National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for future technologies faster

  1. Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014 Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014 The Bioenergy Technologies ...

  2. NREL: Transportation Research - Future Automotive Systems Technology

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulator Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator FASTSim icon The FASTSim simulation tool evaluates the impact of technology improvements on efficiency, performance, cost, and battery life in conventional and advanced vehicles. Developed by NREL, the Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim) evaluates the impact of technology improvements on efficiency, performance, cost, and battery life in conventional vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid

  3. CFB: technology of the future?

    SciTech Connect

    Blankship, S.

    2008-02-15

    Fuel flexibility and a smaller carbon footprint are behind renewed interest in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology. The article explains the technology of CFB and discusses development of CFB units since the late 1990s. China is seeing an explosion in the number of utility-size CFBs. Alstom, Foster Wheeler, Babcock and Wilson and Alex Kvaener are today's major CFB boiler manufacturers. Alstom is testing and developing oxy-firing and post-combustion carbon capture strategies on CFB boilers. One CFB asset is its ability to burn a variety of fuels including waste coal, high sulfur coal and even discarded tires. The article mentions successful CFB projects at the Seward Station using waste coal and at the Gilbert 3 plant in the USA. Lamar is converting its Light and Power Plant from natural gas to burn coal in a 38.5 MW CFB boiler. 1 tab., 3 photos.

  4. The future steelmaking industry and its technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fruehan, R.J.; Paxton, H.W.; Giarratani, F.; Lave, L. |

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this report is to develop a vision of the future steelmaking industry including its general characteristics and technologies. In addition, the technical obstacles and research and development opportunities for commercialization of these technologies are identified. The report is being prepared by the Sloan Steel Industry Competitiveness Study with extensive input from the industry. Industry input has been through AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute), SMA (Steel Manufacturers Association) and contacts with individual company executives and technical leaders. The report identifies the major industry drivers which will influence technological developments in the industry for the next 5--25 years. Initially, the role of past drivers in shaping the current industry was examined to help understand the future developments. Whereas this report concentrates on future technologies other major factors such as national and international competition, human resource management and capital concerns are examined to determine their influence on the future industry. The future industry vision does not specify specific technologies but rather their general characteristics. Finally, the technical obstacles and the corresponding research and development required for commercialization are detailed.

  5. The Future of Absorption Technology in America: A Critical Look...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The Future of Absorption Technology in America: A Critical Look at the Impact of Building, ... for CHP Applications, April 2005 Review of Thermally Activated Technologies, July ...

  6. Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle Systems Explores the ... European Diesel Engine Technology: An Overview 3-Cylinder Turbocharged Gasoline Direct ...

  7. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlan, R.M.; Barletta, W.A.; Dell'Orco, D.; McInturff, A.D.; Asner, A.; Collings, E.W.; Dahl, P.F.; Desportes, H.; Devred, A.; Garre, R.; Gregory, E.; Hassenzahl, W.; Lamm, M.; Larbalestier, D.; Leory, D.; McIntyre, P.; Miller, J.; Shintomi, T.; ten Kate, H.; Wipf, S.

    1994-10-01

    The application of superconducting magnets to large-scale particle accelerators was successfully demonstrated with the completion of the Tevatron at Fermilab in 1983. This machine, utilizing dipole magnets operating at 4.5 T, has been operating successfully for the past 12 years. This success was followed a few years later by HERA, an electron-proton collider that uses superconducting quadrupoles and dipoles of a design similar to those in the Tevatron. The next major project was the ill-fated SSC, which was cancelled in 1993. However, the SSC R&D effort did succeed in demonstrating the reliable operation of dipole magnets up to 6.6 T. The LHC, now under construction, pushes the ductile superconductor, NbTi, to its limit in dipoles designed to operate at fields of 8.6 T at 1.8 K. Several recent studies have addressed the issues involved in taking the next step beyond the LHC. The Division of Particles and Fields Workshop on Future Hadron Facilities in the U.S., held at Indiana U. in 1994, examined two possible facilities--a 2-TeV on 2-TeV collider and a 30-Tev on 30-Tev collider. The participants arrived at the following conclusions with regard to superconducting magnets: (1) Superconducting magnets are the enabling technology for high energy colliders. As such, the highest priority for the future of hadron facilities in the U.S. is the reassembly of a U.S. superconducting magnet R&D program. (2) emphasis on conductor development and new magnet designs; and (3) goals of such a program might be (a) the development of a 9-10 Tesla magnet based on NbTi technology; (b) the development of high quality quadrupoles with gradients in the range 250-300 T/m; and (c) initiation of R&D activities aimed at moving beyond the existing technology as appears to be required for the development of a magnet operating at 12-15 Tesla. In order to reach fields above 10 T, magnet designers must turn to new materials with higher critical fields than that of NbTi. Several candidate

  8. ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Roadmap | Department of Energy of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap mptroadmap.pdf (293.48 KB) More Documents & Publications ITP Mining: Mining Industry Roadmap for Crosscutting Technologies ITP Mining: Water Use in Industries of the Future: Mining Industry ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry

  9. The Future is Here – Smart Home Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: The Future is Here – Smart Home Technology, call slides and discussion summary, April 9, 2015.

  10. Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of 2014 | Department of Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014 Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014 The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) forms cost-share public-private partnerships to help sustainably develop cost-competitive biofuels and bioproducts in the United States from non-food biomass resources. accomplishments_two_pager_2014.pdf (194.5 KB) More Documents & Publications Bioenergy Technologies Office FY 2016

  11. About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future The U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) establishes partnerships with key public and private stakeholders to develop and demonstrate technologies for producing cost-competitive advanced biofuels from non-food biomass resources, including cellulosic biomass, algae, and wet waste (e.g. biosolids).

  12. About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future The U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) establishes partnerships with key public and private stakeholders to develop and demonstrate technologies for producing cost-competitive advanced biofuels from non-food biomass resources, including cellulosic biomass, algae, and wet waste (e.g. biosolids).

  13. AVLIS: The technology for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Rifakes, G.

    1994-12-31

    Gaseous diffusion plants have been in operation for more than 40 yr. Recognizing that these plants have a finite life, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the early 1970s began investing in advanced technologies to determine which technology would be best suited to replace these plants. The two technologies pursued by the DOE were atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) and gas centrifuge. In 1984, the DOE determined that it was in its best interest to stop work on centrifuge technology and to continue AVLIS research. In excess of $1 billion has been sent to further the AVLIS technology.

  14. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dierker,S.; Bergmann, U.; Corlett, J.; Dierker, S.; Falcone, R.; Galayda, J.; Gibson, M.; Hastings, J.; Hettel, B.; Hill, J.; Hussain, Z.; Kao, C.-C.; Kirx, J.; Long, G.; McCurdy, B.; Raubenheimer, T.; Sannibale, F.; Seeman, J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, g.; Schoenlein, B.; Shen, Q.; Stephenson, B.; Stohr, J.; Zholents, A.

    2008-12-01

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects. The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of

  15. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, Janos; Long, Danielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z. -X.; Schenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; Stephenson, Brian; Stohr, Joachim; Zholents, Alexander

    2009-01-28

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of

  16. Current Renewable Energy Technologies and Future Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Stephen W; Lapsa, Melissa Voss; Ward, Christina D; Smith, Barton; Grubb, Kimberly R; Lee, Russell

    2007-05-01

    The generally acknowledged sources of renewable energy are wind, geothermal, biomass, solar, hydropower, and hydrogen. Renewable energy technologies are crucial to the production and utilization of energy from these regenerative and virtually inexhaustible sources. Furthermore, renewable energy technologies provide benefits beyond the establishment of sustainable energy resources. For example, these technologies produce negligible amounts of greenhouse gases and other pollutants in providing energy, and they exploit domestically available energy sources, thereby reducing our dependence on both the importation of fossil fuels and the use of nuclear fuels. The market price of renewable energy technologies does not reflect the economic value of these added benefits.

  17. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Vehicle Technology Deployment...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... These roadblocks include technical problems or perceived safety issues, consumer reluctance to embrace driving changes embodied by the technology or behavioral changes demanded by ...

  18. Future Science & Technology Programs | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Learn More Office of Research and Development Engineering Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion Production Technology Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional R&D ...

  19. Renaissance in Flow-Cell Technologies: Recent Advancements and Future

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Opportunities | Department of Energy Renaissance in Flow-Cell Technologies: Recent Advancements and Future Opportunities Renaissance in Flow-Cell Technologies: Recent Advancements and Future Opportunities Presentation by Mike Perry, United Technologies Research Center, at the Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop held March 7-8, 2012, in Washington, DC. flowcells2012_perry.pdf (2.33 MB) More Documents & Publications Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Summary Report Energy Storage

  20. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies Editor's note: This report was updated in October 2014. To read the most up-to-date version, visit the Revolution Now 2014 page. This report focuses on four technology revolutions that are here today. In the last five years they have achieved dramatic reductions in cost and this has been accompanied by a surge in consumer, industrial

  1. Los Alamos to study future computing technology capabilities

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos to study future computing technology capabilities Los Alamos to study future computing technology capabilities Los Alamos will lead a collaboration within the Department of Energy and with select university partners to explore what the current capabilities and limits are to quantum annealing technology. November 20, 2015 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering

  2. Wide Bandgap Semiconductors: Essential to Our Technology Future |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Wide Bandgap Semiconductors: Essential to Our Technology Future Wide Bandgap Semiconductors: Essential to Our Technology Future January 15, 2014 - 8:00am Addthis Learn how wide bandgap semiconductors could impact clean energy technology and our daily lives. | Video by Sarah Gerrity and Matty Greene, Energy Department. Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy What are the key facts? North Carolina State University will lead the Energy Department's new

  3. Absorption chillers: Technology for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, P.W.; Garland, R.W.

    1997-12-31

    In an era of heightened awareness of energy efficiency and the associated environmental impacts, many industries worldwide are exploring ``environmentally friendly`` technologies that provide equivalent or improved performance while reducing or eliminating harmful side-effects. The refrigeration and air-conditioning industry, due to its reliance on CFCs and HCFCs, has invested in research in alternatives to the industry standard vapor compression machines. One alternative technology with great promise is chemical absorption. Absorption chillers offer comparable refrigeration output with reduced SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x} emissions. Absorption chillers do not use CFCs or HCFCs, refrigerants that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. Additionally, gas-fired absorption chillers can save significant amounts in energy costs when used in combination with a vapor compression chiller in a hybrid system. The hybrid system can take advantage of the comparatively low price of natural gas (per unit ton) and rely on the high performance of vapor compression when electricity prices are lower. The purpose of this article is to provide an introduction for those new to absorption technology as well as a discussion of selected high efficiency cycles, a discussion on the technology of coupling absorption with vapor compression systems to form a hybrid system, and the environmental impacts of absorption.

  4. Innovative Cathode Coating Enables Faster Battery Charging, Dischargin...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovative Cathode Coating Enables Faster Battery Charging, Discharging Technology available for licensing: Coating increases electrical conductivity of cathode materials Coating ...

  5. Future Engine Fluids Technologies: Durable, Fuel-Efficient, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Emissions-Friendly | Department of Energy Future Engine Fluids Technologies: Durable, Fuel-Efficient, and Emissions-Friendly Future Engine Fluids Technologies: Durable, Fuel-Efficient, and Emissions-Friendly 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_bardasz.pdf (561.21 KB) More Documents & Publications Controlled Experiments on the Effects of Lubricant/Additive (Low-Ash, Ashless) Characteristics on DPF Degradation Diesel Particulate

  6. Fossil energy, clean coal technology, and FutureGen

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkus, T.A.

    2008-07-15

    Future fossil use will rely heavily on carbon sequestration. Clean coal technologies are being incorporated in the USA, including air pollution control, and will need to incorporate carbon capture and sequestration. The paper ends with an outline of the restructured FutureGen project. 7 figs.

  7. The future of amorphous silicon photovoltaic technology

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, R; Luft, W

    1995-06-01

    Amorphous silicon modules are commercially available. They are the first truly commercial thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices. Well-defined production processes over very large areas (>1 m{sup 2}) have been implemented. There are few environmental issues during manufacturing, deployment in the field, or with the eventual disposal of the modules. Manufacturing safety issues are well characterized and controllable. The highest measured initial efficiency to date is 13.7% for a small triple-stacked cell and the highest stabilized module efficiency is 10%. There is a consensus among researchers, that in order to achieve a 15% stabilized efficiency, a triple-junction amorphous silicon structure is required. Fundamental improvements in alloys are needed for higher efficiencies. This is being pursued through the DOE/NREL Thin-Film Partnership Program. Cost reductions through improved manufacturing processes are being pursued under the National Renewable Energy Laboratory/US Department of Energy (NREL/DOE)-sponsored research in manufacturing technology (PVMaT). Much of the work in designing a-Si devices is a result of trying to compensate for the Staebler-Wronski effect. Some new deposition techniques hold promise because they have produced materials with lower stabilized defect densities. However, none has yet produced a high efficiency device and shown it to be more stable than those from standard glow discharge deposited material.

  8. COLLOQUIUM: Future Electrical Technologies From a GE Viewpoint | Princeton

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab 1, 2015, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Future Electrical Technologies From a GE Viewpoint Dr. James Bray GE Global Research I will give a brief overview of the technologies being pursued within GE, the largest conglomerate. I will then focus more on the electrical technologies for a more detailed description. These will include new devices such as SiC MOSFETs, electrical systems, controls, electrical machines, superconducting equipment, medical

  9. Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    POET-DSM's Project LIBERTY cellulosic ethanol biorefinery in Emmetsburg, Iowa, was made possible with $100 million in BETO cost-shared funding. Photo courtesy POET-DSM. Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014 The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) forms cost-share public-private partnerships to help sustainably develop cost- competitive biofuels and bioproducts in the United States from non-food biomass resources. The potential exists to sustainably

  10. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies

    DOE R&D Accomplishments

    Tillemann, Levi; Beck, Fredric; Brodrick, James; Brown, Austin; Feldman, David; Nguyen, Tien; Ward, Jacob

    2013-09-17

    For decades, America has anticipated the transformational impact of clean energy technologies. But even as costs fell and technology matured, a clean energy revolution always seemed just out of reach. Critics often said a clean energy future would "always be five years away." This report focuses on four technology revolutions that are here today. In the last five years they have achieved dramatic reductions in cost and this has been accompanied by a surge in consumer, industrial and commercial deployment. Although these four technologies still represent a small percentage of their total market, they are growing rapidly. The four key technologies this report focuses on are: onshore wind power, polysilicon photovoltaic modules, LED lighting, and electric vehicles.

  11. Long-term proliferation and safeguards issues in future technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Keisch, B.; Auerbach, C.; Fainberg, A.; Fiarman, S.; Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.; Lemley, J.R.; O'Brien, J.

    1986-02-01

    The purpose of the task was to assess the effect of potential new technologies, nuclear and non-nuclear, on safeguards needs and non-proliferation policies, and to explore possible solutions to some of the problems envisaged. Eight subdivisions were considered: New Enrichment Technologies; Non-Aqueous Reprocessing Technologies; Fusion; Accelerator-Driven Reactor Systems; New Reactor Types; Heavy Water and Deuterium; Long-Term Storage of Spent Fuel; and Other Future Technologies (Non-Nuclear). For each of these subdivisions, a careful review of the current world-wide effort in the field provided a means of subjectively estimating the viability and qualitative probability of fruition of promising technologies. Technologies for which safeguards and non-proliferation requirements have been thoroughly considered by others were not restudied here (e.g., the Fast Breeder Reactor). The time scale considered was 5 to 40 years for possible initial demonstration although, in some cases, a somewhat optimistic viewpoint was embraced. Conventional nuclear-material safeguards are only part of the overall non-proliferation regime. Other aspects are international agreements, export controls on sensitive technologies, classification of information, intelligence gathering, and diplomatic initiatives. The focus here is on safeguards, export controls, and classification.

  12. Optimization Notice Get Faster Code Faster! Intel® Advisor

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Copyright © 2016, Intel Corporation. All rights reserved. *Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others. Optimization Notice Get Faster Code Faster! Intel® Advisor Vectorization Optimization Have you:  Recompiled for AVX2 with little gain  Wondered where to vectorize?  Recoded intrinsics for new arch.?  Struggled with compiler reports? Data Driven Vectorization:  What vectorization will pay off most?  What's blocking vectorization? Why?  Are my loops

  13. Edison is Back and Faster

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison is Back and Faster Edison is Back and Faster January 17, 2015 by Richard Gerber Edison is Back and Faster Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date October 2016 September 2016 August 2016 June 2016 May 2016 April 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 April 2015 March 2015 January 2015 December 2014 November 2014 October 2014 August 2014 June 2014 May 2014 April 2014 March 2014 January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013

  14. Energy technologies at Sandia National Laboratories: Past, Present, Future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    We at Sandia first became involved with developing energy technology when the nation initiated its push toward energy independence in the early 1970s. That involvement continues to be strong. In shaping Sandia's energy programs for the 1990s, we will build on our track record from the 70s and 80s, a record outlined in this publication. It contains reprints of three issues of Sandia's Lab News that were devoted to our non-nuclear energy programs. Together, they summarize the history, current activities, and future of Sandia's diverse energy concerns; hence my desire to see them in one volume. Written in the fall of 1988, the articles cover Sandia's extremely broad range of energy technologies -- coal, oil and gas, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaics, wind, rechargeable batteries, and combustion.

  15. Thermal batteries: A technology review and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    Thermally activated (``thermal``) batteries have been used for ordnance applications (e.g., proximity fuzes) since World War II and, subsequent to that, in nuclear weapons. This technology was developed by the Germans as a power source for their V2 rockets. It was obtained by the Allies by interrogation of captured German scientists after the war. The technology developed rapidly from the initial primitive systems used by the Germans to one based on Ca/CaCrO{sub 4}. This system was used very successfully into the late 1970s, when it was replaced by the Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} electrochemical system. This paper describes the predominant electrochemical couples that have been used in thermal batteries over the years. Major emphasis is placed on the chemistry and electrochemistry of the Ca/CaCrO{sub 4} and Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} systems. The reason for this is to give the reader a better appreciation for the advances in thermal-battery technology for which these two systems are directly responsible. Improvements to date in the current Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} and related systems are discussed and areas for possible future research and development involving anodes, cathodes, electrolytes, and insulations are outlined. New areas where thermal-battery technology has potential applications are also examined.

  16. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technologies: Current Challenges and Future Plans - 12558

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Andrew

    2012-07-01

    The mission of the Office of Nuclear Energy's Fuel Cycle Technologies office (FCT program) is to provide options for possible future changes in national nuclear energy programs. While the recent draft report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future stressed the need for organization changes, interim waste storage and the establishment of a permanent repository for nuclear waste management, it also recognized the potential value of alternate fuel cycles and recommended continued research and development in that area. With constrained budgets and great expectations, the current challenges are significant. The FCT program now performs R and D covering the entire fuel cycle. This broad R and D scope is a result of the assignment of new research and development (R and D) responsibilities to the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), as well as reorganization within NE. This scope includes uranium extraction from seawater and uranium enrichment R and D, used nuclear fuel recycling technology, advanced fuel development, and a fresh look at a range of disposal geologies. Additionally, the FCT program performs the necessary systems analysis and screening of fuel cycle alternatives that will identify the most promising approaches and areas of technology gaps. Finally, the FCT program is responsible for a focused effort to consider features of fuel cycle technology in a way that promotes nonproliferation and security, such as Safeguards and Security by Design, and advanced monitoring and predictive modeling capabilities. This paper and presentation will provide an overview of the FCT program R and D scope and discuss plans to analyze fuel cycle options and support identified R and D priorities into the future. The FCT program is making progress in implanting a science based, engineering driven research and development program that is evaluating options for a sustainable fuel cycle in the U.S. Responding to the BRC recommendations, any resulting legislative changes

  17. Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction for Future Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, J. Michael

    2002-01-01

    OAK-B135 Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction for Future Nuclear Power Plants

  18. Conventional engine technology. volume 3: comparisons and future potential

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdy, M.W.

    1981-12-01

    The status of five conventional automobile engine technologies was assessed and the future potential for increasing fuel economy and reducing exhaust emission was discussed, using the 1980 EPA California emisions standards as a comparative basis. By 1986, the fuel economy of a uniform charge Otto engine with a three-way catalyst is expected to increase 10%, while vehicles with lean burn (fast burn) engines should show a 20% fuel economy increase. Although vehicles with stratified-charge engines and rotary engines are expected to improve, their fuel economy will remain inferior to the other engine types. When adequate NO emissions control methods are implemented to meet the EPA requirements, vehicles with prechamber diesel engines are expected to yield a fuel economy advantage of about 15%. While successful introduction of direct injection diesel engine technology will provide a fuel savings of 30 to 35%, the planned regulation of exhaust particulates could seriously hinder this technology, because it is expected that only the smallest diesel engine vehicles could meet the proposed particulate requirements.

  19. Conventional engine technology. Volume III. Comparisons and future potential

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdey, M.W.

    1981-12-15

    The status of five conventional automobile engine technologies is assessed and the future potential for increasing fuel economy and reducing exhaust emissions is discussed, using the 1980 EPA California emissions standards as a comparative basis. By 1986, the fuel economy of a uniform charge Otto engine with a three-way catalyst is expected to increase 10%, while vehicles with lean burn (fast burn) engines should show a 20% fuel economy increase. Although vehicles with stratified-charge engines and rotary engines are expected to improve, their fuel economy will remain inferior to the other engine types. When adequate NO/sub x/ emissions control methods are implemented to meet the EPA requirements, vehicles with prechamber diesel engines are expected to yield a fuel economy advantage of about 15%. While successful introduction of direct injection diesel engine technology will provide a fuel savings of 30 to 35%, the planned regulation of exhaust particulates could seriously hinder this technology, because it is expected that only the smallest diesel engine vehicles could meet the proposed particulate requirements.

  20. Current and Future Economics of Parabolic Trough Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Price, H.; Mehos, M.; Kutscher, C.; Blair, N.

    2007-01-01

    Solar energy is the largest energy resource on the planet. Unfortunately, it is largely untapped at present, in part because sunlight is a very diffuse energy source. Concentrating solar power (CSP) systems use low cost reflectors to concentrate the sun's energy to allow it to be used more effectively. Concentrating solar power systems are also well suited for large solar power plants that can be connected into the existing utility infrastructure. These two facts mean that CSP systems can be used to make a meaningful difference in energy supply in a relatively short period. CSP plants are best suited for the arid climates in the Southwestern United States, Northern Mexico, and many desert regions around the globe. A recent Western Governors' Association siting study [1] found that the solar potential in the U.S. Southwest is at least 4 times the total U.S. electric demand even after eliminating urban areas, environmentally sensitive areas, and all regions with a ground slope greater than 1%.While it is currently not practical to power the whole county from the desert southwest, only a small portion of this area is needed to make a substantial contribution to future U.S. electric needs. Many of the best sites are near existing high-voltage transmission lines and close to major power load centers in the Southwest (Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and Phoenix). In addition, the power provided by CSP technologies has strong coincidence with peak electric demand, especially in the Southwest where peak demand corresponds in large part to air conditioning loads. Parabolic troughs currently represent the most cost-effective CSP technology for developing large utility-scale solar electric power systems. These systems are also one of the most mature solar technologies, with commercial utility-scale plants that have been operating for over 20 years. In addition, substantial improvements have been made to the technology in recent years including improved efficiency and the addition of

  1. Edison is Back and Faster

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Edison is Back and Faster Edison is Back and Faster January 16, 2015 by Richard Gerber Edison's New Memory Edison is back, now with all 28,000 memory DIMs replaced and upclocked from 1600 MHz to 1866 MHz. (This is the memory speed, not the processor speed.) So, what will this mean to you? It's hard to predict exactly, but some codes will see a noticeable performance increase, which is good news for everyone. If you know that your code is memory bandwidth limited then your code could run up to 16

  2. 2005 Final Report: New Technologies for Future Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Peter McIntyre; Al McInturff

    2005-12-31

    This document presents an annual report on our long-term R&D grant for development of new technology for future colliders. The organizing theme of our development is to develop a compact high-field collider dipole, utilizing wind-and-react Nb3Sn coil fabrication, stress man-agement, conductor optimization, bladder preload, and flux plate suppression of magnetization multipoles. The development trail for this new technology began over four years ago with the successful testing of TAMU12, a NbTi model in which we put to a first test many of the construction details of the high-field design. We have built TAMU2, a mirror-geometry dipole containing a single coil module of the 3-module set required for the 14 Tesla design. This first Nb3Sn model was built using ITER conductor which carries much less current than high-performance conductor but enables us to prove in practice our reaction bake and impregnation strategies with ‘free’ su-perconductor. TAMU2 has been shipped to LBNL for testing. Work is beginning on the construction of TAMU3, which will contain two coil modules of the 14 Tesla design. TAMU3 has a design field of 13.5 Tesla and will enable us to fully evaluate the issues of stress management that will be important to the full design. With the completion of TAMU2 and the construction of TAMU3 the Texas A&M group ‘comes of age’ in the family of superconducting magnet R&D laboratories. We have completed the phase of developing core technologies and fixtures and entered the phase of building and testing a succession of model dipoles that each build incrementally upon a proven core design.

  3. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    technologies. This report provides an update and finds that cost reductions and deployment have continued to advance in the past year. These technologies are changing the...

  4. Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Bioenergy Technologies Office

    2015-03-25

    This fact sheet summarizes key accomplishments and successes of the Bioenergy Technologies Office in 2014.

  5. Hydrogen Production Roadmap: Technology Pathways to the Future, January 2009

    Publication and Product Library

    Roadmap to identify key challenges and priority R&D needs associated with various hydrogen fuel production technologies.

  6. Hydrogen Production Roadmap. Technology Pathways to the Future, January 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Curry-Nkansah, Maria; Driscoll, Daniel; Farmer, Richard; Garland, Roxanne; Gruber, Jill; Gupta, Nikunj; Hershkowitz, Frank; Holladay, Jamelyn; Nguyen, Kevin; Schlasner, Steven; Steward, Darlene; Penev, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Roadmap to identify key challenges and priority R&D needs associated with various hydrogen fuel production technologies.

  7. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources: A White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, a= Janos; Long, Gabrielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; /Argonne /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-02-03

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects (Figure 1.1). The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter

  8. Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    In 2013, the DOE released a report called Revolution Now highlighting four transformational technologies that are here today: onshore wind power, polysilicon photovoltaic (PV) ...

  9. Technology: How to build a low-energy future

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced construction technologies promise huge energy savings, says Philip Farese. Investment is needed to bring them to market and to encourage their use.

  10. Future of Wind Energy Technology in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Thresher, R.; Robinson, M.; Veers, P.

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes the status of wind energy in the United States as of 2007, its cost, the potential for growth, offshore development, and potential technology improvements.

  11. Cost Effectiveness of Technology Solutions for Future Vehicle Systems

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Explores the economics of CO2 emission reductions by added engine technology to determine if there is an overall positive or negative benefit.

  12. After globalization future security in a technology rich world

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmartin, T J

    2000-02-12

    Over the course of the year 2000, five one-day workshops were conducted by the Center for Global Security Research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on threats that might come against the US and its allies in the 2015 to 2020 timeframe due to the global availability of advanced technology. These workshops focused on threats that are enabled by nuclear, missile, and space technology; military technology; information technology; bio technology; and geo systems technology. In December, an Integration Workshop and Senior Review before national leaders and experts were held. The participants and reviewers were invited from the DOE National Laboratories, the DOD Services, OSD, DTRA, and DARPA, the DOS, NASA, Congressional technical staff, the intelligence community, universities and university study centers, think tanks, consultants on national security issues, and private industry. For each workshop the process of analysis involved identification and prioritization of the participants' perceived most severe threat scenarios (worst nightmares), discussion of the technologies which enabled those threats, and ranking of the technologies' threat potentials. We were not concerned in this exercise with defining responses, although our assessment of each threat's severity included consideration of the ease or difficulty with which it might be countered. At the concluding Integration Workshop and Senior Panel Review, we brought the various workshops' participants together, added senior participant/reviewers with broad experience and responsibility, and discussed the workshop findings to determine what is most certain, and uncertain, and what might be needed to resolve our uncertainties. This document reports the consensus and important variations of both the reviewers and the participants. In all, 45 threats over a wide range of lethality and probability of occurrence were identified. Over 60 enabling technologies were also discussed. These are each described in

  13. Future nano- and micro-systems using nanobonding technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Howlader, Matiar M. R. E-mail: jamal@mcmaster.ca; Deen, M. Jamal E-mail: jamal@mcmaster.ca

    2014-03-31

    In this paper, some of the recent achievements in surface-activation-based nanobonding technology are described. This bonding technology allows for the combination of electronic, photonic, fluidic and mechanical functionalities into small form-factor systems for emerging applications in health diagnostics and screening, for example. These nanobonding technologies provide void-free, strong, and nanoscale bonding at room temperature or at low temperatures (<200 C), and they do not require chemicals, adhesives, or high external pressure. The interfaces of the nanobonded materials in ultra-high vacuum and in air correspond to the covalent bonds, and hydrogen and hydroxyl bonds, respectively, which gives rise to excellent bonding properties. Further, these nanobonding technologies are well-suited for the development of low-cost, high-performance miniaturized systems such as biophotonic imaging systems.

  14. Building America Expert Meeting: Delivering Better, Cheaper, and Faster

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Retrofits through Stakeholder-focused Research | Department of Energy Delivering Better, Cheaper, and Faster Retrofits through Stakeholder-focused Research Building America Expert Meeting: Delivering Better, Cheaper, and Faster Retrofits through Stakeholder-focused Research This expert meeting was conducted by Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership and Gas Technology Institute on November 16, 2010, in Chicago, Illinois. Meeting objectives included: * Review Building America's

  15. DOE Announces Restructured FutureGen Approach to Demonstrate CCS Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    at Multiple Clean Coal Plants | Department of Energy Restructured FutureGen Approach to Demonstrate CCS Technology at Multiple Clean Coal Plants DOE Announces Restructured FutureGen Approach to Demonstrate CCS Technology at Multiple Clean Coal Plants January 30, 2008 - 11:13am Addthis Affirms Commitment to Clean Coal Technology Investments; Requests $648 Million for Coal Research, Development and Deployment for FY09 Budget - Largest Coal Budget Request in more than 25 years WASHINGTON, DC -

  16. Bridge to a sustainable future: National environmental technology strategy

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    For the past two years the Administration has sought the views of Congress, the states, communities, industry, academia, nongovernmental organizations, and interested citizens on ways to spur the development and use of a new generation of environmental technologies. This document represents the views of thousands of individuals who participated in events around the country to help craft a national environmental technology strategy that will put us on the path to sustainable development.

  17. After Globalization Future Security in a Technology Rich World

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmartin,T J

    2001-08-17

    Over the course of the year 2000, five workshops were conducted by the Center for Global Security Research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on threats to international security in the 2015 to 2020 timeframe due to the global availability of advanced technology. These workshops focused on threats that are enabled by nuclear, missile, and space technology; military technology; information technology; bio technology; and geo systems technology. The participants included US national leaders and experts from the Department of Energy National Laboratories; the Department of Defense: Army, Navy, Air Force, Office of the Secretary of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency; the Department of State, NASA, Congressional technical staff, the intelligence community, universities and university study centers, think tanks, consultants on security issues, and private industry. For each workshop the process of analysis involved identification and prioritization of the participants' perceived most severe threat scenarios (worst nightmares), discussion of the technologies which enabled those threats, and ranking of the technologies' threat potentials. The threats ranged from local/regional to global, from intentional to unintended to natural, from merely economic to massively destructive, and from individual and group to state actions. We were not concerned in this exercise with defining responses to the threats, although our assessment of each threat's severity included consideration of the ease or difficulty with which it might be executed or countered. At the concluding review, we brought the various workshops' participants together, added senior participant/reviewers with broad experience and national responsibility, and discussed the workshop findings to determine what is most certain or uncertain, and what might be needed to resolve our uncertainties. This paper summarizes the consenses and important variations of

  18. Coiled tubing technology advances to a bright future

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiselin, R.

    1998-07-01

    This supplement contains six short articles on coiled tubing, its advantages, performance, and materials. The articles are: Coiled Tubing--On the Brink of a New Millennium; CT Advances Promise a Broad, Dynamic Future; Performance, Safety and Cost Make the Case for HPCT; Fast and Accurate, CTD Helps Drillers Hit Their Targets; Composite Tubing Rapidly Proves Advantages in the Field; and People and Performance are Key to Coiled Tubing Growth.

  19. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2. Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, Chad; Bain, Richard; Chapman, Jamie; Denholm, Paul; Drury, Easan; Hall, Douglas G.; Lantz, Eric; Margolis, Robert; Thresher, Robert; Sandor, Debra; Bishop, Norman A.; Brown, Stephen R.; Felker, Fort; Fernandez, Steven J.; Goodrich, Alan C.; Hagerman, George; Heath, Garvin; O'Neil, Sean; Paquette, Joshua; Tegen, Suzanne; Young, Katherine

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  20. Advanced Gas Storage Concepts: Technologies for the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Freeway, Katy; Rogers, R.E.; DeVries, Kerry L.; Nieland, Joel D.; Ratigan, Joe L.; Mellegard, Kirby D.

    2000-02-01

    This full text product includes: 1) A final technical report titled Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts, Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage and presentations from two technology transfer workshops held in 1998 in Houston, Texas, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (both on the topic of Chilled Gas Storage in Mined Caverns); 2) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project, Final Report 1 October 1997 - 31 May 1999; 3) A final technical report titled Natural Gas Hydrates Storage Project Phase II: Conceptual Design and Economic Study, Final Report 9 June - 10 October 1999; 4) A final technical report titled Commerical Potential of Natural Gas Storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC) and presentations from a DOE-sponsored workshop on Alternative Gas Storage Technologies, held Feb 17, 2000 in Pittsburgh, PA; and 5) Phase I and Phase II topical reports titled Feasibility Study for Lowering the Minimum Gas Pressure in Solution-Mined Caverns Based on Geomechanical Analyses of Creep-Induced Damage and Healing.

  1. Hydrogen Production Roadmap: Technology Pathways to the Future

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Production Technical Team This roadmap was created by the Hydrogen Production Technical Team (HPTT) of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership. This is a partnership of industry's U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR), energy companies and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance technologies that enable reduced oil consumption and increased energy efficiency in passenger vehicles. The Partnership focuses on the pre-competitive, high-risk

  2. Future steelmaking technologies and the role of basic research

    SciTech Connect

    Fruehan, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    The steel industry is going through a technological revolution which will not only change how steel is produced but, also, the entire structure of the industry. The drivers for the new or improved technologies, including reduction in capital requirements, possible shortages in raw materials such as coke and low residual scrap, environmental concerns and customer demands are briefly examined. The current status of research and development in the US and selected international producers was examined. As expected, it was found that the industry`s research capabilities have been greatly reduced. Furthermore, less than half of the companies which identified a given technology as critical have significant R and D programs addressing the technology. Examples of how basic research aided in process improvements in the past are given. The examples include demonstrating how fundamentals of reaction kinetics, improved nitrogen control, thermodynamics of systems helped reduce nozzle clogging and fluid flow studies reduced defects in casting. However, in general, basic research did not play a major role in processes previously developed, but helped understanding and aided optimization. To have a major impact, basic research must be focused and be an integral part of any new process development. An example where this has been done successfully is the AISI Direct Ironmaking and Waste Oxide Recycle Projects in which fundamental studies on reduction, slag foaming, and post combustion reactions have led to process understanding, control and optimization. Industry leaders recognize the value and need for basic research but insist it be truly relevant and done with industry input. From these examples the lessons learned on how to make basic research more effective are discussed.

  3. Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of the U.S. Market Light-Duty Diesel EngineTechnology to Meet Future Emissions and Performance Requirements of the U.S. Market 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) ...

  4. Fuel Station of the Future- Innovative Approach to Fuel Cell Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Unveiled in California | Department of Energy Fuel Station of the Future- Innovative Approach to Fuel Cell Technology Unveiled in California Fuel Station of the Future- Innovative Approach to Fuel Cell Technology Unveiled in California September 15, 2011 - 5:51pm Addthis A customer fills up at a new Energy Department supported fuel cell hydrogen energy station in Fountain Valley, California. | Photo courtesy of Air Products and Chemicals. A customer fills up at a new Energy Department

  5. The Future of Absorption Technology in America: A Critical Look at the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Impact of Building, Cooling, Heating, and Power (BCHP) and Innovation, June 2000 | Department of Energy The Future of Absorption Technology in America: A Critical Look at the Impact of Building, Cooling, Heating, and Power (BCHP) and Innovation, June 2000 The Future of Absorption Technology in America: A Critical Look at the Impact of Building, Cooling, Heating, and Power (BCHP) and Innovation, June 2000 Edmond Carré developed the first absorption machine in 1850, using water and sulfuric

  6. HIsmelt{reg_sign} technology: the future of ironmaking

    SciTech Connect

    Leczo, T.

    2009-03-15

    The unique liquid ironmaking process of HIsmelt{reg_sign} technology produces LD-quality hot metal or pig iron using lower-quality iron ore and non-coking coal, and a variety of iron and carbon-bearing mill wastes, without blending or agglomeration. A HIsmelt facility can replace an obsolete blast furnace in a brownfield application or can be the iron-producing component of a greenfield state-of-the-art steelmaking plant. Two companies in China have signed license agreements to build HIsmelt facilities, but are waiting until the plant in Kwinana, Australia operates for 3 months without any shutdowns or delays before they start construction on their plants.

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  8. Current status and future plan of uranium enrichment technology

    SciTech Connect

    Yonekawa, S.; Yamamoto, F.; Yato, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.

    1994-12-31

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has been conducting extensive research and development (R&D) on the centrifuge process for more than a quarter of a century. This development program, designated as a national project in 1972, has resulted in the construction and operation of a pilot plant with a capacity of 50 t separative work unit (SWU) per year as well as a demonstration plant with a capacity of 200 t SWU/yr. Under the basic agreement of cooperation concluded in 1985, the technology developed in this program has been transferred to Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL), which is now constructing and operating the commercial plant with a capacity of 1500 t SWU/yr at Rokkasho, Aomori. This paper describes the operational experiences of the demonstration plant, the status of a new material centrifuge, which will be introduced at a later stage of construction of the commercial plant, the development of an advanced centrifuge as a next-generation machine, and the research of a superadvanced centrifuge.

  9. What future car MPG levels and technology will be necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, P.; Steiner, E.; Singh, M.

    2002-03-04

    The potential peaking of world conventional oil production and the possible imperative to reduce carbon emissions will put great pressure on vehicle manufacturers to produce more efficient vehicles, on vehicle buyers to seek them out in the marketplace, and on energy suppliers to develop new fuels and delivery systems. Four cases for stabilizing or reducing light vehicle fuel use, oil use, and/or carbon emissions over the next 50 years are presented. Case 1--Improve mpg so that the fuel use in 2020 is stabilized for the next 30 years. Case 2--Improve mpg so that by 2030 the fuel use is reduced to the 2000 level and is reduced further in subsequent years. Case 3--Case 1 plus 50% ethanol use and 50% low-carbon fuel cell vehicles by 2050. Case 4--Case 2 plus 50% ethanol use and 50% low-carbon fuel cell vehicles by 2050. The mpg targets for new cars and light trucks require that significant advances be made in developing cost-effective and very efficient vehicle technologies. With the use of alternative fuels that are low in carbon, oil use and carbon emissions can be reduced even further.

  10. The role of advanced technology in the future of the power generation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, T.F.

    1994-10-01

    This presentation reviews the directions that technology has given the power generation industry in the past and how advanced technology will be the key for the future of the industry. The topics of the presentation include how the industry`s history has defined its culture, how today`s economic and regulatory climate has constrained its strategy, and how certain technology options might give some of the players an unfair advantage.

  11. Future

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Information about the future expansion of research fields for synchrotrons and the growing number of light sources, including free electron lasers (FELs) will be posted here ...

  12. Leaders in Future and Current Technology Teaming Up to Improve Ethanol

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Production Leaders in Future and Current Technology Teaming Up to Improve Ethanol Production For more information contact: Gary Schmitz, 303-275-4050 email: Gary Schmitz Golden, Colo., May 30, 2001 - Under a cooperative research and development agreement, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is teaming with Broin and Associates, Inc., a major ethanol producer, to develop new technologies to improve the efficiency of U.S. ethanol production. The

  13. New National Wind Potential Estimates for Modern and Near-Future Turbine Technologies (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J. O.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancements in utility-scale wind turbine technology and pricing have vastly increased the potential land area where turbines can be deployed in the United States. This presentation quantifies the new developable land potential (e.g., capacity curves), visually identifies new areas for possible development (e.g., new wind resource maps), and begins to address deployment barriers to wind in new areas for modern and future turbine technology.

  14. Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction Costs for Future Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    DiNunzio, Camillo A.; Gupta, Abhinav; Golay, Michael; Luk, Vincent; Turk, Rich; Morrow, Charles; Jin, Geum-Taek

    2002-11-30

    This report presents a summation of the third and final year of a three-year investigation into methods and technologies for substantially reducing the capital costs and total schedule for future nuclear plants. In addition, this is the final technical report for the three-year period of studies.

  15. Innovative Cathode Coating Enables Faster Battery Charging, Discharging |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Innovative Cathode Coating Enables Faster Battery Charging, Discharging Technology available for licensing: Coating increases electrical conductivity of cathode materials Coating does not hinder battery performance Provides two coating processes that yield surface-treated, electro-active materials for a variety of applications, such as in a rechargeable lithium battery in both processes, and primary and secondary lithium battery applications in another process.

  16. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume includes chapters discussing biopower, geothermal, hydropower, ocean, solar, wind, and storage technologies. Each chapter includes a resource availability estimate, technology cost and performance characterization, discussions of output characteristics and grid service possibilities, large-scale production and deployment issues, and barriers to high penetration along with possible responses to them. Only technologies that are currently commercially available—biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar PV, CSP, and wind-powered systems—are included in the modeling analysis. Some of these renewable technologies—such as run-of-river hydropower, onshore wind, hydrothermal geothermal, dedicated and co-fired-with-coal biomass—are relatively mature and well-characterized. Other renewable technologies—such as fixed-bottom offshore wind, solar PV, and solar CSP—are at earlier stages of deployment with greater potential for future technology advancements over the next 40 years.

  17. The ARPA-E Innovation Model: A Glimpse into the Future of Automotive Battery Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, Ilan

    2014-03-07

    The Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) focuses on funding game-changing R&D aimed at reducing U.S. foreign energy dependence and emissions. ARPA-E has made a strong commitment to support breakthrough energy storage technologies that can accelerate the mass adoption of electrified vehicles. This presentation will highlight the range of ARPA-E's efforts in this area, offering a glimpse into the ARPA-E innovation model and the future of automotive battery technology.

  18. Innovative experimental particle physics through technological advances: Past, present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Harry W.K.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    This mini-course gives an introduction to the techniques used in experimental particle physics with an emphasis on the impact of technological advances. The basic detector types and particle accelerator facilities will be briefly covered with examples of their use and with comparisons. The mini-course ends with what can be expected in the near future from current technology advances. The mini-course is intended for graduate students and post-docs and as an introduction to experimental techniques for theorists.

  19. Renaissance in Flow-Cell Technologies: Recent Advancements and Future Opportunities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Renaissance in Flow-Cell Technologies Recent Advancements and Future Opportunities Mike Perry Project Leader, Electrochemical Systems United Technologies Research Center ec c es UTC Proprietary Grand Challenges in Electrical Energy Storage (EES) SCALE & COST: Want to go from Wh to kWh to MWh...  El tri Vehicl  Grid-Scale $100/kWh GRIDS Program Target  Portable Devices > $500/kWh  Electric Vehicles $250/kWh BEEST Program Target Wh UTC Proprietary Batteries are currently < 1%

  20. The ARPA-E Innovation Model: A Glimpse into the Future of Automotive Battery Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Gur, Ilan (Program Director and Senior Advisor, ARPA-E)

    2016-07-12

    The Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) focuses on funding game-changing R&D aimed at reducing U.S. foreign energy dependence and emissions. ARPA-E has made a strong commitment to support breakthrough energy storage technologies that can accelerate the mass adoption of electrified vehicles. This presentation will highlight the range of ARPA-E's efforts in this area, offering a glimpse into the ARPA-E innovation model and the future of automotive battery technology.

  1. Compressing bitmap indexes for faster search operations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kesheng; Otoo, Ekow J.; Shoshani, Arie

    2002-04-25

    In this paper, we study the effects of compression on bitmap indexes. The main operations on the bitmaps during query processing are bitwise logical operations such as AND, OR, NOT, etc. Using the general purpose compression schemes, such as gzip, the logical operations on the compressed bitmaps are much slower than on the uncompressed bitmaps. Specialized compression schemes, like the byte-aligned bitmap code(BBC), are usually faster in performing logical operations than the general purpose schemes, but in many cases they are still orders of magnitude slower than the uncompressed scheme. To make the compressed bitmap indexes operate more efficiently, we designed a CPU-friendly scheme which we refer to as the word-aligned hybrid code (WAH). Tests on both synthetic and real application data show that the new scheme significantly outperforms well-known compression schemes at a modest increase in storage space. Compared to BBC, a scheme well-known for its operational efficiency, WAH performs logical operations about 12 times faster and uses only 60 percent more space. Compared to the uncompressed scheme, in most test cases WAH is faster while still using less space. We further verified with additional tests that the improvement in logical operation speed translates to similar improvement in query processing speed.

  2. New Algorithm Enables Faster Simulations of Ultrafast Processes

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Algorithm Enables Faster Simulations of Ultrafast Processes New Algorithm Enables Faster ... Academy of Sciences, have developed a new real-time time-dependent density function ...

  3. Microsoft Word - Science and Technology of Future Light Sources.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    08/39 BNL-81895-2008 LBNL-1090E-2009 SLAC-R-917 Science and Technology of Future Light Sources A White Paper Report prepared by scientists from ANL, BNL, LBNL and SLAC. The coordinating team consisted of Uwe Bergmann, John Corlett, Steve Dierker, Roger Falcone, John Galayda, Murray Gibson, Jerry Hastings, Bob Hettel, John Hill, Zahid Hussain, Chi-Chang Kao, Janos Kirz, Gabrielle Long, Bill McCurdy, Tor Raubenheimer, Fernando Sannibale, John Seeman, Z.-X. Shen, Gopal Shenoy, Bob Schoenlein, Qun

  4. Modern plant metabolomics: Advanced natural product gene discoveries, improved technologies, and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, Lloyd W.; Lei, Zhentian; Nikolau, Basil J.; Saito, Kazuki

    2014-10-24

    Plant metabolomics has matured and modern plant metabolomics has accelerated gene discoveries and the elucidation of a variety of plant natural product biosynthetic pathways. This study highlights specific examples of the discovery and characterization of novel genes and enzymes associated with the biosynthesis of natural products such as flavonoids, glucosinolates, terpenoids, and alkaloids. Additional examples of the integration of metabolomics with genome-based functional characterizations of plant natural products that are important to modern pharmaceutical technology are also reviewed. This article also provides a substantial review of recent technical advances in mass spectrometry imaging, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, integrated LC-MS-SPE-NMR for metabolite identifications, and x-ray crystallography of microgram quantities for structural determinations. The review closes with a discussion on the future prospects of metabolomics related to crop species and herbal medicine.

  5. Modern plant metabolomics: Advanced natural product gene discoveries, improved technologies, and future prospects

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Sumner, Lloyd W.; Lei, Zhentian; Nikolau, Basil J.; Saito, Kazuki

    2014-10-24

    Plant metabolomics has matured and modern plant metabolomics has accelerated gene discoveries and the elucidation of a variety of plant natural product biosynthetic pathways. This study highlights specific examples of the discovery and characterization of novel genes and enzymes associated with the biosynthesis of natural products such as flavonoids, glucosinolates, terpenoids, and alkaloids. Additional examples of the integration of metabolomics with genome-based functional characterizations of plant natural products that are important to modern pharmaceutical technology are also reviewed. This article also provides a substantial review of recent technical advances in mass spectrometry imaging, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, integrated LC-MS-SPE-NMR formore » metabolite identifications, and x-ray crystallography of microgram quantities for structural determinations. The review closes with a discussion on the future prospects of metabolomics related to crop species and herbal medicine.« less

  6. The confluence of ancient wisdom and future technology in our profession

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.P.

    1997-10-01

    The theme of this year`s Annual Meeting is ``Ancient Wisdom-Future Technology.`` The panel assembled for this session has been asked to think metaphorically about the theme and how it relates to their profession of human factors and ergonomics. Originally conceived as a debate centering around the older technologies and research techniques versus the newer ways of finding answers, it was soon realized that there was no dichotomy, but more of a synergy between the old and the new. If human factors is truly a philosophy of design rather than simply a body of knowledge, then one would expect consistency in approach regardless of field of application or new discoveries of human performance. Just as when two or more rivers combine to become a force mightier than the simple summation, the synergistic power of established techniques or knowledge and recent innovation is available to everyone in the profession. The invited panelists represent diverse perspectives in human factors and ergonomics, and this made for a stimulating discussion.

  7. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Vehicle Technology Deployment Pathways. An Examination of Timing and Investment Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, Steve; Stephens, Thomas; McManus, Walter

    2013-03-01

    Scenarios of new vehicle technology deployment serve various purposes; some will seek to establish plausibility. This report proposes two reality checks for scenarios: (1) implications of manufacturing constraints on timing of vehicle deployment and (2) investment decisions required to bring new vehicle technologies to market. An estimated timeline of 12 to more than 22 years from initial market introduction to saturation is supported by historical examples and based on the product development process. Researchers also consider the series of investment decisions to develop and build the vehicles and their associated fueling infrastructure. A proposed decision tree analysis structure could be used to systematically examine investors' decisions and the potential outcomes, including consideration of cash flow and return on investment. This method requires data or assumptions about capital cost, variable cost, revenue, timing, and probability of success/failure, and would result in a detailed consideration of the value proposition of large investments and long lead times. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  8. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Vehicle Technology Deployment Pathways: An Examination of Timing and Investment Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, S.; Stephens, T.; McManus, W.

    2013-03-01

    Scenarios of new vehicle technology deployment serve various purposes; some will seek to establish plausibility. This report proposes two reality checks for scenarios: (1) implications of manufacturing constraints on timing of vehicle deployment and (2) investment decisions required to bring new vehicle technologies to market. An estimated timeline of 12 to more than 22 years from initial market introduction to saturation is supported by historical examples and based on the product development process. Researchers also consider the series of investment decisions to develop and build the vehicles and their associated fueling infrastructure. A proposed decision tree analysis structure could be used to systematically examine investors' decisions and the potential outcomes, including consideration of cash flow and return on investment. This method requires data or assumptions about capital cost, variable cost, revenue, timing, and probability of success/failure, and would result in a detailed consideration of the value proposition of large investments and long lead times. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  9. Fast Physics Testbed for the FASTER Project

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.; Liu, Y.; Hogan, R.; Neggers, R.; Jensen, M.; Fridlind, A.; Lin, Y.; Wolf, A.

    2010-03-15

    This poster describes the Fast Physics Testbed for the new FAst-physics System Testbed and Research (FASTER) project. The overall objective is to provide a convenient and comprehensive platform for fast turn-around model evaluation against ARM observations and to facilitate development of parameterizations for cloud-related fast processes represented in global climate models. The testbed features three major components: a single column model (SCM) testbed, an NWP-Testbed, and high-resolution modeling (HRM). The web-based SCM-Testbed features multiple SCMs from major climate modeling centers and aims to maximize the potential of SCM approach to enhance and accelerate the evaluation and improvement of fast physics parameterizations through continuous evaluation of existing and evolving models against historical as well as new/improved ARM and other complementary measurements. The NWP-Testbed aims to capitalize on the large pool of operational numerical weather prediction products. Continuous evaluations of NWP forecasts against observations at ARM sites are carried out to systematically identify the biases and skills of physical parameterizations under all weather conditions. The highresolution modeling (HRM) activities aim to simulate the fast processes at high resolution to aid in the understanding of the fast processes and their parameterizations. A four-tier HRM framework is established to augment the SCM- and NWP-Testbeds towards eventual improvement of the parameterizations.

  10. Faster plant growth in a safe, economical way

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Faster plant growth in a safe, economical way Faster plant growth in a safe, economical way When applied to plants, Take-Off(tm) speeds crop emergence, increases growth rates and ...

  11. RevolutionƒNow The Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy Technologies…...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... future of EV charging research and development now lies in wireless power transfer-charging a car without a power cord-which could open even more doors for future EVs in America. ...

  12. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center is Helping to Facilitate the Transition to a New Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    The Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center (HTSC) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) uses a systems engineering and integration approach to hydrogen research and development to help the United States make the transition to a new energy future - a future built on diverse and abundant domestic renewable resources and integrated hydrogen systems. Research focuses on renewable hydrogen production, delivery, and storage; fuel cells and fuel cell manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; analysis; education; and market transformation. Hydrogen can be used in fuel cells to power vehicles and to provide electricity and heat for homes and offices. This flexibility, combined with our increasing demand for energy, opens the door for hydrogen power systems. HTSC collaborates with DOE, other government agencies, industry, communities, universities, national laboratories, and other stakeholders to promote a clean and secure energy future.

  13. Buildings of the Future Research Project Launch and Virtual Panel Discussion on Building Technology Trends

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn more about the DOE's Buildings of the Future Project. Buildings will no longer be passive objects that consume resources, but rather active participants engaged in the energy system and our community.

  14. Industrial Technologies Program - A Clean, Secure Energy Future via Industrial Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-01

    The Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) leads the national effort to save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the largest energy-using sector of the U.S. economy. ITP drives energy efficiency improvements and carbon dioxide reductions throughout the manufacturing supply chain, helping develop and deploy innovative technologies that transform the way industry uses energy.

  15. Wind Power Today: Building a New Energy Future, Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program 2009 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-04-01

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  16. POTENTIAL AND FUTURE TRENDS ON INDUSTRIAL RADIATION PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY APPLICATION IN EMERGING COUNTRY - BRAZIL

    SciTech Connect

    Sampa, M.H.O.; Omi, N.M.; Rela, C.S.; Tsai, D.

    2004-10-06

    Brazil started the use of radiation technology in the seventies on crosslinking polyethylene for insulation of wire and electronic cables and sterilization of medical care devices. The present status of industrial applications of radiation shows that the use of this technology is increasing according to the economical development and the necessity to become the products manufactured in the local industries competitive in quality and price for internal and external market. The on going development activities in this area are concentrated on polymers processing (materials modification), foodstuff treatment and environmental protection. The development, the promotion and the technical support to consolidate this technology to the local industries is the main attribution of Institute for Energetic and Nuclear Research-IPEN, a governmental Institution.

  17. Building Science Solutions … Faster and Better | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Solutions … Faster and Better Building Science Solutions … Faster and Better This webinar provides an overview of the DOE Building America Solution Center„a digital communication tool designed to serve building industry professionals, researchers, and market transformation programs by making world-class building science research and information quickly and easily accessible. solution_center_beta_demo_10_17_2012.pdf (4.34 MB) More Documents & Publications DOE ZERH Resources: Building

  18. New Algorithm Enables Faster Simulations of Ultrafast Processes

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Algorithm Enables Faster Simulations of Ultrafast Processes New Algorithm Enables Faster Simulations of Ultrafast Processes Opens the Door for Real-Time Simulations in Atomic-Level Materials Research February 20, 2015 Contact: Rachel Berkowitz, 510-486-7254, rberkowitz@lbl.gov femtosecondalgorithm copy Model of ion (Cl) collision with atomically thin semiconductor (MoSe2). Collision region is shown in blue and zoomed in; red points show initial positions of Cl. The simulation calculates the

  19. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation. View all reports on the TEF Web page, http://www.eere.energy.gov/analysis/transportationenergyfutures/index.html.

  20. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Non-Cost Barriers to Consumer Adoption of New Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, T.

    2013-03-01

    Consumer preferences are key to the adoption of new vehicle technologies. Barriers to consumer adoption include price and other obstacles, such as limited driving range and charging infrastructure; unfamiliarity with the technology and uncertainty about direct benefits; limited makes and models with the technology; reputation or perception of the technology; standardization issues; and regulations. For each of these non-cost barriers, this report estimates an effective cost and summarizes underlying influences on consumer preferences, approximate magnitude and relative severity, and assesses potential actions, based on a comprehensive literature review. While the report concludes that non-cost barriers are significant, effective cost and potential market share are very uncertain. Policies and programs including opportunities for drivers to test drive advanced vehicles, general public outreach and information programs, incentives for providing charging and fueling infrastructure, and development of technology standards were examined for their ability to address barriers, but little quantitative data exists on the effectiveness of these measures. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  1. Communicating the Future: Best Practices for Communication of Science and Technology to the Public

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Gail

    2002-09-30

    To advance the state of the art in science and technology communication to the public a conference was held March 6-8, 2002 at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD. This report of the conference proceedings includes a summary statement by the conference steering committee, transcripts or other text summarizing the remarks of conference speakers, and abstracts for 48 "best practice" communications programs selected by the steering committee through an open competition and a formal peer review process. Additional information about the 48 best practice programs is available on the archival conference Web site at www.nist.gov/bestpractices.

  2. Revolution…Now The Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy Technologies – 2015 Update

    SciTech Connect

    2015-11-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released the Revolution Now report, highlighting four transformational technologies: land-based wind power, silicon photovoltaic (PV) solar modules, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and electric vehicles (EVs). That study and its 2014 update showed how dramatic reductions in cost are driving a surge in consumer, industrial, and commercial adoption for these clean energy technologies—as well as yearly progress. In addition to presenting the continued progress made over the last year in these areas, this year’s update goes further. Two separate sections now cover large, central, utility-scale PV plants and smaller, rooftop, distributed PV systems to highlight how both have achieved significant deployment nationwide, and have done so through different innovations, such as easier access to capital for utility-scale PV and reductions of non-hardware costs and third-party ownership for distributed PV. Along with these core technologies

  3. Utility-industry restructuring and the future of state energy research and technology transfer institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pye, M.; Nadel, S.

    1998-07-01

    State energy research and technology transfer institutions (SERTTI) are state and regional organizations that have historically filled in gaps when a state need was not met. SERTTI build on research of the federal government and universities and focus on technologies with potential for timely commercialization. They have made valuable contributions to the energy balance, economic development, and environment of their states and the nation. SERTTI prospects are uncertain given their dependency on funding from oil-overcharges and utilities in an era of utility restructuring, oil-overcharge fund depletion, and general declines in energy research and development (R and D). SERTTI are likely to continue following restructuring, with funding from traditional sources or systems benefits charges, however, the R{ampersand}D mix and SERTTI activities will probably change. Unless provisions are made, utility investments in public-benefit R and D are likely to fall precipitously, reducing benefits and diminishing state-level R and D efforts because there will be less utility funding for SERTTI to leverage. Many R and D issues emerge that all states will need to address as they make restructuring decisions: What is public-benefit R and D, how can it be more effective, how much funding should be provided, who should administer funds, how should funds be allocated? Is a dedicated R and D fund needed? Is there a role for SERTTI to be involved in technology transfer? This paper looks at the current situation of state-level R and D in regard to restructuring and suggests answers to these questions.

  4. Recovery of uranium from seawater-status of technology and needed future research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Kelmers, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of recent publications concerning uranium recovery from seawater shows that considerable experimental work in this area is currently under way in Japan, less in European countries. Repeated screening programs have identified hydrous titanium oxide as the most promising candidate adsorbent; however, many of its properties, such as distribution coefficient, selectivity, loading, and possibly stability, appear to fall far short of those required for a practical recovery system. In addition, various evaluations of the energy efficiency of pumped or tidal power schemes for contacting the sorbent and seawater are in serious disagreement. Needed future research and development tasks have been identified. A fundamental development program to achieve significantly improved adsorbent properties would be required to permit economical recovery of uranium from seawater. Unresolved engineering aspects of such recovery systems are also identified and discussed. 63 references.

  5. The DOE Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) Project: Demonstration of dynamic information technology for the future power system

    SciTech Connect

    Mittelstadt, W.A.; Krause, P.E.; Wilson, R.E.; Overholt, P.N.; Sobajic, D.J.; Hauer, J.F.; Rizy, D.T.

    1996-07-01

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) joined the US Department of Energy (DOE) in an assessment of longer-term research and development needs for future electric power system operation. The effort produced a progressively sharper vision of a future power system in which enhanced control and operation are the primary means for serving new customer demands, in an environment where increased competition, a wider range of services and vendors, and much narrower operating margins all contribute to increased system efficiencies and capacity. Technology and infrastructure for real time access to wide area dynamic information were identified as critical path elements in realizing that vision. In 1995 the DOE accordingly launched the Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) Project jointly with the two Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) to address these issues in a practical operating environment--the western North America power system. The Project draws upon many years of PMA effort and related collaboration among the western utilities, plus an expanding infrastructure that includes regionally involved contractors, universities, and National Laboratories plus linkages to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The WAMS project also brings added focus and resources to the evolving Western System Dynamic Information Network, or WesDINet. This is a collective response of the Western Systems Coordinating Council (WSCC) member utilities to their shared needs for direct information about power system characteristics, model fidelity, and operational performance. The WAMS project is a key source of the technology and backbone communications needed to make WesDINet a well integrated, cost effective enterprise network demonstrating the role of dynamic information technology in the emerging utility environment.

  6. Biomass energy: State of the technology present obstacles and future potential

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, L.

    1993-06-23

    The prevailing image of wood and waste burning as dirty and environmentally harmful is no longer valid. The use of biomass combustion for energy can solve many of our nation`s problems. Wood and other biomass residues that are now causing expensive disposal problems can be burned as cleanly and efficiently as natural gas, and at a fraction of the cost. New breakthroughs in integrated waste-to-energy systems, from fuel handling, combustion technology and control systems to heat transfer and power generation, have dramatically improved system costs, efficiencies, cleanliness of emissions, maintenance-free operation, and end-use applications. Increasing costs for fossil fuels and for waste disposal strict environmental regulations and changing political priorities have changed the economics and rules of the energy game. This report will describe the new rules, new playing fields and key players, in the hope that those who make our nation`s energy policy and those who play in the energy field will take biomass seriously and promote its use.

  7. Faster Tracks for Particle Accelerators Promoted by ODU Physicists (Inside

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ODU) | Jefferson Lab Faster Tracks for Particle Accelerators Promoted by ODU Physicists (Inside ODU) External Link: http://ww2.odu.edu/ao/ia/insideodu/20120426/topstory2.html By jlab_admin on Thu, 2012-04-2

  8. FutureGen 2.0 Monitoring Program: An Overview of the Monitoring Approach and Technologies Selected for Implementation

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Vermeul, Vince R.; Strickland, Chris E.; Thorne, Paul D.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.; Kelly, Mark E.; Sullivan, Charlotte; Williams, Mark D.; Amonette, James E.; Downs, Janelle L.; et al

    2014-12-31

    The FutureGen 2.0 Project will design and build a first-of-its-kind, near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS). To assess storage site performance and meet the regulatory requirements of the Class VI Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program for CO2 Geologic Sequestration, the FutureGen 2.0 project will implement a suite of monitoring technologies designed to 1) evaluate CO2 mass balance and 2) detect any unforeseen loss in CO2 containment. The monitoring program will include direct monitoring of the injection stream and reservoir, and early-leak-detection monitoring directly above the primary confining zone. It will also implement an adaptive monitoringmore » strategy whereby monitoring results are continually evaluated and the monitoring network is modified as required, including the option to drill additional wells in out-years. Wells will be monitored for changes in CO2 concentration and formation pressure, and other geochemical/isotopic signatures that provide indication of CO2 or brine leakage. Indirect geophysical monitoring technologies that were selected for implementation include passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture logging. Near-surface monitoring approaches that have been initiated include surficial aquifer and surface- water monitoring, soil-gas monitoring, atmospheric monitoring, and hyperspectral data acquisition for assessment of vegetation conditions. Initially, only the collection of baseline data sets is planned; the need for additional near- surface monitoring will be continually evaluated throughout the design and operational phases of the project, and selected approaches may be reinstituted if conditions warrant. Given the current conceptual understanding of the subsurface environment, early and appreciable impacts to near-surface environments are not expected.« less

  9. FutureGen 2.0 Monitoring Program: An Overview of the Monitoring Approach and Technologies Selected for Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vince R.; Strickland, Chris E.; Thorne, Paul D.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.; Kelly, Mark E.; Sullivan, Charlotte; Williams, Mark D.; Amonette, James E.; Downs, Janelle L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    The FutureGen 2.0 Project will design and build a first-of-its-kind, near-zero emissions coal-fueled power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS). To assess storage site performance and meet the regulatory requirements of the Class VI Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program for CO2 Geologic Sequestration, the FutureGen 2.0 project will implement a suite of monitoring technologies designed to 1) evaluate CO2 mass balance and 2) detect any unforeseen loss in CO2 containment. The monitoring program will include direct monitoring of the injection stream and reservoir, and early-leak-detection monitoring directly above the primary confining zone. It will also implement an adaptive monitoring strategy whereby monitoring results are continually evaluated and the monitoring network is modified as required, including the option to drill additional wells in out-years. Wells will be monitored for changes in CO2 concentration and formation pressure, and other geochemical/isotopic signatures that provide indication of CO2 or brine leakage. Indirect geophysical monitoring technologies that were selected for implementation include passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture logging. Near-surface monitoring approaches that have been initiated include surficial aquifer and surface- water monitoring, soil-gas monitoring, atmospheric monitoring, and hyperspectral data acquisition for assessment of vegetation conditions. Initially, only the collection of baseline data sets is planned; the need for additional near- surface monitoring will be continually evaluated throughout the design and operational phases of the project, and selected approaches may be reinstituted if conditions warrant. Given the current conceptual understanding of the subsurface environment, early and appreciable impacts to near-surface environments are not expected.

  10. Future CIS Manufacturing Technology Development: Final Report, 8 July 1998--17 October 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T. J.; Crisalle, O. D.; Li, S. S.; Holloway, P. H.

    2003-06-01

    The University of Florida served as the basis for educating 12 graduate students in the area of photovoltaics engineering and research with a focus on thin-film CIS manufacturing technologies. A critical assessment of the thermodynamic data and of the phase diagrams for the Cu-Se and In-Se binary systems were carried out. We investigated the use of two novel precursor structures that used stacked In-Se and Cu-Se binary layers instead of conventional elemental layers, followed by rapid thermal processing (RTP) to produce CIS films. We investigated the evolution of electrical and microstructural properties of sputter-deposited ZnO:Al thin films. An assessment of the thermodynamics of the pseudobinary Cu2Se-Ga2Se3 system was done by using available experimental data, as well as an empirical method for estimating interactions in semiconductor solid solutions. Optimization studies were conducted to characterize the RTP of binary bilayer precursors for CIS synthesis using a newly acquired AG Associates Heatpulse furnace. Progress was made on the calculation of the 500C isothermal section of the phase diagram of the ternary Cu-In-Se system. Pursuit of developing alternative buffer layers for Cd-free CIS-based solar cells using a chemical-bath deposition (CBD) process has resulted in specific recipes for deposition. A rigorous model has been derived to predict the metal mass fluxes produced by conical thermal effusion sources. A two-dimensional model of the heat transfer was developed to model the substrate temperature distribution in the UF PMEE Reactor that features a rotating platen/substrates and effusion sources. We have grown and characterized polycrystalline CIS epitaxial films on single-crystal GaAs substrates under conditions that enhance the influence of surface effects on the resulting films and their properties. Progress was made on the study of CIS and CGS single-crystal growth, along with accompanying morphological and compositional characterizations. We have

  11. Crowdsource: How do we make computers faster? | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    This article was published in the spring 2016 issue of Argonne Now, the laboratory science magazine. Click for the rest of the issue. Crowdsource: How do we make computers faster? By Louise Lerner * March 7, 2016 Tweet EmailPrint This article was originally published in the spring 2016 issue of Argonne Now, the laboratory's science magazine. CROWDSOURCE asks Argonne scientists from different disciplines to each provide a perspective on a complex question facing society. Today we're asking:

  12. Making the perfect recipe just got faster: NNSA research accelerates

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    materials science | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Making the perfect recipe just got faster: NNSA research accelerates materials science Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 11:01am The Trinity supercomputer at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In a recent paper published in Nature Communications, NNSA researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) recently demonstrated ways to accelerate materials science. Why is this innovation so noteworthy to NNSA's mission, as well as other

  13. Discovering New Metallic Glasses Faster | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Discovering New Metallic Glasses Faster Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Fang Ren, SSRL Program Description Metallic glasses (MGs) are a class of material that combines properties of metals and amorphous ceramics. While efforts over the last several decades have fabricated some MGs, most of which contain expensive metals and not industrially feasible. The fabrication of MGs in the past has relied mainly on empirical rules.

  14. FutureGen.ppt

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Erik Turner Summer 2004 Technical Career Intern Program The Pennsylvania State University FutureGen And the importance of project management Outline * FutureGen technologies * ...

  15. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Patel, Kamlesh D [Ken]; SNL,

    2013-01-25

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  16. Fuel comsumption of heavy-duty trucks : potential effect of future technologies for improving energy efficiency and emission.

    SciTech Connect

    Saricks, C. L.; Vyas, A. D.; Stodolsky, F.; Maples, J. D.; Energy Systems; USDOE

    2003-01-01

    The results of an analysis of heavy-duty truck (Classes 2b through 8) technologies conducted to support the Energy Information Administration's long-term projections for energy use are summarized. Several technology options that have the potential to improve the fuel economy and emissions characteristics of heavy-duty trucks are included in the analysis. The technologies are grouped as those that enhance fuel economy and those that improve emissions. Each technology's potential impact on the fuel economy of heavy-duty trucks is estimated. A rough cost projection is also presented. The extent of technology penetration is estimated on the basis of truck data analyses and technical judgment.

  17. The potential effect of future energy-efficiency and emissions-improving technologies on fuel consumption of heavy trucks.

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, A.; Saricks, C.; Stodolsky, F.

    2003-03-14

    Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory analyzed heavy-duty truck technologies to support the Energy Information Administration's long-term energy use projections. Researchers conducted an analysis of several technology options that have potential to improve heavy truck fuel economy and emissions characteristics. The technologies are grouped as fuel-economy-enhancing and emissions-improving. Each technology's potential impact on heavy truck fuel economy has been estimated, as has the cost of implementation. The extent of technology penetration is estimated on the basis of truck data analyses and technical judgment.

  18. Oak Ridge Finds Ways to Remove K-25 Faster, Cheaper | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Finds Ways to Remove K-25 Faster, Cheaper Oak Ridge Finds Ways to Remove K-25 Faster, Cheaper February 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge Finds Ways to Remove K-25 Faster, Cheaper Oak Ridge Finds Ways to Remove K-25 Faster, Cheaper Oak Ridge Finds Ways to Remove K-25 Faster, Cheaper Oak Ridge Finds Ways to Remove K-25 Faster, Cheaper OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - K-25, once the world's largest building under one roof, reflects less of its former title every day. Due to the partnership between the U.S

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Next Generation Three-Way Catalysts for Future, Highly Efficient Gasoline Engines

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Ford at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Propulsion Materials

  20. Technologies

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies Technologies Scientists and engineers at Los Alamos have developed a variety of advanced technologies that anticipate-affect, detect, and neutralize & mitigate all types of explosive threats. v Technologies Since its inception in 1943, Los Alamos National Laboratory has been a driving force in explosives science. Scientists and engineers at Los Alamos have developed a variety of advanced technologies that anticipate, detect, and mitigate all types of explosive threats. ANDE:

  1. 10-kJ Status and 100-kJ Future for NIF PetaWatt Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C W; Crane, J K; Rushford, M C; Haefner, L C; Hernandez, J E; Dawson, J W; Beach, R J; Clark, W J; Trummer, D J; Tietbohl, G L; Barty, C J

    2007-07-02

    We discuss the status of the NIF ARC, an 8-beam 10-kJ class high-energy petawatt laser, and the future upgrade path of this and similar systems to 100-kJ-class with coherent phasing of multiple apertures.

  2. Technology

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water ...

  3. BACnet's Future Directions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and building controllers BACnet International has developed and deployed a BACnet ... technologies. Future Directions Smart Grid Cyber- Security Moving Forward Integration

  4. The heavy-duty vehicle future in the United States: A parametric analysis of technology and policy tradeoffs

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Askin, Amanda Christine; Barter, Garrett; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka

    2015-02-14

    Here, we present a parametric analysis of factors that can influence advanced fuel and technology deployments in U.S. Class 7–8 trucks through 2050. The analysis focuses on the competition between traditional diesel trucks, natural gas vehicles (NGVs), and ultra-efficient powertrains. Underlying the study is a vehicle choice and stock model of the U.S. heavy-duty vehicle market. Moreover, the model is segmented by vehicle class, body type, powertrain, fleet size, and operational type. We find that conventional diesel trucks will dominate the market through 2050, but NGVs could have significant market penetration depending on key technological and economic uncertainties. Compressed naturalmore » gas trucks conducting urban trips in fleets that can support private infrastructure are economically viable now and will continue to gain market share. Ultra-efficient diesel trucks, exemplified by the U.S. Department of Energy's SuperTruck program, are the preferred alternative in the long haul segment, but could compete with liquefied natural gas (LNG) trucks if the fuel price differential between LNG and diesel increases. However, the greatest impact in reducing petroleum consumption and pollutant emissions is had by investing in efficiency technologies that benefit all powertrains, especially the conventional diesels that comprise the majority of the stock, instead of incentivizing specific alternatives.« less

  5. The heavy-duty vehicle future in the United States: A parametric analysis of technology and policy tradeoffs

    SciTech Connect

    Askin, Amanda Christine; Barter, Garrett; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka

    2015-02-14

    Here, we present a parametric analysis of factors that can influence advanced fuel and technology deployments in U.S. Class 7–8 trucks through 2050. The analysis focuses on the competition between traditional diesel trucks, natural gas vehicles (NGVs), and ultra-efficient powertrains. Underlying the study is a vehicle choice and stock model of the U.S. heavy-duty vehicle market. Moreover, the model is segmented by vehicle class, body type, powertrain, fleet size, and operational type. We find that conventional diesel trucks will dominate the market through 2050, but NGVs could have significant market penetration depending on key technological and economic uncertainties. Compressed natural gas trucks conducting urban trips in fleets that can support private infrastructure are economically viable now and will continue to gain market share. Ultra-efficient diesel trucks, exemplified by the U.S. Department of Energy's SuperTruck program, are the preferred alternative in the long haul segment, but could compete with liquefied natural gas (LNG) trucks if the fuel price differential between LNG and diesel increases. However, the greatest impact in reducing petroleum consumption and pollutant emissions is had by investing in efficiency technologies that benefit all powertrains, especially the conventional diesels that comprise the majority of the stock, instead of incentivizing specific alternatives.

  6. The heavy-duty vehicle future in the United States: A parametric analysis of technology and policy tradeoffs

    SciTech Connect

    Askin, Amanda Christine; Barter, Garrett; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka

    2015-02-14

    Here, we present a parametric analysis of factors that can influence advanced fuel and technology deployments in U.S. Class 78 trucks through 2050. The analysis focuses on the competition between traditional diesel trucks, natural gas vehicles (NGVs), and ultra-efficient powertrains. Underlying the study is a vehicle choice and stock model of the U.S. heavy-duty vehicle market. Moreover, the model is segmented by vehicle class, body type, powertrain, fleet size, and operational type. We find that conventional diesel trucks will dominate the market through 2050, but NGVs could have significant market penetration depending on key technological and economic uncertainties. Compressed natural gas trucks conducting urban trips in fleets that can support private infrastructure are economically viable now and will continue to gain market share. Ultra-efficient diesel trucks, exemplified by the U.S. Department of Energy's SuperTruck program, are the preferred alternative in the long haul segment, but could compete with liquefied natural gas (LNG) trucks if the fuel price differential between LNG and diesel increases. However, the greatest impact in reducing petroleum consumption and pollutant emissions is had by investing in efficiency technologies that benefit all powertrains, especially the conventional diesels that comprise the majority of the stock, instead of incentivizing specific alternatives.

  7. Technolog

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from

  8. Technology

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Technology Delivering science to the marketplace through commercialization, spinoffs and industry partnerships. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets Gary Grider (second from right) with the 2015 Richard P. Feynman Innovation Prize. Also pictured (left to right): Duncan McBranch, Chief Technology Officer of Los Alamos National Laboratory; Terry Wallace, Program Associate Director for Global Security at Los Alamos; and Lee

  9. Technolog

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow ... Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions ...

  10. NEW HIGH STRENGTH AND FASTER DRILLING TSP DIAMOND CUTTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Radtke

    2006-01-31

    The manufacture of thermally stable diamond (TSP) cutters for drill bits used in petroleum drilling requires the brazing of two dissimilar materials--TSP diamond and tungsten carbide. The ENDURUS{trademark} thermally stable diamond cutter developed by Technology International, Inc. exhibits (1) high attachment (shear) strength, exceeding 345 MPa (50,000 psi), (2) TSP diamond impact strength increased by 36%, (3) prevents TSP fracture when drilling hard rock, and (4) maintains a sharp edge when drilling hard and abrasive rock. A novel microwave brazing (MWB) method for joining dissimilar materials has been developed. A conventional braze filler metal is combined with microwave heating which minimizes thermal residual stress between materials with dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion. The process results in preferential heating of the lower thermal expansion diamond material, thus providing the ability to match the thermal expansion of the dissimilar material pair. Methods for brazing with both conventional and exothermic braze filler metals have been developed. Finite element modeling (FEM) assisted in the fabrication of TSP cutters controllable thermal residual stress and high shear attachment strength. Further, a unique cutter design for absorbing shock, the densification of otherwise porous TSP diamond for increased mechanical strength, and diamond ion implantation for increased diamond fracture resistance resulted in successful drill bit tests.

  11. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, P.; /Fermilab; Cary, J.; /Tech-X, Boulder; McInnes, L.C.; /Argonne; Mori, W.; /UCLA; Ng, C.; /SLAC; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization

  12. Next-gen RF MEMS Switch for a Smarter, Faster Internet of Things...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    RF MEMS Switch for a Smarter, Faster Internet of Things Karen Lightman 2014.03.28 Big Data. Internet of Things. Quantified Self. Connected Home. Connected City. These...

  13. Methodology for Calculating Cost-per-Mile for Current and Future Vehicle Powertrain Technologies, with Projections to 2024: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, M.; Timbario, T. A.; Timbario, T. J.; Laffen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, several cost-per-mile calculators exist that can provide estimates of acquisition and operating costs for consumers and fleets. However, these calculators are limited in their ability to determine the difference in cost per mile for consumer versus fleet ownership, to calculate the costs beyond one ownership period, to show the sensitivity of the cost per mile to the annual vehicle miles traveled (VMT), and to estimate future increases in operating and ownership costs. Oftentimes, these tools apply a constant percentage increase over the time period of vehicle operation, or in some cases, no increase in direct costs at all over time. A more accurate cost-per-mile calculator has been developed that allows the user to analyze these costs for both consumers and fleets. The calculator was developed to allow simultaneous comparisons of conventional light-duty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, mild and full hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). This paper is a summary of the development by the authors of a more accurate cost-per-mile calculator that allows the user to analyze vehicle acquisition and operating costs for both consumer and fleets. Cost-per-mile results are reported for consumer-operated vehicles travelling 15,000 miles per year and for fleets travelling 25,000 miles per year.

  14. 2016 Annual Technology Baseline

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hand, Maureen; Kurup, Parthiv

    2016-09-15

    Current and future cost and performance data for electricity generating technologies, including both renewable and conventional technologies.

  15. Savings from energy efficient windows: Current and future savings from new fenestration technologies in the residential market

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, K.; Arasteh, D.; Eto, J.

    1993-04-01

    Heating and cooling energy lost through windows in the residential sector (estimated at two-thirds of the energy lost through windows in all sectors) currently accounts for 3 percent (or 2.8 quads) of total US energy use, costing over $26 billion annually in energy bills. Installation of energy-efficient windows is acting to reduce the amount of energy lost per unit window area. Installation of more energy efficient windows since 1970 has resulted in an annual savings of approximately 0.6 quads. If all windows utilized existing cost effective energy conserving technologies, then residential window energy losses would amount to less than 0.8 quads, directly saving $18 billion per year in avoided energy costs. The nationwide installation of windows that are now being developed could actually turn this energy loss into a net energy gain. Considering only natural replacement of windows and new construction, appropriate fenestration policies could help realize this potential by reducing annual residential window energy losses to 2.2 quids by the year 2012, despite a growing housing stock.

  16. Technology

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology A research team at the University of Colorado has developed a novel heat exchanger design and accompanying manufacturing technique for creating low-cost microchannel heat exchangers from plastics, metals, or ceramics. The prototype used laser welding (upper red lines at right). Expansion makes "chessboard" counter flow pattern (lower right). The figure below shows mass production, where sheets are added one at a time and welded with a mask and filament (left) or laser

  17. Building Better Batteries for Long-Distance Driving and Faster-Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Electronics | Department of Energy Better Batteries for Long-Distance Driving and Faster-Charging Electronics Building Better Batteries for Long-Distance Driving and Faster-Charging Electronics March 2, 2016 - 10:07am Addthis The colors show the uneven distribution of chemical elements on this particle's surface, which is key to its improved performance in batteries. | Courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Karen McNulty Walsh Brookhaven National

  18. SLAC, Stanford Gadget Grabs More Solar Energy to Disinfect Water Faster:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Plopped Into water, a tiny device triggers the formation of chemicals that kill microbes in minutes | Department of Energy SLAC, Stanford Gadget Grabs More Solar Energy to Disinfect Water Faster: Plopped Into water, a tiny device triggers the formation of chemicals that kill microbes in minutes SLAC, Stanford Gadget Grabs More Solar Energy to Disinfect Water Faster: Plopped Into water, a tiny device triggers the formation of chemicals that kill microbes in minutes August 15, 2016 - 2:15pm

  19. The Digital Road to Scientific Knowledge Diffusion; A Faster, Better Way to

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific Progress? (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The Digital Road to Scientific Knowledge Diffusion; A Faster, Better Way to Scientific Progress? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Digital Road to Scientific Knowledge Diffusion; A Faster, Better Way to Scientific Progress? With the United States federal government spending billions annually for research and development, ways to increase the productivity of that research can have a significant return on investment. The

  20. CSP technology

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    technology - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy ...

  1. Technology Overview Fundamentals of Wind Energy (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, S.

    2005-05-01

    A presentation that describes the technology, costs and trends, and future development of wind energy technologies.

  2. Science.gov faster, easier to use | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information faster, easier to use Back to the OSTI News Listing for 2010 Your search for federal government science information at Science.gov is faster than ever before and the portal sports enhancements to streamline your search experience, including: Users can now access their alerts accounts from their alerts email. It is much easier to modify or delete alerts and users can increase the alerts frequency to Daily. Users can now download directly to RefWorks or

  3. Fact #744: September 10, 2012 Average New Light Vehicle Price Grows Faster

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    than Average Used Light Vehicle Price | Department of Energy 4: September 10, 2012 Average New Light Vehicle Price Grows Faster than Average Used Light Vehicle Price Fact #744: September 10, 2012 Average New Light Vehicle Price Grows Faster than Average Used Light Vehicle Price In 2011 the average used light vehicle price was 36% higher than in 1990, while the average new light vehicle price was 67% higher than it was in 1990. The average price of a used vehicle had been between $6,000 and

  4. ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap mptroadmap.pdf (293.48 KB) More Documents & ...

  5. Custom data support for the FAst -physics System Testbed and Research (FASTER) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Toto, T.; Jensen, M.; Vogelmann, A.; Wagener, R.; Liu, Y.; Lin, W.

    2010-03-15

    The multi-institution FAst -physics System Testbed and Research (FASTER) project, funded by the DOE Earth System Modeling program, aims to evaluate and improve the parameterizations of fast processes (those involving clouds, precipitation and aerosols) in global climate models, using a combination of numerical prediction models, single column models, cloud resolving models, large-eddy simulations, full global climate model output and ARM active and passive remote sensing and in-situ data. This poster presents the Custom Data Support effort for the FASTER project. The effort will provide tailored datasets, statistics, best estimates and quality control data, as needed and defined by FASTER participants, for use in evaluating and improving parameterizations of fast processes in GCMs. The data support will include custom gridding and averaging, for the model of interest, using high time resolution and pixel level data from continuous ARM observations and complementary datasets. In addition to the FASTER team, these datasets will be made available to the ARM Science Team. Initial efforts with respect to data product development, priorities, availability and distribution are summarized here with an emphasis on cloud, atmospheric state and aerosol properties as observed during the Spring 2000 Cloud IOP and the Spring 2003 Aerosol IOP at the ARM Southern Great Plains site.

  6. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  7. NREL's CelA Catalyzes Plant Cell Walls Faster - News Feature | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL's CelA Catalyzes Plant Cell Walls Faster January 12, 2015 Close-up photo of a scientist in safety glasses examining small items in plastic containers. NREL Senior Scientist Roman Brunecky examines the molecular weight of the enzyme CelA on a gel in the Protein Chemistry Lab in the Field Test Laboratory Building on NREL's Golden, Colorado, campus. Photo by Dennis Schroeder Scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed an enzyme that could

  8. Genome Databases Get Faster, Bigger, Stronger | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    (SC) Genome Databases Get Faster, Bigger, Stronger Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) Community Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)

  9. FASTER: A new DOE effort to bridge ESM and ASR sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.

    2010-03-15

    In order to better use the long-term ARM measurements to evaluate parameterizations of fast processes used in global climate models --- mainly those related to clouds, precipitation and aerosols, the DOE Earth System Modeling (ESM) program funds a new multi-institution project led by the Brookhaven National Laboratory, FAst -physics System Testbed and Research (FASTER). This poster will present an overview of this new project and its scientific relationships to the ASR sciences and ARM measurements.

  10. Energy for the Future

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy for the Future

  11. Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    vehicles decreases with time. * Manufacturing costs associated with batteries and electric machines fall faster than those of conventional technologies (i.e., engine,...

  12. Science and technology for a sustainable energy future: Accomplishments of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.; Vaughan, K.H.

    1995-03-01

    Accomplishments of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are presented. Included are activities performed in the utilities, transportation, industrial, and buildings technology areas.

  13. Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean Energy Future (Brochure), SunShot, Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Through partnerships with industry academia, and national laboratories, the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program sponsors research and development (R&D) in addition to activities designed to accelerate solar market development and reduce the cost of solar power.

  14. Energy futures-2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This book covers the proceedings of the Symposium on Energy Futures II. Topics covered include: The National Energy Strategy; The Gas and petroleum industry; energy use in the paper industry; solar energy technology; hydroelectric power; biomass/waste utilization; engine emissions testing laboratories; integrated coal gassification-combined-cycle power plants.

  15. They all like it hot: faster cleanup of contaminated soil and groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, R., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    Clean up a greasy kitchen spill with cold water and the going is slow. Us hot water instead and progress improves markedly. So it makes sense that cleanup of greasy underground contaminants such as gasoline might go faster if hot water or steam were somehow added to the process. The Environmental Protection Agency named hundreds of sites to the Superfund list - sites that have been contaminated with petroleum products or petroleum products or solvents. Elsewhere across the country, thousands of properties not identified on federal cleanup lists are contaminated as well. Given that under current regulations, underground accumulations of solvent and hydrocarbon contaminants (the most serious cause of groundwater pollution) must be cleaned up, finding a rapid and effective method of removing them is imperative. In the early 1990`s, in collaboration with the School of Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore developed dynamic underground stripping. This method for treating underground contaminants with heat is much faster and more effective than traditional treatment methods.

  16. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Versus CT in Lung Ablation Procedure: Which is Faster?

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi Battistuzzi, Jean-Benoit Catena, Vittorio; Grasso, Rosario Francesco Zobel, Bruno Beomonte; Schena, Emiliano; Buy, Xavier Palussiere, Jean

    2015-10-15

    AimTo compare cone-beam CT (CBCT) versus computed tomography (CT) guidance in terms of time needed to target and place the radiofrequency ablation (RFA) electrode on lung tumours.Materials and MethodsPatients at our institution who received CBCT- or CT-guided RFA for primary or metastatic lung tumours were retrospectively included. Time required to target and place the RFA electrode within the lesion was registered and compared across the two groups. Lesions were stratified into three groups according to their size (<10, 10–20, >20 mm). Occurrences of electrode repositioning, repositioning time, RFA complications, and local recurrence after RFA were also reported.ResultsForty tumours (22 under CT, 18 under CBCT guidance) were treated in 27 patients (19 male, 8 female, median age 67.25 ± 9.13 years). Thirty RFA sessions (16 under CBCT and 14 under CT guidance) were performed. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that CBCT was faster than CT to target and place the electrode within the tumour independently from its size (β = −9.45, t = −3.09, p = 0.004). Electrode repositioning was required in 10/22 (45.4 %) tumours under CT guidance and 5/18 (27.8 %) tumours under CBCT guidance. Pneumothoraces occurred in 6/14 (42.8 %) sessions under CT guidance and in 6/16 (37.5 %) sessions under CBCT guidance. Two recurrences were noted for tumours receiving CBCT-guided RFA (2/17, 11.7 %) and three after CT-guided RFA (3/19, 15.8 %).ConclusionCBCT with live 3D needle guidance is a useful technique for percutaneous lung ablation. Despite lesion size, CBCT allows faster lung RFA than CT.

  17. Energy and Infrastructure Future Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Rush Robinett Energy &Infrastructure Future Group Sandia National Laboratories rdrobin@sandia.gov Energy & Infrastructure Future Overview 2 Sandia's Core Purpose "Helping our Nation Secure a Peaceful and Free World through Technology" * National Security Laboratory * Broad mission in developing science and technology applications to meet our rapidly changing, complex national security challenges * Safety, security and reliability of our nation's nuclear weapon stockpile 3

  18. Keynote Address: Future Vision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Future Vision Keynote Address: Future Vision May 20, 2014 1:00PM to 1:30PM PDT Pacific Ballroom Tuesday's keynote address by Raffi Garabedian, Chief Technology Officer, First Solar

  19. Future water Cherenkov detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bergevin, Marc

    2015-05-15

    In these proceedings a review of the current proposed large-scale Warer Cherenkov experiments is given. An argument is made that future water Cherenkov detectors would benefit in the investment in neutron detection technology. A brief overview will be given of proposed water Cherenkov experiments such as HYPER-K and MEMPHYS and other R and D experiments to demonstrate neutron capture in water Cherenkov detectors. Finally, innovation developed in the context of the now defunct LBNE Water R and D option to improve Water Cherenkov technology will be described.

  20. Driving the Future | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Driving the Future At Argonne National Laboratory's Center for Transportation Research, our goal is to accelerate the development and deployment of vehicle technologies that help...

  1. Wireless Electric Charging: The Future of Plug-In Electric Vehicles...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    In the future, the engineers hope to reach 10kW and eventually 19kW to facilitate faster charging. What if charging your plug-in electric vehicle was as easy as parking it? No need ...

  2. Carbon Capture and Storage Initiative Aims to Bring Technologies to Market

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Faster | Department of Energy Capture and Storage Initiative Aims to Bring Technologies to Market Faster Carbon Capture and Storage Initiative Aims to Bring Technologies to Market Faster March 16, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has begun research under the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI), partnering with other national laboratories, universities, and industry to develop state-of-the-art

  3. Future Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions Control Technology Future Diesel Engine Thermal Efficiency Improvement andn Emissions Control Technology 2005 Diesel ...

  4. The Future of Bioenergy Feedstock Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The Future of Bioenergy Feedstock Production Cornell University June, 2013 John Ferrell Feedstock Technology Lead Bioenergy Technologies Office US Department of Energy 2 Bioenergy Technologies Office background Feedstock assessment, production and logistics Biomass yield improvements Sustainable feedstock production Future directions Overview 3 Bioenergy Technologies Office 4 Introduction: Terrestrial and Algae Feedstocks Feedstock supply and logistics efforts focus on RD&D to

  5. Faster processing of multiple spatially-heterodyned direct to digital holograms

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Gregory R [Clinton, TN; Bingham, Philip R [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-09

    Systems and methods are described for faster processing of multiple spatially-heterodyned direct to digital holograms. A method includes of obtaining multiple spatially-heterodyned holograms, includes: digitally recording a first spatially-heterodyned hologram including spatial heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis; digitally recording a second spatially-heterodyned hologram including spatial heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis; Fourier analyzing the recorded first spatially-heterodyned hologram by shifting a first original origin of the recorded first spatially-heterodyned hologram including spatial heterodyne fringes in Fourier space to sit on top of a spatial-heterodyne carrier frequency defined as a first angle between a first reference beam and a first object beam; applying a first digital filter to cut off signals around the first original origin and performing an inverse Fourier transform on the result; Fourier analyzing the recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram by shifting a second original origin of the recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram including spatial heterodyne fringes in Fourier space to sit on top of a spatial-heterodyne carrier frequency defined as a second angle between a second reference beam and a second object beam; and applying a second digital filter to cut off signals around the second original origin and performing an inverse Fourier transform on the result, wherein digitally recording the first spatially-heterodyned hologram is completed before digitally recording the second spatially-heterodyned hologram and a single digital image includes both the first spatially-heterodyned hologram and the second spatially-heterodyned hologram.

  6. Faster processing of multiple spatially-heterodyned direct to digital holograms

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Gregory R.; Bingham, Philip R.

    2006-10-03

    Systems and methods are described for faster processing of multiple spatially-heterodyned direct to digital holograms. A method includes of obtaining multiple spatially-heterodyned holograms, includes: digitally recording a first spatially-heterodyned hologram including spatial heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis; digitally recording a second spatially-heterodyned hologram including spatial heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis; Fourier analyzing the recorded first spatially-heterodyned hologram by shifting a first original origin of the recorded first spatially-heterodyned hologram including spatial heterodyne fringes in Fourier space to sit on top of a spatial-heterodyne carrier frequency defined as a first angle between a first reference beam and a first, object beam; applying a first digital filter to cut off signals around the first original origin and performing an inverse Fourier transform on the result; Fourier analyzing the recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram by shifting a second original origin of the recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram including spatial heterodyne fringes in Fourier space to sit on top of a spatial-heterodyne carrier frequency defined as a second angle between a second reference beam and a second object beam; and applying a second digital filter to cut off signals around the second original origin and performing an inverse Fourier transform on the result, wherein digitally recording the first spatially-heterodyned hologram is completed before digitally recording the second spatially-heterodyned hologram and a single digital image includes both the first spatially-heterodyned hologram and the second spatially-heterodyned hologram.

  7. Energy Department Invests Over $7 Million to Commercialize Cost-Effective Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department announced more than $7 million for projects that will help bring cost-effective, advanced hydrogen and fuel cell technologies online faster.

  8. Window Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2000-04-01

    The Window Industry Technology Roadmap looks at the trends in window design and installation in 2000 and projects trends for the future.

  9. Growing the Future Bioeconomy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    the Future Bioeconomy Growing the Future Bioeconomy Breakout Session IA-Conversion Technologies I: Industrial Perspectives on Pathways to Advanced Biofuels Growing the Future Bioeconomy Joel Velasco, Senior Vice President, Amyris, Inc velasco_biomass_2014 (3.29 MB) More Documents & Publications Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Amyris, Inc. Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Amyris, Inc. CX-100755 Categorical Exclusion Determination

  10. Hadron calorimeters for future hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Jim Freeman

    2004-01-27

    Hadron calorimeters are essential for jet and neutrino physics at collider experiments. Current hadron calorimeters for the ATLAS and CMS detectors are described. Increased energy and luminosity of future hadron colliders place constraints on detector technology. Difficulties for operation of the current detectors in future hadron collider environments are discussed. New experiments for future colliders should take notice of physics processes during jet evolution that place fundamental limits on performance of the calorimeter to reconstruct jets. A technique of incorporating tracking information to improve jet resolution is described. Future detectors should be designed with these constraints in mind. Possible avenues of exploration for future technology are described.

  11. Forming the Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Forming the Future Forming the Future This feature article from the April 2014 edition of the Fabricating and Forming Journal (FFJournal) describes how Ford Motor Co.'s sheet metal freeforming technology accelerates prototyping, taking stamping tool costs and lead time out of the equation. Reprinted with permission of FFJournal Forming the Future, FFJournal (April 2014) (863.4 KB) More Documents & Publications RAPID FREEFORM SHEET METAL FORMING: TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AND SYSTEM VERIFICATION

  12. Supplier Perspectives: Fuel Cell Future

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Commercial Confidential Fuel Cell Future September 27 th 2016 Christopher.Johnson@Ballard.com Page 2 Commercial Confidential Agenda * Ballard Overview * Market Leadership * Growing Demand for FC buses * Working Together * Conclusions Page 3 Commercial Confidential Commercial Confidential We Are Ballard Power Systems We are Ballard Power making a meaningful difference with our fuel cell technology that will continue long into the future... * 37 years of experience * 21 years listed on NASDAQ *

  13. About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    You are here Home About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future The U.S. ...

  14. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future

    ScienceCinema

    Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

    2016-07-12

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

  15. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

    2014-07-31

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

  16. NETL Labs of the Future

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Labs of the Future Numerous key NETL technology breakthroughs that now play critical roles in our nation's energy security began years ago. That ability to doggedly pursue long-term innovation is why NETL is considered a lab of the future and why we can expect today's early-stage research to yield incredible benefits for future generations. alloy-development.jpg High-Performance Computing for Alloy Development big-data.jpg Big Data ccsi.jpg Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative ccs.jpg Carbon

  17. Mobility chains analysis of technologies for passenger cars and light duty vehicles fueled with biofuels : application of the Greet model to project the role of biomass in America's energy future (RBAEF) project.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.; Wu, Y.; Wang, M; Energy Systems

    2008-01-31

    The Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) is a multi-institution, multiple-sponsor research project. The primary focus of the project is to analyze and assess the potential of transportation fuels derived from cellulosic biomass in the years 2015 to 2030. For this project, researchers at Dartmouth College and Princeton University designed and simulated an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity using the ASPEN Plus{trademark} model. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted, for the RBAEF project, a mobility chains or well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at ANL. The mobility chains analysis was intended to estimate the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of different production biofuels in light-duty vehicle technologies.

  18. The Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy Technologies - 2016 Update September 2016 Revolution...Now Contributors i Acknowledgments Primary Author U.S. Department of Energy Paul Donohoo-Vallett, DOE Offce of Energy Effciency & Renewable Energy Contributing Authors U.S. Department of Energy Patrick Gilman, DOE Wind Energy Technologies Offce David Feldman, National Renewable Energy Laboratory James Brodrick, DOE Building Technologies Offce David Gohlke, DOE Vehicle Technologies Offce Roland Gravel,

  19. Bosch Powertrain Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Bosch Powertrain Technologies Bosch Powertrain Technologies Provides major supplier view of future gasoline engine powertrain developments deer12yilmaz.pdf (2.84 MB) More ...

  20. NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Technology Basics

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Basics Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies can be a major contributor to our nation's future need for new, clean sources of energy, particularly in the Western...

  1. Building Blocks for the Future of Manufacturing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Building Blocks for the Future of Manufacturing Scott Smith 2011.05.04 Even though we grew ... Can you send more information on this technology? A photo of Scott Smith. About the Author ...

  2. Practical Issues when Selecting PV Technologies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.

    2010-09-09

    Presentation highlighting practical considerations for photovoltaic technologies and strategies for future reductions in cost and increases in efficiency.

  3. Revolutionizing Clean Energy Technology with Advanced Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hockfield, Susan; Holliday Jr, Charles O.; Markell, Brad

    2015-01-13

    Energy conservation and manufacturing leaders discuss manufacturing products with advance composites to revolutionize the future with clean energy technology.

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE established the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Centers of Excellence to provide future generations of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills in advanced automotive...

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, T.; Sandor, D.; Wiser, R.; Schneider, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  6. FutureGen Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cabe, Jim; Elliott, Mike

    2010-09-30

    This report summarizes the comprehensive siting, permitting, engineering, design, and costing activities completed by the FutureGen Industrial Alliance, the Department of Energy, and associated supporting subcontractors to develop a first of a kind near zero emissions integrated gasification combined cycle power plant and carbon capture and storage project (IGCC-CCS). With the goal to design, build, and reliably operate the first IGCC-CCS facility, FutureGen would have been the lowest emitting pulverized coal power plant in the world, while providing a timely and relevant basis for coal combustion power plants deploying carbon capture in the future. The content of this report summarizes key findings and results of applicable project evaluations; modeling, design, and engineering assessments; cost estimate reports; and schedule and risk mitigation from initiation of the FutureGen project through final flow sheet analyses including capital and operating reports completed under DOE award DE-FE0000587. This project report necessarily builds upon previously completed siting, design, and development work executed under DOE award DE-FC26- 06NT4207 which included the siting process; environmental permitting, compliance, and mitigation under the National Environmental Policy Act; and development of conceptual and design basis documentation for the FutureGen plant. For completeness, the report includes as attachments the siting and design basis documents, as well as the source documentation for the following: • Site evaluation and selection process and environmental characterization • Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permit Application including well design and subsurface modeling • FutureGen IGCC-CCS Design Basis Document • Process evaluations and technology selection via Illinois Clean Coal Review Board Technical Report • Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance for slurry-fed gasifier configuration • Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance

  7. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Jay Nathwani Acting Program Manager Geothermal Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy The Geothermal Technologies Program Overview May 18 2010 Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) Program Topic Areas *Low Temperature, Geopressured and Coproduced Resources *Innovative Exploration Technologies National Goals *Economy Putting people to work in the near- term, and in the future *Security Developing and expanding

  8. ITP Aluminum: Alumina Technology Roadmap

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Alumina Technology Roadmap outlines a comprehensive long-term research and development plan that defines the industry’s collective future and establishes a clear pathway forward.

  9. Solar Smarter Faster

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the SunShot Initiative, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced on April 15th the selection of up to $112.5 million over five years for funding to support the...

  10. Solar Smarter Faster

    ScienceCinema

    Armbrust, Dan; Haldar, Pradeep; Kaloyeros, Alain; Holladay, Dan

    2016-07-12

    As part of the SunShot Initiative, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced on April 15th the selection of up to $112.5 million over five years for funding to support the development of advanced solar photovoltaic (PV)-related manufacturing processes throughout the United States. The effort is led by Sematech, with a proven track record in breathing life back into the US semiconduster industry, and in partnership with CNSE, The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, who supplies world class R&D experts and facilities.

  11. Drive Innovation Faster.

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, Douglas K.

    2005-08-01

    Authored article by Doug Lemon. An expert opinion/thought piece on how PNNL approaches R&D projects, incorporating IP protection earlier in the process of innovation to shorten the development timeline. Article cites example of SMART program to illustrate point.

  12. Living a Sustainable Future

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Living a Sustainable Future Living a Sustainable Future August 1, 2013 Biomass to fuel project The Laboratory's biomass team is working to solve the energy crisis through...

  13. OSCARS-Future-Tech

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    OSCARS and Future Tech Engineering Services The Network OSCARS How It Works Who's Using OSCARS? OSCARS and Future Tech OSCARS Standard and Open Grid Forum OSCARS Developers...

  14. Living a Sustainable Future

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Living a Sustainable Future Living a Sustainable Future August 1, 2013 Biomass to fuel project The Laboratory's biomass team is working to solve the energy crisis through ...

  15. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1. Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M. M.; Baldwin, S.; DeMeo, E.; Reilly, J. M.; Mai, T.; Arent, D.; Porro, G.; Meshek, M.; Sandor, D.

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  16. ITP Chemicals: Chemical Industry of the Future: New Biocatalysts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ITP Chemicals: Chemical Industry of the Future: New Biocatalysts: Essential Tools for a ... TECHNOLOGY VISION 2020: The U.S. Chemical Industry Gasoline Biodesulfurization Fact Sheet ...

  17. ITP Glass: Glass Industry of the Future: Energy and Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ITP Glass: Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis Final Report, August 2007 ITP Glass: A Clear Vision for a Bright Future ITP Glass: Glass Industry Technology Roadmap; April 2002

  18. DOE Announces Webinars on Buildings of the Future, Overcoming...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Technology Centre, and Jason Christopher from DOE will explore the future built environment from three unique perspectives: urban planning, the internet of things, and security. ...

  19. Assessment of Future Vehicle Transportation Options and their...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Vehicle Transportation Options and Their Impact on the Electric Grid January 10, 2010 New Analysis of Alternative Transportation Technologies 3 What's New? * Additional ...

  20. Wind Energy Status and Future Wind Engineering Challenges: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Thresher, R.; Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.; Veers, P.

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes the current status of wind energy technology, the potential for future wind energy development and the science and engineering challenges that must be overcome for the technology to meet its potential.

  1. The future of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    Natural gas, mainly methane, produces lower CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions than either oil or coal; thus further substitutions of methane for these fuels could help mitigate air pollution. Methane is, however, a potent greenhouse gas and the domestication of ruminants, cultivation of rice, mining of coal, drilling for oil, and transportation of natural gas have all contributed to a doubling of the amount of atmospheric methane since 1800. Today nearly 300,000 wells yearly produce ca. 21 trillion cubic feet of methane. Known reserves suggest about a 10 year supply at the above rates of recovery; and the potential for undiscovered resources is obscured by uncertainty involving price, new technologies, and environmental restrictions steming from the need to drill an enormous number of wells, many in ecologically sensitive areas. Until all these aspects of methane are better understood, its future role in the world`s energy mix will remain uncertain. The atomic simplicity of methane, composed of one carbon and four hydrogen atoms, may mask the complexity and importance of this, the most basic of organic molecules. Within the Earth, methane is produced through thermochemical alteration of organic materials, and by biochemical reactions mediated by metabolic processes of archaebacteria; some methane may even be primordial, a residue of planetary accretion. Methane also occurs in smaller volumes in landfills, rice paddies, termite complexes, ruminants, and even many humans. As an energy source, its full energy potential is controversial. Methane is touted by some as a viable bridge to future energy systems, fueled by the sun and uranium and carried by electricity and hydrogen.

  2. Future Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven J.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Wigley, Tom M.

    2005-12-01

    The importance of sulfur dioxide emissions for climate change is now established, although substantial uncertainties remain. This paper presents projections for future sulfur dioxide emissions using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. A new income-based parameterization for future sulfur dioxide emissions controls is developed based on purchasing power parity (PPP) income estimates and historical trends related to the implementation of sulfur emissions limitations. This parameterization is then used to produce sulfur dioxide emissions trajectories for the set of scenarios developed for the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). We use the SRES methodology to produce harmonized SRES scenarios using the latest version of the MiniCAM model. The implications, and requirements, for IA modeling of sulfur dioxide emissions are discussed. We find that sulfur emissions eventually decline over the next century under a wide set of assumptions. These emission reductions result from a combination of emission controls, the adoption of advanced electric technologies, and a shift away from the direct end use of coal with increasing income levels. Only under a scenario where incomes in developing regions increase slowly do global emission levels remain at close to present levels over the next century. Under a climate policy that limits emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide emissions fall in a relatively narrow range. In all cases, the relative climatic effect of sulfur dioxide emissions decreases dramatically to a point where sulfur dioxide is only a minor component of climate forcing by the end of the century. Ecological effects of sulfur dioxide, however, could be significant in some developing regions for many decades to come.

  3. Mastering Uncertainty and Risk at Multiple Time Scales in the Future Electrical Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael; Bent, Russell W.; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2012-07-10

    Today's electrical grids enjoy a relatively clean separation of spatio-temporal scales yielding a compartmentalization of grid design, optimization, control and risk assessment allowing for the use of conventional mathematical tools within each area. In contrast, the future grid will incorporate time-intermittent renewable generation, operate via faster electrical markets, and tap the latent control capability at finer grid modeling scales; creating a fundamentally new set of couplings across spatiotemporal scales and requiring revolutionary advances in mathematics techniques to bridge these scales. One example is found in decade-scale grid expansion planning in which today's algorithms assume accurate load forecasts and well-controlled generation. Incorporating intermittent renewable generation creates fluctuating network flows at the hourly time scale, inherently linking the ability of a transmission line to deliver electrical power to hourly operational decisions. New operations-based planning algorithms are required, creating new mathematical challenges. Spatio-temporal scales are also crossed when the future grid's minute-scale fluctuations in network flows (due to intermittent generation) create a disordered state upon which second-scale transient grid dynamics propagate effectively invalidating today's on-line dynamic stability analyses. Addressing this challenge requires new on-line algorithms that use large data streams from new grid sensing technologies to physically aggregate across many spatial scales to create responsive, data-driven dynamic models. Here, we sketch the mathematical foundations of these problems and potential solutions.

  4. Arid site characterization and technology assessment: Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, R.G.

    1993-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) program was initiated in March 1991 to evaluate technologies for all phases of remediation of VOCs in soils and groundwater at DOE arid/semiarid sites. The primary site for field demonstrations under the VOC-Arid ID program is the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to describe (1) the bases for technologies currently under evaluation in the VOC-Arid ID program; (2) the types of subsurface contamination at DOE arid/semiarid sites; and (3) the areas of potential common technology interests based on perceived technology needs at other DOE sites. This report was compiled by Pacific Northwest Laboratory in response to DOE`s Office of Technology Development`s mission to carry out an aggressive program to accelerate the development and implementation of new and existing technologies to meet a 30-year goal set by DOE in June 1989 to clean up all of its sites and to bring all sites into compliance with current and future environmental regulations. A key component of this program is the development of technologies that are better, faster, safer, and cheaper than those technologies currently available. Included in this report are an evaluation of technologies currently (fiscal year 1993) being pursued at the Hanford Site under the auspices of the VOC-Arid ID program, an assessment of subsurface contaminants at arid/semiarid sites, a summarization of technologies under consideration at other DOE sites, a discussion of areas of potential common technology interests, and the conclusions. Also included are a summary of the extent of contamination at the DOE arid/semiarid sites under consideration and a bibliography of source documents from which this report was prepared.

  5. Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study - Lessons for the Transportation Energy Futures Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Path Transportation Futures Study -- Lessons for the Transportation Energy Futures Study Steven Plotkin, Argonne National Laboratory LDV Workshop, July 26, 2010 What have we learned that might be useful to TEF?  Do LOTS of sensitivity analysis - in this time frame, uncertainties about fuel price, technology costs, consumer behavior are very large, and effect of changed assumptions on outcomes can be huge  Focus on marginal costs and performance -- Advanced technologies may look good

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1: Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, T.; Wiser, R.; Sandor, D.; Brinkman, G.; Heath, G.; Denholm, P.; Hostick, D.J.; Darghouth, N.; Schlosser, A.; Strzepek, K.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  8. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, T.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, T.

    2012-11-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  10. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, T.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  11. Keck Futures Initiative

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Complex Systems Conference, November 12 - 15, 2008 Challa Kumar(second from left) was invited to attend 1st National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Complex Systems Conference

  12. Energy for the Future

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    energy for the future Energy for the Future Harnessing the energy of the sun and stars to meet the Earth's energy needs has been a scientific and engineering challenge for decades. ...

  13. Planning for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Lesh, Pamela

    2009-06-15

    Four changes to integrated resource planning could significantly improve alignment between future utility spending and the forces and changes that are upending past preconceptions of how to predict future load. (author)

  14. Create a Sustainable Future

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Create a Sustainable Future Image of river edge with text overlay of 'How does LANL accomplish future stewardship of the natural and historical resources?' We sample to detect any...

  15. ITP Mining: The Future Begins with Mining - A Vision of the Mining Industry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of the Future | Department of Energy The Future Begins with Mining - A Vision of the Mining Industry of the Future ITP Mining: The Future Begins with Mining - A Vision of the Mining Industry of the Future vision.pdf (128.04 KB) More Documents & Publications ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry (December 2002) ITP Mining: Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap

  16. Create a Sustainable Future

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Create a Sustainable Future Image of river edge with text overlay of 'How does LANL accomplish future stewardship of the natural and historical resources?' We sample to detect any release of materials to the environment. We manage environmental concerns by eco region. We evaluate our impact on the environment. We consult with experts and stakeholders. We fund projects that reduce environmental effects. Create a Sustainable Future Home Planning for Years to Come Living a Sustainable Future

  17. Fuels and Lubricants to Support Advanced Diesel Engine Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    New Diesel Feedstocks and Future Fuels Future Engine Fluids Technologies: Durable, Fuel-Efficient, and Emissions-Friendly New Feedstocks and Replacement Fuel Diesel Engine ...

  18. Energy structures and environmental futures

    SciTech Connect

    Haugland, T.; Bergesen, H.O.; Roland, K.

    1998-11-01

    Energy is not only a basis for modern society, but also a product of it. This book is a study of the close and ever-changing relationship between the energy sector and the society that surrounds it. At the end of the twentieth century this relationship faces two fundamental challenges: First, the national confinement of modern energy systems is undermined by technological progress, making long-distance trade increasingly attractive, and by the broad trend towards economic internationalization in general and political integration in Europe in particular. Second, the risk of climate change may lead governments and publics to demand a profound restructuring of the entire energy sector. The purpose is to analyze how these two fundamental challenges, and the connection between them, can affect future energy developments in Europe. The analysis must be rooted in a firm understanding of the past. The first part of the book is therefore devoted to a systematic description and analysis of the energy sector in Europe as it has developed over the past twenty-five years, by major subsectors and with examples from the most important countries. Part 1 discusses trends and policies related to energy demand, energy sector developments in oil, coal, natural gas, and electricity, achievements and challenges in the environment, and the role of international policy bodies. Part 2 forecasts future developments in 1995--2020, by discussing the following: Paths for future developments; National rebound scenario; Liberalization and trade; Liberalization versus national rebound; and Environmental futures.

  19. Mining Industry of the Future Vision: The Future Begins with Mining

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1998-09-01

    The Mining Industry of the Future was started in June 1998 when the Chairman of the National Mining Association and the Secretary of Energy entered into a Compact to pursue a collaborative technology research partnership. After the Compact signing, the mining industry developed its vision document, The Future Begins with Mining, A Vision of the Mining Industry of the Future, in September 1998. This vision document lists long-term goals for the mining industry. Stemming from this vision document, targeted technology roadmaps were developed that describe pathways of research to achieve the vision goals.

  20. Energy Department Charting New Future for Wastewater Treatment | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Charting New Future for Wastewater Treatment Energy Department Charting New Future for Wastewater Treatment March 22, 2016 - 12:45pm Addthis Energy Department Charting New Future for Wastewater Treatment Dr. Valerie Sarisky-Reed Dr. Valerie Sarisky-Reed Deputy Director, Bioenergy Technologies Office What are the key facts? In an effort to modernize transporting and treating wastewater, the Energy Department is working to advance technologies for energy and water systems. The

  1. On the future of BNL user facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to portray the emerging technology of high-power high-brightness electron beams. This new technology will impact several fields of science and it is essential that BNL stay abreast of the development. BNL has a relative advantage and vital interest in pursuing this technology that will impact its two major facilities, the NSLS and RHIC. We have a sensible development path towards this critical future technology, in which BNL will gradually acquire a strong basis of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) technology while executing useful projects. The technology of high-power AND high-brightness (HPHB) electron beams is based of the convergence of two extant, but relatively recent technologies: Photoinjectors and superconducting energy-recovering linacs. The HPHB technology presents special opportunities for the development of future BNL user facilities for High-Energy and Nuclear Science (HE-NP) and Basic Energy Science (BES). In HE-NP this technology makes it possible to build high-energy electron cooling for RHIC in the short range and a unique linac-based electron-ion collider (eRHIC). In BES, we can build short pulse, coherent FIR sources and high flux femtosecond hard x-ray sources based on Compton scattering in the short range and, in the longer range, femtosecond, ultra-high brightness synchrotron light sources and, ultimately, an X-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL).

  2. ITPACK project: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, D.R.; Hayes, L.J.; Young, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    A status report is given on past, present, and future work in the development of research-oriented software packages. The authors` current and future work involves the following areas of research and associated software development: (1) Parallel Iterative Software Using Kernels; (2) Visual Programming; (3) Research on Iterative Algorithms; (4) Objective-oriented Design. The overall objective of this research is to advance iterative methods software technology.

  3. LED Essentials - Technology, Applications, Advantages, Disadvantages |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Essentials - Technology, Applications, Advantages, Disadvantages LED Essentials - Technology, Applications, Advantages, Disadvantages On October 11, 2007, Kevin Dowling, VP of Innovation for Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, presented a broad introduction to LED technology, and discussed the technology status, advantages and disadvantages, current applications, future potential, and evolving path of LED technology from indicator lights to general illumination. View

  4. Energy Department Invests Over $7 Million to Commercialize Cost-Effective Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Energy Department today announced more than $7 million for projects that will help bring cost-effective, advanced hydrogen and fuel cell technologies online faster.

  5. Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    PDF icon arrasummaryfactsheetweb.pdf More Documents & Publications Algae Biofuels Technology Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014 ...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Publishes 2015 Annual Merit Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Vehicle Technologies Office Publishes 2015 Annual Merit Review Report Vehicle Technologies Office Publishes 2015 ... into consideration by DOE in generating future work plans. ...

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Executive Summary

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures) provides an analysis of the grid integration opportunities, challenges, and implications of high levels of renewable electricity generation for the U.S. electric system. The study is not a market or policy assessment. Rather, RE Futures examines renewable energy resources and many technical issues related to the operability of the U.S. electricity grid, and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. RE Futures results indicate that a future U.S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and that further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway.

  8. Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures) provides an analysis of the grid integration opportunities, challenges, and implications of high levels of renewable electricity generation for the U.S. electric system. The study is not a market or policy assessment. Rather, RE Futures examines renewable energy resources and many technical issues related to the operability of the U.S. electricity grid, and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. RE Futures results indicate that a future U.S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and that further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway.

  9. Nuclear and Particle Futures

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear and Particle Futures Nuclear and Particle Futures The Lab's four Science Pillars harness our scientific capabilities for national security solutions. Contacts Pillar Champion John Sarrao Email Nuclear and Particle Futures (NPF) Overview Los Alamos is the premier laboratory in the United States for "all-things nuclear," with capabilities that are grounded in its LANSCE and DARHT facilities, its leadership in critical assembly work (now in Nevada), and extensive capabilities in

  10. Oil-futures markets

    SciTech Connect

    Prast, W.G.; Lax, H.L.

    1983-01-01

    This book on oil futures trading takes a look at a market and its various hedging strategies. Growing interest in trading of commodity futures has spread to petroleum, including crude oil, and key refined products such as gasoline and heating oil. This book describes how the international petroleum trade is structured, examines the working of oil futures markets in the United States and the United Kingdom, and assesses the possible courses of further developments.

  11. Past, Present, and Future Challenges in Electrocatalysis for Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Webinar | Department of Energy Past, Present, and Future Challenges in Electrocatalysis for Fuel Cells Webinar Past, Present, and Future Challenges in Electrocatalysis for Fuel Cells Webinar Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Past, Present, and Future Challenges in Electrocatalysis for Fuel Cells" held on October 13, 2016. Past, Present, and Future Challenges in Electrocatalysis for Fuel Cells Webinar Slides

  12. Saft Factory of the Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Saft Factory of the Future Saft Factory of the Future 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting arravt007_es_conner_2012_p.pdf (11.41 MB) More Documents & Publications Construction of a Li Ion Battery (LIB) Cathode Production Plant in Elyria, Ohio Saft Factory of the Future Saft Factory of the Future

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office: Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    To support DOE's goal to provide clean and secure energy, the Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) invests in research and development that:

  14. Finishing in the Future

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Schedule (pdf) sponsor logos The Sequencing, Finishing and Analysis in the Future meeting is sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Department of Energy...

  15. Future City Competition

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Future City Competition The New Mexico Regional Competition is an unique opportunity for middle school children to combine skills in engineering, environmental science, and art to...

  16. My Amazing Future 2012

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Idaho National Laboratory's My Amazing Future program gives 8th grade women the opportunity to experience careers in science and engineering.

  17. My Amazing Future 2012

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory's My Amazing Future program gives 8th grade women the opportunity to experience careers in science and engineering.

  18. Active stewardship: sustainable future

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Active stewardship: sustainable future Energy sustainability is a daunting task: How do we ... Energy sustainability is a daunting task: How do we develop top-notch innovations with ...

  19. Energy for our Future

    Energy Saver

    ... gallons of diesel per year "Stronger Together for the Next 100 Years" Looking into The Future... (Traditional Athabascan Solar Array?) "Stronger Together for the Next 100 Years"

  20. Transportation Energy Futures Snapshot

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This snapshot is a summary of the EERE reports that provide a detailed analysis of opportunities and challenges along the path to a more sustainable transportation energy future.

  1. Coal: Energy for the future

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This report was prepared in response to a request by the US Department of energy (DOE). The principal objectives of the study were to assess the current DOE coal program vis-a-vis the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), and to recommend the emphasis and priorities that DOE should consider in updating its strategic plan for coal. A strategic plan for research, development, demonstration, and commercialization (RDD and C) activities for coal should be based on assumptions regarding the future supply and price of competing energy sources, the demand for products manufactured from these sources, technological opportunities, and the need to control the environmental impact of waste streams. These factors change with time. Accordingly, the committee generated strategic planning scenarios for three time periods: near-term, 1995--2005; mid-term, 2006--2020; and, long-term, 2021--2040. The report is divided into the following chapters: executive summary; introduction and scope of the study; overview of US DOE programs and planning; trends and issues for future coal use; the strategic planning framework; coal preparation, coal liquid mixtures, and coal bed methane recovery; clean fuels and specialty products from coal; electric power generation; technology demonstration and commercialization; advanced research programs; conclusions and recommendations; appendices; and glossary. 174 refs.

  2. Oakland Operations Office, Oakland, California: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    DOE`s Office of Technology Development manages an aggressive national program for applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation. This program develops high, payoff technologies to clean up the inventory of DOE nuclear component manufacturing sites and to manage DOE-generated waste faster, safer, and cheaper than current environmental cleanup technologies. OTD programs are designed to make new, innovative, and more effective technologies available for transfer to users through progressive development. Projects are demonstrated, tested, and evaluated to produce solutions to current problems. Transition of technologies into more advanced stages of development is based upon technological, regulatory, economic, and institutional criteria. New technologies are made available for use in eliminating radioactive, hazardous, and other wastes in compliance with regulatory mandates. The primary goal is to protect human health and prevent further contamination. OTD technologies address three specific problem areas: (1) groundwater and soils cleanup; (2) waste retrieval and processing; and (3) pollution prevention.

  3. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a webinar given by the California Energy Commission.

  4. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M.; Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in an Union of Concerned Scientists webinar on June 12, 2012.

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a Power Systems Engineering Research Center webinar on September 4, 2012.

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

  8. The Hanford Story: Future

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Future Chapter of the Hanford Story illustrates the potential and possibilities offered by a post-cleanup Hanford. From land use plans and preservation at Hanford to economic development and tourism opportunities, the Future chapter touches on a variety of local economic, cultural and environmental perspectives.

  9. Energy Department Announces $66 Million for Transformational Energy Technologies

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    33 Technologies in 18 States Will Help Secure America’s Energy Future in Advanced Manufacturing and Natural Gas

  10. An electric vehicle vision of the future

    SciTech Connect

    Sperling, D.

    1995-12-01

    We are at the cusp of a technological revolution in automotive technology. The opportunity for creating a more diverse, efficient, and environmentally benign transportation system is before us. Electric drive options are especially attractive. Vehicles powered by batteries, fuel cells, or some combination of these are quite, produce much less pollution and greenhouse gases than internal combustion engines, and require little or no petroleum. I will address vehicle technology futures in terms of new government initiatives and current regulatory activities in California and Washington DC. I will put these initiatives and opportunities in a political and economic framework.

  11. HVDC transmission: a path to the future?

    SciTech Connect

    Teichler, Stephen L.; Levitine, Ilia

    2010-05-15

    Direct current transmission has been the poor stepchild of the U.S. electric industry. Although early-generation plants were based on DC technology, it was soon deemed uneconomical to transmit electricity over long distances, but it now appears poised for a change. Both the increasing technical potential and changing economics of HVDC lines promise a growing role in the future. (author)

  12. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    DeMeo, E.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

  13. Technology reviews: Shading systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends. Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

  14. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat and Power- A Decade of Progress, A Vision for the Future

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Overview of CHP, DOE's CHP program, accomplishments, progress, technology R&D, marketplace transformation, partnerships, strategies, future goals

  15. Innovative Bioenergy Process Recognized for Excellence in Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Transfer | Department of Energy Innovative Bioenergy Process Recognized for Excellence in Technology Transfer Innovative Bioenergy Process Recognized for Excellence in Technology Transfer February 24, 2015 - 10:57am Addthis The Energy Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) recently won a 2015 Excellence in Technology Transfer Award for developing an innovative process that uses heat and pressure to convert whole algae into biocrude oil in just minutes-much faster than

  16. Transportation Energy Futures Study

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum consumption and 33% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) study examines underexplored oil-savings and...

  17. Future Physics | Jefferson Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Physics March 5, 2009 In late January, we held a meeting of our Physics Advisory Committee, PAC34 to be precise. We had two primary goals for the PAC, one related to the ...

  18. ARM - Future Trends

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Trends Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Future Trends Since fossil fuel burning is tied in with industrialization, what is going to happen as third world countries become more industrialized? It seems inevitable this will increase carbon dioxide emissions to our

  19. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented to the 2012 Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners, during their June, 2012, meeting. The Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners is a regional association within the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).

  20. Future City Competition

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Future City Competition The New Mexico Regional Competition is an unique opportunity for middle school children to combine skills in engineering, environmental science, and art to create a vision for the future. Exercising your imagination and sharing your ideas are not only fun but essential for ensuring sustainable growth for our communities. Students work as a team with an educator and engineer mentor to plan cities using SimCity(tm) software: research and write solutions to an engineering

  1. Vehicle Technologies Program Educational Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-13

    Description of educational activities including: EcoCAR2: Plugging In to the Future, EcoCAR: The NeXt Challenge, Green Racing, Automotive X Prize, Graduate Technology Automotive Education (GATE), and Hydrogen Education.

  2. Future land use plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

  3. Annual Technology Baseline

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is conducting a study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy DOE, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), that aims to document and implement an annual process designed to identify a realistic and timely set of input assumptions (e.g., technology cost and performance, fuel costs), and a diverse set of potential futures (standard scenarios), initially for electric sector analysis. This primary product of the Annual Technology Baseline (ATB) project component includes detailed cost and performance data (both current and projected) for both renewable and conventional technologies. This data is presented in MS Excel.

  4. The future of infrastructure security :

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Pablo; Turnley, Jessica Glicken; Parrott, Lori K.

    2013-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop on the future of infrastructure security on February 27-28, 2013, in Albuquerque, NM. The 17 participants came from backgrounds as diverse as federal policy, the insurance industry, infrastructure management, and technology development. The purpose of the workshop was to surface key issues, identify directions forward, and lay groundwork for cross-sectoral and cross-disciplinary collaborations. The workshop addressed issues such as the problem space (what is included in infrastructure problems?), the general types of threats to infrastructure (such as acute or chronic, system-inherent or exogenously imposed) and definitions of secure and resilient infrastructures. The workshop concluded with a consideration of stakeholders and players in the infrastructure world, and identification of specific activities that could be undertaken by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other players.

  5. The Future is bright for Y-12 ? and diverse

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    the history of the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology and the Manufac- turing Skills Campus concludes, it seems good to take a glance into Y-12"s potential future in...

  6. FutureGen Industrial Alliance Announces Carbon Storage Site Selection...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    at FutureGen 2.0, a landmark project that will advance the deployment of carbon capture and storage technology at an Ameren Energy Resources power plant in Meredosia, Illinois. ...

  7. ITP Glass: A Clear Vision for a Bright Future

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document presents perspectives on the glass industry's past, present and future, with special attention to competitive challenges now facing the industry and technological responses that will reinforce its continuing contribution...

  8. Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean Energy Future (Brochure)...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean Energy Future (Brochure), SunShot, Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean ...

  9. Technology transfer 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

  10. Alumina Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2002-02-01

    The Alumina Technology Roadmap outlines a comprehensive long-term research and development plan that defines the industry's collective future and establishes a clear pathway forward. It emphasizes twelve high-priority R&D areas deemed most significant in addressing the strategic goals.

  11. A comparison of three cap-and-trade market designs and incentives for new technologies to reduce Greenhouse gases

    SciTech Connect

    Van Horn, Andrew; Remedios, Edward

    2008-03-15

    A source-based market design is preferable for its simplicity, lower costs, faster implementation, more accurate tracking and verification, and greater incentives for the adoption of lower-emitting technologies. (author)

  12. Charting the Future of Energy Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    the Future of Energy Storage Charting the Future of Energy Storage August 7, 2013 - 2:53pm Addthis Watch the video above to learn how Urban Electric Power is creating a market for energy storage technology. | Video by Matty Greene, Energy Department. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? As we continue to incorporate more renewable energy into the grid, energy storage technologies will be key to providing a

  13. Building a Greener, More Resilient Future in Washington State | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Building a Greener, More Resilient Future in Washington State Building a Greener, More Resilient Future in Washington State July 18, 2014 - 1:45pm Addthis Washington State Governor Jay Inslee, UniEnergy Technologies CEO Dr. Z. Gary Yang, and Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman (left to right) at the July 8 event in Mukilteo, Washington. Photo courtesy of Office of Washington State Governor Jay Inslee Washington State Governor Jay Inslee, UniEnergy Technologies CEO Dr. Z. Gary

  14. Toward an energy surety future.

    SciTech Connect

    Tatro, Marjorie L.; Jones, Scott A.; Covan, John Morgan; Kuswa, Glenn W.; Menicucci, David F.; Robinett, Rush D. III

    2005-10-01

    Because of the inevitable depletion of fossil fuels and the corresponding release of carbon to the environment, the global energy future is complex. Some of the consequences may be politically and economically disruptive, and expensive to remedy. For the next several centuries, fuel requirements will increase with population, land use, and ecosystem degradation. Current or projected levels of aggregated energy resource use will not sustain civilization as we know it beyond a few more generations. At the same time, issues of energy security, reliability, sustainability, recoverability, and safety need attention. We supply a top-down, qualitative model--the surety model--to balance expenditures of limited resources to assure success while at the same time avoiding catastrophic failure. Looking at U.S. energy challenges from a surety perspective offers new insights on possible strategies for developing solutions to challenges. The energy surety model with its focus on the attributes of security and sustainability could be extrapolated into a global energy system using a more comprehensive energy surety model than that used here. In fact, the success of the energy surety strategy ultimately requires a more global perspective. We use a 200 year time frame for sustainability because extending farther into the future would almost certainly miss the advent and perfection of new technologies or changing needs of society.

  15. Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study. Results from Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Phil Patterson, Phil; Singh, Margaret; Plotkin, Steve; Moore, Jim

    2007-03-09

    Presentation reporting Phase 1 results, 3/9/2007. Projecting the future role of advanced drivetrains and fuels in the light vehicle market is inherently difficult, given the uncertainty (and likely volatility) of future oil prices, inadequate understanding of likely consumer response to new technologies, the relative infancy of several important new technologies with inevitable future changes in their performance and costs, and the importance — and uncertainty — of future government marketplace interventions (e.g., new regulatory standards or vehicle purchase incentives). The Multi-Path Transportation Futures (MP) Study has attempted to improve our understanding of this future role by examining several scenarios of vehicle costs, fuel prices, government subsidies, and other key factors. These are projections, not forecasts, in that they try to answer a series of “what if” questions without assigning probabilities to most of the basic assumptions.

  16. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

  17. Science for a sustainable future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    Sustainable development holds the promise for a more prosperous and enduring future for all mankind. The scientific enterprise of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) research programs promises to develop new technology, as well as to help society better understand the earth, more efficiently use natural resources, and enhance the quality of life. DOE science programs are focused on basic and applied research that provides the foundation for technical and economic advancement. By forming partnerships among universities, national laboratories, and industries across the nation; advanced instrumentation is being developed to better understand the world in which we live-from the atomic to the global scale. These technologies allow us to monitor our resources, to continue to develop our industrial processes, to eliminate hazardous waste, and to avoid or minimize the production of toxic substances. In this way, research is ultimately directed to preserve our environment and to provide the basis for sustained economic growth. To make further advances, investment must continue in national research programs, forging partnerships and bringing the skills and knowledge required in the global marketplace of products and ideas.

  18. The house of the future

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Learn what it will take to create tomorrow's net-zero energy home as scientists reveal the secrets of cool roofs, smart windows, and computer-driven energy control systems. The net-zero energy home: Scientists are working to make tomorrow's homes more than just energy efficient -- they want them to be zero energy. Iain Walker, a scientist in the Lab's Energy Performance of Buildings Group, will discuss what it takes to develop net-zero energy houses that generate as much energy as they use through highly aggressive energy efficiency and on-site renewable energy generation. Talking back to the grid: Imagine programming your house to use less energy if the electricity grid is full or price are high. Mary Ann Piette, deputy director of Berkeley Lab's building technology department and director of the Lab's Demand Response Research Center, will discuss how new technologies are enabling buildings to listen to the grid and automatically change their thermostat settings or lighting loads, among other demands, in response to fluctuating electricity prices. The networked (and energy efficient) house: In the future, your home's lights, climate control devices, computers, windows, and appliances could be controlled via a sophisticated digital network. If it's plugged in, it'll be connected. Bruce Nordman, an energy scientist in Berkeley Lab's Energy End-Use Forecasting group, will discuss how he and other scientists are working to ensure these networks help homeowners save energy.

  19. Accelerating Materials Development for a Clean Energy Future | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Materials Development for a Clean Energy Future Accelerating Materials Development for a Clean Energy Future February 24, 2016 - 2:30pm Addthis Accelerating Materials Development for a Clean Energy Future Reuben Sarkar Reuben Sarkar Deputy Assistant Secretary for Transportation Megan Brewster Senior Policy Advisor for Advanced Manufacturing at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Lloyd Whitman Assistant Director for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials at the

  20. Webinar October 13: Past, Present, and Future Challenges in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Electrocatalysis for Fuel Cells | Department of Energy October 13: Past, Present, and Future Challenges in Electrocatalysis for Fuel Cells Webinar October 13: Past, Present, and Future Challenges in Electrocatalysis for Fuel Cells September 29, 2016 - 12:43pm Addthis The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar entitled "Past, Present, and Future Challenges in Electrocatalysis for Fuel Cells" on Thursday, October 13, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT).

  1. The Future of Geothermal Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The Future of Geothermal Energy The Future of Geothermal Energy The Future of Geothermal Energy report is an evaluation of geothermal energy as a major supplier of energy in the United States. An 18-member assessment panel with broad experience and expertise was formed to conduct the study beginning in September 2005. The work evaluated three major areas of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS): Magnitude and distribution of the EGS resource Status and remaining requirements of EGS technology needed

  2. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Water Power for a Clean Energy Future Water Power for a Clean Energy Future This document describes some of the accomplishments of the Department of Energy Water Power Program, and how those accomplishments are supporting the advancement of renewable energy generated using hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Accomplishments Report: Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (9.59 MB) More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Senate Committee on

  3. Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities

    Publication and Product Library

    Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry, Government Policy and Future Opportunities. Fuel cells (FCs)are considered essential future energy technologies by developed and developing economies alike. Several

  4. Portsmouth Future Use

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Economic development professionals in the area are working to evaluate the site’s assets and determine the future industries that would be suitable at Portsmouth Site. These efforts will also provide DOE with necessary information about the community’s specific end state needs, which will be critical in making decisions regarding the D&D project.

  5. FutureGen Industrial Alliance Announces Carbon Storage Site Selection Process for FutureGen 2.0

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The FutureGen Industrial Alliance today announced details of a process that will lead to the selection of an Illinois site for the storage of carbon dioxide collected at FutureGen 2.0, a landmark project that will advance the deployment of carbon capture and storage technology at an Ameren Energy Resources power plant in Meredosia, Illinois.

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Mai, Trieu; Hand, Maureen; Baldwin, Sam F.; Wiser , Ryan; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, Paul; Arent, Doug; Porro, Gian; Sandor, Debra; Hostick, Donna J.; Milligan, Michael; DeMeo, Ed; Bazilian, Morgan

    2014-04-14

    This paper highlights the key results from the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study. It is a detailed consideration of renewable electricity in the United States. The paper focuses on technical issues related to the operability of the U. S. electricity grid and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. The results indicate that the future U. S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and the further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway. The central conclusion of the analysis is that renewable electricity generation from technologies that are commercially available today, in combination with a more flexible electric system, is more than adequate to supply 80% of the total U. S. electricity generation in 2050 while meeting electricity demand on an hourly basis in every region of the United States.

  7. Water for future Mars astronauts?

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Water for future Mars astronauts? Water for future Mars astronauts? Within its first three months on Mars, NASA's Curiosity Rover saw a surprising diversity of soils and sediments ...

  8. Future directions of accelerator-based NP and HEP facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, T.

    2011-07-24

    Progress in particle and nuclear physics has been closely connected to the progress in accelerator technologies - a connection that is highly beneficial to both fields. This paper presents a review of the present and future facilities and accelerator technologies that will push the frontiers of high-energy particle interactions and high intensity secondary particle beams.

  9. Energy Technologies

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions Energy Technologies Area (ETA) Building Technology & Urban Systems Energy Analysis & Environmental...

  10. MMCR Upgrades: Present Status and Future Plans

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    MMCR Upgrades: Present Status and Future Plans K. B. Widener and A. S. Koontz Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington K. P. Moran and K. A. Clark National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado C. Chander STC xxxxxxxxx M. A. Miller and K. L. Johnson Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Abstract In September 2003, the Southern Great Plains (SGP) millimeter wave cloud radar (MMCR) was upgraded to a new digital

  11. Harnessing the Power of the Future

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Harnessing the Power of the Future SunShot Workshop March 25, 2010 2 Proprietary & Confidential Key Factors Influencing Decision to Manufacture in US * Scale of Production Line * Location * Government Incentives * Financing: Equity and Debt * Corporate Partners 3 Proprietary & Confidential Scale of Production Line * Different technologies have different sweet spots * Equipment throughput considerations * Capex ($/W) considerations * Manufacturing Cost ($/W) * Solexant sweet spot is 100MW

  12. State of the Art and Future Developments In Natural Gas Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    State of the Art and Future Developments In Natural Gas Engine Technologies 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Cummins Westport Inc. PDF icon deer2003dunn.pdf More Documents & ...

  13. High Field Magnets for a Future High Energy Proton-proton Collider...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    brief review of current progress, the talk will describe the key issues facing future development and present a roadmap for moving high field accelerator magnet technology forward...

  14. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z. |

    1996-12-31

    A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

  15. Students are our future

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Personal message Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Students are our future A personal message from Nan Sauer, Associate Director for Chemistry, Life and Earth Sciences, Los Alamos National Laboratory June 1, 2015 Nan Sauer, Associate Director for Chemistry, Life and Earth Sciences Nan Sauer, Associate Director for Chemistry, Life and Earth Sciences Contacts Community

  16. Steganography: Past, Present, Future

    SciTech Connect

    Judge, J C

    2001-12-01

    Steganography (a rough Greek translation of the term Steganography is secret writing) has been used in various forms for 2500 years. It has found use in variously in military, diplomatic, personal and intellectual property applications. Briefly stated, steganography is the term applied to any number of processes that will hide a message within an object, where the hidden message will not be apparent to an observer. This paper will explore steganography from its earliest instances through potential future application.

  17. RHIC progress and future

    SciTech Connect

    Montag,C.

    2009-05-04

    The talk reviews RHIC performance, including unprecedented manipulations of polarized beams and recent low energy operations. Achievements and limiting factors of RHIC operation are discussed, such as intrabeam scattering, electron cloud, beam-beam effects, magnet vibrations, and the efficiency of novel countermeasures such as bunched beam stochastic cooling, beam scrubbing and chamber coatings. Future upgrade plans and the pertinent R&D program will also be presented.

  18. Growing America's Energy Future

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    emerging U.S. bioenergy industry provides a secure and growing supply of transportation fuels, biopower, and bioproducts produced from a range of abundant, renewable biomass resources. Bioenergy can help ensure a secure, sustainable, and economically sound future by reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil, developing domestic clean energy sources, and generating domestic green jobs. Bioenergy can also help address growing concerns about climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions to

  19. Growing the Future Bioeconomy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    the Future Bioeconomy JOEL VELASCO July 2014 2 Copyright © 2012 Amyris, Inc. All rights reserved. This presentation and oral statements accompanying this presentation contain forward-looking statements, and any statements other than statements of historical facts could be deemed to be forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements include, among other things, sizes of markets that may be addressed by Amyris's current and potential products, Amyris's expected product pipeline,

  20. Technology Transfer Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Technology Transfer Overview Technology Transfer Overview Through strategic investments in science and technology, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) helps power and secure America's future. DOE's capabilities, and the innovations it supports, help ensure the country's role as a leader in science and technology. In particular, technology transfer supports the maturation and deployment of DOE discoveries, providing ongoing economic, security and environmental benefits for all Americans.

  1. Exploration Technologies - Technology Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Amanda I.; Thorsteinsson, Hildigunnur; Reinhardt, Tim; Solomon, Samantha; James, Mallory

    2011-06-01

    This assessment is a critical component of ongoing technology roadmapping efforts, and will be used to guide the Geothermal Technology Program's research and development.

  2. High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies The Energy Department released the High Impact Technology Catalyst: ...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Education & Workforce Development Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology ...

  4. NREL: Technology Transfer - Technology Partnership Agreements

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ombuds. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Agreements for Commercializing Technology CRADAs Work for...

  5. NREL: Technology Transfer - Technologies Available for Licensing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ombuds. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Technologies Available for Licensing...

  6. Historical impacts and future trends in industrial cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Bluestein, J.; Lihn, M.

    1999-07-01

    Cogeneration, also known as combined heat and power (CHP), is the combined sequential generation of electricity and thermal or electric energy. The technology has been known essentially since the first commercial generation of electricity as a high efficiency technology option. After a period of decline, its use increased significantly during the 1980s and it is receiving renewed interest lately as a means of increasing efficiency and reducing emissions of air pollutants including carbon emissions. New and developing technology options have added to this potential. Forecasts of future growth and efforts to stimulate cogeneration need to take into account the history of the technology, the factors that have driven it in the past, and factors which could stimulate or retard future growth. This paper reviews and analyzes these factors and looks toward the future potential for cogeneration.

  7. Stirling technology development status

    SciTech Connect

    Dochat, G.R. ); Dudenhoefer, J.E. )

    1993-01-15

    Free-piston Stirling power converters have the potential to meet the many future space power requirements for a wide variety of applications with less mass, better efficiency, and less total area (collector and radiator) than other power converter options. These benefits result in significant dollar savings over the projected mission lifetime. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)---Lewis Research Center (LeRC), which has the responsibility to evaluate and develop power technologies that can satisfy anticipated future space mission power requirements, has been developing free-piston Stirling power converters and is bringing the Stirling technology to readiness. As the principal contractor to NASA-LeRC, Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) is under contract to develop the necessary space Stirling technology but also demonstrate the readiness of the technology in two generations of full-scale power converters. The first generation Stirling power converter, the component test power converter (CTPC), initiated cold end testing at the end of 1991, with hot testing scheduled during 1992. This paper reviews test progress of the CTPC including the initial hot engine test results. Modifications incorporated into the CTPC from the earlier space power demonstrator engine are reviewed as well.

  8. Energy and technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Stowers, I.F.; Crawford, R.B.; Esser, M.A.; Lien, P.L.; O'Neal, E.; Van Dyke, P.

    1982-07-01

    The state of the laboratory address by LLNL Director Roger Batzel is summarized, and a breakdown of the laboratory funding is given. The Livermore defense-related committment is described, including the design and development of advanced nuclear weapons as well as research in inertial confinement fusion, nonnuclear ordnance, and particle beam technology. LLNL is also applying its scientific and engineering resources to the dual challenge of meeting future energy needs without degrading the quality of the biosphere. Some representative examples are given of the supporting groups vital for providing the specialized expertise and new technologies required by the laboratory's major research programs. (GHT)

  9. The Future is Here - Smart Home Technology | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Better Buildings Network View | December 2014 Think Again A Fresh Look at Home Performance Business Models and Service Offerings (301) Einstein and Energy Efficiency: Making Homes ...

  10. Recapitalizing EMSL: Meeting Future Science and Technology Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.

    2008-07-01

    EMSL, located in Richland, Washington, is a national scientific user facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The vision that directed the development of EMSL as a problem-solving environment for environmental molecular science has led to significant scientific progress in many areas ranging from subsurface science to atmospheric sciences, and from biochemistry to catalysis. Our scientific staff and users are recognized nationally and internationally for their significant contributions to solving challenging scientific problems. We have explored new scientific frontiers and organized a vibrant and diverse user community in support of our mission as a national scientific user facility that provides integrated experimental and computational resources in the environmental molecular sciences. Users from around the world - from academia to industry and national laboratories to international research organizations - use the resources of EMSL because of the quality of science that we enable.

  11. Los Alamos to study future computing technology capabilities

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    "The highest return we can expect on any investment this early in the evolution of a game-changing idea such as quantum annealing computing is to facilitate exploration by a cadre ...

  12. Microsoft Word - Science and Technology of Future Light Sources...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... We could use the knowledge for modeling the influence of anthropogenic aerosols on climate and health and for effective rain making and hail prevention through cloud seeding. ...

  13. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: The Future of Absorption Technology...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    1 Ferdinand Carr Several factors have influenced absorption chiller sales since then. Natural gas prices, as well as, fuel availability concerns and governmental policies...

  14. Future Engine Fluids Technologies: Durable, Fuel-Efficient, and...

    Energy Saver

    Market Introducution in Europe Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and Exhaust Conditions on Diesel Particulate Filter Service Life and Vehicle Fuel ...

  15. Technology Innovation and Future Research Needs in Net Shape Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dong-Yol

    2005-08-05

    The rapid change in customer needs and industrial environment has demanded innovations in the manufacturing sector. Metal forming industries have been confronted with new challenges of innovations in products, processes, machines, materials and production systems. From the viewpoints of competitiveness of products, new paradigms are required for innovation in manufacturing, especially in net shape manufacturing. Product innovations are increasingly put under emphasis beyond manufacturing innovations based on the holistic concurrent engineering approach. The presentation covers not only the innovation methodologies, but also the innovation directions in net shape manufacturing.

  16. SRF Technology - Past, Present and Future Options (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ratio (RRR) greater than 250. The procedures and processes used from the initial ... required, and explore the processes and procedures that will lay the foundation for ...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office - Materials Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Vehicle Technologies Office Materials Technologies Ed Owens Jerry Gibbs Will Joost eere.energy.gov 2 | Vehicle Technologies Program Materials Technologies Materials Technologies $36.9 M Lightweight Materials $28.0 M Values are FY14 enacted Propulsion Materials $8.9 M Properties and Manufacturing Multi-Material Enabling Modeling & Computational Mat. Sci. Engine Materials, Cast Al & Fe High Temp Alloys Exhaust Sys. Materials, Low T Catalysts Lightweight Propulsion FY13 Enacted $27.5 M

  18. Future Communications Needs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Future Communications Needs Future Communications Needs Chart of Oncor Electric Delivery's Future Communications Needs PDF icon Future Communications Needs More Documents & ...

  19. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  20. NYMEX Futures Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    NYMEX Futures Prices (Crude Oil in Dollars per Barrel, All Others in Dollars per Gallon) Period: Daily Weekly Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Product/ Contract 11/07/16 11/08/16 11/09/16 11/10/16 11/14/16 11/15/16 View History Crude Oil (Light-Sweet, Cushing, Oklahoma) Contract 1 44.89 44.98 45.27 44.66 43.32 45.81 1983-2016 Contract 2 45.47 45.61 45.94 45.36 43.94 46.39 1985-2016 Contract 3 46.10

  1. Intermediate future forecasting system

    SciTech Connect

    Gass, S.I.; Murphy, F.H.; Shaw, S.H.

    1983-12-01

    The purposes of the Symposium on the Department of Energy's Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS) were: (1) to present to the energy community details of DOE's new energy market model IFFS; and (2) to have an open forum in which IFFS and its major elements could be reviewed and critiqued by external experts. DOE speakers discussed the total system, its software design, and the modeling aspects of oil and gas supply, refineries, electric utilities, coal, and the energy economy. Invited experts critiqued each of these topics and offered suggestions for modifications and improvement. This volume documents the proceedings (papers and discussion) of the Symposium. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each presentation for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  2. Angola: a great future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The companies represented in Angola and their concessions by area are tabulated, including offshore leases. The government of this only recently independent country puts great emphasis on petroleum development and welcomes foreign companies. The major portion of the production comes from the fields in the Cabinda area. In the future, the reserves in the Congo basin will become more important. Exploration activity is intense and concentrated on the near offshore area of the country. The gas reserves are still not entirely known; present production serves only the needs of petroleum production, including a gas injection project in the Cabinda area and the production of LPG. A map of the offshore concession blocks also is shown.

  3. Available Technologies

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    application. Search Our Technologies submit Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Biotechnology Biotechnology Chemistry Chemistry Energy Energy High Performance Computing:...

  4. Technology Opportunities

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Intellectual Property » Technology Opportunities Technology Opportunities We deliver innovation through an integrated portfolio of R&D work across our key national security sponsoring agencies, enhanced by the ideas developed through our strategic internal investments. Contact Business Development Team Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 665-9090 Email Periodically, the Laboratory notifies the public of technologies and capabilities that may be of interest. These technologies may

  5. Licensing Technology

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Licensing Technology Licensing Technology The primary function of Los Alamos Licensing Program is to move Los Alamos technology to the marketplace for the benefit of the U.S. economy. Our intellectual property may be licensed for commercial use, research applications, and U.S. government use. Contact thumbnail of Marcus Lucero Head of Licensing Marcus Lucero Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 665-6569 Email Although Los Alamos's primary mission is national security, our technologies

  6. Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    - FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY - DRAFT 1 Advanced Composites Materials and their Manufacture 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ................................................................................................ 2 4 2. Technology Potential and Assessment .................................................................................................. 4 5 2.1 The Potential for Advanced Composites for Clean Energy Application Areas

  7. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/16: The Potential of Technology for the Control of Small Weapons: Applications in Developing Countries

    SciTech Connect

    ALTMANN, JURGEN

    2000-07-01

    For improving the control of small arms, technology provides many possibilities. Present and future technical means are described in several areas. With the help of sensors deployed on the ground or on board aircraft, larger areas can be monitored. Using tags, seals, and locks, important objects and installations can be safeguarded better. With modern data processing and communication systems, more information can be available, and it can be more speedily processed. Together with navigation and transport equipment, action can be taken faster and at greater range. Particular considerations are presented for cargo control at roads, seaports, and airports, for monitoring designated lines, and for the control of legal arms. By starting at a modest level, costs can be kept low, which would aid developing countries. From the menu of technologies available, systems need to be designed for the intended application and with an understanding of the local conditions. It is recommended that states start with short-term steps, such as acquiring more and better radio transceivers, vehicles, small aircraft, and personal computers. For the medium term, states should begin with experiments and field testing of technologies such as tags, sensors, and digital communication equipment.

  8. Future Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Future Use Future Use Facility or infrastructure reuse could avoid costs associated with demolition and disposal. Facility or infrastructure reuse could avoid costs associated with demolition and disposal. PPPO works with GDP communities as they identify their future use vision. PPPO works with GDP communities as they identify their future use vision. Facility or infrastructure reuse could avoid costs associated with demolition and disposal. PPPO works with GDP communities as they identify their

  9. Nuclear Proliferation Technology Trends Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Talbert, Robert J.

    2005-10-04

    A process is underway to develop mature, integrated methodologies to address nonproliferation issues. A variety of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) are being considered. All have one thing in common, a need for a consistent set of proliferation related data that can be used as a basis for application. One approach to providing a basis for predicting and evaluating future proliferation events is to understand past proliferation events, that is, the different paths that have actually been taken to acquire or attempt to acquire special nuclear material. In order to provide this information, this report describing previous material acquisition activities (obtained from open source material) has been prepared. This report describes how, based on an evaluation of historical trends in nuclear technology development, conclusions can be reached concerning: (1) The length of time it takes to acquire a technology; (2) The length of time it takes for production of special nuclear material to begin; and (3) The type of approaches taken for acquiring the technology. In addition to examining time constants, the report is intended to provide information that could be used to support the use of the different non-proliferation analysis methodologies. Accordingly, each section includes: (1) Technology description; (2) Technology origin; (3) Basic theory; (4) Important components/materials; (5) Technology development; (6) Technological difficulties involved in use; (7) Changes/improvements in technology; (8) Countries that have used/attempted to use the technology; (9) Technology Information; (10) Acquisition approaches; (11) Time constants for technology development; and (12) Required Concurrent Technologies.

  10. Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Future Collaboration | Department of Energy Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration December 31, 2013 - 12:14pm Addthis GIF Policy Group Meeting in Brussels, Belgium, November 2013 GIF Policy Group Meeting in Brussels, Belgium, November 2013 Dr. John E. Kelly Dr. John E. Kelly Chief Technology Officer The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) held its 36th Policy Group (PG)

  11. Information technology resources assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Loken, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    The emphasis in Information Technology (IT) development has shifted from technology management to information management, and the tools of information management are increasingly at the disposal of end-users, people who deal with information. Moreover, the interactive capabilities of technologies such as hypertext, scientific visualization, virtual reality, video conferencing, and even database management systems have placed in the hands of users a significant amount of discretion over how these resources will be used. The emergence of high-performance networks, as well as network operating systems, improved interoperability, and platform independence of applications will eliminate technical barriers to the use of data, increase the power and range of resources that can be used cooperatively, and open up a wealth of possibilities for new applications. The very scope of these prospects for the immediate future is a problem for the IT planner or administrator. Technology procurement and implementation, integration of new technologies into the existing infrastructure, cost recovery and usage of networks and networked resources, training issues, and security concerns such as data protection and access to experiments are just some of the issues that need to be considered in the emerging IT environment. As managers we must use technology to improve competitiveness. When procuring new systems, we must take advantage of scalable resources. New resources such as distributed file systems can improve access to and efficiency of existing operating systems. In addition, we must assess opportunities to improve information worker productivity and information management through tedmologies such as distributed computational visualization and teleseminar applications.

  12. Development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technologies Workshops |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technologies Workshops Development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technologies Workshops The following documents are from a series of four workshops held in 2007 that were intended to motivate facilitated discussion on technology gaps related to reservoir management and operations. The first presentation evaluated the assumptions set forth in the report by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) titled The Future of

  13. "Witchgrass" Switchgrass: A Feedstock for Future Flights | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy "Witchgrass" Switchgrass: A Feedstock for Future Flights "Witchgrass" Switchgrass: A Feedstock for Future Flights October 27, 2016 - 9:57am Addthis “Witchgrass” Switchgrass: A Feedstock for Future Flights Dr. Valerie Sarisky-Reed Dr. Valerie Sarisky-Reed Deputy Director, Bioenergy Technologies Office Alicia Moulton Communications Specialist, Bioenergy Technologies Office "Witchgrass" switchgrass facts: Switchgrass is one of many "energy

  14. Global Energy Futures Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2004-01-01

    The Global Energy Futures Model (GEFM) is a demand-based, gross domestic product (GDP)-driven, dynamic simulation tool that provides an integrated framework to model key aspects of energy, nuclear-materials storage and disposition, environmental effluents from fossil and non fossil energy and global nuclear-materials management. Based entirely on public source data, it links oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear and renewable energy dynamically to greenhouse-gas emissions and 13 other measures of environmental impact. It includes historical data frommore » 1990 to 2000, is benchmarked to the DOE/EIA/IEO 2002 [5] Reference Case for 2000 to 2020, and extrapolates energy demand through the year 2050. The GEFM is globally integrated, and breaks out five regions of the world: United States of America (USA), the Peoples Republic of China (China), the former Soviet Union (FSU), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations excluding the USA (other industrialized countries), and the rest of the world (ROW) (essentially the developing world). The GEFM allows the user to examine a very wide range of what ir scenarios through 2050 and to view the potential effects across widely dispersed, but interrelated areas. The authors believe that this high-level learning tool will help to stimulate public policy debate on energy, environment, economic and national security issues.« less

  15. Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future October 19, 2011 - 5:46pm Addthis David Sandalow David Sandalow Former Under Secretary of Energy (Acting) and Assistant Secretary for Policy & International Affairs Why does it matter? Four clean energy technologies-wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting-use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the next five years. Earlier this month, United States, Japanese

  16. DOE Announces Plans for Future Loan Guarantee Solicitations | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Plans for Future Loan Guarantee Solicitations DOE Announces Plans for Future Loan Guarantee Solicitations April 11, 2008 - 10:50am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced plans to issue loan guarantee solicitations in two stages this summer for up to $38.5 billion for projects that employ advanced technologies that avoid, reduce or sequester emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases. This will mark the second and third rounds of

  17. Building Our Energy Future: Teaching Students the Significance of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Efficiency | Department of Energy Our Energy Future: Teaching Students the Significance of Energy Efficiency Building Our Energy Future: Teaching Students the Significance of Energy Efficiency April 2, 2015 - 4:39pm Addthis Students at St. Agnus Catholic School in Arlington, Va., measure weatherstripping to place around doors and windows Students at St. Agnus Catholic School in Arlington, Va., measure weatherstripping to place around doors and windows Holly Ravesloot Lead Energy Technology

  18. Renaissance in Flow-Cell Technologies: Recent Advancements and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Advancements and Future Opportunities Presentation by Mike Perry, United Technologies Research Center, at the Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop held March 7-8, 2012, in ...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Publishes 2014 Annual Merit Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Publishes 2014 Annual Merit Review Report Vehicle Technologies Office Publishes 2014 Annual ... consideration by DOE in generating future ... The 2015 AMR is scheduled for June 8-12. ...

  20. NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL to Play Pivotal Role in White...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    White House Initiative to Bolster America's Manufacturing Future A photo of a large scale wind turbine with foothills in the background. Experts at the National Wind Technology...

  1. Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs Strategic Plan

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    This is the strategic plan for the Building Technology Program in 1998. This describes trends in the BTP program and projects goals for the future.

  2. Oregon Institute of Technology Recognized for Increasing its...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    3.5 Megawatts of Clean Electricity Generation ... technology and its commitment to a clean energy future ... By 2010, the small binary unit was producing power for the ...

  3. Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program BATT Program- Summary and Future Plans Overview and Progress of the Batteries for Advanced ...

  4. Technology '90

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have a long history of excellence in performing research and development in a number of areas, including the basic sciences, applied-energy technology, and weapons-related technology. Although technology transfer has always been an element of DOE and laboratory activities, it has received increasing emphasis in recent years as US industrial competitiveness has eroded and efforts have increased to better utilize the research and development resources the laboratories provide. This document, Technology '90, is the latest in a series that is intended to communicate some of the many opportunities available for US industry and universities to work with the DOE and its laboratories in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. Technology '90 is divided into three sections: Overview, Technologies, and Laboratories. The Overview section describes the activities and accomplishments of the DOE research and development program offices. The Technologies section provides descriptions of new technologies developed at the DOE laboratories. The Laboratories section presents information on the missions, programs, and facilities of each laboratory, along with a name and telephone number of a technology transfer contact for additional information. Separate papers were prepared for appropriate sections of this report.

  5. Perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.; Schaffhauser, A.

    1994-04-01

    This report offers perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry. These perspectives will be used in further research to assess the prospects for Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). The perspectives are developed first by examining economic, political and regulatory, societal, technological, and environmental trends that are (1) national and global in scope and (2) directly related to the electric utility industry. Major national and global trends include increasing global economic competition, increasing political and ethnic strife, rapidly changing technologies, and increasing worldwide concern about the environment. Major trends in the utility industry include increasing competition in generation; changing patterns of electricity demand; increasing use of information technology to control power systems; and increasing implementation of environmental controls. Ways in which the national and global trends may directly affect the utility industry are also explored. The trends are used to construct three global and national scenarios- ``business as usual,`` ``technotopia future,`` and ``fortress state`` -and three electric utility scenarios- ``frozen in headlights,`` ``megaelectric,`` and ``discomania.`` The scenarios are designed to be thought provoking descriptions of potential futures, not predictions of the future, although three key variables are identified that will have significant impacts on which future evolves-global climate change, utility technologies, and competition. While emphasis needs to be placed on understanding the electric utility scenarios, the interactions between the two sets of scenarios is also of interest.

  6. The future of energy gases

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, D.G.

    1995-04-01

    Natural gas, mainly methane, produces lower CO {sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x}, SO {sub 2} and particulate emissions than either oil or coal; thus further substitutions of methane for these fuels could help mitigate air pollution. Methane is, however, a potent greenhouse gas and the domestication of ruminants, cultivation of rice, mining of coal, drilling for oil, and transportation of natural gas have all contributed to a doubling of the amount of atmospheric methane since 1800. Today nearly 300,000 wells yearly produce each 21 trillion cubic feet of methane. Known reserves suggest about a 10 year supply at the above rates of recovery; and the potential for undiscovered resources is obscured by uncertainty involving price, new technologies, and environmental restrictions stemming from the need to drill an enormous number of wells, many in ecologically sensitive areas. The atomic simplicity of methane, composed of one carbon and four hydrogen atoms, may mask the complexity of this, the most basic of organic molecules. Within the Earth, methane is produced through thermochemical alteration of organic materials, and by biochemical reactions mediated by metabolic processes of archaebacteria; some methane may even be primordial, a residue of planetary accretion. Methane is known to exist in the mantle and lower crust. Near the Earth`s surface, methane occurs in enormous oil and/or gas reservoirs in rock, and is absorbed in coal, dissolved in water, and trapped in a latticework of ice-like material called gas hydrate. Methane also occurs in smaller volumes in landfills, rice paddies, termite complexes, ruminants, and even many humans. As an energy source, methane accounts for roughly 25 percent of current U.S. consumption, but its full energy potential is controversial. Methane is touted by some as a viable bridge to future energy systems, fueled by the sun and uranium and carried by electricity and hydrogen.

  7. Future nuclear fuel cycles: prospects and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Boullis, Bernard

    2008-07-01

    Solvent extraction has played, from the early steps, a major role in the development of nuclear fuel cycle technologies, both in the front end and back end. Today's stakes in the field of energy enhance further than before the need for a sustainable management of nuclear materials. Recycling actinides appears as a main guideline, as much for saving resources as for minimizing the final waste impact, and many options can be considered. Strengthened by the important and outstanding performance of recent PUREX processing plants, solvent-extraction processes seem a privileged route to meet the new and challenging requirements of sustainable future nuclear systems. (author)

  8. Future of heavy crude and tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.F.; Steele, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    The 106 papers which were presented at the First International Conference on the Future of Heavy Crude and Tar Sands, held in Edmonton, Alberta are incorporated in this volume. They are grouped under the following sections: (1) role of heavy crude oils and tar sands in world energy; (2) major known occurrences; (3) chemistry and geochemistry; (4) geology; (5) resource evaluation techniques; (6) production research and pilot projects; (7) current production; (8) upgrading and refining; (9) transportation; (10) environmental research; (11) economics; (12) technological problems; (13) institutional factors; and (14) bibliography. All papers have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

  9. Heavy oil upgrading for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, B.E.; Johnson, D.R.; Lasher, J.S.; Hung, C. )

    1989-01-01

    The Chevron RDS Hydrotreating Process and the Gulf Resid HDS Process were pioneers in this field, beginning with the startup of the first resid desulfurization unit in 1969. The merger of Chevron Corporation with Gulf Oil Corporation resulted in a versatile new RDS Hydrotreating technology which utilizes the best features of the original Chevron and Gulf processes. Continuing improvements in the catalyst and in process configuration have greatly increased the capability of combined Chevron RDS hydrotreating to provide deeper demetalation (HDM), denitrification (HDN), Ramscarbon removal (HDR), desulfurization (HDAS), and greater cracking conversion (HCR) while processing more difficult feedstocks. future. The process is detailed by the authors.

  10. The future of energy and climate

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The talk will review some of the basic facts about the history and present status of the use of energy and its climatic consequences. It is clear that the world will have to change its way of energy production, the sooner the better. Because of the difficulty of storing electric energy, by far the best energy source for the future is thermal solar from the deserts, with overnight thermal storage. I will give some description of the present status of the technologies involved and end up with a pilot project for Europe and North Africa.

  11. Brainstorming Apps for a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Brainstorming Apps for a Clean Energy Future Brainstorming Apps for a Clean Energy Future July 20, 2012 - 1:03pm Addthis Notes from the July 9th Energy Data Jam in New York City | Credit: Openei.org Notes from the July 9th Energy Data Jam in New York City | Credit: Openei.org Nick Sinai U.S. Deputy Chief Technology Officer, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Ian Kalin Director of the Energy Data Initiative How can I participate? You can contribute ideas for new products,

  12. Emerging Technologies Program Overview — 2016 BTO Peer Review

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation at the 2016 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office’s Emerging Technologies Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs.

  13. Natural Gas Vehicle Webinar: Technology, Best Strategies, and Lessons Learned

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Clean Cities program webinar elaborates first on successful past technology choices and then suggests future technological pathways that can be taken for the United States to expand its use of...

  14. Independent Assessment of Technology Characterizations to Support the Biomass Program Annual State-of-Technology Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, B.

    2011-03-01

    This report discusses an investigation that addressed two thermochemical conversion pathways for the production of liquid fuels and addressed the steps to the process, the technology providers, a method for determining the state of technology and a tool to continuously assess the state of technology. This report summarizes the findings of the investigation as well as recommendations for improvements for future studies.

  15. Future Steelmaking Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. R. J. Fruehan

    2004-09-20

    There is an increasing demand for an ironmaking process with lower capital cost, energy consumption and emissions than a blast furnace. It is the hypothesis of the present work that an optimized combination of two reasonable proven technologies will greatly enhance the overall process. An example is a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) linked to a smelter (e.g., AISI, HIsmelt). The objective of this research is to select promising process combinations, develop energy, materials balance and productivity models for the individual processes, conduct a limited amount of basic research on the processes and evaluate the process combinations. Three process combinations were selected with input from the industrial partners. The energy-materials and productivity models for the RHF, smelter, submerged arc furnace and CIRCOFER were developed. Since utilization of volatiles in coal is critical for energy and CO{sub 2} emission reduction, basic research on this topic was also conducted. The process models developed are a major product developed in this research. These models can be used for process evaluation by the industry. The process combinations of an RHF-Smelter and a simplified CIRCOFER-Smelter appear to be promising. Energy consumption is reduced and productivity increased. Work on this project is continuing using funds from other sources.

  16. NREL: Technology Transfer - Agreements for Commercializing Technology

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    303-384-7353. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Agreements for Commercializing Technology CRADAs Work for...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2015 Electric Drive Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electric Drive Technologies Annual R&D Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2015 Electric Drive Technologies Annual R&D Progress Report The Electric Drive Technologies ...

  18. Huazhong Science Technology University Yongtai Science Technology...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Huazhong Science Technology University Yongtai Science Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Huazhong Science & Technology University Yongtai Science & Technology Co...

  19. Technology Transfer

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    technology transfer Technology Transfer Since 1974, the Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer has recognized scientists and engineers at federal government and research centers for their "uncommon creativity and initiative in conveying innovations from their facilities to industry and local government." Scientists and engineers from more than 650 federal government laboratories and research centers compete for the 30 awards presented each year.

  20. Technology Partnering

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Transfer and Related Technology Partnering Activities at the National Laboratories and Other Facilities Fiscal Years 2009-2013 Report to Congress May 2015 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Message from the Secretary The Report on Technology Transfer and Related Partnering Activities at the National Laboratories and Other Facilities for Fiscal Year 2009-2013 is prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Technology Transfer and Commercialization Act of 2000: It is

  1. Technology Opportunities

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    by the U.S. Department of Energy and Office of Science - ... feedstock-to-fuel conversion, coproduct production, ... Patents Software Tools Technology Opportunities Penta Charts

  2. Technology Validation

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  3. TECHNOLOGY FORUM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    TECHNOLOGY FORUM The 2014 SunShot Grand Challenge Summit and Peer Review is hosting a Technology Forum showcasing innovative and cutting-edge technologies that are helping to drive down the cost of solar energy. The Forum features a wide range of solar industry exhibitors showcasing software and hardware products and solutions, as well as nearly 300 SunShot awardees displaying their work and answering questions about their projects. TECHNOLOGY FORUM HOURS * May 19 from 4:00-7:00 PM * May 20

  4. Webinar: Past, Present, and Future Challenges in Electrocatalysis for Fuel

    Energy Saver

    Cells | Department of Energy Webinar: Past, Present, and Future Challenges in Electrocatalysis for Fuel Cells Webinar: Past, Present, and Future Challenges in Electrocatalysis for Fuel Cells October 13, 2016 12:00PM to 1:00PM EDT The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a webinar entitled "Past, Present, and Future Challenges in Electrocatalysis for Fuel Cells" on Thursday, October 13, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT). Addressing the need for active and durable,

  5. Building Technologies Office Overview- 2014 Peer Review

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Roland Risser, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs.

  6. Artificial Lift Technology | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Centers to develop technology for the future. You Might Also Like IMG0475 Innovation 247: We're Always Open a40-v-electric-submersible-pump Electric Submersible...

  7. An evaluation of enhanced geothermal systems technology

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    A review of the assumptions and conclusions of the DOE-sponsored 2006 MIT study on "The Future of Geothermal Energy" and an evaluation of relevant technology from the commercial geothermal industry.

  8. Inspiring and Challenging the Nation's Future Leaders in Science and

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Inspiring and Challenging the Nation's Future Leaders in Science and Technology News News Home Featured Articles 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.02.15 Inspiring and

  9. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO AMERICA'S FUTURE.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    AMERICA'S FUTURE. regulators consumer advocates environmental groups policymakers ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS A smarter grid requires the participation of those who can deliver technology solutions to assist utilities and engage consumers. technology providers utilities 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof,

  10. Mobil lube dewaxing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C.L.; McGuiness, M.P.

    1995-09-01

    Currently, the lube refining industry is in a period of transition, with both hydroprocessing and catalytic dewaxing gathering momentum as replacements for solvent extraction and solvent dewaxing. In addition, lube product quality requirements have been increasing, both in the US and abroad. Mobil has developed a broad array of dewaxing catalytic technologies which can serve refiners throughout the stages of this transition. In the future, lube feedstocks which vary in source and wax content will become increasingly important, requiring an optimized system for highest performance. The Mobil Lube Dewaxing (MLDW) process is the work-horse of the catalytic dewaxing technologies, being a robust, low cost technology suitable for both solvent extracted and hydrocracked feeds. The Mobil Selective Dewaxing (MSDW) process has been recently introduced in response to the growth of hydroprocessing. MSDW requires either severely hydrotreated or hydrocracked feeds and provides improved lube yields and VI. For refiners with hydrocrackers and solvent dewaxing units, Mobil Wax Isomerization (MWI) technology can make higher VI base stocks to meet the growing demand for very high quality lube products. A review of these three technologies is presented in this paper.

  11. ITP Mining: Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap emroadmap.pdf (237.6 KB) More Documents & Publications ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry Roadmap for Crosscutting Technologies ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry (December 2002)

  12. Building Technologies Office 2015 Highlights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2015 Highlights Building Technologies Office 2015 Highlights View a summary of select 2015 accomplishments from DOE's Building Technologies Office. Building Technologies Office 2015 Highlights (3.51 MB) More Documents & Publications The Future of Air Conditioning for Buildings Report Research & Development Roadmap: Next-Generation Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Building Technologies Office Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review

  13. The Future of Atomic Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Arrives for Five Clean Energy Technologies - 2016 Update September 2016 Revolution...Now Contributors i Acknowledgments Primary Author U.S. Department of Energy Paul Donohoo-Vallett, DOE Offce of Energy Effciency & Renewable Energy Contributing Authors U.S. Department of Energy Patrick Gilman, DOE Wind Energy Technologies Offce David Feldman, National Renewable Energy Laboratory James Brodrick, DOE Building Technologies Offce David Gohlke, DOE Vehicle Technologies Offce Roland Gravel, DOE

  14. Saft Factory of the Future

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  15. Saft Factory of the Future

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  16. 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    3 Wind Technologies Market Report 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report This report describes the status of the U.S. wind energy industry in 2013; its trends, performance, market drivers and future outlook. A thumbnail of the 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report Cover 2013 Wind Technologies Market Report.pdf (2.5 MB) More Documents & Publications 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report 2015 Wind Technologies Market Report 2012

  17. Status and Future of TRANSCOM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Program status g Upcoming Changes Glimpse at future options Versatility Signal relay S t d t Smart-mode system DOE Commitments 14 632010 8 Flexible...

  18. Future City The Right Stuff

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... to conserve U.S. fiscal resources * Effective - Produce superb results by becoming the ... Generation Z (those born between 1995 and 2014) is the latest generation. These future ...

  19. New Mexico Future City Competition

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Future City Competition is focused on tackling challenges of our infrastructure and natural resources. New Mexico's ecosystem and climate are unique. Growing the next generation of ...

  20. Future missions require improving LANSCE

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Future missions require improving LANSCE capabilities to support five principal research ... Science Critical to DOE and NNSA Missions for Over 35 Years Hydrodynamics with Proton ...

  1. The Future of Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Haimei

    2015-05-06

    Berkeley Lab scientist Haimei Zheng discusses the future of electron microscopy and her breakthrough research into examining liquids using an electron microscope.

  2. Thermally activated technologies: Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this Technology Roadmap is to outline a set of actions for government and industry to develop thermally activated technologies for converting America’s wasted heat resources into a reservoir of pollution-free energy for electric power, heating, cooling, refrigeration, and humidity control. Fuel flexibility is important. The actions also cover thermally activated technologies that use fossil fuels, biomass, and ultimately hydrogen, along with waste heat.

  3. NREL: Technology Deployment - Technology Acceleration

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Acceleration NREL offers technology-specific assistance to federal and private industry to help address market barriers to sustainable energy technologies. Learn more about NREL's work in the following areas: Biopower and Waste-to-Energy Biopower and Waste-to-Energy Buildings Buildings Fuels, Vehicles, & Transportation Fuels, Vehicles, and Transportation Microgrid Design Microgrid Design Solar Solar Wind Wind Contact Us For more information on NREL's market transformation work,

  4. Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Roll to Roll (R2R) Processing 1 Technology Assessment 2 3 Contents 4 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ............................................................................................... 2 5 1.1. Introduction to R2R Processing..................................................................................................... 2 6 1.2. R2R Processing Mechanisms ......................................................................................................... 3 7 2.

  5. Program Pu Futures 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M

    2006-06-12

    The coordination chemistry of plutonium remains relatively unexplored. Thus, the fundamental coordination chemistry of plutonium is being studied using simple multi-dentate ligands with the intention that the information gleaned from these studies may be used in the future to develop plutonium-specific sequestering agents. Towards this goal, hard Lewis-base donors are used as model ligands. Maltol, an inexpensive natural product used in the commercial food industry, is an ideal ligand because it is an all-oxygen bidentate donor, has a rigid structure, and is of small enough size to impose little steric strain, allowing the coordination preferences of plutonium to be the deciding geometric factor. Additionally, maltol is the synthetic precursor of 3,4-HOPO, a siderophore-inspired bidentate moiety tested by us previously as a possible sequestering agent for plutonium under acidic conditions. As comparisons to the plutonium structure, Ce(IV) complexes of the same and related ligands were examined as well. Cerium(IV) complexes serve as good models for plutonium(IV) structures because Ce(IV) has the same ionic radius as Pu(IV) (0.94 {angstrom}). Plutonium(IV) maltol crystals were grown out of a methanol/water solution by slow evaporation to afford red crystals that were evaluated at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using single crystal X-ray diffraction. Cerium(IV) complexes with maltol and bromomaltol were crystallized via slow evaporation of the mother liquor to afford tetragonal, black crystals. All three complexes crystallize in space group I4{sub 1}/a. The Ce(IV) complex is isostructural with the Pu(IV) complex, in which donating oxygens adopt a trigonal dodecahedral geometry around the metal with the maltol rings parallel to the crystallographic S{sub 4} axis and lying in a non-crystallographic mirror plane of D{sub 2d} molecular symmetry (Fig 1). The metal-oxygen bonds in both maltol complexes are equal to within 0.04 {angstrom

  6. Fact Sheet: Clean Coal Technology Ushers In New Era in Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Clean Coal Technology Ushers In New Era in Energy Fact Sheet: Clean Coal Technology Ushers In New Era in Energy A fact sheet on Clean Coal technology of the future. Fact Sheet: ...

  7. Technology Commercialization Showcase 2008 Vehicle Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Patrick B.

    2009-06-19

    Presentation illustrating various technology commercialization opportunities and unexploited investment gaps for the Vehicle Technologies Program.

  8. GDF Future Energies | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Future Energies Jump to: navigation, search Name: GDF Future Energies Place: France Product: Clean energy subsidiary of Gaz de France. References: GDF Future Energies1 This...

  9. How ARPA-e is "Winning the Future"

    ScienceCinema

    Obama, Barack; Chu, Steven; Majumdar, Arun;

    2013-05-29

    The Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) is answering the President's call to "Win the Future". By directly funding some of the most groundbreaking discoveries in science and technology, we're encouraging the development of the most advanced clean tech innovations out there today.

  10. Direct Current Episode 5: The Future of Cool

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this episode of Direct Current, we're taking you to the future of cooling, where new technologies like magnet-based air conditioning and personalized robots will transform how we fight climate change, save on energy costs and stay comfortable.

  11. How ARPA-e is "Winning the Future"

    SciTech Connect

    Obama, Barack; Chu, Steven; Majumdar, Arun

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) is answering the President's call to "Win the Future". By directly funding some of the most groundbreaking discoveries in science and technology, we're encouraging the development of the most advanced clean tech innovations out there today.

  12. Presentation: Task Force Report on the Future of Nuclear Power

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board received a presentation on the report by the SEAB Task Force on the Future of Nuclear Power. The presentation was given by Dr. John Deutch, SEAB Chairman and Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology , on September 22, 2016.

  13. Tag: technology

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Tags

    technology<...

  14. Technology Validation

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    To reduce solar technology risks, DOE and its partners evaluate the performance and reliability of novel photovoltaic (PV) hardware and systems through laboratory and field testing. The focus of...

  15. Making a Difference: Quadrennial Technology Review 2015

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2015 Quadrennial Technology Review is the Energy Department's strategic document, evaluating progress in clean and sustainable energy and efficient technologies over the past four years. It provides a benchmark and blueprint both in guiding our efforts at improving America's energy future.

  16. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems. Operations and Transmission Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, Michael; Ela, Erik; Hein, Jeff; Schneider, Thomas; Brinkman, Gregory; Denholm, Paul

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  17. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3. End-Use Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect

    Hostick, Donna; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  18. Fossil fuels in a sustainable energy future

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, T.F.

    1995-12-01

    The coal industry in the United States has become a world leader in safety, productivity, and environmental protection in the mining of coal. The {open_quotes}pick-and-shovel{close_quotes} miner with mangled limbs and black lung disease has been replaced by the highly skilled technicians that lead the world in tons per man-hour. The gob piles, polluted streams, and scared land are a thing of the past. The complementary efforts of the DOE and EPRI-funded programs in coal utilization R&D and the Clean Coal Technology Program commercial demonstrations, have positioned the power generation industry to utilize coal in a way that doesn`t pollute the air or water, keeps electrical power costs low, and avoids the mountains of waste material. This paper reviews the potential for advanced coal utilization technologies in new power generation applications as well as the repowering of existing plants to increase their output, raise their efficiency, and reduce pollution. It demonstrates the potential for these advanced coal-fueled plants to play a complementary role in future planning with the natural gas and oil fired units currently favored in the market place. The status of the US program to demonstrate these technologies at commercial scale is reviewed in some detail.

  19. NREL: Technology Deployment - Solar Deployment and Market Transformation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Deployment and Market Transformation NREL enables faster, easier, and less expensive solar installations by applying our expertise and knowledge to projects that addresses challenges, inefficiencies, and market barriers to solar technology deployment. Northeast Denver Housing Center Solarize Grassroots Movement Drives Down Solar Prices 30% in Portland, Oregon Solarize Northeast Denver Housing Center NREL Identifies PV for 28 Affordable Housing Units Our technical experts work with

  20. CRC handbook of NASA future missions and payloads

    SciTech Connect

    Hord, M.

    1986-01-01

    The author presents a detailed and quantitative description of all of the programs, systems, sensors and experiments associated with the next 30 years of space endeavors by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Derived from the fifth issue of the NASA Space Systems Technology Model, the missions and payloads are categorized by applications area: solar system exploration, astrophysics, earth sciences, communications, space transportation and utilization of the space environment. Far-term missions are described as opportunity missions and landmark missions, for the distant future. Technology requirements are collected by discipline: power, propulsion, materials, structures, information systems, navigation, guidance and control. Payload technology requirements are organized by instrument sensing range. This information defines in quantitative terms, the opportunities and limits for future civilian space system capabilities.

  1. Saft Factory of the Future

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  2. Powertrain Trends and Future Potential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Gasoline and clean diesel engines have the potential to reduce CO2 further as technology for both types of engines continues to evolve

  3. SMU Geothermal Conference 2011 - Geothermal Technologies Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    eere.energy.gov Timothy Reinhardt Geothermal Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy timothy.reinhardt@ee.doe.gov Geothermal Technologies Program 2011 SMU Geothermal Conference Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov * Program's past * Present status of ARRA projects * Program's near future Presentation Outline Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov The Geothermal Technologies Program annual budget peaked

  4. Water Power Technologies Office | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Water Power Technologies Office Water Power Technologies Office Direct Current: From Water to Wattage Podcast Direct Current: From Water to Wattage Podcast Hydropower is America's oldest and largest source of clean, renewable energy. But can it grow to meet our changing needs? Follow our hosts on a journey from hydropower's origins to the new wave of technologies that could shape its future. Read more Amped Up for Water Amped Up for Water The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office At-A-Glance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    OFFICE VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE FY 2017 BUDGET AT-A-GLANCE Transportation accounts for two-thirds of U.S. petroleum use, and on-road vehicles are responsible for nearly 85% of this amount. U.S. dependence on petroleum affects the national economy and potential for future growth-making it a high-value opportunity for change. The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) develops and overcomes barriers to the widespread use of advanced highway transportation technologies that reduce petroleum

  6. Powertrain Trends and Future Potential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Powertrain Trends and Future Potential * Global Trends - Fighting Global Warming * Clean Diesel - Neglected in the U.S. for Too Long Agenda DSNE-NA | August 4, 2009 | Robert ...

  7. The future of nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cugnon, J.

    2005-06-14

    Various aspects of the World energy problem indicate that nuclear energy will still be needed in the future. Conditions for a continued valuable use are discussed. Special attention is focused on the nuclear waste problem.

  8. The Future of Microbial Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrpides, Nikos [Genome Biology group at the DOE Joint Genome Institute

    2010-06-02

    Nikos Kyrpides, head of the Genome Biology group at the DOE Joint Genome Institute discusses current challenges in the field of microbial genomics on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  9. Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology R&D Relevant to DOE Power Electronics Cost Targets Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology R&D ...

  10. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Energy Efficiency Starts Here. 2 Building Technologies Office Integrated Approach: Improving ...

  11. Emerging Technologies Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Emerging Technologies Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review Emerging Technologies Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Pat Phelan, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2015 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Emerging Technologies Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. VIEW THE PRESENTATION Emerging Technologies Program Overview - 2015 BTO

  12. 2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report 2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report This report summarizes 2010 data on fuel cells, including market penetration and industry trends. It also covers cost, price, and performance trends, along with policy and market drivers and the future outlook for fuel cells. 2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report (1.61 MB) More Documents & Publications 2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report 2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report 2009 Fuel Cell Market

  13. Study of Fuel Property Effects Using Future Low Emissions Heavy Duty Truck Engine Hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Sharon

    2000-08-20

    Fuel properties have had substantial impact on engine emissions. Fuel impact varies with engine technology. An assessment of fuel impact on future low emission designs was needed as part of an EMAEPA-API study effort

  14. NREL Tests Energy-Saving Office of the Future - News Feature...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Tests Energy-Saving Office of the Future March 13, 2009 Photo of an office cubicle with ... nearly 740 staff, along with an energy efficient information technology data center. ...

  15. Manufacturing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

  16. (Environmental technology)

    SciTech Connect

    Boston, H.L.

    1990-10-12

    The traveler participated in a conference on environmental technology in Paris, sponsored by the US Embassy-Paris, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the French Environmental Ministry, and others. The traveler sat on a panel for environmental aspects of energy technology and made a presentation on the potential contributions of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to a planned French-American Environmental Technologies Institute in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Evry, France. This institute would provide opportunities for international cooperation on environmental issues and technology transfer related to environmental protection, monitoring, and restoration at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The traveler also attended the Fourth International Conference on Environmental Contamination in Barcelona. Conference topics included environmental chemistry, land disposal of wastes, treatment of toxic wastes, micropollutants, trace organics, artificial radionuclides in the environment, and the use biomonitoring and biosystems for environmental assessment. The traveler presented a paper on The Fate of Radionuclides in Sewage Sludge Applied to Land.'' Those findings corresponded well with results from studies addressing the fate of fallout radionuclides from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. There was an exchange of new information on a number of topics of interest to DOE waste management and environmental restoration needs.

  17. Plasma technology

    SciTech Connect

    Herlitz, H.G.

    1986-11-01

    This paper describes the uses of plasma technology for the thermal destruction of hazardous wastes such as PCBs, dioxins, hydrocarbons, military chemicals and biological materials; for metals recovery from steel making dusts. One advantage of the process is that destruction of wastes can be carried out on site. Systems in several countries use the excess thermal energy for district heating.

  18. Algae Education Helping Grow Jobs of the Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Algae Education Helping Grow Jobs of the Future Algae Education Helping Grow Jobs of the Future August 30, 2016 - 3:30pm Addthis The Algae Technology Education Consortium (ATEC) is developing opportunities for education and training for next-generation jobs in the algal industry. | <em>Photo courtesy of ATEC</em> The Algae Technology Education Consortium (ATEC) is developing opportunities for education and training for next-generation jobs in the algal industry. | Photo courtesy of

  19. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Wind and Water Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Program (WWPP) | Department of Energy for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP) Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP) This fact sheet provides an overview of the Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's water power research activities. 51315.pdf (662.58 KB) More Documents & Publications Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Fact Sheet 47688.pdf Before the House Science and Technology

  20. Future Home Tech: 8 Energy-Saving Solutions on the Horizon | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Future Home Tech: 8 Energy-Saving Solutions on the Horizon Future Home Tech: 8 Energy-Saving Solutions on the Horizon December 18, 2015 - 12:37pm Addthis Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency Dr. Kathleen Hogan explains how efficiency standards and advances in technology are helping consumers save energy and previews the energy-saving home technologies of tomorrow. | Video by Jeremy Kahn, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital

  1. The Future of Public Transport - In Pursuit of Zero Emissions | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy The Future of Public Transport - In Pursuit of Zero Emissions The Future of Public Transport - In Pursuit of Zero Emissions Presented at the Technology Transition Corporation and U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Webinar: Go Local: Maximizing Your Local Renewable Resources With Fuel Cells, August 16, 2011. webinaraug16_peeples.pdf (3.01 MB) More Documents & Publications Fuel Cell Transit Bus Coordination and Evaluation Plan California Fuel Cell Transit

  2. Supercomputing Our Way to a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Supercomputing Our Way to a Clean Energy Future Supercomputing Our Way to a Clean Energy Future August 6, 2012 - 2:34pm Addthis Using computer modeling technology from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), truck manufacturer Navistar is able to improve vehicle fuel efficiency and durability without the expense of wind tunnel testing. | Photo courtesy of LLNL Livermore Valley Open Campus. Using computer modeling technology from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), truck

  3. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    for a Clean Energy Future Water power is the nation's largest source of clean, domestic, renewable energy. Harnessing energy from rivers, manmade waterways, and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses can help secure America's energy future. Water power technologies fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower facilities include run-of-the-river, storage, and pumped storage. Most

  4. Future HEP Accelerators: The US Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Pushpalatha; Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-11-02

    Accelerator technology has advanced tremendously since the introduction of accelerators in the 1930s, and particle accelerators have become indispensable instruments in high energy physics (HEP) research to probe Nature at smaller and smaller distances. At present, accelerator facilities can be classified into Energy Frontier colliders that enable direct discoveries and studies of high mass scale particles and Intensity Frontier accelerators for exploration of extremely rare processes, usually at relatively low energies. The near term strategies of the global energy frontier particle physics community are centered on fully exploiting the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC), while the intensity frontier HEP research is focused on studies of neutrinos at the MW-scale beam power accelerator facilities, such as Fermilab Main Injector with the planned PIP-II SRF linac project. A number of next generation accelerator facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium- and long-term future programs of accelerator-based HEP research. In this paper, we briefly review the post-LHC energy frontier options, both for lepton and hadron colliders in various regions of the world, as well as possible future intensity frontier accelerator facilities.

  5. Back to the FutureGen?

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-04-15

    After years of political wrangling, Democrats may green-light the experimental clean coal power plants. The article relates how the project came to be curtailed, how Senator Dick Durbin managed to protect $134 million in funding for FutureGen in Mattoon, and how once Obama was in office a $2 billion line item to fund a 'near zero emissions power plant(s)' was placed in the Senate version of the Stimulus Bill. The final version of the legislation cut the funding to $1 billion for 'fossil energy research and development'. In December 2008 the FutureGen Alliance and the City of Mattoon spent $6.5 billion to purchase the plants eventual 440 acre site. A report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) said that Bush's inaction may have set back clean coal technology in the US by as much as a decade. If additional funding comes through construction of the plant could start in 2010. 1 fig., 1 photo.

  6. Advancing Research & Technology in the Sciences (ARTS) Forum | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Advancing Research & Technology in the Sciences (ARTS) Forum Advancing Research & Technology in the Sciences (ARTS) Forum January 28, 2016 - 4:11pm Addthis VE-Suite, a virtual engineering tool developed at Ames Laboratory, displayed on a six-sided virtual reality room which helps engineers build greener, next-generation power plants faster and less expensively than ever before. VE-Suite, a virtual engineering tool developed at Ames Laboratory, displayed on a six-sided

  7. The Future Potential of Waver Power in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Mirko Previsic; Jeff Epler; Maureen Hand; Donna Heimiller; Walter Short; Kelly Eurek

    2012-09-20

    The theoretical ocean wave energy resource potential exceeds 50% of the annual domestic energy demand of the United States, is located close to coastal population centers, and, although variable in nature, may be more consistent and predictable than some other renewable generation technologies. As a renewable electricity generation technology, ocean wave energy offers a low air pollutant option for diversifying the U.S. electricity generation portfolio. Furthermore, the output characteristics of these technologies may complement other renewable technologies. This study addresses the following: (1) The theoretical, technical and practical potential for electricity generation from wave energy (2) The present lifecycle cost profile (Capex, Opex, and Cost of Electricity) of wave energy conversion technology at a reference site in Northern California at different plant scales (3) Cost of electricity variations as a function of deployment site, considering technical, geo-spatial and and electric grid constraints (4) Technology cost reduction pathways (5) Cost reduction targets at which the technology will see significant deployment within US markets, explored through a series of deployment scenarios RE Vision Consulting, LLC (RE Vision), engaged in various analyses to establish current and future cost profiles for marine hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, quantified the theoretical, technical and practical resource potential, performed electricity market assessments and developed deployment scenarios. RE Vision was supported in this effort by NREL analysts, who compiled resource information, performed analysis using the ReEDSa model to develop deployment scenarios, and developed a simplified assessment of the Alaska and Hawaii electricity markets.

  8. Multi-path transportation futures study : vehicle characterization and scenario analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, S. E.; Singh, M. K.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering; ORNL

    2009-12-03

    Projecting the future role of advanced drivetrains and fuels in the light vehicle market is inherently difficult, given the uncertainty (and likely volatility) of future oil prices, inadequate understanding of likely consumer response to new technologies, the relative infancy of several important new technologies with inevitable future changes in their performance and costs, and the importance - and uncertainty - of future government marketplace interventions (e.g., new regulatory standards or vehicle purchase incentives). This Multi-Path Transportation Futures (MP) Study has attempted to improve our understanding of this future role by examining several scenarios of vehicle costs, fuel prices, government subsidies, and other key factors. These are projections, not forecasts, in that they try to answer a series of 'what if' questions without assigning probabilities to most of the basic assumptions.

  9. Smart Federal Partnerships Build Our Biofuels Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Smart Federal Partnerships Build Our Biofuels Future Smart Federal Partnerships Build Our Biofuels Future April 13, 2015 - 10:30am Addthis The Energy Department’s Bioenergy Technologies Office engages with the U.S. Department of Agriculture on many projects, including guidance on the proper removal of corn stover (non-edible corn husks, stalks, and leaves) from the field when it is used for cellulosic ethanol and other advanced biofuel production. A corn stover bale is pictured here. The

  10. The Future of Fuel and Refueling | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Future of Fuel and Refueling Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) The Future of Fuel and Refueling Anna Lis Laursen 2012.07.18 Due to the large domestic Natural Gas reserves, the interest in developing new technology to allow profitable use of NG, has increased significantly. ARPA-E has identified an

  11. LEDs: The Future of Lighting is Here | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    LEDs: The Future of Lighting is Here LEDs: The Future of Lighting is Here February 27, 2012 - 1:19pm Addthis So, what does the little indicator light on your cell phone, a street light, an exit sign, and the common household light bulb have in common? If your answer is that light emitting diode (LED) technology can power all these things, then you're pretty bright. LEDs are a form of solid state lighting. Once the new kid on the block, LEDs have emerged as one of today's most energy-efficient

  12. Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    4: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Agenda Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Agenda Tuesday, July 29, 2014 7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m. Breakfast and Registration 8:00 a.m.-8:20 a.m. Welcome and Introduction Jonathan Male, Director, Bioenergy Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy 8:20 a.m.-9:00 a.m. Morning Keynotes David Danielson, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy Byron Paez, Deputy Director for Deputy Assistant Secretary of the

  13. Precision Information Environments Envisioning the future of emergency management

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing future work environments for the emergency management community called Precision Information Environments (or PIEs). PIEs will provide tailored access to information and decision support capabilities in a system that supports the multiple user roles, contexts, and phases of emergency management, planning, and response. This video gives you a look at one vision for the future. To view an annotated version that describes each of the technology concepts you'll see as well as the end user needs that motivated them and the research challenges that must be addressed to make them a reality visit http://precisioninformation.org.

  14. COLLOQUIUM: EXTERNAL PROPULSION AND THE FUTURE OF SPACE ACCESS | Princeton

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab June 24, 2015, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: EXTERNAL PROPULSION AND THE FUTURE OF SPACE ACCESS Dr. Dmitriy Tseliakhovich Escape Dynamics, Inc. At Escape Dynamics we are working on the next generation propulsion technologies with the goal of developing electromagnetically-powered engines operating at 10x the efficiency of chemical rockets. In this talk I will describe results of Escape Dynamics' R&D efforts and outline our vision for the future

  15. Making Our Solar Future with American Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Making Our Solar Future with American Manufacturing Making Our Solar Future with American Manufacturing October 7, 2016 - 9:35am Addthis Charlie Gay Solar Energy Technologies Office Director Fast Facts Every second that ticks by, six solar cells come off U.S. manufacturing lines that produce crystalline silicon. In 10 years, the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative expects nearly three-times that amount to be racing across the lines, helping to make America a leader in high-tech solar

  16. The Future of Geothermal Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of the workshop, the first in the series, was to gain insight from the MIT analysis to start the evaluation of EGS technology pathways. Special emphasis was placed on leveraging...

  17. Chapter 4 — Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This chapter describes the current status and future outlook for power generation technologies, and identifies RDD&D directions that will contribute to a portfolio of technology options that can meet future regional demands. A combination of flexible technology options will be required to meet increasing power needs in the U.S. and globally. The QTR focuses on technological advances to meet U.S. energy needs and challenges, recognizing that these also offer opportunities for cooperative research that will expedite the international deployment of these technologies.

  18. Problems of future energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, Y.

    1981-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the key issues in the present energy system and to discuss possible future visions of the system. The first part of this paper deals with the progress in energy conservation since the oil embargo in 1973. Assuming the prospect that the petroleum supply will peak within this century and then will go down, and that the limit of energy conservation of the present energy systems will be achieved during the same period, the possible and desirable image is discussed of the future energy system. 5 refs.

  19. Water for future Mars astronauts?

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Water for future Mars astronauts? Water for future Mars astronauts? Within its first three months on Mars, NASA's Curiosity Rover saw a surprising diversity of soils and sediments along a half-kilometer route that tell a complex story about the gradual desiccation of the Red Planet. September 26, 2013 This image shows two areas on Mars in a location named Rocknest that were scooped out by the Curiosity Rover last year. Researchers took samples of the areas to determine whether they were wetter

  20. Forest Products Industry of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc

    2002-05-01

    Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc (LATA) conducted an evaluation of the potential impact and value of a portion of the current portfolio of r&d projects supported by the Office of Industrial Technology and the Forest Products Industry of the Future. The mission of the evaluation was to (a) assess the potential impact of the projects to meet the critical goals of the industry as identified in the vision and roadmapping documents. (b) Evaluate the relationship between the current portfolio of projects and the Agenda 202 Implementation Plan. In addition, evaluate the relationship between the portfolio and the newly revised draft technology strategy being created by the industry. (c) Identify areas where current efforts are making significant progress towards meeting industry goals and identify areas where additional work my be required to meet these goals. (d) Make recommendations to the DOE and the Forest Products Industry on possible improvements in the portfolio and in the current methodology that DOE uses to assess potential impacts on its R&D activities.

  1. Making a Difference: Hydropower and Our Clean Energy Future | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy a Difference: Hydropower and Our Clean Energy Future Making a Difference: Hydropower and Our Clean Energy Future November 5, 2015 - 9:52am Addthis Making a Difference: Hydropower and Our Clean Energy Future Sarah Wagoner Sarah Wagoner Communications Specialist, Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Not much beats stepping outside and taking a deep breath of fresh air. Guess what-you can thank hydropower for contributing to that! Since hydropower is fueled by water, it is a

  2. February 27, 2003: Abraham and Dobriansky announce "FutureGen" | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy 7, 2003: Abraham and Dobriansky announce "FutureGen" February 27, 2003: Abraham and Dobriansky announce "FutureGen" February 27, 2003: Abraham and Dobriansky announce "FutureGen" February 27, 2003 Secretary Abraham and Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs Paula Dobriansky announce the formation of an ambitious new international effort to advance carbon capture and storage technology as a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The Secretary

  3. ITP Mining: Water Use in Industries of the Future: Mining Industry |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Water Use in Industries of the Future: Mining Industry ITP Mining: Water Use in Industries of the Future: Mining Industry water_use_mining.pdf (158.07 KB) More Documents & Publications ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry (December 2002) U.S. Mining Industry Energy Bandwidth Study ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap

  4. Hydropower Vision: New Report Highlights Future Pathways for U.S.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydropower | Department of Energy Hydropower Vision: New Report Highlights Future Pathways for U.S. Hydropower Hydropower Vision: New Report Highlights Future Pathways for U.S. Hydropower July 26, 2016 - 3:00pm Addthis Hydropower Vision: New Report Highlights Future Pathways for U.S. Hydropower Jose Zayas Jose Zayas Wind Energy Technologies Office Director Hydropower has been around for more than a century, and is currently the nation's largest source of clean, domestic, renewable

  5. Goal Practice & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial Scale

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Biomass Energy Development in China | Department of Energy Goal Practice & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial Scale Biomass Energy Development in China Goal Practice & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial Scale Biomass Energy Development in China Breakout Session 3D-Fostering Technology Adoption III: International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy Goal Practice & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial Scale Biomass Energy Development in

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect

    Hostick, D.; Belzer, D.B.; Hadley, S.W.; Markel, T.; Marnay, C.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hein, J.; Schneider, T.; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, P.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  8. Review of nonconventional bioreactor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Turick, C.E.; Mcllwain, M.E.

    1993-09-01

    Biotechnology will significantly affect many industrial sectors in the future. Industrial sectors that will be affected include pharmaceutical, chemical, fuel, agricultural, and environmental remediation. Future research is needed to improve bioprocessing efficiency and cost-effectiveness in order to compete with traditional technologies. This report describes recent advances in bioprocess technologies and bioreactor designs and relates them to problems encountered in many industrial bioprocessing operations. The primary focus is directed towards increasing gas and vapor transfer for enhanced bioprocess kinetics as well as unproved by-product separation and removal. The advantages and disadvantages of various conceptual designs such as hollow-fiber, gas-phase, hyperbaric/hypobaric, and electrochemical bioreactors are also discussed. Specific applications that are intended for improved bioprocesses include coal desulfurization, coal liquefaction, soil bioremediation, biomass conversion to marketable chemicals, biomining, and biohydrometallurgy as well as bioprocessing of gases and vapors.

  9. Software Technology

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Software Software Technology Enabling a new era of computational and scientific capabilities by advancing high-performance computing on an exponential scale. Contacts Galen Shipman Applied Computer Science (505) 665-4021 Email Michael Lang Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences (505) 500-2993 Email James Ahrens Applied Computer Science (505) 667-5797 Email Video thumbnail image for ExaSky software 3:21 ExaSky: Next-generation dark matter cosmology simulations (demonstration) The

  10. Plant stress analysis technology deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Monitoring vegetation is an active area of laser-induced fluorescence imaging (LIFI) research. The Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU) is assisting in the transfer of the LIFI technology to the agricultural private sector through a market survey. The market survey will help identify the key eco-agricultural issues of the nations that could benefit from the use of sensor technologies developed by the Office of Science and Technology (OST). The principal region of interest is the Western Hemisphere, particularly, the rapidly growing countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. The analysis of needs will assure that the focus of present and future research will center on economically important issues facing both hemispheres. The application of the technology will be useful to the agriculture industry for airborne crop analysis as well as in the detection and characterization of contaminated sites by monitoring vegetation. LIFI airborne and close-proximity systems will be evaluated as stand-alone technologies and additions to existing sensor technologies that have been used to monitor crops in the field and in storage.

  11. Building Technologies Office Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2013-04-01

    Building Technologies Office Overview Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  12. Emerging technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shin-yee

    1993-03-01

    The mission of the Emerging Technologies thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is to help individuals establish technology areas that have national and commercial impact, and are outside the scope of the existing thrust areas. We continue to encourage innovative ideas that bring quality results to existing programs. We also take as our mission the encouragement of investment in new technology areas that are important to the economic competitiveness of this nation. In fiscal year 1992, we have focused on nine projects, summarized in this report: (1) Tire, Accident, Handling, and Roadway Safety; (2) EXTRANSYT: An Expert System for Advanced Traffic Management; (3) Odin: A High-Power, Underwater, Acoustic Transmitter for Surveillance Applications; (4) Passive Seismic Reservoir Monitoring: Signal Processing Innovations; (5) Paste Extrudable Explosive Aft Charge for Multi-Stage Munitions; (6) A Continuum Model for Reinforced Concrete at High Pressures and Strain Rates: Interim Report; (7) Benchmarking of the Criticality Evaluation Code COG; (8) Fast Algorithm for Large-Scale Consensus DNA Sequence Assembly; and (9) Using Electrical Heating to Enhance the Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds from Soil.

  13. Technology disrupted

    SciTech Connect

    Papatheodorou, Y.

    2007-02-15

    Three years ago, the author presented a report on power generation technologies which in summary said 'no technology available today has the potential of becoming transformational or disruptive in the next five to ten years'. In 2006 the company completed another strategic view research report covering the electric power, oil, gas and unconventional energy industries and manufacturing industry. This article summarises the strategic view findings and then revisits some of the scenarios presented in 2003. The cost per megawatt-hour of the alternatives is given for plants ordered in 2005 and then in 2025. The issue of greenhouse gas regulation is dealt with through carbon sequestration and carbon allowances or an equivalent carbon tax. Results reveal substantial variability through nuclear power, hydro, wind, geothermal and biomass remain competitive through every scenario. Greenhouse gas scenario analysis shows coal still be viable, albeit less competitive against nuclear and renewable technologies. A carbon tax or allowance at $24 per metric ton has the same effect on IGCC cost as a sequestration mandate. However, the latter would hurt gas plants much more than a tax or allowance. Sequestering CO{sub 2} from a gas plant is almost as costly per megawatt-hour as for coal. 5 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. NREL: Geothermal Technologies Home Page

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Geothermal Technologies Photo of a red-hot pool of molten lava within a broad lava bed and with snow-capped peaks in the distance. Geothermal energy taps the heat from beneath the earth's surface to generate electricity. Existing reservoirs of steam or hot water are brought to the surface to power electrical generators throughout the Western United States. In the future, the intense heat deep below the surface will be accessed for electricity generation by the advanced engineering of reservoirs

  15. Science and Technology Highlights | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Technology Highlights NREL researchers' accomplishments in fundamental energy science contribute to a clean energy future for the nation. Take a look at recent technical highlights and learn about the key results and impacts in NREL's energy science research involving: Solar January 2016 NREL, CSEM Jointly Set New Efficiency Record with Dual-Junction Solar Cell Scientists set a new world record for converting non-concentrated sunlight into electricity using a dual-junction III-V/Si

  16. Framing the Energy Technology Menu

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Future of Coal and Nuclear Power Ernest J. Moniz Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems Director, MIT Energy Initiative EIA April 2008 2 NAE Engineering Achievement of the Twentieth Century l Electrification l Reflects both the technological challenge of this continent- scale system and the ubiquitous contribution to quality of life 3 Annual Per Capita Electricity Use (kWh) 4 MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change H. Jacoby and R. Prinn,

  17. Framing the Energy Technology Menu

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Future of Coal and Nuclear Power Ernest J. Moniz Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems Director, MIT Energy Initiative EIA April 2008 2 NAE Engineering Achievement of the Twentieth Century l Electrification l Reflects both the technological challenge of this continent- scale system and the ubiquitous contribution to quality of life 3 Annual Per Capita Electricity Use (kWh) 4 MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change H. Jacoby and R. Prinn,

  18. Options for Kentucky's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01

    Three important imperatives are being pursued by the Commonwealth of Kentucky: ? Developing a viable economic future for the highly trained and experienced workforce and for the Paducah area that today supports, and is supported by, the operations of the US Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Currently, the PGDP is scheduled to be taken out of service in May, 2013. ? Restructuring the economic future for Kentucky’s most abundant indigenous resource and an important industry – the extraction and utilization of coal. The future of coal is being challenged by evolving and increasing requirements for its extraction and use, primarily from the perspective of environmental restrictions. Further, it is important that the economic value derived from this important resource for the Commonwealth, its people and its economy is commensurate with the risks involved. Over 70% of the extracted coal is exported from the Commonwealth and hence not used to directly expand the Commonwealth’s economy beyond the severance taxes on coal production. ? Ensuring a viable energy future for Kentucky to guarantee a continued reliable and affordable source of energy for its industries and people. Today, over 90% of Kentucky’s electricity is generated by burning coal with a delivered electric power price that is among the lowest in the United States. Anticipated increased environmental requirements necessitate looking at alternative forms of energy production, and in particular electricity generation.

  19. Vision of the Future Grid

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The GTT developed a draft vision (below) which describes a future electricity system and lists several key attributes of that system. In its current form, this vision incorporates comments made by stakeholders during meetings organized by the GTT. The vision will continue to evolve and be refined as the GTT engages with the broader stakeholder community.

  20. NREL: Energy Analysis - Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study RE Futures Scenario Viewer A screenshot of the main map on the RE Futures Scenario Viewer Explore the RE Futures scenarios at a state-level and download the data. RE Futures Visualizations These visualizations are based on RE Futures modeling and represent the transformation of the U.S. electric system to a high renewable system from 2010 to 2050 and the hourly operation and transmission flow of that system in 2050. Transformation of the Electric Sector

  1. Chapter 7: Advancing Systems and Technologies to Produce Cleaner Fuels | Unconventional Oil and Gas Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Infrastructure Offshore Safety and Spill Prevention Unconventional Oil and Gas ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 1 Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 Unconventional Oil and Gas Chapter 7: Technology Assessments Executive Summary The United States will, for the foreseeable future, continue to rely heavily upon oil and natural gas to support our economy, national security, and energy security. Given the increasing reliance on unconventional oil and gas (UOG) resources,

  2. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Light Water Reactors Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Light Water Reactors Chapter 4: Technology Assessments Past, Present, and Future of the Technology The world's first full-scale nuclear power plant (NPP) devoted exclusively to peacetime uses came online in 1957. Light water reactors (LWRs) are now a mature technology, with over 350 operational LWRs worldwide (Figure 4.M.1) and over 60 under construction (Figure 4.M.2). 1 Note that the Fukushima accident adversely affected nuclear power operations in Japan (and other countries throughout the

  3. Oil shale technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

  4. Future Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name: Future Energy Solutions Place: Didcot, United Kingdom Zip: OX11 0QR Product: Future Energy Solutions is a sustainable energy...

  5. Future Energy Assets LP | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Assets LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Future Energy Assets LP Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78701 Product: String representation "Future Energy A ... S and in China." is too...

  6. Hydrogen & Our Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Future Hydrogen & Our Energy Future DOE overview of hydrogen fuel initiative and hydrogen production, delivery and storate hydrogenenergyfutureweb.pdf More Documents &...

  7. Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status, October 29, 2010 Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status, October 29, 2010 ...

  8. Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. Authors: Brady, Patrick V....

  9. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print Wednesday, 28 January 2015 00:00 With an aging population in ...

  10. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Transportation Energy Futures ...

  11. Heavy Duty Vehicle Futures Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Askin, Amanda Christine; Barter, Garrett.; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka

    2014-05-01

    This report describes work performed for an Early Career Research and Development project. This project developed a heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) sector model to assess the factors influencing alternative fuel and efficiency technology adoption. This model builds on a Sandia light duty vehicle sector model and provides a platform for assessing potential impacts of technological advancements developed at the Combustion Research Facility. Alternative fuel and technology adoption modeling is typically developed around a small set of scenarios. This HDV sector model segments the HDV sector and parameterizes input values, such as fuel prices, efficiencies, and vehicle costs. This parameterization enables sensitivity and trade space analyses to identify the inputs that are most associated with outputs of interest, such as diesel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Thus this analysis tool enables identification of the most significant HDV sector drivers that can be used to support energy security and climate change goals.

  12. Energy efficiency in passenger transportation: What the future may hold

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, S.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation very briefly projects future impacts of energy efficiency in passenger transportation. Continuing expansion of the U.S. transportation sector, with a corresponding increased dependency on imported oil, is noted. Freight trucks and air fleets are targeted as having the greatest potential for increased energy efficiency. The light duty vehicle is identified as the only technology option for major efficiency increases. 4 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. HOW THE SMART GRID PROMOTES A GREENER FUTURE.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    HOW THE SMART GRID PROMOTES A GREENER FUTURE. regulators consumer advocates technology providers policymakers ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS A smarter electric grid can engage renewables at scale, enable the market for electric transportation and usher in a new age of sustainability. environmental groups utilities 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United

  14. WHAT A SMART GRID MEANS TO OUR NATION'S FUTURE.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    WHAT A SMART GRID MEANS TO OUR NATION'S FUTURE. regulators consumer advocates environmental groups technology providers ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS A smarter electric grid works to strengthen our nation's economy, environment, security and independence. policymakers utilities 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency

  15. Testing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This bulletin from Sandia National Laboratories presents current research highlights in testing technology. Ion microscopy offers new nondestructive testing technique that detects high resolution invisible defects. An inexpensive thin-film gauge checks detonators on centrifuge. Laser trackers ride the range and track helicopters at low-level flights that could not be detected by radar. Radiation transport software predicts electron/photon effects via cascade simulation. Acoustic research in noise abatement will lead to quieter travelling for Bay Area Rapid Transport (BART) commuters.

  16. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    404-NOV. 1, 2000 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 VerDate 11-MAY-2000 04:52 Nov 16, 2000 Jkt 089139 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 6579 Sfmt 6579 E:\PUBLAW\PUBL404.106 APPS27 PsN: PUBL404 114 STAT. 1742 PUBLIC LAW 106-404-NOV. 1, 2000 Public Law 106-404 106th Congress An Act To improve the ability of Federal agencies to license federally owned inventions. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT

  17. Technology Name

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Tech Fact Sheet Site Project & Identifier Tech Stage: Development DE-EM0000598 D&D KM-IT For the deployment of Information Technology for D&D knowledge management Page 1 of 2 Florida International University Florida D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool Challenge Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) work is a high priority across the DOE Complex. The D&D community associated with the various DOE sites has gained extensive knowledge and experience over the years. To

  18. Bioenergy Technologies Office April Monthly News Blast

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    April 2014 BETO Announces Seventh Annual Conference- Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy The U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will host its seventh annual conference, Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy, on July 29-30, 2014, in Washington, D.C. As in past years, the conference will bring together top government officials, members of Congress, industry leaders, and other experts to continue the ongoing dialogue about critical challenges and key

  19. Building Technologies Office | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Building Technologies Office The Future of Air Conditioning for Buildings Report The Future of Air Conditioning for Buildings Report This report characterizes the current landscape and trends in the global air conditioning (A/C) market, including discussion of both direct and indirect climate impacts, and potential global warming impacts from growing global A/C usage. Read more Energy Department Invests $19 Million to Improve Efficiency of Nation's Buildings Energy Department Invests $19 Million

  20. High Performance Tools And Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Collette, M R; Corey, I R; Johnson, J R

    2005-01-24

    This goal of this project was to evaluate the capability and limits of current scientific simulation development tools and technologies with specific focus on their suitability for use with the next generation of scientific parallel applications and High Performance Computing (HPC) platforms. The opinions expressed in this document are those of the authors, and reflect the authors' current understanding and functionality of the many tools investigated. As a deliverable for this effort, we are presenting this report describing our findings along with an associated spreadsheet outlining current capabilities and characteristics of leading and emerging tools in the high performance computing arena. This first chapter summarizes our findings (which are detailed in the other chapters) and presents our conclusions, remarks, and anticipations for the future. In the second chapter, we detail how various teams in our local high performance community utilize HPC tools and technologies, and mention some common concerns they have about them. In the third chapter, we review the platforms currently or potentially available to utilize these tools and technologies on to help in software development. Subsequent chapters attempt to provide an exhaustive overview of the available parallel software development tools and technologies, including their strong and weak points and future concerns. We categorize them as debuggers, memory checkers, performance analysis tools, communication libraries, data visualization programs, and other parallel development aides. The last chapter contains our closing information. Included with this paper at the end is a table of the discussed development tools and their operational environment.

  1. Choices for a Brighter Future

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Choices for a Brighter Future For more information contact: George Douglas, 303-275-4096 e:mail: George Douglas Golden, Colo., Nov. 12, 1999 - More and more Americans are getting the power to choose electricity suppliers as the utility industry is deregulated and reorganized. Those energy choices can affect health and well-being for many decades to come. Renewable energy sources—solar, wind, biomass, geothermal and hydropower—can provide reliable electricity while reducing environmental

  2. Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

    Annual Energy Outlook

    NGPL Composite 3.69 3.89 4.48 4.65 2009-2016 Futures Prices Contract 1 2.23 1.93 1.81 2.01 2.08 2.63 1994-2016 Contract 2 2.24 2.0 1.91 2.12 2.23 2.68 1994-2016 Contract 3 2.30 ...

  3. Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    15 View History Spot Price Henry Hub 2.75 2.69 2.69 2.70 2.70 2.61 1997-2015 Futures Prices Contract 1 2.72 2.68 2.68 2.68 2.68 2.57 1994-2015 Contract 2 2.75 2.70 2.76 2.76 2.75...

  4. Natural Gas Futures Prices (NYMEX)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2.75 3.73 1997-2013 NGPL Composite 8.99 11.83 15.12 10.98 9.94 9.56 2007-2014 Futures Prices Contract 1 4.159 4.382 4.03 2.83 3.73 1994-2013 Contract 2 4.428 4.471 4.09 2.93 3.77...

  5. The Future of Home Heating

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Future of Home Heating The Industry * Stationary Liquid Fuels Industry * * We are: * - ~6,000 dealers nationwide * - ~8 million homes/Principally in Northeast * - ~7,000,000,000 gallons of fuel annually Slide: 2 Slide: 3 * National Organization Established by Congress in 2000 * A Check-off Program * Responsible for Consumer Education, Research and Development and Education and Training Slide: 4 Aggressively move forward Slide: 5 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 110% 2010 2020 2030 Reduction in Carbon

  6. Green Future Double Barrel House

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    University Green Future Double Barrel House DOE Race to Zero Student Competition 2016 Sean Benson Team Leader - Net Zero Energy Design I & II Bachelor of Science in Architecture, Dec 2016 Alexis Borman Net Zero Energy Design II Bachelor of Science in Architecture, May 2016 Christopher Brown AIA COTE, Net Zero Energy Design I & II Bachelor of Science in Architecture, May 2016 Devonta Magee Net Zero Energy Design II Bachelor of Science in Architecture, Aug 2016 Yasmine Parker Net Zero

  7. Options Impacting the Electric System of the Future (ESF); NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Cory, Karlynn

    2015-08-10

    As utilities are faced with adapting to new technologies, technology and policy due diligence are necessary to ensure the development of a future grid that brings greater value to utilities and their consumers. This presentation explores the different kinds of future directions the power industry could consider to create, discussing key components necessary for success. It will also discuss the practical application and possible strategies for utilities and innovators to implement smart technologies that will enable an ultimate ‘intelligent’ grid capable of two-way communication, interoperability, and greater efficiency and system resiliency.

  8. Future directions of C3 research at DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency)

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.G.; Dahmann, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Research into C3 related problems is a major effort of the Information Science and Technology Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The major thrusts of projects is in the area of future, high-risk efforts, often resulting in the development of a conceptual model or prototype. Some of these prototypes are then further developed to provide an infrastructure for future research. The programs can be divided into two groups: base technology research programs and testbed programs. The testbeds provide a focus for the technology programs.

  9. Building Technologies Office Window and Envelope Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Building Technologies Office Window and Envelope Technologies Emerging Technologies R&D Program Karma Sawyer, Ph.D. karma.sawyer@ee.doe.gov BTO Goal Reduce building energy use by ...

  10. Blades of Glory: Wind Technology Bringing Us Closer To a Clean Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Future | Department of Energy Blades of Glory: Wind Technology Bringing Us Closer To a Clean Energy Future Blades of Glory: Wind Technology Bringing Us Closer To a Clean Energy Future July 17, 2012 - 2:14pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? The Energy Department is supporting the validation of newly developed technologies at wind testing facilities across America. There's a simple truth in wind energy -- the

  11. The Future of Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kubik, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of enhanced, or engineered, geothermal systems was carried out by an 18-member panel assembled by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to evaluate the potential of geothermal energy becoming a major energy source for the United States.

  12. NETL Technologies Recognized for Technology Development, Transfer |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Recognized for Technology Development, Transfer NETL Technologies Recognized for Technology Development, Transfer October 25, 2013 - 1:31pm Addthis Did you know? The Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer is the nationwide network of federal laboratories that provides the forum to develop strategies and opportunities for linking laboratory mission technologies and expertise with the marketplace. In consonance with the Federal Technology Transfer Act of

  13. High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies The Energy Department released the High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies to serve as an overview of the HIT Catalyst program activities, including a summary of the selection process undertaken to identify, evaluate and prioritize the current HITs, descriptions of the technologies and markets for each HIT, and plans for deployment. High

  14. Hydrogen and OUr Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Tidball; Stu Knoke

    2009-03-01

    In 2003, President George W. Bush announced the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative to accelerate the research and development of hydrogen, fuel cell, and infrastructure technologies that would enable hydrogen fuel cell vehicles to reach the commercial market in the 2020 timeframe. The widespread use of hydrogen can reduce our dependence on imported oil and benefit the environment by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and criteria pollutant emissions that affect our air quality. The Energy Policy Act of 2005, passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bush on August 8, 2005, reinforces Federal government support for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Title VIII, also called the 'Spark M. Matsunaga Hydrogen Act of 2005' authorizes more than $3.2 billion for hydrogen and fuel cell activities intended to enable the commercial introduction of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles by 2020, consistent with the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. Numerous other titles in the Act call for related tax and market incentives, new studies, collaboration with alternative fuels and renewable energy programs, and broadened demonstrations--clearly demonstrating the strong support among members of Congress for the development and use of hydrogen fuel cell technologies. In 2006, the President announced the Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI) to accelerate research on technologies with the potential to reduce near-term oil use in the transportation sector--batteries for hybrid vehicles and cellulosic ethanol--and advance activities under the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. The AEI also supports research to reduce the cost of electricity production technologies in the stationary sector such as clean coal, nuclear energy, solar photovoltaics, and wind energy.

  15. Nuclear Science & Technology

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. No...

  16. NREL: Technology Transfer - Ombuds

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Transfer Ombuds NREL's Technology Transfer Ombuds offers an informal process to help resolve issues and concerns regarding the laboratory's technology partnership,...

  17. Hydrogen Technologies Group

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-03-01

    The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

  18. Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    desiccant technology and applications, and to show how these technologies can be designed to utilize the available thermal energy from a combined heat and power (CHP) system. ...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and ...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Electric Drive Technologies research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge ...