity is to demonstrate what happens when land ice melts and how it is different from the effect of melting icebergs. Materials A big rectangular container

  6. United Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global statistics or as geospatial data sets (maps), covering themes like Freshwater, Population,...

  7. Scenarios of Future Socio-Economics, Energy, Land Use, and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Moss, Richard H.; Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.; Kopp, Roberrt; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Patel, Pralit L.; Thomson, Allison M.; Wise, Marshall A.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2013-04-13

    This chapter explores uncertainty in future scenarios of energy, land use, emissions and radiative forcing that span the range in the literature for radiative forcing, but also consider uncertainty in two other dimensions, challenges to mitigation and challenges to adaptation. We develop a set of six scenarios that we explore in detail including the underlying the context in which they are set, assumptions that drive the scenarios, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), used to produce quantified implications for those assumptions, and results for the global energy and land-use systems as well as emissions, concentrations and radiative forcing. We also describe the history of scenario development and the present state of development of this branch of climate change research. We discuss the implications of alternative social, economic, demographic, and technology development possibilities, as well as potential stabilization regimes for the supply of and demand for energy, the choice of energy technologies, and prices of energy and agricultural commodities. Land use and land cover will also be discussed with the emphasis on the interaction between the demand for bioenergy and crops, crop yields, crop prices, and policy settings to limit greenhouse gas emissions.

  8. Biogenic carbon fluxes from global agricultural production and consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Julie; West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Collatz, George; Imhoff, Marc L.

    2015-10-01

    Quantification of biogenic carbon fluxes from agricultural lands is needed to generate comprehensive bottom-up estimates of net carbon exchange for global and regional carbon monitoring. We estimated global agricultural carbon fluxes associated with annual crop net primary production (NPP), harvested biomass, and consumption of biomass by humans and livestock. These estimates were combined for a single estimate of net carbon exchange (NCE) and spatially distributed to 0.05 degree resolution using MODIS satellite land cover data. Global crop NPP in 2011 was estimated at 5.25 ± 0.46 Pg C yr-1, of which 2.05 ± 0.05 Pg C yr-1 was harvested and 0.54 Pg C yr-1 was collected from crop residues for livestock fodder. Total livestock feed intake in 2011 was 2.42 ± 0.21 Pg C yr-1, of which 2.31 ± 0.21 Pg C yr-1 was emitted as CO2, 0.07 ± 0.01 Pg C yr-1 was emitted as CH4, and 0.04 Pg C yr-1 was contained within milk and egg production. Livestock grazed an estimated 1.27 Pg C yr-1 in 2011, which constituted 52.4% of total feed intake. Global human food intake was 0.57 ± 0.03 Pg C yr-1 in 2011, the majority of which is respired as CO2. Completed global cropland carbon budgets accounted for the ultimate use of ca. 80% of harvested biomass. The spatial distribution of these fluxes may be used for global carbon monitoring, estimation of regional uncertainty, and for use as input to Earth system models.

  9. Covered Product Category: Commercial Griddles

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial griddles, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program

  10. Covered Product Category: Commercial Fryers

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial fryers, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  11. Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Chini, Louise M.; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter; Hurtt, George; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-06-01

    Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for the 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). To examine the significance of such effects on global and regional patterns of climate change, a baseline and alternative scenario of future anthropogenic activity are simulated within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples the Global Change Assessment Model, Global Land-use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative scenario has high biofuel utilization and approximately 50% less global forest cover compared to the baseline, standard RCP4.5 scenario. Both scenarios stabilize radiative forcing from atmospheric constituents at 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. Thus, differences between their climate predictions quantify the biophysical effects of LUC. Offline radiative transfer and land model simulations are also utilized to identify forcing and feedback mechanisms driving the coupled response. Boreal deforestation is found to strongly influence climate due to increased albedo coupled with a regional-scale water vapor feedback. Globally, the alternative scenario yields a 21st century warming trend that is 0.5 °C cooler than baseline, driven by a 1 W/m2 mean decrease in radiative forcing that is distributed unevenly around the globe. Some regions are cooler in the alternative scenario than in 2005. These results demonstrate that neither climate change nor actual radiative forcing are uniquely related to atmospheric forcing targets such as those found in the RCP’s, but rather depend on particulars of the socioeconomic pathways followed to meet each target.

  12. TRIDEC Land TRIDEC Land Transfer REQUEST Transfer REQUEST

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Area TRIDEC Land TRIDEC Land Transfer REQUEST Transfer REQUEST 300 Acres 300 Acres Additional Lands Additional Lands Identified for Identified for EA Analysis EA Analysis 2,772...

  13. Land Management - Hanford Site

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Management About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us Land Management Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size...

  14. GCAM Bioenergy and Land Use Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    GCAM Bioenergy and Land Use Modeling March 25, 2015 Analysis and Sustainability PI: Marshall Wise Pacific Northwest National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement Support BETO Analysis and Sustainability goals by studying bioenergy production and use in a systems and economic context of US and global energy, agriculture, land use, and emissions. MYPP goal: Develop and maintain analytical tools, models,

  15. COVER

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3, 2015 Mr. James R. Haynes Chief Executive Officer Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC Post Office Box 2009 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830-8245 SEL-2015-01 Dear Mr. Haynes: The Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of Enforcement has completed an investigation into a security incident involving the unclassified waste stream at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), as identified in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Safeguards and Security Information Management System (SSIMS) report

  16. Cover

    Energy Savers

    Awarded Cooperative Agreement Awarded September 28, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor bill.taylor@srs.gov 803-952-8564 Cincinnati - The Department of Energy today awarded a cooperative agreement to the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) to continue efforts to engage states and to work collaboratively to solve continued challenges posed by waste management and cleanup at DOE sites. Through this cooperative agreement, the NGA Center will continue

  17. cover

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

  18. Cover

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    3 Financial Statement Audit OAS-FS-15-02 November 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 19, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ADMINISTRATOR, WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION FROM: Daniel M. Weeber Assistant Inspector General for Audits and Administration Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Western Federal Power System's Fiscal Year 2013 Financial Statement

  19. Cover

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Year 2015 Financial Statement Audit OAI-FS-16-07 April 2016 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 6, 2016 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ADMINISTRATOR, WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION FROM: Sarah B. Nelson Assistant Inspector General for Audits and Administration SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Western Federal Power System's Fiscal Year 2015 Financial Statement Audit" The attached report

  20. Cover Stories | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ Characterization of Li-ion Battery Electrochemistry via Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy," Adv. Mater., 23, 5613-5617 (2011). Click to view cover V. G. Pol and...

  1. Global environmental change: Its nature and impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hidore, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    This book is intended as an entry-level textbook on environmental science for nonscience majors. Twenty chapters address topics from historical geology and climatic change to population dynamics, land-use, water pollution, ozone depletion and biodiversity, global warming.

  2. Global decarbonization strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messner, S.

    1996-12-31

    The presentation covers a brief summary of the research activities of the Environmentally Compatible Energy Strategies Project (ECS) at IIASA. The overall research focuses on long-term global energy development and emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). The ultimate goal is to analyze strategies that achieve decarbonization of global energy systems during the next century. The specific activities range from mitigation of GHG emissions to an integrated assessment of climate change. One focal point is the GHG mitigation technology inventory CO{sub 2}DB, which presently covers approximately 1,400 technologies related to energy and the greenhouse effect. Another integral part is the development of global energy and emissions scenarios, an effort involving a number of formal models to assess the implications. A large number of global scenarios for the next century has been developed, that could be grouped into three families. All of them include energy efficiency improvements and some degree of decarbonization in the world. They are based on different economic and technological development trajectories, and their emissions range from very high to a stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions. The presentation will outline the salient characteristics of the three scenario families and provide some regional implications of these alternative futures.

  3. Global ice sheet modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

  4. COVERING A CORE BY EXTRUSION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karnie, A.J.

    1963-07-16

    A method of covering a cylindrical fuel core with a cladding metal ms described. The metal is forced between dies around the core from both ends in two opposing skirts, and as these meet the ends turn outward into an annular recess in the dics. By cutting off the raised portion formed by the recess, oxide impurities are eliminated. (AEC)

  5. Hillslope stability and land use (1985). Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidle, R.C.; Pearce, A.J.; O'Loughlin, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book emphasizes the natural factors affecting slope stability, including soils and geomorphic, hydrologic, vegetative, and seismic factors and provides information on landslide classification, global damage, and analytical methods. The effects of various extensive and intensive land management practices on slope stability are discussed together with methods for prediction, avoidance, and control. Examples of terrain evaluation procedures and land management practices are presented.

  6. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

    2009-08-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

  7. Corrugated cover plate for flat plate collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollands, K. G. Terry; Sibbitt, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    A flat plate radiant energy collector is providing having a transparent cover. The cover has a V-corrugated shape which reduces the amount of energy reflected by the cover away from the flat plate absorber of the collector.

  8. Archaeology on Lab Land

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Archaeology on Lab Land Archaeology on Lab Land People have lived in this area for more than 5,000 years. Lab archaeologists are studying and preserving the ancient human occupation of the Pajarito Plateau. Archaeology on Lab Land exhibit Environmental Research & Monitoring Visit our exhibit and find out how Los Alamos researchers are studying our rich cultural diversity. READ MORE Nake'muu archaeological site Unique Archaeology The thousands of Ancestral Pueblo sites identified on Lab land

  9. Global Solutions

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Global Solutions Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions ⇒ Navigate Section Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions A-Z Index Berkeley Lab masthead U.S. Department of Energy logo Phone Book Jobs Search BANGLADESH INDIA CHINA DAYA BAY CHINA RUSSIA SIBERIA JAPAN SAMOA HAWAII SOUTH POLE ANTARCTICA NEW MEXICO SOUTH DAKOTA TEXAS GULF OF MEXICO NEW YORK PUERTO RICO AMAZON RAIN FOREST CANARY ISLANDS SWITZERLAND ETHIOPIA

  10. Design, Performance, and Sustainability of Engineered Covers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Design, Performance, and Sustainability of Engineered Covers for Uranium Mill Tailings Design, Performance, and Sustainability of Engineered Covers for Uranium Mill Tailings ...

  11. Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Energy Use Cover Page Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Contact Us * Feedback * PrivacySecurity *...

  12. Trends Online: A Compendium of Data on Global Change

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Trends Online provides synopses of frequently used time series of global-change data: • historical and modern records (from ice cores and current monitoring stations) of atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) • atmospheric concentrations of methane • isotopic measurements (14C et al.) for atmospheric greenhouse gases • estimates of global, regional, and national CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels, gas flaring, and the production of cement • global emissions estimates for methane (CH4) • carbon flux from land-cover change • long-term temperature records, whose spatial coverage ranges from individual sites to the entire globe and from the Earth's surface to the lower stratosphere • total cloud amount over China • ecosystems (area and carbon content) Data records are presented in multipage formats, each dealing with a specific site, region, or emissions species. The data records include tables; graphs; discussions of methods for collecting, measuring, and reporting the data; trends in the data, and references to literature providing further information. Instructions for citing specific data in Trends Online are provided for each compiled data set. All data appearing in Trends Online are available, on request, on digital media from CDIAC at no cost. [Copied from the Abstract to Trends Online at http://cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/abstract.htm

  13. A global warning for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paepe, R.

    1996-12-31

    The problem of global warming is a complex one not only because it is affecting desert areas such as the Sahel leading to famine disasters of poor rural societies, but because it is an even greater threat to modern well established industrial societies. Global warming is a complex problem of geographical, economical and societal factors together which definitely are biased by local environmental parameters. There is an absolute need to increase the knowledge of such parameters, especially to understand their limits of variance. The greenhouse effect is a global mechanism which means that in changing conditions at one point of the Earth, it will affect all other regions of the globe. Industrial pollution and devastation of the forest are quoted as similar polluting anthropogenic activities in far apart regions of the world with totally different societies and industrial compounds. The other important factor is climatic cyclicity which means that droughts are bound to natural cycles. These natural cycles are numerous as is reflected in the study of geo-proxydata from several sequential geological series on land, ice and deepsea. Each of these cycles reveals a drought cycle which occasionally interfere at the same time. It is believed that the present drought might well be a point of interference between the natural cycles of 2,500 and 1,000 years and the man induced cycle of the last century`s warming up. If the latter is the only cycle involved, man will be able to remediate. If not, global warming will become even more disastrous beyond the 21st century.

  14. Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houghton, R.A.

    2001-02-22

    The database documented in this numeric data package, a revision to a database originally published by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) in 1995, consists of annual estimates, from 1850 through 1990, of the net flux of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere resulting from deliberate changes in land cover and land use, especially forest clearing for agriculture and the harvest of wood for wood products or energy. The data are provided on a year-by-year basis for nine regions (North America, South and Central America, Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, Tropical Africa, the Former Soviet Union, China, South and Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Developed Region) and the globe. Some data begin earlier than 1850 (e.g., for six regions, areas of different ecosystems are provided for the year 1700) or extend beyond 1990 (e.g., fuelwood harvest in South and Southeast Asia, by forest type, is provided through 1995). The global net flux during the period 1850 to 1990 was 124 Pg of carbon (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams). During this period, the greatest regional flux was from South and Southeast Asia (39 Pg of carbon), while the smallest regional flux was from North Africa and the Middle East (3 Pg of carbon). For the year 1990, the global total net flux was estimated to be 2.1 Pg of carbon.

  15. Watershed response and land energy feedbacks under climate change depend upon groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, R M; Kollet, S J

    2008-06-10

    Human induced climate change will have a significant impact on the hydrologic cycle, creating changes in fresh water resources, land cover, and feedbacks that are difficult to characterize, which makes it an issue of global importance. Previous studies have not included subsurface storage in climate change simulations and feedbacks. A variably-saturated groundwater flow model with integrated overland flow and land surface model processes is used to examine the interplay between coupled water and energy processes under climate change conditions. A case study from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) USA, an important agricultural region that is susceptible to drought, is used as the basis for three scenarios simulations using a modified atmospheric forcing dataset to reflect predicted effects due to human-induced climate change. These scenarios include an increase in the atmospheric temperature and variations in rainfall amount and are compared to the present-day climate case. Changes in shallow soil saturation and groundwater levels are quantified as well as the corresponding energy fluxes at the land surface. Here we show that groundwater and subsurface lateral flow processes are critical in understanding hydrologic response and energy feedbacks to climate change and that certain regions are more susceptible to changes in temperature, while others to changes in precipitation. This groundwater control is critical for understanding recharge and drought processes, possible under future climate conditions.

  16. Global strategies for environmental issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This is the 19th Annual NAEP conference proceedings, containing abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions. Broad areas covered include the following: Environmental Management; Biodiversity/sustainable development; Gulf Regional Issues; Environmental ethics/equity; NEPA workshop and symposium; International environmental issues; global Environmental Effects; Risk Assessment; and Environmental effects of nuclear waste management.

  17. Water-Balance Cover Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1 Conference, February 27-March 3, 2011, Phoenix, AZ Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test C.H. Benson University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin W.J. Waugh S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado W.H. Albright Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada G.M. Smith Geo-Smith Engineering, Grand Junction, Colorado R.P. Bush U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado ABSTRACT The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a

  18. Coupled land-ocean-atmosphere processes and South Asian monsoon variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meehl, G.A.

    1994-10-14

    Results from a global coupled ocean-atmosphere climate model and a model with specified tropical convective heating anomalies show that the South Asian monsoon was an active part of the tropical biennial oscillation (TBO). Convective heating anomalies over Africa and the western Pacific Ocean associated with the TBO altered the simulated pattern of atmospheric circulation for the Northern Hemisphere winter mid-latitude over Asia. This alteration in the mid-latitude circulation maintained temperature anomalies over South Asia through winter and helped set up the land-sea temperature contrast for subsequent monsoon development. South Asian snow cover contributed to monsoon strength but was symptomatic of the larger scale alteration in the mid-latitude atmospheric circulation pattern. 36 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Global warming, global research, and global governing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preining, O.

    1997-12-31

    The anticipated dangers of Global Warming can be mitigated by reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, especially CO{sub 2}. To reach acceptable, constant levels within the next couple of centuries it might be necessary to accept stabilization levels higher than present ones, The annual CO{sub 2} emissions must be reduced far below today`s values. This is a very important result of the models discussed in the 1995 IPCC report. However, any even very modest scenario for the future must take into account a substantial increase in the world population which might double during the 21st century, There is a considerable emission reduction potential of the industrialized world due to efficiency increase, However, the demand for energy services by the growing world population will, inspite of the availability of alternative energy resources, possibly lead to a net increase in fossil fuel consumption. If the climate models are right, and the science community believes they are, we will experience a global warming of the order of a couple of degrees over the next century; we have to live with it. To be prepared for the future it is essential for us to use new research techniques embracing not only the familiar fields of hard sciences but also social, educational, ethical and economic aspects, We must find a way to build up the essential intellectual capacities needed to deal with these kinds of general problems within all nations and all societies. But this is not Although, we also have to find the necessary dynamical and highly flexible structures for a global governing using tools such as the environmental regime. The first step was the Framework Convention On Climate Change, UN 1992; for resolution of questions regarding implementations the Conference of the Parties was established.

  20. Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Shujiang; Post, Wilfred M; Wang, Dali; Nichols, Dr Jeff A; Bandaru, Vara Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

  1. Global climate feedbacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  2. Cover Heated, Open Vessels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Cover Heated, Open Vessels Cover Heated, Open Vessels This tip sheet on covering heated, open vessels provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies. STEAM TIP SHEET #19 Cover Heated, Open Vessels (January 2012) (386.38 KB) More Documents & Publications Improving Steam System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Second Edition Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam Improving

  3. Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Improvements, and Long-Term Performance | Department of Energy Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance (882.35 KB) More

  4. A causal analysis framework for land-use change and the potential role of bioenergy policy

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Efroymson, Rebecca A.; Kline, Keith L.; Angelsen, Arild; Verburg, Peter H.; Dale, Virginia H.; Langeveld, Johannes W. A.; McBride, Allen

    2016-10-05

    Here we propose a causal analysis framework to increase the reliability of land-use change (LUC) models and the accuracy of net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions calculations for biofuels. The health-sciences-inspired framework is used here to determine probable causes of LUC, with an emphasis on bioenergy and deforestation. Calculations of net GHG emissions for LUC are critical in determining whether a fuel qualifies as a biofuel or advanced biofuel category under national (U.S., U.K.), state (California), and European Union regulations. Biofuel policymakers and scientists continue to discuss whether presumed indirect land-use change (ILUC) estimates, which often involve deforestation, should be includedmore » in GHG accounting for biofuel pathways. Current estimates of ILUC for bioenergy rely largely on economic simulation models that focus on causal pathways involving global commodity trade and use coarse land cover data with simple land classification systems. ILUC estimates are highly uncertain, partly because changes are not clearly defined and key causal links are not sufficiently included in the models. The proposed causal analysis framework begins with a definition of the change that has occurred and proceeds to a strength-of-evidence approach based on types of epidemiological evidence including plausibility of the relationship, completeness of the causal pathway, spatial co-occurrence, time order, analogous agents, simulation model results, and quantitative agent response relationships.Lastly, we discuss how LUC may be allocated among probable causes for policy purposes and how the application of the framework has the potential to increase the validity of LUC models and resolve ILUC and biofuel controversies.« less

  5. Using Unmanned Helicopters to Assess Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Randy Lee

    2012-07-01

    Evaluating vegetation cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. Methods that have sufficient accuracy and improved cost efficiency could dramatically alter how biotic resources are monitored on both public and private lands. This will be of interest to land managers because there are rarely enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, unmanned helicopters were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover during May, June, and July in 2005. The images were used to estimate percent cover for six vegetative cover classes (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forbs, litter, and bare ground). The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Ocular assessments of digital imagery were performed using a software program called SamplePoint, and the results were compared against field measurements collected using a point-frame method to assess accuracy. The helicopter imagery evaluation showed a high degree of agreement with field cover class values for litter, bare ground, and grass, and reasonable agreement for dead shrubs. Shrub cover was often overestimated and forbs were generally underestimated. The helicopter method took 45% less time than the field method to set plots and collect and analyze data. This study demonstrates that UAV technology provides a viable method for monitoring vegetative cover on rangelands in less time and with lower costs. Tradeoffs between cost and accuracy are critical management decisions that are important when managing vegetative conditions across vast sagebrush ecosystems throughout the Intermountain West.

  6. how much land | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    how much land Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land...

  7. csp land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    csp land use Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land...

  8. Bureau of Land Management

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable ... Arctic Climate Measurements Global Climate Models Software Sustainable Subsurface ...

  9. Wheelspace windage cover plate for turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Norman Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Windage cover plates are secured between the wheels and spacer of a turbine rotor to prevent hot flow path gas ingestion into the wheelspace cavities. Each cover plate includes a linear, axially extending body curved circumferentially with a radially outwardly directed wall at one axial end. The wall defines a axially opening recess for receiving a dovetail lug. The cover plate includes an axially extending tongue received in a circumferential groove of the spacer. The cover plate is secured with the tongue in the groove and dovetail lug in the recess. Lap joints between circumferentially adjacent cover plates are provided.

  10. Swimming Pool Covers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Swimming Pool Covers Swimming Pool Covers Covering a pool when it is not in use is the single most effective means of reducing pool heating costs. | Photo courtesy of Aquatherm Industries. Covering a pool when it is not in use is the single most effective means of reducing pool heating costs. | Photo courtesy of Aquatherm Industries. You can significantly reduce swimming pool heating costs by using a pool cover. On the following pages, see the tables showing the costs of heating pools with and

  11. Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning Handbook | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning HandbookPermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuideHandbook Abstract...

  12. Colorado State Land Board Land Survey Requirements | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Colorado State Land Board Land Survey Requirements Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Colorado...

  13. Hawaii Land Study Bureau's Land Classification Finder | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hawaii Land Study Bureau's Land Classification Finder Citation Hawaii State...

  14. Global change: Acronyms and abbreviations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodard, C.T.; Stoss, F.W.

    1995-05-01

    This list of acronyms and abbreviations is compiled to provide the user with a ready reference to dicipher the linguistic initialisms and abridgements for the study of global change. The terms included in this first edition were selected from a wide variety of sources: technical reports, policy documents, global change program announcements, newsletters, and other periodicals. The disciplinary interests covered by this document include agriculture, atmospheric science, ecology, environmental science, oceanography, policy science, and other fields. In addition to its availability in hard copy, the list of acronyms and abbreviations is available in DOS-formatted diskettes and through CDIAC`s anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) area on the Internet.

  15. Multi-decadal trends in global terrestrial evapotranspiration...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Recent decline in the global land evapotranspiration trend due to limited moisture supply. Nature 467, 951-954, doi: 10.1038nature09396 (2010). 2. Trenberth, K. E., Smith, L., ...

  16. Global Climate Change and Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released in 2007 significantly increased our confidence about the role that humans play in forcing climate change. There is now a high degree of confidence that the (a) current atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) far exceed those of the pre-industrial era, (b) global increases in CO2 arise mainly from fossil fuel use and land use change while those of CH4 and N2O originate primarily from agricultural activities, and (c) the net effect of human activities since 1750 has led to a warming of the lower layers of the atmosphere, with an increased radiative forcing of 1.6 W m-2. Depending on the scenario of human population growth and global development, mean global temperatures could rise between 1.8 and 4.0 C by the end of the 21st century.

  17. Uni Land | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search Name: Uni Land Place: Bologna, Italy Zip: 40063 Sector: Solar Product: Italian property company, which buys land without permits and develops it for residential and...

  18. Global Arrays

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-02-23

    The Global Arrays (GA) toolkit provides an efficient and portable “shared-memory” programming interface for distributed-memory computers. Each process in a MIMD parallel program can asynchronously access logical blocks of physically distributed dense multi-dimensional arrays, without need for explicit cooperation by other processes. Unlike other shared-memory environments, the GA model exposes to the programmer the non-uniform memory access (NUMA) characteristics of the high performance computers and acknowledges that access to a remote portion of the sharedmore » data is slower than to the local portion. The locality information for the shared data is available, and a direct access to the local portions of shared data is provided. Global Arrays have been designed to complement rather than substitute for the message-passing programming model. The programmer is free to use both the shared-memory and message-passing paradigms in the same program, and to take advantage of existing message-passing software libraries. Global Arrays are compatible with the Message Passing Interface (MPI).« less

  19. Monitoring the performance of an alternative cover using caisson lysimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.; Smith, G.M.; Mushovic, P.S.

    2004-02-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 8, collaborated on a series of field lysimeter studies to design and monitor the performance of an alternative cover for a uranium mill tailings disposal cell at the Monticello, Utah, Superfund Site. Because groundwater recharge is naturally limited at Monticello in areas with thick loess soils, DOE and EPA chose to design a cover for Monticello using local soils and a native plant community to mimic this natural soilwater balance. Two large drainage lysimeters fabricated of corrugated steel culvert lined with high-density polyethylene were installed to evaluate the hydrological and ecological performance of an alternative cover design constructed in 2000 on the disposal cell. Unlike conventional, lowpermeability designs, this cover relies on (1) the water storage capacity of a 163-cm soil “sponge” layer overlying a sand-and-gravel capillary barrier to retain precipitation while plants are dormant and (2) native vegetation to remove precipitation during the growing season. The sponge layer consists of a clay loam subsoil compacted to 1.65 g/cm2 in one lysimeter and a loam topsoil compacted to 1.45 g/cm2 in the other lysimeter, representing the range of as-built conditions constructed in the nearby disposal cell cover. About 0.1 mm of drainage occurred in both lysimeters during an average precipitation year and before they were planted, an amount well below the EPA target of <3.0 mm/yr. However, the cover with less compacted loam topsoil sponge had a 40% greater water storage capacity than the cover with overly compacted clay loam subsoil sponge. The difference is attributable in part to higher green leaf area and water extraction by plants in the loam topsoil. The lesson learned is that seemingly subtle differences in soil types, sources, and compaction can result in salient differences in performance. Diverse, seeded communities of

  20. Proposed Conveyance of Land

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Conveyance of Land at the Hanford Site, Richland, WA Public Scoping Fact Sheet The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking input for a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment (EA) to assess the potential environmental effects of conveying approximately 1,641 acres of Hanford Site land to a local economic development organization (https://federalregister.gov/a/2012-23099). The Tri-City Development Council (TRIDEC), a DOE-recognized Community Reuse Organization

  1. integrated-land-use

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Planning Tool for Sydney, Australia Dr. Matthew Berryman, University of Wollongong Monday, November 28, 2011 - 1pm Argonne TRACC Building 222, Room D-233 The SMART Infrastructure Facility at the University of Wollongong, Australia, has been building an agent-based model to explore the feedbacks between transportation and land use. We focus on livability as a key driver of agent's location choice, and in addition to transport we include factors such as:

  2. Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends...

  3. Covered Product Category: Displays | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Displays Covered Product Category: Displays The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for displays, a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies buy ENERGY STAR qualified products in all product categories covered by this program and any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. MEETING EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL PURCHASES The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

  4. Development of a winter wheat model in the Community Land Model (version 4.5)

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Lu, Yaqiong; Williams, Ian N.; Bagley, Justin E.; Torn, Margaret S.; Kueppers, Lara M.

    2016-10-12

    Winter wheat is a staple crop for global food security, and is the dominant vegetation cover for a significant fraction of earth's croplands. As such, it plays an important role in carbon cycling and land-atmosphere interactions in these key regions. Accurate simulation of winter wheat growth is not only crucial for future yield prediction under changing climate, but also for understanding the energy and water cycles for winter wheat dominated regions. We developed a new winter wheat model in the Community Land Model (CLM) to better simulate wheat growth and grain production. These included schemes to represent vernalization, as wellmore » as frost tolerance and damage. We calibrated three key parameters (minimum planting temperature, maximum crop growth days, and initial value of leaf carbon allocation coefficient) and modified the grain carbon allocation algorithm for simulations at the U.S. Southern Great Plains ARM site (US-ARM), and validated the model performance at three additional sites across the continental US. We found that the new winter wheat model improved the prediction of monthly variation in leaf area index, latent heat flux, and net ecosystem exchange during the spring growing season. The model accurately simulated the interannual variation in yield at the US-ARM site, but underestimated yield at sites and in regions (Northwestern and Southeastern US) with historically greater yields.« less

  5. Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Categories Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for Data Center, Computer, ... redundancy; and the length of uptime required in the event of an outage. ...

  6. Covered Product Category: Commercial Refrigerators and Freezers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial refrigerators and freezers, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  7. Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for hot food holding cabinets, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  8. Covered Product Category: Commercial Steam Cookers

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial steam cookers, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  9. "PBS NEWSHOUR" covers new technique that may make solar panel production

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    less expensive "PBS NEWSHOUR" covers new technique that may make solar panel production less expensive "PBS NEWSHOUR" covers new technique that may make solar panel production less expensive Scientists have developed a more efficient method of creating the material that makes solar panels work, according to a report published this week, which researchers say could be key to creating clean global energy in the future. April 24, 2015 image description Scientists Aditya

  10. Global Arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Vishnu, Abhinav; Palmer, Bruce J.

    2015-11-01

    Global Arrays (GA) is a distributed-memory programming model that allows for shared-memory-style programming combined with one-sided communication, to create a set of tools that combine high performance with ease-of-use. GA exposes a relatively straightforward programming abstraction, while supporting fully-distributed data structures, locality of reference, and high-performance communication. GA was originally formulated in the early 1990’s to provide a communication layer for the Northwest Chemistry (NWChem) suite of chemistry modeling codes that was being developed concurrently.

  11. Energy and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

  12. Future land use plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

  13. gas-hydrate-global-assessment | netl.doe.gov

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    gas-hydrate-global-assessment Frozen Heat: A Global Outlook on Methane Hydrate cover of executive summary The United Nations Environmental Programme released this new, two-volume report in March 2015. Frozen Heat: A Global Outlook on Methane Hydrate details the science and history of gas hydrates, evaluates the current state of gas hydrate research, and explores the potential impact of this untapped natural gas source on the future global energy mix. An executive summary of report is also

  14. Covered Sites/Populations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Covered Sites/Populations Covered Sites/Populations Construction Worker Screening Projects Construction Worker Projects, Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Production Worker Screening Projects Production Worker Projects, Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) National Supplemental Screening Program National Supplemental Screening Program Beryllium Vendor Screening Program Defunct Beryllium Vendor Screening Program

  15. land requirements | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    land requirements Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv...

  16. Land use and energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robeck, K.E.; Ballou, S.W.; South, D.W.; Davis, M.J.; Chiu, S.Y.; Baker, J.E.; Dauzvardis, P.A.; Garvey, D.B.; Torpy, M.F.

    1980-07-01

    This report provides estimates of the amount of land required by past and future energy development in the United States and examines major federal legislation that regulates the impact of energy facilities on land use. An example of one land use issue associated with energy development - the potential conflict between surface mining and agriculture - is illustrated by describing the actual and projected changes in land use caused by coal mining in western Indiana. Energy activities addressed in the report include extraction of coal, oil, natural gas, uranium, oil shale, and geothermal steam; uranium processing; preparation of synfuels from coal; oil refineries; fossil-fuel, nuclear, and hydro-electric power plants; biomass energy farms; and disposal of solid wastes generated during combustion of fossil fuels. Approximately 1.1 to 3.3 x 10/sup 6/ acres were devoted to these activities in the United States in 1975. As much as 1.8 to 2.0 x 10/sup 6/ additional acres could be required by 1990 for new, nonbiomass energy development. The production of grain for fuel ethanol could require an additional 16.9 to 55.7 x 10/sup 6/ acres by 1990. Federal laws that directly or indirectly regulate the land-use impacts of energy facilities include the National Environmental Protection Act, Clean Air Act, Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and Coastal Zone Management Act. The major provisions of these acts, other relevant federal regulations, and similar state and local regulatons are described in this report. Federal legislation relating to air quality, water quality, and the management of public lands has the greatest potential to influence the location and timing of future energy development in the United States.

  17. Machine Learning Approaches for High-resolution Urban Land Cover Classification: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatsavai, Raju; Chandola, Varun; Cheriyadat, Anil M; Bright, Eddie A; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Graesser, Jordan B

    2011-01-01

    The proliferation of several machine learning approaches makes it difficult to identify a suitable classification technique for analyzing high-resolution remote sensing images. In this study, ten classification techniques were compared from five broad machine learning categories. Surprisingly, the performance of simple statistical classification schemes like maximum likelihood and Logistic regression over complex and recent techniques is very close. Given that these two classifiers require little input from the user, they should still be considered for most classification tasks. Multiple classifier systems is a good choice if the resources permit.

  18. Covered Product Category: Air-Cooled Electric Chillers | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Covered Product Category: Air-Cooled Electric Chillers Covered Product Category: Air-Cooled ... chillers (i.e., none with remote condensers) are covered. b Performance ...

  19. DOE-L.__ PROPOSAL PREPARATION INSTRUCTIONS - COVER LETTER AND

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    L. PROPOSAL PREPARATION INSTRUCTIONS - COVER LETTER AND VOLUME I, OFFER AND OTHER DOCUMENTS (a) Instruction - Cover Letter. The cover letter shall include, but not be limited to,...

  20. [Cover page, Margins: Left 1 in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Organizations: General Atomics, Strategic Analysis, NovaCentrix, Global Solar Energy, Mossey Creek Solar, Ampulse, Ferro Corporation Date Published: October 2012 ...

  1. Global Climate & Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Concentrating Solar Power, Customers & Partners, Cyber, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Facilities, Global Climate & Energy, Global ...

  2. Graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngil; Jang, Dae -Heung; Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-08-10

    Covering arrays relax the condition of orthogonal arrays by only requiring that all combination of levels be covered but not requiring that the appearance of all combination of levels be balanced. This allows for a much larger number of factors to be simultaneously considered but at the cost of poorer estimation of the factor effects. To better understand patterns between sets of columns and evaluate the degree of coverage to compare and select between alternative arrays, we suggest several new graphical methods that show some of the patterns of coverage for different designs. These graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays are illustrated with a few examples.

  3. Graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngil; Jang, Dae -Heung; Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-08-10

    Covering arrays relax the condition of orthogonal arrays by only requiring that all combination of levels be covered but not requiring that the appearance of all combination of levels be balanced. This allows for a much larger number of factors to be simultaneously considered but at the cost of poorer estimation of the factor effects. To better understand patterns between sets of columns and evaluate the degree of coverage to compare and select between alternative arrays, we suggest several new graphical methods that show some of the patterns of coverage for different designs. As a result, these graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays are illustrated with a few examples.

  4. Sustainable bioenergy production from marginal lands in the US Midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelfand, Ilya; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Gross, Katherine L.; Robertson, G. P.

    2013-01-24

    Long-term measurements of global warming impact coupled with spatially explicit modeling suggests that both climate benefits and the production potential of cellulosic crops grown on marginal lands of the US North Central region are substantial but will be insufficient to meet long-term biofuel needs.

  5. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  6. Navajo-Hopi Land Commission

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Renewable Power at the Paragon-Bisti Ranch DOE TEP Review, Golden, CO May 7, 2015   THE NAVAJO-HOPI LAND SETTLEMENT ACT  Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act passed 1974  Required relocation of Navajo and Hopi families living on land partitioned to other tribe.  Set aside lands for the benefit of relocates  Proceeds from RE development for Relocatee Project Background   Paragon-Bisti Ranch is selected lands :  Located in northwestern New Mexico.  22,000 acres of land

  7. Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Planning Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning Abstract The BLM's Resource Management Plans...

  8. Swimming Pool Covers | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Gas Heating Costs and Savings Use of a pool cover also can help reduce the size of a solar pool heating system, which can save money. How They Work Swimming pools lose energy in...

  9. Swimming Pool Covers | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of heating pools with and without pool covers in different U.S. cities: Estimating Heat Pump Swimming Pool Heater Costs and Savings Estimating Swimming Pool Gas Heating Costs...

  10. The Thermal Collector With Varied Glass Covers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luminosu, I.; Pop, N.

    2010-08-04

    The thermal collector with varied glass covers represents an innovation realized in order to build a collector able to reach the desired temperature by collecting the solar radiation from the smallest surface, with the highest efficiency. In the case of the thermal collector with variable cover glasses, the number of the glass plates covering the absorber increases together with the length of the circulation pipe for the working fluid. The thermal collector with varied glass covers compared to the conventional collector better meet user requirements because: for the same temperature increase, has the collecting area smaller; for the same collection area, realizes the highest temperature increase and has the highest efficiency. This works is addressed to researchers in the solar energy and to engineers responsible with air-conditioning systems design or industrial and agricultural products drying.

  11. Six-Year Review of Covered Products

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum explains that the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) requires the Department of Energy to re-evaluate efficiency standards for all covered appliances and products...

  12. Product Categories Covered by Efficiency Programs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document shows a list of energy- and water-efficient product categories covered by various efficiency programs, including ENERGY STAR, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT), FEMP Low Standby Power, and WaterSense.

  13. Repositioning of Covered Stents: The Grip Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, John Martin; Guo Xiaofeng; Midia, Mehran

    2011-06-15

    Introduction: Retrieval and repositioning of a stent deployed beyond its intended target region may be a difficult technical challenge. Materials and Methods: A balloon-mounted snare technique, a variant of the coaxial loop snare technique, is described. Results: The technique is described for the repositioning of a covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent and a covered biliary stent. Conclusion: The balloon-mounted snare technique is a useful technique for retrieval of migrated stents.

  14. 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Cover | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Peer Review Report Cover 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Cover 2014 Water Power Peer Review Report Cover.JPG More Documents & Publications NOWEGIS Report Cover Water Power For...

  15. Texas General Land Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Land Office Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Texas General Land Office Name: Texas General Land Office Address: 1700 Congress Ave Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78701 Website:...

  16. IDRISI Land Change Modeler | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    IDRISI Land Change Modeler Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IDRISI Land Change Modeler AgencyCompany Organization: Clark Labs Sector: Land Focus Area:...

  17. California State Lands Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Lands Commission Jump to: navigation, search Logo: California State Lands Commission Name: California State Lands Commission Abbreviation: CSLC Address: 100 Howe Ave., Suite 100...

  18. Graphical methods for evaluating covering arrays

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Kim, Youngil; Jang, Dae -Heung; Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-08-10

    Covering arrays relax the condition of orthogonal arrays by only requiring that all combination of levels be covered but not requiring that the appearance of all combination of levels be balanced. This allows for a much larger number of factors to be simultaneously considered but at the cost of poorer estimation of the factor effects. To better understand patterns between sets of columns and evaluate the degree of coverage to compare and select between alternative arrays, we suggest several new graphical methods that show some of the patterns of coverage for different designs. As a result, these graphical methods formore » evaluating covering arrays are illustrated with a few examples.« less

  19. GE Global Research Careers | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Careers The best and brightest minds in science and technology make breakthroughs daily at GE Global Research. Are you ready to join our team? Job Search Location Location Bangalore, India Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Munich, Germany Niskayuna, USA Oklahoma City, USA Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Shanghai, China Tirat Carmel, Israel Keyword Search Jobs » View All Jobs Keep in Touch With GE Global Research Careers Home > Careers Why Global Research careers_why_GE At Global Research, scientists, engineers

  20. Paddy field, groundwater and land subsidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, L.J.

    1995-12-31

    Through many years of research and technical interchange both at home and abroad, it is commonly recognized that paddy fields possess the functions of micro-climate adjustment, flood detection and prevention, soil and water conservation, river-flow stabilization, soil salinization prevention, water purification, groundwater recharge, rural area beautification and environmental protection which are all beneficial to the public. In recent years, the global environmental problems have become a series concern throughout the world. These include the broken ozone layer, green house effects, acid rain, land desertion, tropical rain forest disappearing etc. Among them, rain forest disappearing draws great attention. Both rain forests and paddy fields are in tropical areas. They have similar functions and are disappearing because of economic pressure. This paper describes the special functions of paddy fields on water purification, ground water recharge and prevention of land subsidence, and reiterates groundwater utilization and land subsidence prevention measures. In view of the importance of groundwater resources, paddy fields, which can not be replaced by any other artificial groundwater recharge facilities, should not be reduced in acreage, nor can they be left idle. Paddy fields shall be properly maintained and managed in order to strengthen their special functions in the years to come even under heavy pressure from foreign countries.

  1. Covered Product Category: Light Fixtures (Luminaires)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including luminaires, or light fixtures. The luminaires product category is very broad and covers a wide variety of lighting products. Both ENERGY STAR® and FEMP provide programmatic guidance for various types of luminaires. See table 2 for more information about which types of light fixtures are covered by which program (FEMP or ENERGY STAR). Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  2. Rich land Operations Office

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    TG Department of Energy Rich land Operations Office P.O. Box 550 AES Richland, Washington 99352 CERTIFIED MAIL NOV~ 2 10 2009 Mr. Gerald Pollet Heart of America Northwest 1314 N.E. 5 6 th Street Suite 100 Seattle, Washington 98105 Dear Mr. Pollet: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUEST (FOI 2009-0054) The purpose of this letter is to inform you that we have withdrawn our response dated September 14, 2009, and have issued the following determination regarding item 8 of your request. In response to

  3. Rich land Operations Office

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Rich land Operations Office P.O. Box 550 July 10, 2009 CERTIFIED MAIL Mr. Ryan Jarvis Heart of America Northwest 1314 N.E. 56h" Street Suite 100 Seattle, Washington 98105 Dear Mr. Jarvis: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUEST (FOI 2009-0054) Pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOJA), you requested the following information as stated below: 1. "The RCRA permit (both Parts A and B) for the mixed waste disposal trenches 31 and 34 located in the 200 West area of Hanford, including,

  4. Global Home Filesystem

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Global Home Global Home Filesystem Overview Global home directories (or "global homes") provide a convenient means for a user to have access to dotfiles, source files, input files, configuration files, etc., regardless of the platform the user is logged in to. Quotas, Performance, and Usage Default global home quotas are 40 GB and 1,000,000 inodes. Quota increases in global homes are approved only in extremely unusual circumstances; users are encouraged to use the various scratch,

  5. ARM - Global Beginners

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Beginners Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Global Beginners What is Global Warming? Have you noticed a change in the temperature outside? Learn about global warming. What Causes Global Warming? Greenhouse gases, cars, and coal are just a few of the factors that cause global

  6. ARM - Global Thinkers

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Thinkers Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Global Thinkers What is Global Warming? Investigate global warming and the conditions which lead to climatic changes. What Causes Global Warming? Information about the conditions in the atmosphere that lead to global warming. What are

  7. Covered Product Category: Refrigerated Beverage Vending Machines

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including refrigerated beverage vending machines, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  8. Covered Product Category: Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including commercial gas water heaters, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR® program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  9. Bureau of Land Management: A Successful ESPC Across Six States (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Anasazi Heritage Center in Dolores, Colorado. Photo from Bureau of Land Management Bureau of Land Management: A Successful ESPC Across Six States The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) successfully implemented an energy savings performance contract (ESPC) with Johnson Controls, Inc. (JCI) to implement energy effciency improve- ments at remote BLM sites. This $3.6 million project covered small BLM facili- ties across six western states (Colorado, Idaho, Montana,

  10. Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) Developer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, FM

    2004-12-21

    This document describes the guidelines adopted for software development of the Community Land Model (CLM) and serves as a reference to the entire code base of the released version of the model. The version of the code described here is Version 3.0 which was released in the summer of 2004. This document, the Community Land Model Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) User's Guide (Vertenstein et al., 2004), the Technical Description of the Community Land Model (CLM) (Oleson et al., 2004), and the Community Land Model's Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM): Technical Description and User's Guide (Levis et al., 2004) provide the developer, user, or researcher with details of implementation, instructions for using the model, a scientific description of the model, and a scientific description of the Dynamic Global Vegetation Model integrated with CLM respectively. The CLM is a single column (snow-soil-vegetation) biogeophysical model of the land surface which can be run serially (on a laptop or personal computer) or in parallel (using distributed or shared memory processors or both) on both vector and scalar computer architectures. Written in Fortran 90, CLM can be run offline (i.e., run in isolation using stored atmospheric forcing data), coupled to an atmospheric model (e.g., the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM)), or coupled to a climate system model (e.g., the Community Climate System Model Version 3 (CCSM3)) through a flux coupler (e.g., Coupler 6 (CPL6)). When coupled, CLM exchanges fluxes of energy, water, and momentum with the atmosphere. The horizontal land surface heterogeneity is represented by a nested subgrid hierarchy composed of gridcells, landunits, columns, and plant functional types (PFTs). This hierarchical representation is reflected in the data structures used by the model code. Biophysical processes are simulated for each subgrid unit (landunit, column, and PFT) independently, and prognostic variables are maintained for each subgrid unit. Vertical heterogeneity

  11. Global Climate & Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Global Climate & Energy HomeTag:Global Climate & Energy Electricity use by water service sector and county. Shown are electricity ...

  12. Sandia Energy - Global

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Global Home Analysis Permalink Gallery Results from the Human Resilience Index and Modeling project were reported recently in the National Intelligence Council's Global Trends 2030...

  13. Timeline | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Global Research Over Time From our earliest days, we've been changing the landscape in commercial science and technology. Explore our inventions' evolution. Home > Global Research ...

  14. Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Professional Resource Global Limited CPR Global Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cleantech Professional Resource Global Limited (CPR Global) Place: London, United Kingdom Zip:...

  15. Global Material Security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Global Material Security

  16. Assessment of model estimates of land-atmosphere CO2 exchange across Northern Eurasia

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Rawlins, M. A.; McGuire, A. D.; Kimball, J. S.; Dass, P.; Lawrence, D.; Burke, E.; Chen, X.; Delire, C.; Koven, C.; MacDougall, A.; et al

    2015-07-28

    A warming climate is altering land-atmosphere exchanges of carbon, with a potential for increased vegetation productivity as well as the mobilization of permafrost soil carbon stores. Here we investigate land-atmosphere carbon dioxide (CO2) cycling through analysis of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and its component fluxes of gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) and soil carbon residence time, simulated by a set of land surface models (LSMs) over a region spanning the drainage basin of Northern Eurasia. The retrospective simulations cover the period 1960–2009 at 0.5° resolution, which is a scale common among many global carbon and climate modelmore » simulations. Model performance benchmarks were drawn from comparisons against both observed CO2 fluxes derived from site-based eddy covariance measurements as well as regional-scale GPP estimates based on satellite remote-sensing data. The site-based comparisons depict a tendency for overestimates in GPP and ER for several of the models, particularly at the two sites to the south. For several models the spatial pattern in GPP explains less than half the variance in the MODIS MOD17 GPP product. Across the models NEP increases by as little as 0.01 to as much as 0.79 g C m⁻² yr⁻², equivalent to 3 to 340 % of the respective model means, over the analysis period. For the multimodel average the increase is 135 % of the mean from the first to last 10 years of record (1960–1969 vs. 2000–2009), with a weakening CO2 sink over the latter decades. Vegetation net primary productivity increased by 8 to 30 % from the first to last 10 years, contributing to soil carbon storage gains. The range in regional mean NEP among the group is twice the multimodel mean, indicative of the uncertainty in CO2 sink strength. The models simulate that inputs to the soil carbon pool exceeded losses, resulting in a net soil carbon gain amid a decrease in residence time. Our analysis points to improvements in

  17. Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.; Gaston, G.; Daniels, R.C.

    1996-06-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  18. Water Power For a Clean Energy Future Cover Photo | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    For a Clean Energy Future Cover Photo Water Power For a Clean Energy Future Cover Photo Image icon Water Power For a Clean Energy Future Cover.JPG More Documents & Publications ...

  19. Land Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Land Energy Place: North Yorkshire, United Kingdom Zip: YO62 5DQ Sector: Biomass, Renewable Energy Product: A renewable-energy company...

  20. Integrated Dynamic Gloabal Modeling of Land Use, Energy and Economic Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atul Jain, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL Brian O'Neill, NCAR, Boulder, CO

    2009-10-14

    The overall objective of this collaborative project is to integrate an existing general equilibrium energy-economic growth model with a biogeochemical cycles and biophysical models in order to more fully explore the potential contribution of land use-related activities to future emissions scenarios. Land cover and land use change activities, including deforestation, afforestation, and agriculture management, are important source of not only CO2, but also non-CO2 GHGs. Therefore, contribution of land-use emissions to total emissions of GHGs is important, and consequently their future trends are relevant to the estimation of climate change and its mitigation. This final report covers the full project period of the award, beginning May 2006, which includes a sub-contract to Brown University later transferred to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) when Co-PI Brian O'Neill changed institutional affiliations.

  1. Reconstruction of Intensity From Covered Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Watkins, Thomas R; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Burchell, Timothy D; Rosseel, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    The safe handling of activated samples requires containment and covering the sample to eliminate any potential for contamination. Subsequent characterization of the surface with x-rays ideally necessitates a thin film. While many films appear visually transparent, they are not necessarily x-ray transparent. Each film material has a unique beam attenuation and sometimes have amorphous peaks that can superimpose with those of the sample. To reconstruct the intensity of the underlying activated sample, the x-ray attenuation and signal due to the film needs to be removed from that of the sample. This requires the calculation of unique deconvolution parameters for the film. The development of a reconstruction procedure for a contained/covered sample is described.

  2. New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Services » New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation (178.03 KB) More Documents & Publications Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance

  3. Covered Product Category: Displays | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers

    Cover photos, top to bottom, left to right: * Prairie at the Fernald Preserve (Ohio). * Drilling rig at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site. * Monitoring well and meteorological station at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site. * Removing East Trenches Plume Treatment System Cell 1 railing at the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site. * Philip C. Leahy Memorial Park at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Site. DOE - Office of Legacy Management January 2016 Site Management Guide - Update 18 Page 2 of 22

  4. Assessment of uncertainties in the response of the African monsoon precipitation to land use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung Ruby; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin -Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Furthermore, the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  5. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  6. GE Global Research Locations | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Locations GE Global Research is innovating around the clock. Select one of our locations to learn more about operations there.GE Global Research is innovating around the clock. Select a location to learn more about our operations. Home > Locations GE Global Research is ALWAYS OPEN Already know about our locations? Experience a special look at a day in our life around the world! See What We're Doing Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Founded: 2015 Employees: 15 Focus Areas: Material Characterization,

  7. Toward A National Early Warning System for Forest Disturbances Using Remotely Sensed Land Surface Phenology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HargroveJr., William Walter; Spruce, Joe; Gasser, Gerry; Hoffman, Forrest M

    2009-12-01

    We are using a statistical clustering method for delineating homogeneous ecoregions as a basis for identifying disturbances in forests through time over large areas, up to national and global extents. Such changes can be shown relative to past conditions, or can be predicted relative to present conditions, as with forecasts of future climatic change. This quantitative ecoregion approach can be used to predict destinations for populations whose local environments are forecast to become unsuitable and are forced to migrate as their habitat shifts, and is also useful for predicting the susceptibility of new locations to invasive species like Sudden Oak Death. EFETAC and our sister western center WWETAC, along with our NASA and ORNL collaborators, are designing a new national-scale early warning system for forest threats, called FIRST. Envisioned as a change-detection system, FIRST will identify all land surface cover changes at the MODIS observational scale, and then try to discriminate normal, expected seasonal changes from locations having unusual activity that may represent potential forest threats. As a start, we have developed new national data sets every 16 days from 2002 through 2008, based on land surface phenology, or timing of leaf-out in the spring and brown-down in the fall. Changes in such phenological maps will be shown to contain important information about vegetation health status across the United States. The standard deviation of the duration of fall can be mapped, showing places where length of fall is relatively constant or is variable in length from year to year.

  8. GE Global Research News | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Times Union: GE Global Research Center conference sees future of Industrial Internet ... collaborate to build more tangible things-like tanks, planes, and consumer appliances. ...

  9. GE Global Research News | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Showcases Smart Sensing Drone, Advanced Labs ... ... Global Research Oil & Gas Technology Center, said in a letter to The Journal Record, ... has won an international competition ...

  10. First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation Infrastructure First-ever Hydropower Market Report Covers Hydropower Generation Infrastructure May 28, 2015 -...

  11. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test ...

    Energy Savers

    Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test Paper presented at the Waste Management 2011 Conference. ...

  12. EERE Template for Microsoft Word Document Standard Cover and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Template for Microsoft Word Document Standard Cover and Second Page EERE Template for Microsoft Word Document Standard Cover and Second Page This template was designed for print ...

  13. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - Cover and Table of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Cover and Table of Contents 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - Cover and Table of Contents DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review 2008meritreviewcontents.pdf ...

  14. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Cover, Title Page, and Contents FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover, Title Page, and Contents Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and ...

  15. Sandia Research Featured on Journal of Physical Chemistry A Cover

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Featured on Journal of Physical Chemistry A Cover - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon ... Sandia Research Featured on Journal of Physical Chemistry A Cover HomeEnergy, Materials ...

  16. "PBS NEWSHOUR" covers new technique that may make solar panel...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    covers new technique that may make solar panel production less expensive "PBS NEWSHOUR" covers new technique that may make solar panel production less expensive Scientists have ...

  17. Fast Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Fast Company covers "Just Your Typical New Mexico Image Recognition Startup Spun Off From A ... covers new technique that may make solar panel production less expensive The ...

  18. Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Includes information about the installed base of residential windows and window coverings, and the operation of window coverings by households. residentialwindowscoverings.pdf ...

  19. Taking It from Brown to Green: Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Taking It from Brown to Green: Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands Taking It from Brown to Green: Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands This presentation, presented April 22, 2009, covered renewable energy on contaminated sites. Presenters included Otto Van Geet from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Brian K. Johnson from the New Mexico Energy Minerals and Natural Resources Department, and Pam Swingle from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Taking It

  20. Land-use history alters contemporary insect herbivore community composition and decouples plant-herbivore relationships.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, Philip G.; Orrock, John L.

    2015-04-01

    1. Past land use can create altered soil conditions and plant communities that persist for decades, although the effects of these altered conditions on consumers are rarely investigated. 2. Using a large-scale field study at 36 sites in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) woodlands, we examined whether historic agricultural land use leads to differences in the abundance and community composition of insect herbivores (grasshoppers, families Acrididae and Tettigoniidae). 3. We measured the cover of six plant functional groups and several environmental variables to determine whether historic agricultural land use affects the relationships between plant cover or environmental conditions and grasshopper assemblages. 4. Land-use history had taxa-specific effects and interacted with herbaceous plant cover to alter grasshopper abundances, leading to significant changes in community composition. Abundance of most grasshopper taxa increased with herbaceous cover in woodlands with no history of agriculture, but there was no relationship in post-agricultural woodlands. We also found that grasshopper abundance was negatively correlated with leaf litter cover. Soil hardness was greater in post-agricultural sites (i.e. more compacted) and was associated with grasshopper community composition. Both herbaceous cover and leaf litter cover are influenced by fire frequency, suggesting a potential indirect role of fire on grasshopper assemblages. 5. Our results demonstrate that historic land use may create persistent differences in the composition of grasshopper assemblages, while contemporary disturbances (e.g. prescribed fire) may be important for determining the abundance of grasshoppers, largely through the effect of fire on plants and leaf litter. Therefore, our results suggest that changes in the contemporary management regimes (e.g. increasing prescribed fire) may not be sufficient to shift the structure of grasshopper communities in post-agricultural sites towards communities in

  1. Soil Carbon Change and Net Energy Associated with Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: A Regional Modeling Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Link, Robert P.; Zhang, Xuesong; Post, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    The use of marginal lands (MLs) for biofuel production has been contemplated as a promising solution for meeting biofuel demands. However, there have been concerns with spatial location of MLs, their inherent biofuel potential, and possible environmental consequences with the cultivation of energy crops. Here, we developed a new quantitative approach that integrates high-resolution land cover and land productivity maps and uses conditional probability density functions for analyzing land use patterns as a function of land productivity to classify the agricultural lands. We subsequently applied this method to determine available productive croplands (P-CLs) and non-crop marginal lands (NC-MLs) in a nine-county Southern Michigan. Furthermore, Spatially Explicit Integrated Modeling Framework (SEIMF) using EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) was used to understand the net energy (NE) and soil organic carbon (SOC) implications of cultivating different annual and perennial production systems.

  2. Land reclamation beautifies coal mines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coblentz, B.

    2009-07-15

    The article explains how the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiments station, MAFES, has helped prepare land exploited by strip mining at North American Coal Corporation's Red Hills Mine. The 5,800 acre lignite mine is over 200 ft deep and uncovers six layers of coal. About 100 acres of land a year is mined and reclaimed, mostly as pine plantations. 5 photos.

  3. Land-use transition for bioenergy and climate stabilization: model comparison of drivers, impacts and interactions with other land use based mitigation options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popp, Alexander; Rose, Steven K.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Dietrich, Jan P.; Wise, Marshall A.; Stehfest, Eike; Humpenoder, Florian; Kyle, G. Page; Van Vliet, Jasper; Bauer, Nico; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Klein, David; Kriegler, Elmar

    2014-04-01

    This study is a model comparison assessing the drivers and impacts of bioenergy production on the global land system and the interaction with other land use based mitigation options in the context of the EMF 27 project. We compare and evaluate results from three integrated assessment models (GCAM, IMAGE, and ReMIND/MAgPIE). All three models project that dedicated bioenergy crops and biomass residues are a potentially important and cost-effective component of the energy system. But bioenergy deployment levels and feedstock composition vary notably across models as do the implications for land-use and greenhouse gas emissions and the interaction with other land use based mitigation measures. Despite numerous model differences, we identify a few that are likely contributing to differences in land-use and emissions attributable to energy crop deployment.

  4. Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to Assess Vegetative Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosytstems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge

    2005-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with the University of Idaho, is evaluating novel approaches for using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quicker and safer method for monitoring biotic resources. Evaluating vegetative cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. In assessing vegetative cover, methods that improve accuracy and cost efficiency could revolutionize how biotic resources are monitored on western federal lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species, some of which are important indicator species (e.g., sage grouse). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluation of these ecosystems. In this project, two types of UAV platforms (fixed wing and helicopter) were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate total percent cover, (2) estimate percent cover for six different types of vegetation, and (3) locate sage grouse based on representative decoys. The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetative cover. A software program called SamplePoint developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) was used to evaluate the imagery for percent cover for the six vegetation types (bare ground, litter, shrubs, dead shrubs, grasses, and forbs). Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy.

  5. Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Berkeley Lab Researcher Says Climate Science is Entering New Golden Age November 12, 2014 Contact: Julie Chao, jchao@lbl.gov, 510.486.6491 wehnerclimate2 Simulated and observed annual maximum 5 day accumulated precipitation over land points, averaged. Observations are calculated from the period 1979 to 1999. Model results are calculated from the period 1979 to 2005. Not long ago,

  6. How much of the world’s land has been urbanized, really? A hierarchical framework for evading confusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, zhifeng; He, Chunyang; Zhou, Yuyu; Wu, jianguo

    2014-05-01

    Urbanization has transformed the world’s landscapes, resulting in a series of ecological and environmental problems. To assess urbanization impacts and improve sustainability, one of the first questions that we must address is: how much of the world’s land has been urbanized? Unfortunately, the estimates of the global urban land reported in the literature vary widely from less than 1% to 3% primarily because different definitions of urban land were used. To evade confusion, here we propose a hierarchical framework for representing and communicating the spatial extent of the world’s urbanized land at the global, regional, and more local levels. The hierarchical framework consists of three spatially nested definitions: “urban area” that is delineated by administrative boundaries, “built-up area” that is dominated by artificial surfaces, and “impervious surface area” that is devoid of life. These are really three different measures of urbanization. In 2010, the global urban land was close to 3%, the global built-up area was 0.65%, and the global impervious surface area was 0.45%, of the word’s total land area (excluding Antarctica and Greenland). We argue that this hierarchy of urban land measures, in particular the ratios between them, can also facilitate better understanding the biophysical and socioeconomic processes and impacts of urbanization.

  7. Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (9/22/1999)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Cover Sheet Final HCP EIS | Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, Bureau 6 of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant counties; and 7 the City of Richland, Washington 8 | 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian

  8. Land Ice Verification and Validation Kit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-07-15

    To address a pressing need to better understand the behavior and complex interaction of ice sheets within the global Earth system, significant development of continental-scale, dynamical ice-sheet models is underway. The associated verification and validation process of these models is being coordinated through a new, robust, python-based extensible software package, the Land Ice Verification and Validation toolkit (LIVV). This release provides robust and automated verification and a performance evaluation on LCF platforms. The performance V&V involves a comprehensive comparison of model performance relative to expected behavior on a given computing platform. LIVV operates on a set of benchmark and test data, and provides comparisons for a suite of community prioritized tests, including configuration and parameter variations, bit-4-bit evaluation, and plots of tests where differences occur.

  9. Land Ice Verification and Validation Kit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-07-15

    To address a pressing need to better understand the behavior and complex interaction of ice sheets within the global Earth system, significant development of continental-scale, dynamical ice-sheet models is underway. The associated verification and validation process of these models is being coordinated through a new, robust, python-based extensible software package, the Land Ice Verification and Validation toolkit (LIVV). This release provides robust and automated verification and a performance evaluation on LCF platforms. The performance V&Vmore » involves a comprehensive comparison of model performance relative to expected behavior on a given computing platform. LIVV operates on a set of benchmark and test data, and provides comparisons for a suite of community prioritized tests, including configuration and parameter variations, bit-4-bit evaluation, and plots of tests where differences occur.« less

  10. Bioenergy and the importance of land use policy in a carbon-constrained world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Wise, Marshall A.

    2010-06-01

    Policies aimed at limiting anthropogenic climate change would result in significant transformations of the energy and land-use systems. However, increasing the demand for bioenergy could have a tremendous impact on land use, and can result in land clearing and deforestation. Wise et al. (2009a,b) analyzed an idealized policy to limit the indirect land use change emissions from bioenergy. The policy, while effective, would be difficult, if not impossible, to implement in the real world. In this paper, we consider several different land use policies that deviate from this first-best, using the Joint Global Change Research Institute’s Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Specifically, these new frameworks are (1) a policy that focuses on just the above-ground or vegetative terrestrial carbon rather than the total carbon, (2) policies that focus exclusively on incentivizing and protecting forestland, and (3) policies that apply an economic penalty on the use of biomass as a proxy to limit indirect land use change emissions. For each policy, we examine its impact on land use, land-use change emissions, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, agricultural supply, and food prices.

  11. File:03-CO-b - ROW Process for State Land Board Land.pdf | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    CO-b - ROW Process for State Land Board Land.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03-CO-b - ROW Process for State Land Board Land.pdf Size of...

  12. File:03CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    03CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03CAAStateLandLeasingProcessAndLandAccessROWs.pdf Size of...

  13. File:03-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599...

  14. Integrated assessment of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, K.O.

    1996-12-31

    The anomalies of sea surface temperatures, which show a warming trend since the 1850s through the decade 1960/70 of {Delta}SST {approximately} 0.3 C, are complemented by changes of the ground surface temperature ({Delta}GST). The global surface temperature change, based on these data, allows an integrated assessment of the associated increase in black-body irradiance and a comparison with the enhanced greenhouse-gas back-scattering. Information on the GST history is obtained from unfolding analyses of underground temperature distributions measured in 90 boreholes in Alaskan permafrost and Canadian bedrock. These analyses show GST increases ({Delta}GST) since the 19th century through 1960/70 of 3 C on average, with standard deviations of +1.8 C and {minus}0.9 C on the high and low end respectively. The onset of the warming trend, which is uncertain in the GST data, is timed more accurately by detailed length records of large valley glaciers in the US and the Alps. Evaluation of the heat capacities and heat transfer indicates that the temperature response to an increase in radiative forcing must be much larger on land than on the sea. Conversely, the observed large ratio of {Delta}GST and {Delta}SST can only be explained by increased radiative forcing. From 1960/70 through the warmest decade on record, 1980/90, global {Delta}SST and {Delta}SAT have further increased to 0.6 C and 0.8 C respectively, But, the most recent GST data are not accurate enough to extend the comparison through 1990. Calculation of the increase of radiative forcing from back-scattering of greenhouse gases for 1850 to 1970 yields 1.3 W/cm{sup 2}. The increase in black-body irradiance from 3.6 C warming on land and 0.3 C on sea provides the required balance. The warming on land of 3.6 C is larger than the average value of 3.0 C, but well within the observed range.

  15. Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    GeothermalLand Use < Geothermal(Redirected from Land Use) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT GeothermalLand Use Planning Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  16. LDK Uni Land JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Uni Land JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: LDK & Uni Land JV Place: Italy Product: Italy-based JV to develop and construct PV projects. References: LDK & Uni Land JV1 This...

  17. Montana State Land Board | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Land Board Jump to: navigation, search Name: Montana State Land Board Place: Helena, Montana Website: dnrc.mt.govLandBoardStaff.as References: Webpage1 This article is a stub....

  18. AG Land 5 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    5 Jump to: navigation, search Name AG Land 5 Facility AG Land 5 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner AG Land Energy LLC Developer...

  19. Photonics | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Home > Impact > The Photonics Lab at GE Global Research Click to email this to a friend ... The Photonics Lab at GE Global Research Loucas Tsakalakos, the Photonics lab manager at GE ...

  20. Building | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    For a long time in many... Read More The Photonics Lab at GE Global Research Loucas Tsakalakos, the Photonics lab manager at GE Global Research, introduces photonics and shares ...

  1. ARM - Global Experts

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Experts Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Global Experts Welcome to our Global Experts! These pages provide detailed information about global climate change. We hope you'll gain a good understanding of how our earth's climate is changing and how human activities are influencing

  2. Global Climate & Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    CRFclimatechange Permalink Gallery Understanding Hazardous Combustion Byproducts Reduces Factors Impacting Climate Change CRF, Global Climate & Energy, News, News & Events, ...

  3. Global Security 2009

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Management *Data Loss Prevention *Audit ability *OI & CS Technology Platforms *Big Data *Analytics *Monitoring *Cyber Security *Intelligence *Hyper Innovation Global ...

  4. Colorado State Board of Land Commissioners Strategic Plan | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Land Use Plan: Colorado State Board of Land Commissioners Strategic Plan Abstract The Colorado State Board of Land Commissioners (State Land Board)...

  5. Cosmic Rays and Global Warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, T.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2008-01-24

    Some workers have claimed that the observed temporal correlations of (low level) terrestrial cloud cover with the cosmic ray intensity changes, due to solar modulation, are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and Global Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim in some detail. So far, we have not found any evidence in support and so our conclusions are to doubt it. From the absence of corroborative evidence we estimate that less than 15% at the 95% confidence level, of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 43 years is due to this cause. The origin of the correlation itself is probably the cycle of solar irradiance although there is, as yet, no certainty.

  6. New Global Research Website | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    I Want to See... the New Global Research Website Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) ...

  7. GE Global Research Contact | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    1800 Cai Lun Road, Zhangjiang High-Tech Park, Pudong, Shanghai, 201203, China Joey Yang +86 21 38773407 joey.yang@ge.com Communications and Public Relations GE Global...

  8. Ewing Land Development Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Ewing Land Development Services Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ewing Land Development & Services Place: Pella, Iowa Zip: 50219 Product: Real estate development company...

  9. Elektra Basel Land EBL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Basel Land EBL Jump to: navigation, search Name: Elektra Basel Land (EBL) Place: Liestal, Switzerland Zip: 4410 Product: Swiss utility with a possible investment interest in...

  10. Arizona State Land Department | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Department Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Arizona State Land Department Name: Arizona State Land Department Abbreviation: ASLD Address: 1616 W. Adams St. Place: Phoenix, AZ Zip:...

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions ...

  12. State Land Commission FAQ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Land Commission FAQ Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: State Land Commission FAQ Abstract Frequently Asked Questions, California State...

  13. ARM - Lesson Plans: Effects of Solar Radiation on Land and Sea

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Effects of Solar Radiation on Land and Sea Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Effects of Solar Radiation on Land and Sea Educational resources that have been selected by the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) have passed an extensive peer-review

  14. PROTECTIVELY COVERED ARTICLE AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Plott, R.F.

    1958-10-28

    A method of casting a protective jacket about a ura nium fuel element that will bond completely to the uranium without the use of stringers or supports that would ordinarily produce gaps in the cast metal coating and bond is presented. Preformed endcaps of alumlnum alloyed with 13% silicon are placed on the ends of the uranium fuel element. These caps will support the fuel element when placed in a mold. The mold is kept at a ing alloy but below that of uranium so the cast metal jacket will fuse with the endcaps forming a complete covering and bond to the fuel element, which would otherwise oxidize at the gaps or discontinuities lefi in the coating by previous casting methods.

  15. Energy Corridors on Federal Lands

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    To improve energy delivery and enhance the electric transmission grid for the future, several government agencies currently are working together to establish a coordinated network of Federal energy corridors on Federal lands throughout the United States.

  16. Land and Facility Use Planning

    Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-07-09

    The Land and Facility Use Planning process provides a way to guide future site development and reuse based on the shared long-term goals and objectives of the Department, site and its stakeholders. Does not cancel other directives.

  17. Comparison of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Platforms for Assessing Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Sera White

    2011-09-01

    In this study, the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quick and safe method for monitoring biotic resources was evaluated. Vegetation cover and the amount of bare ground are important factors in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems and assessment of rangeland health. Methods that improve speed and cost efficiency could greatly improve how biotic resources are monitored on western lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species (including sage grouse and pygmy rabbit). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, two UAV platforms, fixed wing and helicopter, were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate percent cover for six different vegetation types (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forb, litter, and bare ground) and (2) locate sage grouse using representative decoys. The field plots were located on the Idaho National Engineering (INL) site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetation cover. A software program called SamplePoint was used along with visual inspection to evaluate percent cover for the six cover types. Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy. The comparison of fixed-wing and helicopter UAV technology against field estimates shows good agreement for the measurement of bare ground. This study shows that if a high degree of detail and data accuracy is desired, then a helicopter UAV may be a good platform to use. If the data collection objective is to assess broad-scale landscape level changes, then the collection of imagery with a fixed-wing system is probably more appropriate.

  18. R&D100 Winners * Impacts on Global Technology

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    R&D100 Winners * Impacts on Global Technology OUTSIDE FRONT COVER 2 SANDIA NATIONAL LABOR ATORIES 3 R&D100 Winners * Impacts on Global Technology For further information, contact: Henry R. Westrich LDRD Program Manager hrwestr@sandia.gov 505-844-9092 ABOUT THE COVER: Representative images from the R&D100- winning technologies in this brochure, all with their roots in Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD). 4 SANDIA NATIONAL LABOR ATORIES 5 R&D100 Winners *

  19. Trade-offs of different land and bioenergy policies on the path to achieving climate targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

    2013-10-16

    Many papers have shown that bioenergy and land-use are potentially important elements in a strategy to limit anthropogenic climate change. But, significant expansion of bioenergy production can have a large terrestrial footprint. In this paper, we test the implications for land use, the global energy system, carbon cycle, and carbon prices of meeting a specific climate target, using a single fossil fuel and industrial sector policy instrument—the carbon tax, but with five alternative bioenergy and land-use policy architectures. We find that the policies we examined have differing effects on the different segments of the economy. Comprehensive land policies can reduce land-use change emissions, increasing allowable emissions in the energy system, but have implications for the cost of food. Bioenergy taxes and constraints, on the other hand, have little effect on food prices, but can result in increased carbon and energy prices.

  20. Informational Webinar: First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands (FOA-0001621)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy is hosting an informational webinar on the funding opportunity, First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands (FOA-0001621). The webinar will cover eligibility, application, and cost share requirements; selection process; and more.

  1. 1999 Report on Hanford Site land disposal restriction for mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLACK, D.G.

    1999-03-25

    This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-011. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of managing land-disposal-restricted mixed waste at the Hanford Facility.

  2. Venture Global Calcasieu Pass, LLC - (Formerly Venture Global...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Venture Global Calcasieu Pass, LLC - (Formerly Venture Global LNG, LLC) - 14-88-LNG Venture Global Calcasieu Pass, LLC - (Formerly Venture Global LNG, LLC) - 14-88-LNG The Office ...

  3. William Rees appointed to new Global Security leadership position

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Global security leadership position William Rees appointed to new Global Security leadership position A new position that elevates the importance of the Lab's work in key program areas, including non-proliferation, intelligence support, defense, nuclear counterterrorism, and homeland security. June 16, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from

  4. "Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos Lab "Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos Lab By the end of the century, the woodlands of the ...

  5. Cover Heated, Open Vessels, Energy Tips: STEAM, Steam Tip Sheet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    9 Cover Heated, Open Vessels Open vessels that contain heated liquids often have high heat loss due to surface evaporation. Both energy and liquid losses are reduced by covering ...

  6. 2014 Offshore Wind Market & Economic Analysis Cover Photo | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    4 Offshore Wind Market & Economic Analysis Cover Photo 2014 Offshore Wind Market & Economic Analysis Cover Photo Navigant 2014 Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis.JPG (33.04 ...

  7. Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    22.62 KB) More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc Recovery Act, Office of the Biomass Program,Funding Opportunity Announcements Special Notice Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc

  8. Support EM LA Airport Landfill Cover Project by providing 40000...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Support EM LA Airport Landfill Cover Project by providing 40000 tons of soil Support EM LA Airport Landfill Cover Project by providing 40000 tons of soil DE-DT0010454-Task-Order-4 ...

  9. Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and International Organizations, Committee on Foreign Affairs | Department of Energy House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations, Committee on Foreign Affairs Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations, Committee on Foreign Affairs Testimony of Jonathan Elkind, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of International Affairs Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global

  10. Using the National Environmental Policy Act to facilitate the transfer of federal lands for economic development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ladino, A.G.

    1997-06-01

    In order to evaluate the transfer of certain Federal lands at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the US Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the proposed action had the potential to result in environmental impacts and required the preparation of an Environmental Assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The specific proposed action evaluated by DOE with support from LANL was the transfer of approximately 28 contiguous acres of underutilized Federal land to the County. This tract was locally referred to as the DP Road tract. Although the land was underutilized, it functioned as part of a larger buffer area between potentially hazardous operations at LANL and the general public. The tract was covered with scrub vegetation. There were no government buildings located on the site. The tract of land had two Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) located within the tract boundary as well as a buried but active liquid radioactive waste pipeline that crossed the site. The tract of land was adjacent to several other DOE SWMUs as well as a public road. In addition, there were ownership issues pertaining to the transfer of the land to persons and agencies other than the County. This particular tract of land was being considered for transfer to the County at the same time DOE and LANL began evaluating another large Federal land tract for lease to the County to be developed as a private research park.

  11. Performance Evaluation of the Engineered Cover at the Lakeview, Oregon,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Uranium Mill Tailings Site | Department of Energy Evaluation of the Engineered Cover at the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Site Performance Evaluation of the Engineered Cover at the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Site Performance Evaluation of the Engineered Cover at the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Site Performance Evaluation of the Engineered Cover at the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Site (150.61 KB) More Documents & Publications Applied Science

  12. Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Site | Department of Energy Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (507.34 KB) More Documents & Publications Revegetation of the Rocky Flats Site Smooth Brome Monitoring at Rocky Flats-2005 Results EIS-0285-SA-134:

  13. Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site | Department of Energy the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the

  14. Assessment of model estimates of land-atmosphere CO2 exchange across Northern Eurasia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawlins, M. A.; McGuire, A. D.; Kimball, J. S.; Dass, P.; Lawrence, D.; Burke, E.; Chen, X.; Delire, C.; Koven, C.; MacDougall, A.; Peng, S.; Rinke, A.; Saito, K.; Zhang, W.; Alkama, R.; Bohn, T. J.; Ciais, P.; Decharme, B.; Gouttevin, I.; Hajima, T.; Ji, D.; Krinner, G.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Miller, P.; Moore, J. C.; Smith, B.; Sueyoshi, T.

    2015-07-28

    A warming climate is altering land-atmosphere exchanges of carbon, with a potential for increased vegetation productivity as well as the mobilization of permafrost soil carbon stores. Here we investigate land-atmosphere carbon dioxide (CO2) cycling through analysis of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and its component fluxes of gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) and soil carbon residence time, simulated by a set of land surface models (LSMs) over a region spanning the drainage basin of Northern Eurasia. The retrospective simulations cover the period 1960–2009 at 0.5° resolution, which is a scale common among many global carbon and climate model simulations. Model performance benchmarks were drawn from comparisons against both observed CO2 fluxes derived from site-based eddy covariance measurements as well as regional-scale GPP estimates based on satellite remote-sensing data. The site-based comparisons depict a tendency for overestimates in GPP and ER for several of the models, particularly at the two sites to the south. For several models the spatial pattern in GPP explains less than half the variance in the MODIS MOD17 GPP product. Across the models NEP increases by as little as 0.01 to as much as 0.79 g C m⁻² yr⁻², equivalent to 3 to 340 % of the respective model means, over the analysis period. For the multimodel average the increase is 135 % of the mean from the first to last 10 years of record (1960–1969 vs. 2000–2009), with a weakening CO2 sink over the latter decades. Vegetation net primary productivity increased by 8 to 30 % from the first to last 10 years, contributing to soil carbon storage gains. The range in regional mean NEP among the group is twice the multimodel mean, indicative of the uncertainty in CO2 sink strength. The models simulate that inputs to the soil carbon pool exceeded losses, resulting in a net soil carbon gain amid a decrease in residence time. Our

  15. Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for Data Center,

    Energy Savers

    Computer, and Telecommunication Applications) | Department of Energy Categories » Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for Data Center, Computer, and Telecommunication Applications) Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for Data Center, Computer, and Telecommunication Applications) The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for uninterruptible power supplies (UPS), a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  16. Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for Data Center,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Computer, and Telecommunication Applications) | Department of Energy Categories » Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for Data Center, Computer, and Telecommunication Applications) Covered Product Category: Uninterruptible Power Supplies (for Data Center, Computer, and Telecommunication Applications) The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for uninterruptible power supplies (UPS), a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  17. 2009 ECR Report Cover Letter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    9 ECR Report Cover Letter 2009 ECR Report Cover Letter 2009_ECR_Report_Cover_Letter.pdf (502.87 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE_ECR_Report_2006_(2).pdf DOE ECR Report 2006 2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010

  18. ARM - Global Warming

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Warming Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Global Warming Click on one of the links below to learn more about global warming! But first, take a look at this presentation given by former Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman to a group of

  19. Powering | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Powering Whether generating or distributing power, in familiar or new forms, we're making sure the world has power when and where it's needed. Home > Impact > Powering Grid Technologies at GE Global Research Chief Scientist Jim Bray describes the makeup and challenges of the electrical distribution grid and how GE Global Research is... Read More » GE Global Research Oil & Gas Technology Center Mark Little, SVP and chief technology officer for GE, and Eric Gebhardt, vice president of

  20. Building | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Building We're creating infrastructure, refining materials and assembling technologies that accommodate our constantly changing world. Home > Impact > Building GE Celebrates the Holidays with 3D-Printed Ornaments Scientists at GE Global Research get into the holiday spirit by bringing high-tech additive manufacturing techniques to Christmas... Read More » Global Research and GE Capital: Middle Market Collaboration In 2013, a partnering initiative between Global Research and GE Capital

  1. Global Threat Reduction Initiative

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 1 The Current Status of Gap and ... Global Threat Reduction Initiative Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ...

  2. Curing | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Curing We're pioneering medical developments, from robotic healthcare assistants to diagnostic tools and specialized, globally deployed gear. Home > Impact > Curing Crowdsourcing...

  3. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    6. Land use 6.1. Total land use, land use change, and forests This chapter presents estimates of carbon sequestration (removal from the atmosphere) and emissions (release into the atmosphere) from forests, croplands, grasslands, and residential areas (urban trees, grass clippings, and food scraps) in the United States. In 2008, land use, land use change, and forests were responsible for estimated net carbon sequestration of 940 MMTCO2e (Table 31), representing 16 percent of total U.S. CO2

  4. Microsoft Word - Cover Template 3-22-2015.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1) the Race to Zero competition requirements, 2) the State College Community Land Trust, and 3) the Race to Zero competition team in a whole systems building approach. ...

  5. A SOAP Web Service for accessing MODIS land product subsets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SanthanaVannan, Suresh K; Cook, Robert B; Pan, Jerry Yun; Wilson, Bruce E

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing data from satellites have provided valuable information on the state of the earth for several decades. Since March 2000, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor on board NASA s Terra and Aqua satellites have been providing estimates of several land parameters useful in understanding earth system processes at global, continental, and regional scales. However, the HDF-EOS file format, specialized software needed to process the HDF-EOS files, data volume, and the high spatial and temporal resolution of MODIS data make it difficult for users wanting to extract small but valuable amounts of information from the MODIS record. To overcome this usability issue, the NASA-funded Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for Biogeochemical Dynamics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed a Web service that provides subsets of MODIS land products using Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP). The ORNL DAAC MODIS subsetting Web service is a unique way of serving satellite data that exploits a fairly established and popular Internet protocol to allow users access to massive amounts of remote sensing data. The Web service provides MODIS land product subsets up to 201 x 201 km in a non-proprietary comma delimited text file format. Users can programmatically query the Web service to extract MODIS land parameters for real time data integration into models, decision support tools or connect to workflow software. Information regarding the MODIS SOAP subsetting Web service is available on the World Wide Web (WWW) at http://daac.ornl.gov/modiswebservice.

  6. Electrically shielded enclosure with magnetically retained removable cover

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rivers, Craig J.; Lee, Roanne A.; Jones, Glenn E.

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is an electrically shielded enclosure having electrical components therein and a removable electrically shielded cover over an opening in the enclosure with a magnetic securement mechanism provided to removably secure the cover to the enclosure in a manner which will provide easy access, yet also provide an electrical seal between the cover and the enclosure capable of preventing the passage of electrical radiation through the joint between the cover and the enclosure. Magnets are provided on the enclosure peripherally around the opening and facing the cover, and a ferromagnetic surface is provided on the mating surface of the cover facing the magnets, with a continuous electrical seal provided between the magnets and the ferromagnetic surface on the cover to prevent the leakage of electromagnetic radiation therethrough. In one embodiment the electrical seal includes a flexible metal casing or surface, which is attached to the enclosure and positioned between the magnets and the ferromagnetic surface on the cover, and which is sufficiently flexible to be capable of conforming to the ferromagnetic surface to provide an electrical seal between the cover and the enclosure. In another embodiment, the electrical seal includes a metal mesh associated with the enclosure and positioned between the magnets on the enclosure and the ferromagnetic surface on the cover. The metal mesh is also capable of conforming to the surface of the ferromagnetic surface to thereby provide an electrical seal between the cover and the enclosure.

  7. The contribution of future agricultural trends in the US Midwest to global climate change mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Wise, Marshall A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-19

    Land use change is a complex response to changing environmental and socioeconomic systems. Historical drivers of land use change include changes in the natural resource availability of a region, changes in economic conditions for production of certain products and changing policies. Most recently, introduction of policy incentives for biofuel production have influenced land use change in the US Midwest, leading to concerns that bioenergy production systems may compete with food production and land conservation. Here we explore how land use may be impacted by future climate mitigation measures by nesting a high resolution agricultural model (EPIC – Environmental Policy Indicator Climate) for the US Midwest within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM – Global Change Assessment Model). This approach is designed to provide greater spatial resolution and detailed agricultural practice information by focusing on the climate mitigation potential of agriculture and land use in a specific region, while retaining the global economic context necessary to understand the far ranging effects of climate mitigation targets. We find that until the simulated carbon prices are very high, the US Midwest has a comparative advantage in producing traditional food and feed crops over bioenergy crops. Overall, the model responds to multiple pressures by adopting a mix of future responses. We also find that the GCAM model is capable of simulations at multiple spatial scales and agricultural technology resolution, which provides the capability to examine regional response to global policy and economic conditions in the context of climate mitigation.

  8. Bureau of Land Management - Table 1.4-1 - Land Use Planning Process...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Instructions: Bureau of Land Management - Table 1.4-1 - Land Use Planning Process StepsPermittingRegulatory...

  9. Figure 1. Project Area, Focused Study Area, Potential Access Agreement Land, and Land Not

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Page 4 of 8 Figure 1. Project Area, Focused Study Area, Potential Access Agreement Land, and Land Not Suitable for Conveyance

  10. Livestock impacts for management of reclaimed land at Navajo Mine: Vegetation responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, M.K.; Buchanan, B.A.; Estrada, O.

    1997-12-31

    The post-mining land use for Navajo Mine, a large surface coal mine in northwest New Mexico, is livestock grazing. Reclamation began in the early 1970`s and has been primarily directed toward the development of a grassland with shrubs. However, none of these lands were grazed before 1994 and none have been released back to the Navajo Nation. Therefore, it is not known how these reclaimed lands will respond to livestock impacts once the lands are released. Livestock impacts include grazing, trampling, and adding feces and urine. Cattle impacts were applied in 1994 to a land that had been reclaimed in 1978, 1991 and 1992. Vegetation monitoring procedures were implemented to detect and document successful and unsuccessful impact practices for both impacted areas and areas excluded from cattle. After three impact seasons, there were similar levels of perennial plant cover, production, and density on impacted lands compared to excluded lands. Based on age structure analysis, there is a trend that establishment of seedlings is stimulated by cattle. Cattle also decrease the amount of previous years` growth of standing phytomass with a trend to stimulate new growth. It is possible that some of the previous year`s growth was reduced by cattle trampling as much as by grazing because cattle generally prefer to eat the current year`s growth before it cures. No differences in number of seedheads per plant, animal sign, plant pedestals, and soil rills could be detected after three seasons of impacting.

  11. Bioenergy and Land Use Change

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-07-26

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratoy has developed a new system dynamics global LUC model intended to examine LUC attributed to biofuel production. The model represents major global, stocks, flows and produces results under different food and biofuel demand assumptions, with flexible regional divisions. This model is not intended to generate precise numerical estimates, but instead to provide insights into the drivers and dynamic interactions of LUC, population, dietary choices, and biofuel policy.

  12. Solar conductive spa water heater and safety cover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ely, G.W.

    1987-04-28

    This patent describes a solar conductive portable cover for a spa which has an opening for access comprising a rigid plastic member vacuum formed in a series of interconnected parallel U-shaped channels. Each channel is separated from an adjacent channel by a wall. A shape conforms plastic top solvent or heat is welded to a top surface of the walls to form a cover wider in diameter than the opening of the spa, such that the cover rests on coping at the top of the spa. Method is described for heating water for a spa comprising covering the top of the spa with a portable rigid thin plastic member forming a cover wider than the opening of the spa such that the cover rests on coping at the top of the spa and having a series of parallel U-shaped channels.

  13. Incoherent systems and coverings in finite dimensional Banach spaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temlyakov, V N

    2014-05-31

    We discuss the construction of coverings of the unit ball of a finite dimensional Banach space. There is a well-known technique based on comparing volumes which gives upper and lower bounds on covering numbers. However, this technique does not provide a method for constructing good coverings. Here we study incoherent systems and apply them to construct good coverings. We use the following strategy. First, we build a good covering using balls with a radius close to one. Second, we iterate this construction to obtain a good covering for any radius. We shall concentrate mainly on the first step of this strategy. Bibliography: 14 titles.

  14. Covered Product Category: Imaging Equipment | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers

    Enterprise Servers Covered Product Category: Enterprise Servers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for enterprise servers, a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies buy ENERGY STAR-qualified products in all product categories covered by this program and any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. MEETING EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL PURCHASES The U.S.

  15. Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers

    Dishwashers Covered Product Category: Residential Dishwashers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for residential dishwashers, a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies purchase ENERGY STAR-qualified products in all product categories covered by this program and any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. MEETING EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL PURCHASES The U.S.

  16. Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Room Air Conditioners Covered Product Category: Room Air Conditioners The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for room air conditioners, a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies purchase ENERGY STAR-qualified products in all product categories covered by this program and any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. MEETING EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL PURCHASES The

  17. DOE Proposes Requirement for Certification of Admissibility for Covered

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Products and Equipment | Department of Energy Proposes Requirement for Certification of Admissibility for Covered Products and Equipment DOE Proposes Requirement for Certification of Admissibility for Covered Products and Equipment February 22, 2016 - 6:26pm Addthis DOE has issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) in which it proposes to require that a person importing into the United States any covered product or equipment subject to an applicable energy conservation standard provide,

  18. Career Map: Land Acquisition Specialist | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Land Acquisition Specialist Career Map: Land Acquisition Specialist a male land acquisition specialist takes notes while surveying a piece of land. Land Acquisition Specialist Position Title Land Acquisition Specialist Alternate Title(s) Land Agent, Land Acquisition Associate Education & Training Level Bachelor degree required, prefer graduate degree Education & Training Level Description Land acquisition specialists are expected to have a bachelor's degree or higher in business, real

  19. New Technologies to Reclaim Arid Lands User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler

    2002-10-01

    Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Under conventional technologies to mitigate these impacts, it is estimated that up to 35 percent of revegetation projects in arid areas will fail due to unpredictable natural environmental conditions, such as drought, and reclamation techniques that were inadequate to restore vegetative cover in a timely and cost-effective manner. New reclamation and restoration techniques are needed in desert ranges to help mitigate the adverse effects of military training and other activities to arid-land environments. In 1999, a cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the US. Department of Defense (DoD), and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on mitigating military impacts in arid lands. As arid lands are impacted due to DoD and DOE activities, biological and soil resources are gradually lost and the habitat is altered. A conceptual model of that change in habitat quality is described for varying levels of disturbance in the Mojave Desert. As the habitat quality degrades and more biological and physical resources are lost from training areas, greater costs are required to return the land to sustainable levels. The purpose of this manual is to assist land managers in recognizing thresholds associated with habitat degradation and provide reclamation planning and techniques that can reduce the costs of mitigation for these impacted lands to ensure sustainable use of these lands. The importance of reclamation planning is described in this manual with suggestions about

  20. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover...

    Energy Savers

    FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover, Title Page, and Contents WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and ...

  1. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    PDF icon "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies ... Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy ...

  2. EISA Federal Covered Facility Management and Benchmarking Data...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Federal Government Compliance Overview FEMP offers covered facility management and ... Annual Energy Reporting Requirements FEMP Contacts Chris Tremper U.S. Department of ...

  3. Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Electric Chillers The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for water-co...

  4. Continuous monitors for tritium in sodium coolant and cover gas...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Continuous monitors for tritium in the sodium coolant and the cover gas of a fast breeder reactor have been ... Language: English Subject: N77500* --Reactors--Power Reactors, ...

  5. FEMP First Thursday Update Covers Fiscal Year 2015 Government...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Toward Energy and Sustainability Goals FEMP First Thursday Update Covers Fiscal Year 2015 Government Performance Toward Energy and Sustainability Goals July 6, 2016 - ...

  6. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    6 Revised "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2006 Revised Under Title I of the Public Utility Regulatory...

  7. "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    "List of Covered Electric Utilities" under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) - 2009 Under Title I, Sec. 102(c) of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies ...

  8. Covered Product Category: Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Heat Pump Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal ...

  9. Covered Product Category: Data Center Storage | Department of...

    Energy Savers

    Data Center Storage Covered Product Category: Data Center Storage The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for data center storage, a product ...

  10. Microsoft Word - DOE_Staffing_Study_Cover.doc | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Word - DOEStaffingStudyCover.doc More Documents & Publications 2010 DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan - Report to the White House Council on Environmental...

  11. FEMP First Thursday Update Covers Updates to 2016 Federal Energy...

    Energy Savers

    Updates to 2016 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards Criteria FEMP First Thursday Update Covers Updates to 2016 Federal Energy and Water Management Awards Criteria January 7, 2016 ...

  12. Covered Product Category: Air-Cooled Ice Machines

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for air-cooled ice machines, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  13. Solar Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Solar Land Use Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory report on solar land use in the United States.)1 One concern...

  14. Land Use Planning Handbook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Handbook H-1601-1 released by the United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management (BLM). "This Handbook provides supplemental guidance to the Bureau of Land...

  15. Building | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    how we work across supply chains. By... Read More What is the GE store? Mark Little, CTO & Head of Global Research at GE, describes what the GE Store means and why it's...

  16. Fast Global File Status

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-01-01

    Fast Global File Status (FGFS) is a system software package that implimints a scalable mechanism to retrieve file information, such as its degree of distribution or replication and consistency.

  17. Connecting | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    GE Global Research's Danielle Merfeld talked to GE's Creator-in-Residence Sally LePage about what it takes to move... Read More Ars Technica: Analyzing the Internet of Things As ...

  18. Global Cool Cities Alliance

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the...

  19. new Global Bio Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos and Agilent Technologies develop first high-throughput system to be deployed at UCLA's new Global Bio Lab LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, June 9, 2009-In a joint effort by ...

  20. Global Climate & Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... titled "Pros ... By admin| 2015-05-11T18:36:21+00:00 October 17th, 2013|Carbon Capture & Storage, Carbon Storage, Climate, Earth Sciences Research Center, Energy, Global ...

  1. Moving | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Moving We're always working on planes, trains and automobiles-and specialized ways to move people and products efficiently and sustainably. Home > Impact > Moving Rail Networks Are Getting Smarter Sources: 2012 GE Annual Report (page 12); Norfolk Southern 2010 sustainability reporter (page 17) North American Freight Railroad... Read More » The GE Store for Technology is Open for Business Welcome to GE Global Research, also known as the GE Store for Technology. Across our global network of

  2. Marine One Landing Exercise at Argonne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-20

    Marine One and its support helicopters conduct a landing exercise at Argonne prior to the President's visit.

  3. Global Renewable Power International Global RPI | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    to: navigation, search Name: Global Renewable Power International (Global RPI) Place: Spain Sector: Wind energy Product: Spain-based developer of wind projects in Poland, Croatia...

  4. Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Testimony of Jonathan Elkind, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of International Affairs Before House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International ...

  5. Workshop proceedings: Developing the scientific basis for long-term land management of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sperber, T.D.; Reynolds, T.D.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1998-03-01

    Responses to a survey on the INEEL Comprehensive Facility and Land Use Plan (US DOE 1996a) indicated the need for additional discussion on environmental resources, disturbance, and land use issues on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). As a result, in September 1997, a workshop evaluated the existing scientific basis and determined future data needs for long-term land management on the INEEL. This INEEL Long-Term Land Management Workshop examined existing data on biotic, abiotic, and heritage resources and how these resources have been impacted by disturbance activities of the INEEL. Information gained from this workshop will help guide land and facility use decisions, identify data gaps, and focus future research efforts. This report summarizes background information on the INEEL and its long-term land use planning efforts, presentations and discussions at the workshop, and the existing data available at the INEEL. In this document, recommendations for future INEEL land use planning, research efforts, and future workshops are presented. The authors emphasize these are not policy statements, but comments and suggestions made by scientists and others participating in the workshop. Several appendices covering land use disturbance, legal drivers, land use assumptions and workshop participant comments, workshop participants and contributors, and the workshop agenda are also included.

  6. Fundamental to the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    in agriculture ranging from more accurate weather forecasting to improved water management decisions and crop yield estimation. CLASIC CLASIC - - LAND LAND Cloud and Land...

  7. Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on DOE's Uranium Lease Tracts, Southwestern Colorado Mined Land Reclamation on...

  8. Geothermal/Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Land Use Planning < Geothermal(Redirected from GeothermalLand Use) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Planning Leasing Exploration Well Field...

  9. Hawaii State Land Use Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Hawaii State Land Use Commission Jump to: navigation, search Name: State Land Use Commission Abbreviation: LUC Place: Honolulu, Hawaii References: State Land Use Commission -...

  10. RCW 79.13 Land Leases | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    RCW 79.13 Land LeasesLegal Abstract Washington statute governing the administration of land leases for state trust lands. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect...

  11. Global temperature deviations as a random walk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, O.

    1996-12-31

    Surface air temperature is the main parameter to represent the earth`s contemporary climate. Several historical temperature records on a global/monthly basis are available. Time-series analysis shows that they can be modelled via autoregressive moving average models closely connected to the classical random walk model. Fitted models emphasize a nonstationary character of the global/monthly temperature deviation from a certain level. The nonstationarity explains all trends and periods, found in the last century`s variability of global mean temperature. This means that the short-term temperature trends are inevitable and may have little in common with a currently increasing carbon dioxide amount. The calculations show that a reasonable understanding of the contemporary global mean climate is attainable, assuming random forcing to the climate system and treating temperature deviation as a response to it. The forcings occur due to volcanic eruptions, redistribution of cloudiness, variations in snow and ice covered areas, changes in solar output, etc. Their impact can not be directly estimated from changes of the earth`s radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere, because actual measurements represent mixture of the forcings and responses. Thus, it is impossible empirically to separate the impact of one particular forcing (e.g., that due to increase of CO{sub 2} amount) from the sequence of all existing forcings in the earth climate system. More accurate modelling involving main feedback loops is necessary to ease such a separation.

  12. SPECIAL ANALYSIS OF OPERATIONAL STORMWATER RUNOFF COVERS OVER SLIT TRENCHES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collard, L; Luther Hamm, L

    2008-12-18

    Solid Waste Management (SWM) commissioned this Special Analysis (SA) to determine the effects of placing operational stormwater runoff covers (referred to as covers in the remainder of this document) over slit trench (ST) disposal units ST1 through ST7 (the center set of slit trenches). Previously the United States Department of Energy (DOE) entered into an agreement with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to place covers over Slit Trenches 1 and 2 to be able to continue disposing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) solid waste (see USDOE 2008). Because the covers changed the operating conditions, DOE Order 435.1 (DOE 1999) required that an SA be performed to assess the impact. This Special Analysis has been prepared to determine the effects of placing covers over slit trenches at about years 5, 10 and 15 of the 30-year operational period. Because some slit trenches have already been operational for about 15 years, results from analyzing covers at 5 years and 10 years provide trend analysis information only. This SA also examined alternatives of covering Slit Trenches 1 and 2 with one cover and Slit Trenches 3 and 4 with a second cover versus covering them all with a single cover. Based on modeling results, minimal differences exist between covering Slit Trench groups 1-2 and 3-4 with two covers or one large cover. This SA demonstrates that placement of covers over slit trenches will slow the subsequent release and transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone in the early time periods (from time of placement until about 100 years). Release and transport of some radionuclides in the vadose zone beyond 100 years were somewhat higher than for the case without covers. The sums-of-fractions (SOFs) were examined for the current waste inventory in ST1 and ST2 and for estimated inventories at closure for ST3 through ST7. In all

  13. Land-Use Change and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-07-01

    This publication describes the Biomass Program’s efforts to examine the intersection of land-use change and bioenergy production. It describes legislation requiring land-use change assessments, key data and modeling challenges, and the research needs to better assess and understand the impact of bioenergy policy on land-use decisions.

  14. Global surface temperature changes since the 1850s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    Temperature data from land and marine areas form the basis for many studies of climatic variations on local, regional and hemispheric scales, and the global mean temperature is a fundamental measure of the state of the climate system. In this paper it is shown that the surface temperature of the globe has warmed by about 0.5{degrees}C since the mid-nineteenth century. This is an important part of the evidence in the {open_quote}global warming{close_quote} debate. How certain are we about the magnitude of the warming? Where has it been greatest? In this paper, these and related issues will be addressed.

  15. Management of Philippine tropical forests: Implications to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasco, R.D.

    1997-12-31

    The first part of the paper presents the massive changes in tropical land management in the Philippines as a result of a {open_quotes}paradigm shift{close_quotes} in forestry. The second part of the paper analyzes the impacts of the above management strategies on global warming, in general, preserved forests are neither sinks not sources of greenhouse gasses (GHG). Reforestation activities are primarily net sinks of carbon specially the use of fast growing reforestation species. Estimates are given for the carbon-sequestering ability of some commonly used species. The last part of the paper policy recommendations and possible courses of action by the government to maximize the role of forest lands in the mitigation of global warming. Private sector initiatives are also explored.

  16. Models of carbon flow in tropical ecosystems with emphasis on their role in the global carbon cycle. Final report, September 15, 1978-September 14, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.; Lugo, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    The role of tropical forests on the carbon balance of the world is studied with four different approaches: (1) to quantify the area of tropical forests and the changes in forest cover; (2) to calculate the storage and production of organic carbon in tropical forests; (3) the modelling of land use changes in tropical countries using computer simulation models; and (4) the synthesis of information from many sources into conceptual schemes using Life Zone and energy use concepts. Results are not yet conclusive but indicate that tropical forests play a significant role in the global carbon cycle, and they are likely to be small sources of carbon to the atmosphere. The basis for this statement is: (1) the large area of tropical forests do not appear to be changing as fast as suggested earlier; (2) the storage of carbon in the tropics is about one half as previously suggested; (3) the turnover of carbon in the tropics is very fast with large exports to the ocean via rivers; and (4) models of land use change using data from Bolivia show only a small net addition of carbon to the atmosphere.

  17. Perihelion Global | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Perihelion Global Jump to: navigation, search Name: Perihelion Global Place: Port Jefferson, New York Zip: 11776 Product: A company focused on the acquisition, development and...

  18. Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to Assess Vegetative Cover and Identify Biotic Resources in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems: Preliminary Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge

    2006-04-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with the University of Idaho, is evaluating novel approaches for using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quicker and safer method for monitoring biotic resources. Evaluating vegetative cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. In assessing vegetative cover, methods that improve accuracy and cost efficiency could revolutionize how biotic resources are monitored on western federal lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species, some of which are important indicator species (e.g., sage grouse). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluation of these ecosystems. In this project, two types of UAV platforms (fixed wing and helicopter) were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate total percent cover, (2) estimate percent cover for six different types of vegetation, and (3) locate sage grouse based on representative decoys. The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetative cover. A software program called SamplePoint developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service was used to evaluate the imagery for percent cover for the six vegetation types (bare ground, litter, shrubs, dead shrubs, grasses, and forbs). Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy.

  19. Enhanced Cover Assessment Project:Soil Manipulation and Revegetation Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W. Joseph; Albright, Dr. Bill; Benson, Dr. Craig

    2014-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management is evaluating methods to enhance natural changes that are essentially converting conventional disposal cell covers for uranium mill tailings into water balance covers. Conventional covers rely on a layer of compacted clayey soil to limit exhalation of radon gas and percolation of rainwater. Water balance covers rely on a less compacted soil “sponge” to store rainwater, and on soil evaporation and plant transpiration (evapotranspiration) to remove stored water and thereby limit percolation. Over time, natural soil-forming and ecological processes are changing conventional covers by increasing hydraulic conductivity, loosening compaction, and increasing evapotranspiration. The rock armor on conventional covers creates a favorable habitat for vegetation by slowing soil evaporation, increasing soil water storage, and trapping dust and organic matter, thereby providing the water and nutrients needed for plant germination, survival, and sustainable transpiration. Goals and Objectives Our overall goal is to determine if allowing or enhancing these natural changes could improve cover performance and reduce maintenance costs over the long term. This test pad study focuses on cover soil hydrology and ecology. Companion studies are evaluating effects of natural and enhanced changes in covers on radon attenuation, erosion, and biointrusion. We constructed a test cover at the Grand Junction disposal site to evaluate soil manipulation and revegetation methods. The engineering design, construction, and properties of the test cover match the upper three layers of the nearby disposal cell cover: a 1-foot armoring of rock riprap, a 6-inch bedding layer of coarse sand and gravel, and a 2-foot protection layer of compacted fine soil. The test cover does not have a radon barrier—cover enhancement tests leave the radon barrier intact. We tested furrowing and ripping as means for creating depressions parallel to the slope

  20. Satellite remote sensing of global rainfall using passive microwave radiometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferriday, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    Global rainfall over land and ocean is estimated using measurements of upwelling microwaves by a satellite passive microwave radiometer. Radiative transfer calculations through a cloud model are used to parameterize an inversion technique for retrieving rain rates from brightness temperatures measured by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I). The rainfall retrieval technique is based on the interaction between multi-spectral microwave radiances and millimeter sized liquid and frozen hydrometeors distributed in the satellite`s field of view. The rain rate algorithm is sensitive to both hydrometeor emission and scattering while being relatively insensitive to extraneous atmospheric and surface effects. Separate formulations are used over ocean and land to account for different background microwave characteristics and the algorithm corrects for inhomogeneous distributions of rain rates within the satellite`s field of view. Estimates of instantaneous and climate scale rainfall are validated through comparisons with modeled clouds, surface radars, rain gauges and alternative satellite estimates. The accuracy of the rainfall estimates is determined from a combination of validation comparisons, theoretical sampling error calculations, and modeled sensitivity to variations in atmospheric and surface radiative properties. An error budget is constructed for both instantaneous rain rates and climate scale global estimates. At a one degree resolution, the root mean square errors in instantaneous rain rate estimates are 13% over ocean and 20% over land. The root mean square errors in global rainfall totals over a four month period are found to be 46% over ocean and 63% over land. Global rainfall totals are computed on a monthly scale for a three year period from 1987 to 1990. The time series is analyzed for climate scale rainfall distribution and variability.

  1. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, C.H.; Waugh, W.J.; Albright, W.H.; Smith, G.M.; Bush, R.P.

    2011-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

  2. VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wood, Robert [VOCALS-REx PI, University of Washington; Bretherton, Christopher [GEWEX/GCSS Representative, University of Washington; Huebert, Barry [SOLAS Representative, University of Hawaii; Mechoso, Roberto C. [VOCALS Science Working Group Chair, UCLA; Weller, Robert [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

    VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) is an international CLIVAR program the major goal of which is to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding of the Southeast Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system on diurnal to inter-annual timescales. The principal program objectives are: 1) the improved understanding and regional/global model representation of aerosol indirect effects over the SEP; 2) the elimination of systematic errors in the region of coupled atmospheric-ocean general circulation models, and improved model simulations and predictions of the coupled climate in the SEP and global impacts of the system variability. VOCALS is organized into two tightly coordinated components: 1) a Regional Experiment (VOCALSREx), and 2) a Modeling Program (VOCALS-Mod). Extended observations (e.g. IMET buoy, satellites, EPIC/PACS cruises) will provide important additional contextual datasets that help to link the field and the modeling components. The coordination through VOCALS of observational and modeling efforts (Fig. 3) will accelerate the rate at which field data can be used to improve simulations and predictions of the tropical climate variability [Copied from the Vocals Program Summary of June 2007, available as a link from the VOCALS web at http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/]. The CLIVAR sponsored program to under which VOCALS falls is VAMOS, which stands for Variability of the American Monsoon Systems.

  3. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Topic Landing Pages | Department...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    topic landing pages by fiscal year. Topic Landing Pages FY10 (2.04 MB) Topic Landing Pages FY11 (2.02 MB) Topic Landing Pages FY12-FY13 (366.66 KB) More Documents & Publications ...

  4. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and Postgre

  5. A Dynamic Simulation of the Indirect Land Use Implications of Recent Biofuel Production and Use in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A; Kline, Keith L

    2013-01-01

    The global indirect land use change (ILUC) implications of biofuel use in the United States of America (USA) from 2001 to 2010 are evaluated with a dynamic general equilibrium model. The effects of biofuels production on agricultural land area vary by year; from a net expansion of 0.17 ha per 1000 gallons produced (2002) to a net contraction of 0.13 ha per 1000 gallons (2018) in Case 1 of our simulation. In accordance with the general narrative about the implications of biofuel policy, agricultural land area increased in many regions of the world. However, oil-export dependent economies experienced agricultural land contraction because of reductions in their revenues. Reducing crude oil imports is a major goal of biofuel policy, but the land use change implications have received little attention in the literature. Simulations evaluating the effects of doubling supply elasticities for land and fossil resources show that these parameters can significantly influence the land use change estimates. Therefore, research that provides empirically-based and spatially-detailed agricultural land-supply curves and capability to project future fossil energy prices is critical for improving estimates of the effects of biofuel policy on land use.

  6. Microsoft Word - Cover Letter Regulatory Burden RFI 4-15-11 ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Cover Letter Regulatory Burden RFI 4-15-11 Microsoft Word - Cover Letter Regulatory Burden ... on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2011. PDF icon Microsoft Word - Cover Letter Regulatory Burden ...

  7. Global Insight Energy Group

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Outlook Mary Novak Managing Director IHS Global Insight Copyright © 2010 IHS Global Insight, Inc. Overview: Energy Sector Transformation Underway * The recession has hit energy demand hard, and aggregate energy demand is not expected to return to 2007 levels until 2018. * Oil and natural gas prices will both rise over the long-term, but the price trends will diverge with natural gas prices rising slowly due to the development of shale gas. * This forecast does not include a GHG cap-and-trade

  8. Eolian cover sands: a sedimentologic model and paleoenvironmental implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lea, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    In periglacial areas, accumulations of eolian sand commonly form low-relief blankets without well-developed dunes. Internally, these sandsheet deposits exhibit subhorizontal lamination rather than high-angle cross-bedding. Such cover sands of late-Pleistocene age mantle extensive areas in northern Europe, but have been reported more rarely from North America. The processes by which cover sands, as opposed to dunes, accumulate have not yet been determined conclusively. Wind ripples and sand dunes do not form a continuum; flow separation and avalanching and negligible in the former and vital in the latter. Accretion of a sand patch into a mound sufficient to cause flow separation and dune growth requires a consistently available supply of loose sand. In cover-sand areas, sand may be immobilized prior to dune development by several factors: (1) a sparse vegetation cover, (2) moist ground conditions, (3) snow cover, and (4) a shallow permafrost table and/or an ice-cemented active layer. Detailed sedimentologic studies may allow discrimination among these various controls. The importance of the individual controlling factors can vary seasonally in a given deposit, as well as between deposits in different paleogeographic settings. However, all factors imply more mesic conditions than those associated with many dune deposits. The association of cover sands with paraboloid dunes is also consistent with somewhat moist conditions. The relatively mesic nature of cover sands controls their Pleistocene distribution; they become decreasingly important relative to dunes in maritime-to-continental transects across Alaska and northern Europe.

  9. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  10. Assessment of uncertainties in the response of the African monsoon precipitation to land use change simulated by a regional model

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung Ruby; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin -Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Furthermore, the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubsmore » and an increase in surface air temperature.« less

  11. Integrated Assessment and the Relation Between Land-Use Change and Climate Change

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Dale, V. H.

    1994-10-07

    Integrated assessment is an approach that is useful in evaluating the consequences of global climate change. Understanding the consequences requires knowledge of the relationship between land-use change and climate change. Methodologies for assessing the contribution of land-use change to atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations are considered with reference to a particular case study area: south and southeast Asia. The use of models to evaluate the consequences of climate change on forests must also consider an assessment approach. Each of these points is discussed in the following four sections.

  12. Global Scratch Gets an Upgrade

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Global Scratch Gets an Upgrade Global Scratch Gets an Upgrade Improvements Will Include Higher Data Output Rates, Connection to PDSF October 29, 2013 The most used file system at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)-global scratch-just got an upgrade. As a result, some users may see their data output to global scratch reach up to 80 gigabytes per second. Although users will probably not see their 20-terabyte storage quotas increase, the upgrade ensures that global

  13. On Performance of Covers and Liners In Performance Assessments...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    December 11 and 12, 2014 To view all the P&RA CoP 2014 Technical Exchange Meeting videos click here. Video Presentation PDF icon On Performance of Covers and Liners In...

  14. Electronic Structure of Thiol-Covered Gold Nanoparticles: Au102...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of Thiol-Covered Gold Nanoparticles: Au102(MBA)44 Authors: Li, Y., Galli, G., ... properties of thiolate-protected gold nanoparticles Au102(MBA)44 that have ...

  15. Liners and Covers: Field Performance & Life Expectancy | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Meeting 11-12 December 2014 Las Vegas, Nevada, USA To view all the P&RA CoP 2014 ... an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site

  16. Cover Heated, Open Vessels - Steam Tip Sheet #19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    This revised AMO steam tip sheet on covering heated, open vessels provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  17. Changes in the Vegetation Cover in a Constructed Wetland at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergman, C.L.; LaGory, K.

    2004-01-01

    Wetlands are valuable resources that are disappearing at an alarming rate. Land development has resulted in the destruction of wetlands for approximately 200 years. To combat this destruction, the federal government passed legislation that requires no net loss of wetlands. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for regulating wetland disturbances. In 1991, the USACE determined that the construction of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory would damage three wetlands that had a total area of one acre. Argonne was required to create a wetland of equal acreage to replace the damaged wetlands. For the first five years after this wetland was created (1992-1996), the frequency of plant species, relative cover, and water depth was closely monitored. The wetland was not monitored again until 2002. In 2003, the vegetation cover data were again collected with a similar methodology to previous years. The plant species were sampled using quadrats at randomly selected locations along transects throughout the wetland. The fifty sampling locations were monitored once in June and percent cover of each of the plant species was determined for each plot. Furthermore, the extent of standing water in the wetland was measured. In 2003, 21 species of plants were found and identified. Eleven species dominated the wetland, among which were reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), crown vetch (Coronilla varia), and Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). These species are all non-native, invasive species. In the previous year, 30 species were found in the same wetland. The common species varied from the 2002 study but still had these non-native species in common. Reed canary grass and Canada thistle both increased by more than 100% from 2002. Unfortunately, the non-native species may be contributing to the loss of biodiversity in the wetland. In the future, control measures should be taken to ensure the establishment of more desired native species.

  18. Find Product Categories Covered by Efficiency Programs | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Products & Technologies » Energy-Efficient Products » Find Product Categories Covered by Efficiency Programs Find Product Categories Covered by Efficiency Programs Legend ★ ENERGY STAR △ FEMP Designated O EPEAT ♦ Low Standby Power X WaterSense Federal agencies are required to purchase energy-efficient products. To help buyers meet these requirements, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) maintains acquisition guidance for the following product categories, which are

  19. Bed drain cover assembly for a fluidized bed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comparato, Joseph R. (Bloomfield, CT); Jacobs, Martin (Hartford, CT)

    1982-01-01

    A loose fitting movable cover plate (36), suitable for the severe service encountered in a fluidized bed combustor (10), restricts the flow of solids into the combustor drain lines (30) during shutdown of the bed. This cover makes it possible to empty spent solids from the bed drain lines which would otherwise plug the piping between the drain and the downstream metering device. This enables use of multiple drain lines each with a separate metering device for the control of solids flow rate.

  20. UMTRA project disposal cell cover biointrusion sensitivity assessment, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    This study provides an analysis of potential changes that may take place in a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cell cover system as a result of plant biointrusion. Potential changes are evaluated by performing a sensitivity analysis of the relative impact of root penetrations on radon flux out of the cell cover and/or water infiltration into the cell cover. Data used in this analysis consist of existing information on vegetation growth on selected cell cover systems and information available from published studies and/or other available project research. Consistent with the scope of this paper, no new site-specific data were collected from UMTRA Project sites. Further, this paper does not focus on the issue of plant transport of radon gas or other contaminants out of the disposal cell cover though it is acknowledged that such transport has the potential to be a significant pathway for contaminants to reach the environment during portions of the design life of a disposal cell where plant growth occurs. Rather, this study was performed to evaluate the effects of physical penetration and soil drying caused by plant roots that have and are expected to continue to grow in UMTRA Project disposal cell covers. An understanding of the biological and related physical processes that take place within the cover systems of the UMTRA Project disposal cells helps the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determine if the presence of a plant community on these cells is detrimental, beneficial, or of mixed value in terms of the cover system`s designed function. Results of this investigation provide information relevant to the formulation of a vegetation control policy.

  1. Gas tagging and cover gas combination for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenny C.; Laug, Matthew T.

    1985-01-01

    The invention discloses the use of stable isotopes of neon and argon, that are grouped in preselected different ratios one to the other and are then sealed as tags in different cladded nuclear fuel elements to be used in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Failure of the cladding of any fuel element allows fission gases generated in the reaction and these tag isotopes to escape and to combine with the cover gas held in the reactor over the fuel elements. The isotopes specifically are Ne.sup.20, Ne.sup.21 and Ne.sup.22 of neon and Ar.sup.36, Ar.sup.38 and Ar.sup.40 of argon, and the cover gas is helium. Serially connected cryogenically operated charcoal beds are used to clean the cover gas and to separate out the tags. The first or cover gas cleanup bed is held between approximately 0.degree. and -25.degree. C. operable to remove the fission gases from the cover gas and tags and the second or tag recovery system bed is held between approximately -170.degree. and -185.degree. C. operable to isolate the tags from the cover gas. Spectrometric analysis further is used to identify the specific tags that are recovered, and thus the specific leaking fuel element. By cataloging the fuel element tags to the location of the fuel elements in the reactor, the location of the leaking fuel element can then be specifically determined.

  2. Enhanced cover methods for surface coal refuse reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile, L.F.; Cargill, K.W.; McGarvie, S.D.

    1997-12-31

    Controlling acid rock drainage (ARD) can be a major component of surface mining reclamation. An enhanced reclamation cover system is being constructed to control infiltration of rain water and generation of ARD from coal-refuse disposal areas at a closed mine in southern Illinois. Development of the mine reclamation plan required consideration of ARD generation in coal refuse disposal areas located adjacent to an alluvial aquifer used for public water supply. An integrated site characterization was performed at the mine to provide information to develop and support the enhanced reclamation plan. The enhanced cover system is similar to covers required for municipal solid waste landfills by the Resource Conversation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Subtitle D regulations. The system comprises a graded and compacted gob layer, overlain by a compacted clay liner, and a protective soil cover. The results of infiltration modeling and analyses showed that the standard reclamation cover is effective in reducing infiltration by about 18 percent compared to an unreclaimed coal-refuse surface. The modeling results showed that the inhanced cover system should reduce infiltration by about 84 percent. The geochemical modeling results showed that the reduction in infiltration would help minimize ARD generation and contribute to an earlier reclamation of the mine site.

  3. Improved gas tagging and cover gas combination for nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

    1983-09-26

    The invention discloses the use of stable isotopes of neon and argon, sealed as tags in different cladding nuclear fuel elements to be used in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. Cladding failure allows fission gases and these tag isotopes to escape and to combine with the cover gas. The isotopes are Ne/sup 20/, Ne/sup 21/ and Ne/sup 22/ and Ar/sup 36/, Ar/sup 38/ and Ar/sup 40/, and the cover gas is He. Serially connected cryogenically operated charcoal beds are used to clean the cover gas and to separate out the tags. The first or cover gas cleanup bed is held between 0 and -25/sup 0/C to remove the fission gases from the cover gas and tags, and the second or tag recovery system bed between -170 and -185/sup 0/C to isolate the tags from the cover gas. Spectrometric analysis is used to identify the specific tags that are recovered, and thus the specific leaking fuel element. By cataloging the fuel element tags to the location of the fuel elements in the reactor, the location of the leaking fuel element can then be determined.

  4. Explicitly Accounting for Protected Lands within the GCAM 3.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2012-05-01

    The Global Change Assessment Model Version 3.0 defines three different levels of “Protected Lands” within the agricultural and landuse component. These three different scenarios effectively cordon off 3.5% (5.0 million km2) of the Earth’s terrestrial lands in the de minimus Protected Land Scenario, 5.0% (7.20 million km2) in the Core Protected Land Scenario, and 8.2% (11.8 million km2) in the Expanded Protected Land Scenario. None of these scenarios represents the “right” level of Protected Lands for the planet today or tomorrow. Rather, the goal is to create a range of scenarios that can be used in modeling human responses to climate change and the impact those would have on managed and unmanaged terrestrial lands. These scenarios harness the wealth of information in the United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre’s World Database on Protected Areas and its categories of explicit degrees of protection.

  5. Physically Based Global Downscaling: Regional Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.; Fox, Jared

    2006-02-01

    The climate simulated by a global atmosphere/land model with a physically-based subgrid orography scheme is evaluated in ten selected regions. Climate variables simulated for each of multiple elevation classes within each grid cell are mapped according the high-resolution distribution of surface elevation in each region. Comparison of the simulated annual mean climate with gridded observations leads to the following conclusions. At low to moderate elevations the downscaling scheme correctly simulates increasing precipitation, decreasing temperature, and increasing snow with increasing elevation within regions smaller than 100 km. At high elevations the downscaling scheme correctly simulates a decrease in precipitation with increasing elevation. Too little precipitation is simulated on the windward side of mountain ranges and too much precipitation is simulated on the lee side. The simulated sensitivity of surface air temperature to surface elevation is too strong, particularly in valleys influenced by drainage circulations. Observations show little evidence of a snow shadow, so the neglect of the subgrid rainshadow does not produce an unrealistic simulation of the snow distribution. Summertime snow area, which is a proxy for land ice, is much larger than observed. Summertime snow water equivalent is far less than the observed thickness of glaciers because a 1 m upper bound on snow water is applied to the simulations and because snow transport by slides is neglected. The 1 m upper bound on snow water equivalent also causes an underestimate of seasonal snow water during late winter, compared with gridded station measurements. Potential solutions to these problems are discussed.

  6. LANL Land Transfers 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Land Transfers 2015 LANL Land Transfers 2015 Land transfer activities are planned to occur fiscal year 2016 which will require independent verification of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)'s sampling protocol and analyses. The former Sewage Treatment Plant within land tract A-16-D and the southern portion of A-16-E are on track for MARSSIM final status survey. The remainder of TA-21 will require verification once final D&D of structures is complete. The sampling activities for these

  7. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01

    Brochure describes the Tribal Energy Program, which provides American Indian tribes with financial and technical assistance for developing renewable energy projects on tribal land.

  8. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Brochure describes the Tribal Energy Program, which provides American Indian tribes with financial and technical assistance for developing renewable energy projects on tribal land.

  9. Agriculture, land use, and commercial biomass energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmonds, J.A.; Wise, M.A.; Sands, R.D.; Brown, R.A.; Kheshgi, H.

    1996-06-01

    In this paper we have considered commercial biomass energy in the context of overall agriculture and land-use change. We have described a model of energy, agriculture, and land-use and employed that model to examine the implications of commercial biomass energy or both energy sector and land-use change carbon emissions. In general we find that the introduction of biomass energy has a negative effect on the extent of unmanaged ecosystems. Commercial biomass introduces a major new land use which raises land rental rates, and provides an incentive to bring more land into production, increasing the rate of incursion into unmanaged ecosystems. But while the emergence of a commercial biomass industry may increase land-use change emissions, the overall effect is strongly to reduce total anthropogenic carbon emissions. Further, the higher the rate of commercial biomass energy productivity, the lower net emissions. Higher commercial biomass energy productivity, while leading to higher land-use change emissions, has a far stronger effect on fossil fuel carbon emissions. Highly productive and inexpensive commercial biomass energy technologies appear to have a substantial depressing effect on total anthropogenic carbon emissions, though their introduction raises the rental rate on land, providing incentives for greater rates of deforestation than in the reference case.

  10. Bureau of Land Management - Final Programmatic Environmental...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Bureau of Land Management - Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Geothermal Leasing in the...

  11. LANDS WITH WILDERNESS CHARACTERISTICS, RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AND LAND EXCHANGES: CROSS-JURISDICTIONAL MANAGEMENT AND IMPACTS ON UNCONVENTIONAL FUEL DEVELOPMENT IN UTAH'S UINTA BASIN Utah is rich in oil shale and oil sands resources. ...

  12. Women Engineers Lead Global Innovation in Bangalore | GE Global...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Women Engineers Lead Global Innovation in Bangalore Click to email this to a friend (Opens ... Women Engineers Lead Global Innovation in Bangalore Suchismita Sanyal 2012.09.14 When I ...

  13. Curing | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Curing We're pioneering medical developments, from robotic healthcare assistants to diagnostic tools and specialized, globally deployed gear. Home > Impact > Curing Behind-the-Scenes of the BERTI program After graduating in Biomedical Engineering, Pedro Gomez moved from Mexico to Munich, Germany, to get his Masters in Biomedical... Read More » Invention Factory: How Will We Live Forever? In this episode of Invention Factory - a partnership between GE and Vice - we probe the cutting edge

  14. Invention | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Invention Our people drive every scientific advance we make, every day. Find out who they are and what they're thinking right now. Home > Invention Inventors GE Global Research Centers are home to many of the world's brightest, most inquisitive minds in science and technology. Meet our people » Stump the Scientist Ask us your question about science or technology. Then check back often to see what our scientists say! Leave them speechless » Edison's Desk Blog Curious about researchers'

  15. Global Bioenergy Partnership Meetings

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office Sustainability Technology Manager Kristen Johnson represented the Office at the Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP) Meetings in Rome, Italy. The event included three meetings, the 7th annual GBEP Working Group on Capacity Building, the 13th annual Task Force on Sustainability to discuss the experiences with the GBEP Sustainability Indicators for Bioenergy, and the 18th annual GBEP Steering Committee to discuss strategies for sustainable bioenergy development and deployment.

  16. Moving | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Moving We're always working on planes, trains and automobiles-and specialized ways to move people and products efficiently and sustainably. Home > Impact > Moving Green Skies of Brazil Improves Airspace Efficiency It's not uncommon for planes approaching some of Brazil's busiest airports to travel miles out of the way while pilots wait... Read More » Reducing Emissions in the New Tier 4 Locomotive GE Global Research Internal Combustion lab manager Omowoleola "Wole" Akinyemi

  17. Curing | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Curing We're pioneering medical developments, from robotic healthcare assistants to diagnostic tools and specialized, globally deployed gear. Home > Impact > Curing Young Inventor Shares His Award-Winning Invention Innovation can come from scientists of any age. Young inventor and two-time finalist, Connor Danz, shares his award-winning... Read More » Hospital Management Is Evolving to Reduce Wait Times With hospitals busier than ever and not enough staff to meet the higher demand, going

  18. Global residential appliance standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E.; Lebot, B.

    1993-03-01

    In most countries, residential electricity consumption typically ranges from 20% to 40% of total electricity consumption. This energy is used for heating, cooling, refrigeration and other end-uses. Significant energy savings are possible if new appliance purchases are for models with higher efficiency than that of existing models. There are several ways to ensure or encourage such an outcome, for example, appliance rebates, innovative procurement, and minimum efficiency standards. This paper focuses on the latter approach. At the present time, the US is the only country with comprehensive appliance energy efficiency standards. However, many other countries, such as Australia, Canada, the European Community (EC), Japan and Korea, are considering enacting standards. The greatest potential impact of minimum efficiency standards for appliances is in the developing countries (e.g., China and India), where saturations of household appliances are relatively low but growing rapidly. This paper discusses the potential savings that could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also discusses the impediments to establishing common standards for certain appliance types, such as differing test procedures, characteristics, and fuel prices. A methodology for establishing global efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers is described.

  19. Global Energy Futures Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-01-01

    The Global Energy Futures Model (GEFM) is a demand-based, gross domestic product (GDP)-driven, dynamic simulation tool that provides an integrated framework to model key aspects of energy, nuclear-materials storage and disposition, environmental effluents from fossil and non fossil energy and global nuclear-materials management. Based entirely on public source data, it links oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear and renewable energy dynamically to greenhouse-gas emissions and 13 other measures of environmental impact. It includes historical data frommore » 1990 to 2000, is benchmarked to the DOE/EIA/IEO 2002 [5] Reference Case for 2000 to 2020, and extrapolates energy demand through the year 2050. The GEFM is globally integrated, and breaks out five regions of the world: United States of America (USA), the Peoples Republic of China (China), the former Soviet Union (FSU), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations excluding the USA (other industrialized countries), and the rest of the world (ROW) (essentially the developing world). The GEFM allows the user to examine a very wide range of what ir scenarios through 2050 and to view the potential effects across widely dispersed, but interrelated areas. The authors believe that this high-level learning tool will help to stimulate public policy debate on energy, environment, economic and national security issues.« less

  20. Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO): Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO)- 2012 Project

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission (NHLCO), together with its partners, will conduct a feasibility study (FS) of a program to develop renewable energy on the Paragon-Bisti ranch lands in northwestern New Mexico, which were set aside under the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act for the benefit of relocatees (defined as Navajo families living on Hopi Partitioned Lands as of December 22, 1974).

  1. Global interrupt and barrier networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E; Heidelberger, Philip; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.

    2008-10-28

    A system and method for generating global asynchronous signals in a computing structure. Particularly, a global interrupt and barrier network is implemented that implements logic for generating global interrupt and barrier signals for controlling global asynchronous operations performed by processing elements at selected processing nodes of a computing structure in accordance with a processing algorithm; and includes the physical interconnecting of the processing nodes for communicating the global interrupt and barrier signals to the elements via low-latency paths. The global asynchronous signals respectively initiate interrupt and barrier operations at the processing nodes at times selected for optimizing performance of the processing algorithms. In one embodiment, the global interrupt and barrier network is implemented in a scalable, massively parallel supercomputing device structure comprising a plurality of processing nodes interconnected by multiple independent networks, with each node including one or more processing elements for performing computation or communication activity as required when performing parallel algorithm operations. One multiple independent network includes a global tree network for enabling high-speed global tree communications among global tree network nodes or sub-trees thereof. The global interrupt and barrier network may operate in parallel with the global tree network for providing global asynchronous sideband signals.

  2. Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

    2012-06-20

    In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

  3. TDR calibration for the alternative landfill cover demonstration (ALCD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, J.; Dwyer, S.F.; Swanson, J.N.

    1997-09-01

    The Alternative Landfill Cover Demonstration is a large scale field test that compares the performance of various landfill cover designs in dry environments. An important component of the comparison is the change in the moisture content of the soils throughout the different cover test plots. Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) is the primary method for the measurement of the volumetric moisture content. Each of the covers is composed of layers of varying types and densities of soils. The probes are therefore calibrated to calculate the volumetric moisture content in each of the different soils in order to gain the optimum performance of the TDR system. The demonstration plots are constructed in two phases; a different probe is used in each phase. The probe that is used in Phase 1 is calibrated for the following soils: compacted native soil, uncompacted native soil, compacted native soil mixed with 6% sodium bentonite by weight, and sand. The probe that is used in Phase 2 is calibrated for the following soils: compacted native soil, uncompacted native soil, and sand. In addition, the probes are calibrated for the varying cable lengths of the TDR probes. The resulting empirically derived equations allow for the calculation of in-situ volumetric moisture content of all of the varying soils throughout the cover test plots in the demonstration.

  4. Restoration of surface-mined lands with rainfall harvesting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauer, R.H.; Rickard, W.H.

    1982-12-01

    Strip mining for coal in the arid western US will remove grazing land as energy demands are met. Conventional resotration usually includes leveling the spoil banks and covering them with top soil, fertilizing, seeding and irrigation with well or river water. An overview of research on an alternate method of restoring this land is reported. From 1976 through 1981 studies were conducted on the use of water harvesting, the collection and use of rainfall runoff, to restore the vegetative productivity of strip mined lands in arid regions. These studies tested the technical and economic feasibility of using partially leveled spoil banks at strip mines as catchment areas to collect and direct runoff to the topsoiled valley floor where crops were cultivated. Information was collected on the efficiency of seven treatments to increase runoff from the catchment areas and on the productivity of seven crops. The experiments were conducted in arid areas of Washington, Arizona, and Colorado. It was concluded that water harvesting can replace or augment expensive and inadequate supplies of well and river water in arid regions with a suitable climate. These studies showed that some treatments provided adequate runoff to produce a useful crop in the valleys, thus making this alternative approach to restoration technically feasible. This approach was also potentially economically feasible where the treatment costs of the catchment areas were low, the treatment was effective, the crop was productive and valuable, and earthmoving costs were lower than with conventional restoration involving complete leveling of spoil banks. It was also concluded that water harvesting can be made more effective with further information on catchment area treatments, which crops are most adaptable to water harvesting, the optimum incline of the catchment areas and climatic influences on water harvesting.

  5. Endeavor Global | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    :"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map References: Endeavor Global Web Site1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Endeavor Global is...

  6. Greenhouse gas emissions from forest, land use and biomass burning in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matitu, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) gases are the main contributors to the greenhouse effect that consequently results in global warming. This paper examines the sources and sinks of these gases from/to forest, land use and biomass burning and their likely contribution to climate change using IPCC/OECD methodology. Emissions have been calculated in mass units of carbon and nitrogen Emissions and uptake have been summed for each gas and the emissions converted to full molecular weights. Mismanagement of forests and land misuse have contributed much to greenhouse gas emissions in Tanzania. For example, cultivation methods, forest clearing, burning of savannah grass and indiscriminate logging (non-sustainable logging) have contributed significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. These categories contribute more than 90% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. However, the study shows that shifting cultivation, savannah burning and forest clearing for conversion to permanent crop land and pasture are the main contributors.

  7. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  8. Oak Ridge reservation land-use plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibb, W. R.; Hardin, T. H.; Hawkins, C. C.; Johnson, W. A.; Peitzsch, F. C.; Scott, T. H.; Theisen, M. R.; Tuck, S. C.

    1980-03-01

    This study establishes a basis for long-range land-use planning to accommodate both present and projected DOE program requirements in Oak Ridge. In addition to technological requirements, this land-use plan incorporates in-depth ecological concepts that recognize multiple uses of land as a viable option. Neither environmental research nor technological operations need to be mutually exclusive in all instances. Unique biological areas, as well as rare and endangered species, need to be protected, and human and environmental health and safety must be maintained. The plan is based on the concept that the primary use of DOE land resources must be to implement the overall DOE mission in Oak Ridge. This document, along with the base map and overlay maps, provides a reasonably detailed description of the DOE Oak Ridge land resources and of the current and potential uses of the land. A description of the land characteristics, including geomorphology, agricultural productivity and soils, water courses, vegetation, and terrestrial and aquatic animal habitats, is presented to serve as a resource document. Essentially all DOE land in the Oak Ridge area is being fully used for ongoing DOE programs or has been set aside as protected areas.

  9. Global climate change crosses state boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Changnon, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    The hot, dry summer of 1988 brought the specter of global warming a bit too close for comfort. {open_quotes}Scorching heat, not scientific models, attracted media attention,{close_quotes} says Stanley A. Changnon, senior scientist with the Illinois State Water Survey in Champaign, Illinois. Rising temperatures in the late 1980`s prompted individual states to begin to take action to curb greenhouse-gas emissions. A 1990 report by the National Governors Association identified two guiding principles for addressing climate change issues. {open_quotes}First, that energy policy must be at the center of any efforts to control greenhouse-gas emissions. Second, that state can...restrict emissions through state policies related to public utilities, land use, transportation, and even taxation,{close_quotes} Changnon says. Even if concerns for global warming prove to be overblown, states decided to act for broader economic and environmental reasons. Such initiatives not only save money, but they improve air quality and leave the nation more energy independent,{close_quotes} Changnon says.

  10. ARM - Lesson Plans: Global Warming

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Global Warming Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Global Warming Objective The objective is to understand the enhanced greenhouse effect and the effects of global warming. Important Points to Understand If the emission of greenhouse gases continues at the present

  11. ARM - What Causes Global Warming?

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ThinkersWhat Causes Global Warming? Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans What Causes Global Warming? What is the basis for the predictions concerning global warming? There are several gases in the air, collectively called greenhouse gases, that trap the infrared radiation emitted

  12. Enlighten Your Research Global Program

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Enlighten Your Research Global Program Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops CrossConnects Workshop Series Operating Innovative Networks Workshop Series Enlighten Your Research Global Program Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Enlighten Your Research

  13. Radon diffusion through multilayer earthen covers: models and simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, D.W.; Oster, C.A.; Nelson, R.W.; Gee, G.W.

    1981-09-01

    A capability to model and analyze the fundamental interactions that influence the diffusion of radon gas through uranium mill tailings and cover systems has been investigated. The purpose of this study is to develop the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion and to develop an understanding of the fundamental interactions that influence radon diffusion. This study develops the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion in one, two and three dimensions. The theory has been incorporated into three computer models that are used to analyze several tailings and cover configurations. This report contains a discussion of the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion, a discussion of the computer models used to analyze uranium mill tailings and multilayered cover systems, and presents the results that have been obtained.

  14. Selecting reasonable future land use scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allred, W.E.; Smith, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper examines a process to help select the most reasonable future land use scenarios for hazardous waste and/or low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. The process involves evaluating future land use scenarios by applying selected criteria currently used by commercial mortgage companies to determine the feasibility of obtaining a loan for purchasing such land. The basis for the process is that only land use activities for which a loan can be obtained will be considered. To examine the process, a low-level radioactive waste site, the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, is used as an example. The authors suggest that the process is a very precise, comprehensive, and systematic (common sense) approach for determining reasonable future use of land. Implementing such a process will help enhance the planning, decisionmaking, safe management, and cleanup of present and future disposal facilities.

  15. Multi-well sample plate cover penetration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2011-12-27

    An apparatus for penetrating a cover over a multi-well sample plate containing at least one individual sample well includes a cutting head, a cutter extending from the cutting head, and a robot. The cutting head is connected to the robot wherein the robot moves the cutting head and cutter so that the cutter penetrates the cover over the multi-well sample plate providing access to the individual sample well. When the cutting head is moved downward the foil is pierced by the cutter that splits, opens, and folds the foil inward toward the well. The well is then open for sample aspiration but has been protected from cross contamination.

  16. FEMP First Thursday Seminar Covers Executive Order 13693 Updates |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Executive Order 13693 Updates FEMP First Thursday Seminar Covers Executive Order 13693 Updates November 6, 2015 - 5:14pm Addthis FEMP First Thursday Seminar Covers Executive Order 13693 Updates The U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) will present a new First Thursday Seminar on December 3, 2015, from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Executive Order 13693: Recent Developments, Implementation Updates, and Opportunities. This seminar will provide learners

  17. Global warming from HFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, E.

    1998-11-01

    Using a variety of public sources, a computer model of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerant emissions in the UK has been developed. This model has been used to estimate and project emissions in 2010 under three types of scenarios: (1) business as usual; (2) voluntary agreements to reduce refrigerant leakage; and (3) comprehensive regulations to reduce refrigerant leakage. This resulting forecast is that UK emissions of HFC refrigerants in 2010 will account for 2% to 4% of the UK`s 1990 baseline global warming contribution.

  18. The Global Energy Challenge

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Crabtree, George

    2016-07-12

    The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use.   The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate.  New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

  19. Going Global: Tight Oil Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    GOING GLOBAL: TIGHT OIL PRODUCTION Leaping out of North America and onto the World Stage JULY 2014 GOING GLOBAL: TIGHT OIL PRODUCTION Jamie Webster, Senior Director Global Oil Markets Jamie.webster@ihs.com 1 GOING GLOBAL: TIGHT OIL PRODUCTION Key Message: Tight Oil Will Have Unconventional Effects Tight Oil Production will change in the coming decades. It will be:  More global, as it leaps out of North America  More inclusive, as companies come to the US for experience and US companies go

  20. Probabilistic Modeling of Settlement Risk at Land Disposal Facilities - 12304

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foye, Kevin C.; Soong, Te-Yang

    2012-07-01

    The long-term reliability of land disposal facility final cover systems - and therefore the overall waste containment - depends on the distortions imposed on these systems by differential settlement/subsidence. The evaluation of differential settlement is challenging because of the heterogeneity of the waste mass (caused by inconsistent compaction, void space distribution, debris-soil mix ratio, waste material stiffness, time-dependent primary compression of the fine-grained soil matrix, long-term creep settlement of the soil matrix and the debris, etc.) at most land disposal facilities. Deterministic approaches to long-term final cover settlement prediction are not able to capture the spatial variability in the waste mass and sub-grade properties which control differential settlement. An alternative, probabilistic solution is to use random fields to model the waste and sub-grade properties. The modeling effort informs the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of land disposal facilities. A probabilistic method to establish design criteria for waste placement and compaction is introduced using the model. Random fields are ideally suited to problems of differential settlement modeling of highly heterogeneous foundations, such as waste. Random fields model the seemingly random spatial distribution of a design parameter, such as compressibility. When used for design, the use of these models prompts the need for probabilistic design criteria. It also allows for a statistical approach to waste placement acceptance criteria. An example design evaluation was performed, illustrating the use of the probabilistic differential settlement simulation methodology to assemble a design guidance chart. The purpose of this design evaluation is to enable the designer to select optimal initial combinations of design slopes and quality control acceptance criteria that yield an acceptable proportion of post-settlement slopes meeting some design minimum. For this specific

  1. (Global energy development)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trivelpiece, A.W.; Fulkerson, W.

    1989-11-21

    This is the report of foreign travel by Alvin W. Trivelpiece and William Fulkerson who were part of a US delegation of ten individuals who visited the Soviet Union for two weeks as part of a joint activity between the US National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the Academy of Sciences (AS) of the USSR. Trivelpiece headed the US delegation. The trip was sponsored by the NAS under a grant from the MacArthur Foundation. It consisted of three parts: (1) a tour of energy facilities and laboratories in Siberia, including the cities of Novosibirsk, Krasnoyarsk, Nazarovo, Achinsk, Bratsk, and Irkutsk; (2) a joint seminar in Moscow called Global Energy Development and Associated Ecological (Environmental) Impacts''; and (3) a workshop to discuss areas of potential future collaboration and cooperation. A Memorandum of Record was signed on the final day. It recommended that the Presidents of the two Academies establish a joint committee for ...coordinating, recommending, and encouraging activities in accordance with this memorandum.'' Projects for possible collaboration were identified in the areas of energy data and models, global warming, technologies for more efficient use of energy, clean coal, gas turbines, tools for assessing environmental impacts, and analysis of approaches to energy decision making.

  2. Plasma bullets behavior in a tube covered by a conductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xian, Y. B.; Xu, H. T.; Lu, X. P. Pei, X. K.; Gong, W. W.; Lu, Y.; Liu, D. W.; Yang, Y.

    2015-06-15

    In this work, for better applications of atmospheric pressure plasma jets, the physics of plasma streamers in a glass tube with a part of it covered by a conductor is investigated. To better understand the propagation mechanism of plasma bullets in capillary tubes passing through a curved or narrow passage for some biomedical or material applications, the propagation of plasma streamers in a tube covered by a floating conductor is investigated. For a plasma streamer propagating in a tube covered by a conductor, the plasma streamer is suppressed and becomes shorter, and a secondary streamer is generated in the tube at the downstream end of the conductor. The larger the area covered by the conductor, or the thinner the tube, the stronger the plasma streamer is inhibited. The electric potential of the conductor is measured to be as high as 6 kV. On the other hand, a higher voltage applied on the HV electrode, or a higher gas flow rate will make the secondary plasma streamer longer. It is found that the capacitor formed by the conductor outside the tube and the wall of the tube plays an important role in inhibiting the original plasma streamer and generating the secondary streamer. Moreover, the active species generated by the original plasma play important role in generating a secondary plasma streamer.

  3. Output-increasing, protective cover for a solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammerbacher, Milfred D.

    1995-11-21

    A flexible cover (14) for a flexible solar cell (12) protects the cell from the ambient and increases the cell's efficiency. The cell(12)includes silicon spheres (16) held in a flexible aluminum sheet matrix (20,22). The cover (14) is a flexible, protective layer (60) of light-transparent material having a relatively flat upper, free surface (64) and an irregular opposed surface (66). The irregular surface (66) includes first portions (68) which conform to the polar regions (31R) of the spheres (16) and second convex (72) or concave (90) portions (72 or 90) which define spaces (78) in conjunction with the reflective surface (20T) of one aluminum sheet (20). Without the cover (14) light (50) falling on the surface (20T) between the spheres (16) is wasted, that is, it does not fall on a sphere (16). The surfaces of the second portions are non-parallel to the direction of the otherwise wasted light (50), which fact, together with a selected relationship between the refractive indices of the cover and the spaces, result in sufficient diffraction of the otherwise wasted light (50) so that about 25% of it is reflected from the surface (20T) onto a sphere (16).

  4. Solar Development on Contaminated and Disturbed Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, Jordan; Lee, Courtney; Mosey, Gail; Melius, Jenny

    2013-12-01

    Land classified as contaminated and disturbed across the United States has the potential to host developments of utility-scale solar power. This report examines the prospect of developing utility- and commercial-scale concentrated solar power (CSP) and solar photovoltaics (PV) technologies on degraded and environmentally contaminated lands. The potential for solar development on contaminated anddisturbed lands was assessed, and for the largest and highest solar resource sites, the economic impacts and feasibility were evaluated. Developing solar power on contaminated and disturbed lands can help create jobs and revitalize local and state economies, and selecting these sites over greenfield sites can potentially have permitting and environmental mitigation advantages. The U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot goals call for 632 GW of PV and 83 GW of CSP to be deployed by 2050. Conservative land-use estimates of this study (10 acres per megawatt) show that there are disturbed and environmentally contaminated lands throughout the country that could be suitable for utility-scale solar power, and, that there is sufficient land area to meet SunShot solar deployment goals. The purpose of this assessment is to improve the understanding of these sites and facilitate solar developers' selection of contaminated and disturbed sites for development.

  5. Idaho State Board of Land Commissioners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Board of Land Commissioners Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Idaho State Board of Land Commissioners Name: Idaho State Board of Land Commissioners Address: 300 N. 6th St, Suite...

  6. Nevada Division of State Lands | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    State Lands Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Nevada Division of State Lands Name: Nevada Division of State Lands Address: 901 S. Stewart St., Suite 5003 Place: Carson City, Nevada...

  7. VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study () | Data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Title: VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) is an international ...

  8. Sustainable Land Lab Tour | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainable Land Lab Tour Sustainable Land Lab Tour PARC researchers and guests were taken on a tour of the new Sustainable land lab and shown the rennovations going on in North ...

  9. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Access/New Mexico | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Mexico State Land Office Competitive Land Leasing: Yes, New Mexico State Land Office issues geothermal leases through competitive auction. Noncompetitive Land Leasing: No Royalty...

  10. Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich; Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Hoenicke, Dirk; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2010-01-19

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

  11. Global fish production and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brander, K.M.

    2007-12-11

    Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

  12. Black carbon contribution to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chylek, P.; Johnson, B.; Kou, L.; Wong, J.

    1996-12-31

    Before the onset of industrial revolution the only important source of black carbon in the atmosphere was biomass burning. Today, black carbon production is divided between the biomass and fossil fuel burning. Black carbon is a major agent responsible for absorption of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols. Thus black carbon makes other aerosols less efficient in their role of reflecting solar radiation and cooling the earth-atmosphere system. Black carbon also contributes to the absorption of solar radiation by clouds and snow cover. The authors present the results of black carbon concentrations measurements in the atmosphere, in cloud water, in rain and snow melt water collected during the 1992--1996 time period over the southern Nova Scotia. Their results are put into the global and historical perspective by comparing them with the compilation of past measurements at diverse locations and with their measurements of black carbon concentrations in the Greenland and Antarctic ice cores. Black carbon contribution to the global warming is estimated, and compared to the carbon dioxide warming, using the radiative forcing caused by the black carbon at the top of the atmosphere.

  13. Posters Cloud Parameterizations in Global Climate Models: The Role of Aerosols

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Posters Cloud Parameterizations in Global Climate Models: The Role of Aerosols J. E. Penner and C. C. Chuang Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California Introduction Aerosols influence warm clouds in two ways. First, they determine initial drop size distributions, thereby influencing the albedo of clouds. Second, they determine the lifetime of clouds, thereby possibly changing global cloud cover statistics. At the present time, neither effect of aerosols on clouds is included

  14. Modeling the impact of agricultural land use and management on US carbon budgets

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Drewniak, B. A.; Mishra, U.; Song, J.; Prell, J.; Kotamarthi, V. R.

    2014-09-22

    Cultivation of the terrestrial land surface can create either a source or sink of atmospheric CO2, depending on land management practices. The Community Land Model (CLM) provides a useful tool to explore how land use and management impact the soil carbon pool at regional to global scales. CLM was recently updated to include representation of managed lands growing maize, soybean, and spring wheat. In this study, CLM-Crop is used to investigate the impacts of various management practices, including fertilizer use and differential rates of crop residue removal, on the soil organic carbon (SOC) storage of croplands in the continental Unitedmore » States over approximately a 170 year period. Results indicate that total US SOC stocks have already lost over 8 Pg C (10%) due to land cultivation practices (e.g., fertilizer application, cultivar choice, and residue removal), compared to a land surface composed of native vegetation (i.e., grasslands). After long periods of cultivation, individual plots growing maize and soybean lost up to 65% of the carbon stored, compared to a grassland site. Crop residue management showed the greatest effect on soil carbon storage, with low and medium residue returns resulting in additional losses of 5% and 3.5%, respectively, in US carbon storage, while plots with high residue returns stored 2% more carbon. Nitrogenous fertilizer can alter the amount of soil carbon stocks significantly. Under current levels of crop residue return, not applying fertilizer resulted in a 5% loss of soil carbon. Our simulations indicate that disturbance through cultivation will always result in a loss of soil carbon, and management practices will have a large influence on the magnitude of SOC loss.« less

  15. Modeling the impact of agricultural land use and management on US carbon budgets

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Drewniak, B. A.; Mishra, U.; Song, J.; Prell, J.; Kotamarthi, V. R.

    2015-04-09

    Cultivation of the terrestrial land surface can create either a source or sink of atmospheric CO2, depending on land management practices. The Community Land Model (CLM) provides a useful tool for exploring how land use and management impact the soil carbon pool at regional to global scales. CLM was recently updated to include representation of managed lands growing maize, soybean, and spring wheat. In this study, CLM-Crop is used to investigate the impacts of various management practices, including fertilizer use and differential rates of crop residue removal, on the soil organic carbon (SOC) storage of croplands in the continental Unitedmore » States over approximately a 170-year period. Results indicate that total US SOC stocks have already lost over 8 Pg C (10%) due to land cultivation practices (e.g., fertilizer application, cultivar choice, and residue removal), compared to a land surface composed of native vegetation (i.e., grasslands). After long periods of cultivation, individual subgrids (the equivalent of a field plot) growing maize and soybean lost up to 65% of the carbon stored compared to a grassland site. Crop residue management showed the greatest effect on soil carbon storage, with low and medium residue returns resulting in additional losses of 5 and 3.5%, respectively, in US carbon storage, while plots with high residue returns stored 2% more carbon. Nitrogenous fertilizer can alter the amount of soil carbon stocks significantly. Under current levels of crop residue return, not applying fertilizer resulted in a 5% loss of soil carbon. Our simulations indicate that disturbance through cultivation will always result in a loss of soil carbon, and management practices will have a large influence on the magnitude of SOC loss.« less

  16. Consideration of liners and covers in performance assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, Mark A.; Seitz, Robert R.; Suttora, Linda C.

    2014-09-18

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several United States Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These disposal cells are typically regulated by States and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) in addition to having to comply with requirements in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management due to the radioactive waste. The USDOE-Environmental Management Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these CERCLA disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to CERCLA risk assessments and DOE Order 435.1 performance assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement, respectively. One of the issues considered by the working group, which is addressed in this report, was how to appropriately consider the performance of covers and liners/leachate collections systems in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 performance assessment (PA). This same information may be appropriate for consideration within CERCLA risk assessments for these facilities. These OSDCs are generally developed to meet hazardous waste (HW) disposal design standards under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as well as the DOE Order 435.1 performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. To meet the standards for HW, the facilities typically include engineered covers and liner/leachate collection systems. Thus, when considering such facilities in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 PA, there is a need to address the evolution of performance of covers and liner/leachate collection systems in the context of meeting a performance standard considering time

  17. Utah Public Lands Policy Coordination Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Lands Policy Coordination Office Jump to: navigation, search Name: Governor's Public Lands Policy Coordination Office Address: 5110 State Office Building Place: Salt Lake City,...

  18. Bayesian Calibration of the Community Land Model using Surrogates...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bayesian Calibration of the Community Land Model using Surrogates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bayesian Calibration of the Community Land Model using Surrogates We ...

  19. Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities...

    Energy Savers

    Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear Facilities among Several Countries: Evaluation for Regulatory Input Approaches used for Clearance of Lands from Nuclear ...

  20. Vectorizing the Community Land Model (CLM) (Journal Article)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Vectorizing the Community Land Model (CLM) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Vectorizing the Community Land Model (CLM) In this paper we describe our...

  1. Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas...

  2. ORS 197 - Comprehensive Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    197 - Comprehensive Land Use Planning Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: ORS 197 - Comprehensive Land Use...

  3. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Access/Utah | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    RAPIDGeothermalLand AccessUtah < RAPID | Geothermal | Land Access Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk...

  4. Hawaii's Rainforest Crunch: Land, People, and Geothermal Development...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Rainforest Crunch: Land, People, and Geothermal Development Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Periodical: Hawaii's Rainforest Crunch: Land, People,...

  5. California Land Use Planning Information Network | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Land Use Planning Information Network Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: California Land Use Planning Information...

  6. Beijing Ideal land Technology Development Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Ideal land Technology Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Beijing Ideal-land Technology Development Co Ltd Place: China Sector: Biofuels Product: Biofuels (...

  7. Geothermal/Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    GeothermalLand Use Planning < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Planning Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Grid Connection...

  8. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Logo: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Address: 1151 Punchbowl St Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip: 96813 Website:...

  9. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Access/Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    RAPIDGeothermalLand AccessNevada < RAPID | Geothermal | Land Access Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk...

  10. Montana - Land Use License Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Land Use License Application Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Montana - Land Use License Application Author Montana Department of Natural...

  11. RAPID/Solar/Land Access/Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    RAPIDSolarLand AccessNevada < RAPID | Solar | Land Access Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk...

  12. Idaho - Idaho Dept. of Lands - Application for Easement | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Easement. Boise, Idaho. Idaho Department of Lands. Easement Application Instructions; 4p. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleIdaho-IdahoDept.ofLands-A...

  13. EA-1927: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Potential Land and Facilities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Potential Land and Facilities Transfers; McCracken County, Kentucky EA-1927: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Potential Land and Facilities ...

  14. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Use/Federal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    RAPIDGeothermalLand UseFederal < RAPID | Geothermal | Land Use Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk...

  15. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Access/Colorado | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    RAPIDGeothermalLand AccessColorado < RAPID | Geothermal | Land Access Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About...

  16. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Access/Oregon | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    RAPIDGeothermalLand AccessOregon < RAPID | Geothermal | Land Access Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk...

  17. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Access/Alaska | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    RAPIDGeothermalLand AccessAlaska < RAPID | Geothermal | Land Access Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk...

  18. Mozambique-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Jump to: navigation, search Name Mozambique-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods AgencyCompany Organization International...

  19. Tanzania-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Tanzania-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Jump to: navigation, search Name Tanzania-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods AgencyCompany Organization...

  20. CleanEnergyProjectsonTribalLands_Project_Descriptions_072011...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CleanEnergyProjectsonTribalLandsProjectDescriptions072011.pdf More Documents & Publications CleanEnergyProjectsonTribalLandsProjectDescriptions072011.pdf...

  1. NREL: Energy Analysis - Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy on Contaminated Lands Map of U.S. Map of Potential Limbo Land Sites for Consideration for Renewable Energy Technology Development. Enlarge image NREL's ...

  2. Oregon Land Management Division - Easements | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Division - Easements Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Land Management Division - Easements Author Oregon Land Management...

  3. Vermont State Lands Administration: Application Page | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    State Lands Administration: Application Page Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Vermont State Lands Administration: Application Page...

  4. Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration Name: Utah School and Institutional...

  5. Bacteria increase arid-land soil surface temperature through...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bacteria increase arid-land soil surface temperature through the production of sunscreens Prev Next Title: Bacteria increase arid-land soil surface temperature through the ...

  6. Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management,...

  7. Mays Landing, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Smart Grid Project Registered Energy Companies in Mays Landing, New Jersey Energy Enterprises Utility Companies in Mays Landing, New Jersey Atlantic City Electric Co References...

  8. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands From Open Energy Information Address: P.O. Box 261 Place:...

  9. Soil carbon sequestration and land use change associated with...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Soil carbon sequestration and land use change associated with biofuel production: empirical evidence Title Soil carbon sequestration and land use change associated with biofuel...

  10. Land Management Practices More Critical as Biofuels Use Grows

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Management Practices More Critical as Biofuels Use Grows Land Management Practices More Critical as Biofuels Use Grows Climate Simulations Run at NERSC Show Cultivation Causes ...

  11. Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Planning Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) On October 23, 2009, ...

  12. EA-1856: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Portsmouth...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    56: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Piketon, Ohio EA-1856: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the...

  13. ORS Chapter 273 State Lands Generally | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    ORS Chapter 273 State Lands GenerallyLegal Abstract Oregon statute setting forth rules and procedures related to state land. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect...

  14. Department of Energy Land Ice Modeling Efforts (Conference) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Land Ice Modeling Efforts Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Department of Energy Land Ice Modeling Efforts Authors: Price, Stephen F. Dr 1 + Show Author...

  15. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries Name Assessment of...

  16. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Access/Montana | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Way Easement for Utilities Through State Lands. Local Land Access Process not available Policies & Regulations An Introduction to Electric Power Transmission Environmental...

  17. Title 16 USC 818 Public Lands Included in Project - Reservation...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Entry (1996). Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTitle16USC818PublicLandsIncludedinProject-ReservationofLandsFromEntry&oldid722800" ...

  18. Oregon Division of State Lands | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Lands. The agency is comprised of four divisions: Director's Office, Land Management, Wetlands and Waterways Conservation, and Finance and Administration, and the South Slough...

  19. Land Use License | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Land Use LicenseLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2013 Legal Citation Not...

  20. pv land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    pv land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy GenerationProduction Shreveport Airport...

  1. solar land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    solar land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy GenerationProduction Shreveport...

  2. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands Conference

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Electric Utility Consultants, Inc. (EUCI) is hosting a conference to examine key considerations when designing tribal projects to improve feasibility, assess risks and opportunities of active vs. passive tribal participation, and building a project on tribal lands.

  3. AG Land 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    LLC Developer AG Land Energy LLC Energy Purchaser Alliant Energy Location Story County IA Coordinates 42.145531, -93.432161 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  4. AG Land 4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    LLC Developer AG Land Energy LLC Energy Purchaser Alliant Energy Location Story County IA Coordinates 42.206397, -93.325714 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  5. AG Land 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    LLC Developer AG Land Energy LLC Energy Purchaser Alliant Energy Location Story County IA Coordinates 41.904231, -93.354864 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  6. AG Land 3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    LLC Developer AG Land Energy LLC Energy Purchaser Alliant Energy Location Story County IA Coordinates 42.146061, -93.428028 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  7. 2015 Tribal Lands and Environment Forum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) are hosting the annual Tribal Lands and Environment Forum. The four-day forum will feature special trainings, field trips, and breakout sessions focused on tribal water programs.

  8. 2015 Tribal Lands and Environment Forum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) are hosting the annual Tribal Lands and Environment Forum. The four-day forum will feature special trainings, field trips, and breakout...

  9. Marine and Land Active-Source Seismic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Marine and Land Active-Source Seismic Imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged Faulting near Geothermal Prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada Amy Eisses1-3, Annie Kell1'3, Graham ...

  10. Land O Lakes Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    O Lakes Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Land O'Lakes Inc Place: Saint Paul, Minnesota Zip: 55164-0101 Product: Farmer-owned cooperative, marketer of dairy-based products for...

  11. Global/Local Dynamic Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeffer, A; Das, S; Lawless, D; Ng, B

    2006-10-10

    Many dynamic systems involve a number of entities that are largely independent of each other but interact with each other via a subset of state variables. We present global/local dynamic models (GLDMs) to capture these kinds of systems. In a GLDM, the state of an entity is decomposed into a globally influenced state that depends on other entities, and a locally influenced state that depends only on the entity itself. We present an inference algorithm for GLDMs called global/local particle filtering, that introduces the principle of reasoning globally about global dynamics and locally about local dynamics. We have applied GLDMs to an asymmetric urban warfare environment, in which enemy units form teams to attack important targets, and the task is to detect such teams as they form. Experimental results for this application show that global/local particle filtering outperforms ordinary particle filtering and factored particle filtering.

  12. al2000-08withoutCoverMemo.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    al2000-08withoutCoverMemo.pdf al2000-08withoutCoverMemo.pdf PDF icon al2000-08withoutCoverMemo.pdf More Documents & Publications AbrahamMemoToMcSlarrow-Brooks.pdf...

  13. ARM - What is Global Warming?

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    is Global Warming? Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans What is Global Warming? Our earth's average temperature stays pretty much the same from year to year. Sometimes it gets very cold in the winter and very hot in the summer where you live. And some years may be a little hotter

  14. ARM - What is Global Warming?

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    is Global Warming? Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans What is Global Warming? The surface temperature of each of the planets in our solar system depends on a process called the heat budget. This budget, like any other type of budget, remains balanced if the amount (of energy)

  15. Principal Associate Director - Global Security

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Principal Associate Director - Global Security As Principal Associate Director for Global Security, Terry Wallace leads Laboratory programs with special focus on developing and applying the scientific and engineering capabilities to address complex national and global security threats. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Wallace's expertise is forensic seismology, a highly specialized discipline focusing on detection and quantification of nuclear tests. Terry C.

  16. Evapotranspiration Cover for the 92-Acre Area Retired Mixed Waste Pits:Interim CQA Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Delphi Groupe, Inc., and J. A. Cesare and Associates, Inc.

    2011-06-20

    This Interim Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report is for the 92-Acre Evapotranspiration Cover, Area 5 Waste Management Division (WMD) Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada for the period of January 20, 2011 to May 12, 2011. This Interim Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report is for the 92-Acre Evapotranspiration Cover, Area 5 Waste Management Division (WMD) Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada for the period of January 20, 2011 to May 12, 2011. Construction was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) under the Approval of Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, on January 6, 2011, pursuant to Subpart XII.8a of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The project is located in Area 5 of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly known as the Nevada Test Site, located in southern Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, in Nye County. The project site, in Area 5, is located in a topographically closed basin approximately 14 additional miles north of Mercury Nevada, in the north-central part of Frenchman Flat. The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste. The 92-Acre Area encompasses the southern portion of the Area 5 RWMS, which has been designated for the first final closure operations. This area contains 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes, 16 narrow trenches, and 9 broader pits. With the exception of two active pits (P03 and P06), all trenches and pits in the 92-Acre Area had operational covers approximately 2.4 meters thick, at a minimum, in most areas when this project began. The units within the 92-Acre Area are grouped into the following six informal categories based on physical location

  17. Solar heat collecting panel assembly and method for covering structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.P.; Jones, I.R.; Vurpillat, V.V.

    1984-06-19

    Panels are formed and mounted in an exterior structure covering assemblage exteriorly simulating a standard exterior structure covering panel assemblage while simultaneously providing a fluid flow network within the panel assemblage for solar heat collection while not substantially disturbing the standard panel assemblage simulation. Generally, the panels have a relatively thin, freely heat transferring exterior layer portion with directly underlying fluid flow channels interconnected between panels for the overall assemblage fluid flow network without substantially disturbing the exterior standard panel simulation. The panels may be formed to simulate any standard roofing or siding panels and the solar heat collecting assemblage may be integrated with adjacent panel assemblages not including the solar heat collecting features with the overall assemblage still maintaining the same standard panel simulation.

  18. Providing Diurnal Sky Cover Data at ARM Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klebe, Dimitri I.

    2015-03-06

    The Solmirus Corporation was awarded two-year funding to perform a comprehensive data analysis of observations made during Solmirus’ 2009 field campaign (conducted from May 21 to July 27, 2009 at the ARM SGP site) using their All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer (ASIVA) instrument. The objective was to develop a suite of cloud property data products for the ASIVA instrument that could be implemented in real time and tailored for cloud modelers. This final report describes Solmirus’ research and findings enabled by this grant. The primary objective of this award was to develop a diurnal sky cover (SC) data product utilizing the ASIVA’s infrared (IR) radiometrically-calibrated data and is described in detail. Other data products discussed in this report include the sky cover derived from ASIVA’s visible channel and precipitable water vapor, cloud temperature (both brightness and color), and cloud height inferred from ASIVA’s IR channels.

  19. Anisotropic capillary barrier for waste site surface covers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stormont, John C. (Sandia Park, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Waste sites are capped or covered upon closure. The cover structure incorporates a number of different layers each having a contributory function. One such layer is the barrier layer. Traditionally the barriers have been compacted soil and geosynthetics. These types of barriers have not been successfully implemented in unsaturated ground conditions like those found in dry climates. Capillary barriers have been proposed as barrier layers in dry environments, but the divergence length of these barriers has been found to be inadequate. An alternative to the capillary barrier is a anisotropic capillary barrier. An anisotropic capillary barrier has an increased divergence length which results in more water being diverted laterally preventing the majority of water from percolating in a downward direction through the barrier.

  20. Covered Product Category: Exterior Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Exterior Lighting Covered Product Category: Exterior Lighting The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for outdoor wall-mounted light fixtures or luminaires, outdoor pole/arm-mounted area and roadway luminaires, outdoor pole/arm-mounted decorative luminaires, fuel pump canopy luminaires, bollards, and parking garage luminaires, all of which are FEMP-designated product categories. Federal laws and requirements mandate that

  1. Covered Product Category: Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay) | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay) Covered Product Category: Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay) The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay). Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for Industrial

  2. Covered Product Category: Residential Windows, Doors, and Skylights |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Residential Windows, Doors, and Skylights Covered Product Category: Residential Windows, Doors, and Skylights The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for residential windows, doors, and skylights, which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most

  3. L.43 EXHIBIT C PAST PERFORMANCE QUESTIONNAIRE COVER LETTER

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    3 EXHIBIT C PAST PERFORMANCE QUESTIONNAIRE COVER LETTER The Department of Energy is seeking your assistance on a very important procurement. is participating in a proposal for a DOE contract. has identified you as someone who is familiar with their past performance on similar work. We are asking you to complete the attached Past Performance Information Questionnaire to help DOE evaluate 's past performance. We greatly appreciate your time and assistance in completing this questionnaire. In

  4. Enlighten Your Research Global Program

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Enlighten Your Research Global Program Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops CrossConnects Workshop Series Operating Innovative Networks Workshop Series Enlighten...

  5. Office of Global Material Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    at Wilton Park, United Kingdom, on the growing challenge of securing the global maritime supply chain. In total, 55 participants from 15 countries and 9 international...

  6. Aviation Technology | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Read More Ceramic Matrix Composites Improve Engine Efficiency Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are a breakthrough materials technology for jet engines that started at our Global ...

  7. Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

    2014-06-01

    Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

  8. Water flow through cover soils using modeling and experimental methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choo, L.P.; Yanful, E.K.

    2000-04-01

    The vertical flow of water in cover soils is simulated using published analytical and finite-element methods. The two methods gave virtually identical pressure head and water content profiles during steady infiltration of water in a multilayer soil cover and transient infiltration in a single-layer cover. The finite-element model was then used to simulate flow in two laboratory columns packed with multilayer soils and subjected to downward drainage and conditions of evaporation and no evaporation. The model adequately predicted transient pressure heads and water contents for the first 7.5 h of drainage in a till-sand layer without evaporation. Predictions at times equal to and greater than 3 days were not as good, probably due to the formation of discontinuous water pockets in the draining sand around the residual water content, which apparently produced locked-in or static nonequilibrium pressures. These pressures are not captured by existing methods used for estimating the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity-pressure function of soils. Further modeling showed that at times greater than 8 days, the flux from the column with evaporation was all in the vapor phase.

  9. Evaluating the Probabilistic Land-Use Scenarios in the Radiological Dose Assessment for License Termination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.Y.; Yu, C.; Kamboj, S.; Allison, T.; LePoire, D.; Mo, T.

    2006-07-01

    A recent trend in establishing regulatory policy regarding environmental cleanup has been the adoption of a risk-informed decision approach. This approach places an emphasis on the development of a defensible technical basis upon which cleanup decisions can be understood and accepted by stakeholders. The process has been exemplified by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) approach to implement its License Termination Rule in Title 10, Part 20, Subpart E of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 20, Subpart E), for which probabilistic radiological dose assessment has been a key technical element for demonstrating compliance. Further guidance including NUREG-1757 and its supplemental document are also prepared for this purpose. The approach also entails extensive data collection to cover the range of parameter variability, along with interpretations of the probabilistic dose results and demonstration of compliance. One major remaining issue, however, involves the future use of the land following cleanup. Land use is a key factor that may profoundly influence dose assessment, which in turn will affect the level of cleanup and therefore the associated costs. Despite this, incorporation of land-use considerations into the current probabilistic dose assessment approach has not actually been performed in the regulatory process. In order to address the issue, a study was initiated to evaluate the potential influence of land use on dose analysis, to understand the possible ramifications in cleanup decision-making. A probabilistic distribution based on land use was developed as input into the probabilistic RESRAD analysis for the demonstration of this approach.. This results in an understanding of the characteristics of dose distributions as exhibited by various land-use scenarios. By factoring in the probability distribution of land-use scenarios, the potential 'levels of conservatism' can be explicitly defined and evaluated. The results allow the

  10. Survey of lands held for uranium exploration, development, and production in fourteen western states in the six-month period ending December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The statistics set forth for the period covered in this report are based on data gathered from records available to the public. The county records of mining claim locations, reports of state and federal land offices, and commercial reporting services furnish the data for this report.

  11. (Managing the global environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.F.

    1989-10-03

    The conference was stimulated by concern that policy makers increasingly have to make environmental management decisions in the absence of solidly established scientific consensus about ecological processes and the consequences of human actions. Often, as in the case of climate change, some decisions may have to be made in the absence of information that is desirable but may not be available for years to come, if ever. Six topics were identified as running throughout the Congress. These were: the epistemology and history of the sciences or disciplines concerned with the environment, including the scientific basis of rationality and modes of dealing with uncertainty and complexity; the social, economic, and institutional conditions for the production of knowledge bearing on the environment, including the politics of research and the improvement of scientific data; the structuring and institutionalization of expert assessments on national and international levels, including the global distribution of expertise; the means of establishing scientific information, the role of the media in transmitting and processing knowledge about the environment, and the organization of public environmental debate; and decision making and management under conditions of uncertainty; and, finally the relationship between science and ethics. 13 refs.

  12. Balancing global water availability and use at basin scale in an integrated assessment model

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Kim, Son H.; Hejazi, Mohamad; Liu, Lu; Calvin, Katherine; Clarke, Leon; Edmonds, Jae; Kyle, Page; Patel, Pralit; Wise, Marshall; Davies, Evan

    2016-01-22

    Water is essential for the world’s food supply, for energy production, including bioenergy and hydroelectric power, and for power system cooling. Water is already scarce in many regions of the world and could present a critical constraint as society attempts simultaneously to mitigate climate forcing and adapt to climate change, and to provide for a larger and more prosperous human population. Numerous studies have pointed to growing pressures on the world’s scarce fresh water resources from population and economic growth, and climate change. This study goes further. We use the Global Change Assessment Model to analyze interactions between population, economicmore » growth, energy, land, and water resources simultaneously in a dynamically evolving system where competing claims on water resources from all claimants—energy, land, and economy—are reconciled with water resource availability—from renewable water, non-renewable groundwater and desalinated water sources —across 14 geopolitical regions, 151 agriculture-ecological zones, and 235 major river basins. We find that previous estimates of global water withdrawal projections are overestimated. Model simulations show that it is more economical in some basins to alter agricultural and energy activities rather than utilize non-renewable groundwater or desalinated water. Lastly, this study highlights the importance of accounting for water as a binding factor in agriculture, energy and land use decisions in integrated assessment models and implications for global responses to water scarcity, particularly in the trade of agricultural commodities and land-use decisions.« less

  13. H.R. 817: A Bill to authorize the Secretary of Energy to lease lands within the naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the development and production of oil and natural gas. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This bill would give the Secretary of Energy authority to lease lands within the Naval oil shale reserves to private entities for the purpose of surveying for and developing oil and gas resources from the land (other than oil shale). It also allows the Bureau of Land Management to be used as a leasing agent, establishes rules on royalties, and the sharing of royalties with the state, and covers the transfer of existing equipment.

  14. Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration (61.28 KB) More Documents & Publications PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory

  15. U.S.DOE Global Monthly Station Temperature and Precipitation, 1738-1980

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The global monthly station temperature and precipitation data from the U.S. Department of Energy, a dataset hosted at, covers the time period from January, 1738 to December, 1980. The air temperature and precipitation levels are platform observations from ground and water surfaces. The data are maintained in the Research Data Archive at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

  16. Global production through 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foreman, N.E.

    1996-12-01

    Two companion studies released recently should provide great food for thought among geo-political strategists and various national governments. If predictions contained in these Petroconsultants studies of oil and gas production trends for the next 10 years are realized, there will be great repercussions for net exporters and importers, alike. After analyzing and predicting trends within each of the world`s significant producing nations for the 1996--2005 period, the crude oil and condensate report concludes tat global production will jump nearly 24%. By contrast, worldwide gas output will leap 40%. The cast of characters among producers and exporters that will benefit from these increases varies considerably for each fuel. On the oil side, Russia and the OPEC members, particularly the Persian Gulf nations, will be back in the driver`s seat in terms of affecting export and pricing patterns. On the gas side, the leading producers will be an interesting mix of mostly non-OPEC countries. The reemergence of Persian Gulf oil producers, coupled with an anticipated long-term decline among top non-OPEC producing nations should present a sobering picture to government planners within large net importers, such as the US. They are likely to find themselves in much the same supply trap as was experienced in the 1970s, only this time the dependence on foreign oil supplies will be much worse. Gas supplies will not be similarly constrained, and some substitution for oil is probable. Here, two articles, ``World oil industry is set for transition`` and ``Worldwide gas surges forward in next decade,`` present a summary of the findings detailed in Petroconsultants` recent studies.

  17. COVER PLACEHOLDER Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage: Climate Change, Economic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    PLACEHOLDER Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage: Climate Change, Economic Competitiveness, and Energy Security August 2016 U.S. Department of Energy SUMMARY Carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) technologies provide a key pathway to address the urgent U.S. and global need for affordable, secure, resilient, and reliable sources of clean energy. In the United States, fossil fuel-fired power plants account for 30% of total U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and will continue to be a

  18. Cover option 1 presentation title two lines max

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    © 2016 General Electric Company - All rights reserved DOE Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Environmental Cracking and Irradiation Resistant Stainless Steel by Additive Manufacturing Xiaoyuan Lou, GE Global Research Frederick List, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Gary Was, University of Michigan Myles Connor, GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy 2016 DOE AMM Workshop, Germantown, MD Oct. 17-18, 2016 2 © 2016 General Electric Company - All rights reserved Program Overview 3 © 2016 General

  19. Reinventing the Bureau of Land Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yager, J.O.; Muller, K.

    1995-12-01

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has developed a {open_quotes}Blueprint for the Future{close_quotes} changing its organizational structure to better manage nearly 270 million acres of public lands and 540 million acres of subsurface mineral resources. Both efforts focus on ecosystem management and better business practices. The mission identified in the {open_quotes}Blueprint{close_quotes} is {open_quotes}to sustain the health, diversity and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.{close_quotes} Within this mission goals include maintaining healthy ecosystems and improving customer service and business practices. In conjunction with the Blueprint, the BLM developed strategies to streamline its headquarters and field organizational structures and to accommodate an ecosystem management approach. The new headquarters structure uses flexible interdisciplinary work teams in place of the programmatic hierarchical approach. These teams may be established on either a permanent or temporary basis. For example, one team is responsible for reporting on the condition of the public lands as an essential part of maintaining healthy ecosystems. Although it is too early to judge the success of the BLM`s reinvention efforts, insights can be gained from a review of these efforts. One insight is that most people are so used to thinking about the public lands on a statute by statute, resource by resource, project by project basis, that is difficult for them to adjust to the ecosystem management or streamlining paradigms.

  20. Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (9/22/1999)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    EIS Summary Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, Bureau 6 of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant counties; and 7 the City of Richland, Washington 8 | 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 11 12 Title: