National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ff cor inne

  1. COR Toolkit

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The COR Toolkit cited in the attachments to Policy Flash 2012-25 and posted to/linked from various DOE Internet pages has been withdrawn until further notice.

  2. Accessing Online COR Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Contracting Officer’s Representative (COR) training is now be available in an online format. "Accessing Online COR Training" provides a step-by-step guide to access the online COR course. 

  3. Riverside Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Riverside Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Riverside Inn Sector...

  4. vanDuin_ReaxFF

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    The second ReaxFF application connects with Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) studies, which indicate that protonation and deprotonation of surface SiOH groups are unimpeded in the ...

  5. River Inn Natural Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Inn Natural Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name River Inn Natural Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  6. The Saratoga Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Saratoga Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name The Saratoga Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility The Saratoga...

  7. ACMP Handbook Contracting Officer's Representative (COR)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ACMP Handbook Contracting Officer's Representative (COR) December 22, 2011 1 Acquisition Career Management Handbook Certification and Appointment of Contracting Officer's Representative (COR) 1. PURPOSE a. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) DOE has established this Contracting Officer's Representative (COR) Program to outline a comprehensive curriculum to systematically develop skill at performing delegated contract management duties; define competency based training standards to ensure that CORs

  8. Application for COR Certification-Recertification

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Solicitation number 1. Previous certification (attached): Date last issued or renewed: 2. Experience: (Attach COR Summary of Experience...

  9. I-N-N Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    I-N-N Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: I-N-N Electric Coop, Inc Place: Alaska Phone Number: 800-571-1259 (In Alaska) or Outside Alaska: 907-571-1259 ...

  10. Fountain Inn, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Fountain Inn, South Carolina Verde Biofuels Inc References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil...

  11. VBH-0079- In the Matter of William Cor

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by William Cor under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. From August 1998 to September 2001, Mr. Cor was...

  12. Consent-Based Siting Public Meeting Holiday Inn Capitol Plaza...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Consent-Based Siting Public Meeting Holiday Inn Capitol Plaza - Sacramento 300 J Street Sacramento, CA 95814 April 26, 2016 4:00-5:00 PM Informal Open House and Poster Session ...

  13. Hanford Site - 300-FF-3 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    300-FF-3 Hanford Site - 300-FF-3 July 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Hanford, WA Responsible DOE Office: Office of Environmental Management Plume Name: 300-FF-3 Remediation Contractor: CHPRC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: July 2014 with CY2013 data Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup Requirement DCE 220 Yes 16 (CUL) TCE 430 Yes 4

  14. Two-Dimensional Electron Gas in Monolayer InN Quantum Wells....

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Two-Dimensional Electron Gas in Monolayer InN Quantum Wells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Two-Dimensional Electron Gas in Monolayer InN Quantum Wells. Abstract not...

  15. TBU-0045- In the Matter of William Cor

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    William Cor (the complainant or the employee), appeals the dismissal of his complaint of retaliation filed under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection...

  16. Geothermal heating facilities for Frontier Inn, Susanville, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    The Frontier Inn, located in Susanville, California, is a 38 unit motel composed of six major sections (coffee shop, A frame units, apartments, back units, two story units and office). These sections were built over a number of years and exhibit widely varying types of construction. Space heating is provided by primarily electric resistance equipment with some propane use. Domestic hot water is provided primarily by propane with some electric resistance. The coffee shop uses fuel oil for both space and domestic hot water heating. The City of Susanville is currently in the process of installing a geothermal district heating system. Although the motel site is not located in the area of present construction activity, it is expected that the pipeline will be extended in the near future. This study examines the potential of retrofitting the existing heating facilities at the Frontier Inn to geothermal.

  17. The Committee convened in the Clark Room, Holiday Inn Capitol,

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    MEETING - - - Thursday, April 25, 1996 - - - The Committee convened in the Clark Room, Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., Dr. Timothy D. Mount, Chairman, presiding. PRESENT: TIMOTHY D. MOUNT, Chairman SAMPRIT CHATTERJEE BRENDA G. COX JOHN D. GRACE CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG RICHARD A. LOCKHART DANIEL A. RELLES PRESENT (Continued): BRADLEY O. SKARPNESS G. CAMPBELL WATKINS ALSO PRESENT: RENEE MILLER YVONNE BISHOP MARY HUTZLER JAY HAKES DOUGLAS HALE ART HOLLAND

  18. Mesquite Solar Plan - build out next to existing FF plants Solar...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Mesquite Solar Plan - build out next to existing FF plants Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Mesquite Solar Plan - build out next to existing FF plants Solar Power...

  19. LOCALIZED PLASMA DENSITY ENHANCEMENTS OBSERVED IN STEREO COR1

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Shaela I.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2009-08-20

    Measurements of solar wind speed in the solar corona, where it is primarily accelerated, have proven elusive. One of the more successful attempts has been the tracking of outward-moving density inhomogeneities in white-light coronagraph images. These inhomogeneities, or 'blobs', have been treated as passive tracers of the ambient solar wind. Here we report on the extension of these observations to lower altitudes using the STEREO COR1 coronagraph, and discuss the implications of these measurements for theories about the origin of these features.

  20. Phase I remedial investigation report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-01

    The focus of this remedial investigation (RI) is the 300-FF-5 operable unit, one of five operable units associated with the 300 Area aggregate of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site. The 300-FF-5 operable unit is a groundwater operable unit beneath the 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-3 source operable units. This operable unit was designated to include all contamination detected in the groundwater and sediments below the water table that emanates from the 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-3 operable units (DOE-RL 1990a). In November 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the 300 Area on the National Priorities List (NPL) contained within Appendix B of the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP, 53 FR 51391 et seq.). The EPA took this action pursuant to their authority under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA, 42 USC 9601 et seq.). The DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), the EPA and Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) issued the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), in May 1989 (Ecology et al. 1992, Rev. 2). This agreement, among other matters, governs all CERCLA efforts at the Hanford Site. In June 1990, a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) workplan for the 300-FF-5 operable unit was issued pursuant to the Tri-Party Agreement.

  1. Structural and functional characterization of the hazelnut allergen Cor a 8

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, Lesa R.; Bublin, Merima; Perdue, Makenzie L.; Pfeifer, Sabine; Dubiela, Pawel; Borowski, Tomasz; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin

    2015-09-28

    Nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are basic proteins, stabilized by four disulfide bonds, and are expressed throughout the plant kingdom. These proteins are also known as important allergens in fruits and tree nuts. In this study, the nsLTP from hazelnuts, Cor a 8, was purified and its crystal structure determined. The protein is stable at low pH and refolds after thermal denaturation. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to provide an insight into conformational changes of Cor a 8 upon ligand binding. When known epitope areas from Pru p 3 were compared to those of Cor a 8, differences were obvious, which may contribute to limited cross-reactivity between peach and hazelnut allergens. The differences in epitope regions may contribute to limited cross-reactivity between Cor a 8 and nsLTPs from other plant sources. The structure of Cor a 8 represents the first resolved structure of a hazelnut allergen.

  2. Large area InN terahertz emitters based on the lateral photo-Dember effect

    SciTech Connect

    Wallauer, Jan Grumber, Christian; Walther, Markus; Polyakov, Vladimir; Iannucci, Robert; Cimalla, Volker; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-09-14

    Large area terahertz emitters based on the lateral photo-Dember effect in InN (indium nitride) are presented. The formation of lateral photo-Dember currents is induced by laser-illumination through a microstructured metal cover processed onto the InN substrate, causing an asymmetry in the lateral photogenerated charge carrier distribution. Our design uses simple metal structures, which are produced by conventional two-dimensional micro-structuring techniques. Having favoring properties as a photo-Dember material InN is particularly well-suited as a substrate for our emitters. We demonstrate that the emission intensity of the emitters can be significantly influenced by the structure of the metal cover leaving room for improvement by optimizing the masking structures.

  3. Spectral dependence of third-order nonlinear optical properties in InN

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, H. Lee, M.-T.; Chang, Y.-M.

    2014-05-19

    We report on the nonlinear optical properties of InN measured in a wide near-infrared spectral range with the femtosecond Z-scan technique. The above-bandgap nonlinear absorption in InN is found to originate from the saturation of absorption by the band-state-filling and its cross-section increases drastically near the bandgap energy. With below-bandgap excitation, the nonlinear absorption undergoes a transition from saturation absorption (SA) to reverse-SA (RSA), attributed to the competition between SA of band-tail states and two-photon-related RSA. The measured large nonlinear refractive index of the order of 10{sup −10} cm{sup 2}/W indicates InN as a potential material for all-optical switching and related applications.

  4. Lois Curfman McInnes, 2011 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Lois Curfman McInnes, 2011 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 2010's Lois Curfman McInnes, 2011 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Computer,

  5. Two-dimensional electron gas in monolayer InN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Dimakis, Emmanouil; Wang, George T.; Moustakas, Theodore D.; Tsui, Daniel C.

    2014-11-24

    We report in this letter experimental results that confirm the two-dimensional nature of the electron systems in monolayer InN quantum wells embedded in GaN barriers. The electron density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in these InN quantum wells are 5×1015 cm-2 and 420 cm2 /Vs, respectively. Moreover, the diagonal resistance of the 2DES shows virtually no temperature dependence in a wide temperature range, indicating the topological nature of the 2DES.

  6. Two-dimensional electron gas in monolayer InN quantum wells

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Pan, Wei; Dimakis, Emmanouil; Wang, George T.; Moustakas, Theodore D.; Tsui, Daniel C.

    2014-11-24

    We report in this letter experimental results that confirm the two-dimensional nature of the electron systems in monolayer InN quantum wells embedded in GaN barriers. The electron density and mobility of the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in these InN quantum wells are 5×1015 cm-2 and 420 cm2 /Vs, respectively. Moreover, the diagonal resistance of the 2DES shows virtually no temperature dependence in a wide temperature range, indicating the topological nature of the 2DES.

  7. Growth mechanism and microstructure of low defect density InN (0001) In-face thin films on Si (111) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kehagias, Th.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Koukoula, T.; Komninou, Ph.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.; Physics Department, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion-Crete ; Tsagaraki, K.; Adikimenakis, A.

    2013-10-28

    Transmission electron microscopy has been employed to analyze the direct nucleation and growth, by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, of high quality InN (0001) In-face thin films on (111) Si substrates. Critical steps of the heteroepitaxial growth process are InN nucleation at low substrate temperature under excessively high N-flux conditions and subsequent growth of the main InN epilayer at the optimum conditions, namely, substrate temperature 400450 C and In/N flux ratio close to 1. InN nucleation occurs in the form of a very high density of three dimensional (3D) islands, which coalesce very fast into a low surface roughness InN film. The reduced reactivity of Si at low temperature and its fast coverage by InN limit the amount of unintentional Si nitridation by the excessively high nitrogen flux and good bonding/adhesion of the InN film directly on the Si substrate is achieved. The subsequent overgrowth of the main InN epilayer, in a layer-by-layer growth mode that enhances the lateral growth of InN, reduces significantly the crystal mosaicity and the density of threading dislocations is about an order of magnitude less compared to InN films grown using an AlN/GaN intermediate nucleation/buffer layer on Si. The InN films exhibit the In-face polarity and very smooth atomically stepped surfaces.

  8. Nanostructural and electronic properties of polytypes in InN nanocolumns

    SciTech Connect

    Kioseoglou, J.; Koukoula, T.; Komninou, Ph.; Kehagias, Th.; Georgakilas, A.; Androulidaki, M.

    2013-08-21

    Transmission electron microscopy techniques and density functional theory calculations were employed to investigate the nanostructural and electronic properties of InN polytypes observed in InN nanocolumns, grown on Si(111) by molecular beam epitaxy. Moir fringes and alternating hexagonal and cubic lattice stacking sequences along the c-axis, observed among the wurtzite layers, implied the presence of different structures embedded in the basic 2H structure of the nanocolumns. Quantitative electron diffraction analysis and high-resolution image simulations verified the coexistence of the wurtzite structure with the 4H, 6H, and the 3C zinc-blende structural polytypes. Total energies calculations established the 2H wurtzite structure as the most stable polytype. The band gap of all polytypes was found direct with the energies and the band gaps of the 4H (E{sub g} = 0.64 eV) and 6H (E{sub g} = 0.60 eV) structures calculated between the corresponding values of the 2H (E{sub g} = 0.75 eV) and 3C (E{sub g} = 0.49 eV) basic structures. Theoretical and experimental analysis showed that at the initial stages of growth InN nanocolumns were under tensile strain along both the basal plane and growth direction. Structural polytypes were then introduced in the form of embedded inclusions to accommodate the excess tensile strain along the growth direction, allowing the entire process of polymorphism to be the dominant strain relaxation mechanism of InN nanocolumns. Moreover, the lattice and energetic properties and band gap values of InN polytypes showed a linear dependence on hexagonality, while the presence of polytypes led to a characteristic broadening of the photoluminescence emission peak toward lower emission energies.

  9. Sulfur passivation of surface electrons in highly Mg-doped InN

    SciTech Connect

    Linhart, W. M.; Veal, T. D.; Chai, J.; McConville, C. F.; Durbin, S. M.; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008

    2013-09-14

    Electron accumulation with a sheet density greater than 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} usually occurs at InN surfaces. Here, the effects of treatment with ammonium sulfide ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub x}) on the surface electronic properties of highly Mg-doped InN (>4×10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}) have been investigated with high resolution x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The valence band photoemission spectra show that the surface Fermi level decreases by approximately 0.08 eV with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub x} treatment, resulting in a decrease of the downward band bending and up to a 70% reduction in the surface electron sheet density.

  10. Growth modes of InN(000-1) on GaN buffer layers on sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bing; Kitajima, Takeshi; Chen, Dongxue; Leone, Stephen R.

    2005-01-24

    In this work, using atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy, we study the surface morphologies of epitaxial InN films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy with intervening GaN buffer layers on sapphire substrates. On smooth GaN buffer layers, nucleation and evolution of three-dimensional InN islands at various coverages and growth temperatures are investigated. The shapes of the InN islands are observed to be predominantly mesa-like with large flat (000-1) tops, which suggests a possible role of indium as a surfactant. Rough GaN buffer layers composed of dense small GaN islands are found to significantly improve uniform InN wetting of the substrates, on which atomically smooth InN films are obtained that show the characteristics of step-flow growth. Scanning tunneling microscopy imaging reveals the defect-mediated surface morphology of smooth InN films, including surface terminations of screw dislocations and a high density of shallow surface pits with depths less than 0.3 nm. The mechanisms of the three-dimensional island size and shape evolution and formation of defects on smooth surfaces are considered.

  11. On the crystalline structure, stoichiometry and band gap of InN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, K.M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Walukiewicz, W.; Li, S.X.; Jones, R.E.; Shan, W.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Lu, Hai; Schaff, William J.

    2004-09-23

    Detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and optical characterization of a variety of InN thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy under both optimized and non-optimized conditions is reported. Optical characterization by absorption and photoluminescence confirms that the band gap of single crystalline and polycrystalline wurtzite InN is 0.70 {+-} 0.05 eV. Films grown under optimized conditions with a AlN nucleation layer and a GaN buffer layer are stoichiometric, single crystalline wurtzite structure with dislocation densities not exceeding mid-10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}. Non-optimal films can be poly-crystalline and display an XRD diffraction feature at 2{theta} {approx} 33{sup o}; this feature has been attributed by others to the presence of metallic In clusters. Careful indexing of wide angle XRD scans and selected area diffraction patterns shows that this peak is in fact due to the presence of polycrystalline InN grains; no evidence of metallic In clusters was found in any of the studied samples.

  12. Structural and functional characterization of the hazelnut allergen Cor a 8

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Offermann, Lesa R.; Bublin, Merima; Perdue, Makenzie L.; Pfeifer, Sabine; Dubiela, Pawel; Borowski, Tomasz; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin

    2015-09-28

    Nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are basic proteins, stabilized by four disulfide bonds, and are expressed throughout the plant kingdom. These proteins are also known as important allergens in fruits and tree nuts. In this study, the nsLTP from hazelnuts, Cor a 8, was purified and its crystal structure determined. The protein is stable at low pH and refolds after thermal denaturation. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to provide an insight into conformational changes of Cor a 8 upon ligand binding. When known epitope areas from Pru p 3 were compared to those of Cor a 8, differences were obvious,more » which may contribute to limited cross-reactivity between peach and hazelnut allergens. The differences in epitope regions may contribute to limited cross-reactivity between Cor a 8 and nsLTPs from other plant sources. The structure of Cor a 8 represents the first resolved structure of a hazelnut allergen.« less

  13. Statement of Work for Drilling Four CERCLA Groundwater Monitoring Wells During Fiscal Year 2006, 300-FF-5 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Bruce A.

    2005-10-10

    This document contains the statement of work required to drill, characterize, and construct the proposed groundwater monitoring wells at 300-FF-5 Operable Unit during FY 2006.

  14. The Committee convened in the Clark Room of the Holiday Inn

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    - - - - - COMMITTEE ON ENERGY STATISTICS - - - - - MEETING - - - - - FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1996 The Committee convened in the Clark Room of the Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., DR. TIMOTHY D. MOUNT, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: TIMOTHY D. MOUNT, Chair SAMPRIT CHATTERJEE BRENDA G. COX JOHN D. GRACE CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG RICHARD A. LOCKHART DANIEL A. RELLES BRADLEY O. SKARPNESS G. CAMPBELL WATKINS ALSO PRESENT: RENEE MILLER YVONNE M. BISHOP DIANE LIQUE L.A.

  15. The Committee met in the Columbia Room at the Holiday Inn

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Friday, April 21, 1995 - - - The Committee met in the Columbia Room at the Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., Timothy D. Mount, Chairman, presiding. PRESENT: TIMOTHY D. MOUNT, Chair DAVID R. BELLHOUSE CHARLES W. BISCHOFF BRENDA G. COX FAYE DUCHIN JOHN D. GRACE PHILIP HANSWER CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG JAMES L. O'BRIEN DANIEL A. RELLES BRADLEY O. SKARPNESS G. CAMPBELL WATKINS A-G-E-N-D-A Page No. Introductory Remarks, TIMOTHY MOUNT, Chairman 3 Announcement of

  16. The Committee met in the Clark Room in the Holiday Inn Capitol,

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    - - - COMMITTEE ON ENERGY STATISTICS - - - THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 1998 - - - The Committee met in the Clark Room in the Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., Daniel A. Relles, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: DANIEL A. RELLES Chair CHARLES W. BISCHOFF Member CAROL A. GOTWAY CRAWFORD Member PHILIP HANSER Member CALVIN KENT Member GRETA M. LJUNG Member POLLY A. PHIPPS Member SEYMOUR SUDMAN Member ROY W. WHITMORE Member DENNY ELLERMAN Guest JAMES HAMMITT Guest I N D E X

  17. The Committee met in the Clark Room in the Holiday Inn Capitol,

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    FRIDAY APRIL 24, 1998 - - - The Committee met in the Clark Room in the Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., Daniel Relles, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: DANIEL RELLES Chair CHARLES BISCHOFF Member CAROL CRAWFORD Member CALVIN KENT Member GRETA M. LJUNG Member POLLY PHIPPS Member SEYMOUR SUDMAN Member ROY WHITMORE Member JAMES HAMMITT Guest I N D E X Page Opening Comments from the Chair 3 Recognizing Previous Judges of the EIA Graphics 4 Contest and Announcing

  18. The Committee met in the Clark Room of the Capitol Holiday Inn,

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    PUBLIC MEETING + + + + + THURSDAY NOVEMBER 13, 1997 + + + + + WASHINGTON, D.C. The Committee met in the Clark Room of the Capitol Holiday Inn, 550 C Street, S.W., at 9:00 a.m., G. Campbell Watkins, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: G. CAMPBELL WATKINS Chair DANIEL A. RELLES Vice Chair DAVID R. BELLHOUSE R. SAMPRIT CHATTERJEE BRENDA G. COX CAROL A. GOTWAY CRAWFORD PHILIP HANSEN CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG ROY WHITMORE INVITED GUESTS: SEYMOUR SUDMAN RICHARD TABORS EIA STAFF: JAY HAKES EIA Administrator

  19. The Committee met in the Clark Room, Holiday Inn Capitol at 550

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    PUBLIC MEETING + + + THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 1997 + + + The Committee met in the Clark Room, Holiday Inn Capitol at 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., G. Campbell Watkins, Chairman, presiding. PRESENT: G. CAMPBELL WATKINS, Chairman DAVID R. BELLHOUSE CHARLES W. BISCHOFF BRENDA G. COX CAROL A. GOTWAY CRAWFORD CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG DANIEL A. RELLES BRADLEY O. SKARPNESS PRESENT (Continued): ROY WHITMORE C O N T E N T S PAGE Opening Remarks, Lynda Carlson 10 Update on 1997

  20. The Committee met in the Columbia Room at the Holiday Inn Capitol,

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    THURSDAY, APRIL 20, 1995 The Committee met in the Columbia Room at the Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., Timothy D. Mount, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: TIMOTHY D. MOUNT, Chair DAVID R. BELLHOUSE CHARLES W. BISCHOFF BRENDA G. COX FAYE DUCHIN JOHN D. GRACE PHILIP HANSER CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG JAMES L. O'BRIEN DANIEL A. RELLES BRADLEY O. SKARPNESS G. CAMPBELL WATKINS AGENDA Introductions by Committee Chair . . . . . . . . . 3 Opening Remarks by Administrator

  1. Growth of wurtzite InN on bulk In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Sadofev, Sergey; Cho, Yong Jin; Brandt, Oliver; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Calarco, Raffaella; Riechert, Henning; Erwin, Steven C.; Galazka, Zbigniew; Korytov, Maxym; Albrecht, Martin; Uecker, Reinhard; Fornari, Roberto

    2012-10-22

    A single phase InN epitaxial film is grown on a bulk In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(111) wafer by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The InN/In{sub 2}O{sub 3} orientation relationship is found to be (0001) parallel (111) and [1100] parallel [112]. High quality of the layer is confirmed by the small widths of the x-ray rocking curves, the sharp interfaces revealed by transmission electron microscopy, the narrow spectral width of the Raman E{sub 2}{sup h} vibrational mode, and the position of the photoluminescence band close to the fundamental band gap of InN.

  2. Elimination of surface band bending on N-polar InN with thin GaN capping

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmík, J. Haščík, Š.; Kučera, M.; Kúdela, R.; Dobročka, E.; Adikimenakis, A.; Mičušík, M.; Gregor, M.; Plecenik, A.; Georgakilas, A.

    2015-11-09

    0.5–1 μm thick InN (0001) films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy with N- or In-polarity are investigated for the presence of native oxide, surface energy band bending, and effects introduced by 2 to 4 monolayers of GaN capping. Ex situ angle-resolved x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy is used to construct near-surface (GaN)/InN energy profiles, which is combined with deconvolution of In3d signal to trace the presence of InN native oxide for different types of polarity and capping. Downwards surface energy band bending was observed on bare samples with native oxide, regardless of the polarity. It was found that the In-polar InN surface is most readily oxidized, however, with only slightly less band bending if compared with the N-polar sample. On the other hand, InN surface oxidation was effectively mitigated by GaN capping. Still, as confirmed by ultra-violet photo-electron spectroscopy and by energy band diagram calculations, thin GaN cap layer may provide negative piezoelectric polarization charge at the GaN/InN hetero-interface of the N-polar sample, in addition to the passivation effect. These effects raised the band diagram up by about 0.65 eV, reaching a flat-band profile.

  3. The ReaxFF reactive force-field: Development, applications, and future directions

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Senftle, Thomas; Hong, Sungwook; Islam, Md Mahbubul; Kylasa, Sudhir; Zheng, Yuanzia; Shin, Yun Kyung; Junkermeier, Chad; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Janik, Michael J.; Aktulga, Hasan Metin; et al

    2016-03-04

    The reactive force-field (ReaxFF) interatomic potential is a powerful computational tool for exploring, developing and optimizing material properties. Methods based on the principles of quantum mechanics (QM), while offering valuable theoretical guidance at the electronic level, are often too computationally intense for simulations that consider the full dynamic evolution of a system. Alternatively, empirical interatomic potentials that are based on classical principles require significantly fewer computational resources, which enables simulations to better describe dynamic processes over longer timeframes and on larger scales. Such methods, however, typically require a predefined connectivity between atoms, precluding simulations that involve reactive events. The ReaxFFmore » method was developed to help bridge this gap. Approaching the gap from the classical side, ReaxFF casts the empirical interatomic potential within a bond-order formalism, thus implicitly describing chemical bonding without expensive QM calculations. As a result, this article provides an overview of the development, application, and future directions of the ReaxFF method.« less

  4. Temperature dependences of the contact resistivity in ohmic contacts to n{sup +}-InN

    SciTech Connect

    Sachenko, A. V.; Belyaev, A. E.; Boltovets, N. S.; Brunkov, P. N.; Jmerik, V. N.; Ivanov, S. V.; Kapitanchuk, L. M.; Konakova, R. V. Klad’ko, V. P.; Romanets, P. N.; Saja, P. O.; Safryuk, N. V.; Sheremet, V. N.

    2015-04-15

    The temperature dependences of the contact resistivity (ρ{sub c}) of ohmic contacts based on the Au-Ti-Pd-InN system are measured at an InN doping level of 2 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} in the temperature range of 4.2–300 K. At temperatures T > 150 K, linearly increasing dependences ρ{sub c}(T) are obtained. The dependences are explained within the mechanism of thermionic current flow through metal shunts associated with dislocations. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental dependences is achieved assuming that the flowing current is limited by the total resistance of the metal shunts, and the density of conductive dislocations is ∼5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}. Using the X-ray diffraction method, the density of screw and edge dislocations in the structure under study is measured: their total density exceeds 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}.

  5. Angular-dependent Raman study of a- and s-plane InN

    SciTech Connect

    Filintoglou, K.; Katsikini, M. Arvanitidis, J.; Lotsari, A.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Vouroutzis, N.; Ves, S.; Christofilos, D.; Kourouklis, G. A.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.; Zoumakis, N.

    2015-02-21

    Angular-dependent polarized Raman spectroscopy was utilized to study nonpolar a-plane (11{sup ¯}20) and semipolar s-plane (101{sup ¯}1) InN epilayers. The intensity dependence of the Raman peaks assigned to the vibrational modes A{sub 1}(TO), E{sub 1}(TO), and E{sub 2}{sup h} on the angle ψ that corresponds to rotation around the growth axis, is very well reproduced by using expressions taking into account the corresponding Raman tensors and the experimental geometry, providing thus a reliable technique towards assessing the sample quality. The s- and a-plane InN epilayers grown on nitridated r-plane sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) exhibit good crystalline quality as deduced from the excellent fitting of the experimental angle-dependent peak intensities to the theoretical expressions as well as from the small width of the Raman peaks. On the contrary, in the case of the s-plane epilayer grown on non-nitridated r-plane sapphire, fitting of the angular dependence is much worse and can be modeled only by considering the presence of two structural modifications, rotated so as their c-axes are almost perpendicular to each other. Although the presence of the second variant is verified by transmission electron and atomic force microscopies, angular dependent Raman spectroscopy offers a non-destructive and quick way for its quantification. Rapid thermal annealing of this sample did not affect the angular dependence of the peak intensities. The shift of the E{sub 1}(TO) and E{sub 2}{sup h} Raman peaks was used for the estimation of the strain state of the samples.

  6. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of Six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    J. D. Ludowise; K. L. Vialetti

    2008-05-12

    This report provides the final hazard categorization for the remediation of six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Burial Grounds, the 618-1, 618-2, 618-3, 618-7, 618-8, and 618-13 sites.

  7. Popular Science Recognizes Innovative Solar Technologies

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL

  8. ODU Researcher Visits JLab to Talk About Living in the Arctic (Daily Press)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F

  9. Structural properties of InN films grown on O-face ZnO(0001) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yong Jin; Brandt, Oliver; Kaganer, Vladimir M.; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Riechert, Henning; Korytov, Maxim; Albrecht, Martin

    2012-04-09

    We study the impact of substrate temperature and layer thickness on the morphological and structural properties of InN films directly grown on O-face ZnO(0001) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. With increasing substrate temperature, an interfacial reaction between InN and ZnO takes place that eventually results in the formation of cubic In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and voids. The properties of the InN films, however, are found to be unaffected by this reaction for substrate temperatures less than 550 deg. C. In fact, both the morphological and the structural quality of InN improve with increasing substrate temperature in the range from 350 to 500 deg. C. High quality films with low threading dislocation densities are demonstrated.

  10. ReaxFF Study of the Oxidation of Softwood Lignin in View of Carbon Fiber Production

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana

    2014-10-06

    We investigate the oxidative, thermal conversion of softwood lignin by performing molecular dynamics simulations based on a reactive force field (ReaxFF). The lignin samples are constructed from coniferyl alcohol units, which are connected through linkages that are randomly selected from a natural distribution of linkages in softwood. The goal of this work is to simulate the oxidative stabilization step during carbon fiber production from lignin precursor. We find that at simulation conditions where stabilization reactions occur, the lignin fragments have already undergone extensive degradation. The 5-5 linkage shows the highest reactivity towards cyclization and dehydrogenation.

  11. ReaxFF Study of the Oxidation of Softwood Lignin in View of Carbon Fiber Production

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Beste, Ariana

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the oxidative, thermal conversion of softwood lignin by performing molecular dynamics simulations based on a reactive force field (ReaxFF). The lignin samples are constructed from coniferyl alcohol units, which are connected through linkages that are randomly selected from a natural distribution of linkages in softwood. The goal of this work is to simulate the oxidative stabilization step during carbon fiber production from lignin precursor. We find that at simulation conditions where stabilization reactions occur, the lignin fragments have already undergone extensive degradation. The 5-5 linkage shows the highest reactivity towards cyclization and dehydrogenation.

  12. A novel cold-regulated gene from Camellia sinensis, CsCOR1, enhances salt- and dehydration-tolerance in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xian-Wen; College of Life Science, Xinyang Normal University, Xinyang 464000; Key Laboratory of Horticultural Plant Biology of the Ministry of Education, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 ; Feng, Zhi-Guo; Yang, Hui-Min; Zhu, Xiao-Pei; Liu, Jun; Key Laboratory of Horticultural Plant Biology of the Ministry of Education, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 ; Yuan, Hong-Yu

    2010-04-02

    In present research, the full-length cDNA and the genomic sequence of a novel cold-regulated gene, CsCOR1, were isolated from Camellia sinensis L. The deduced protein CsCOR1 contains a hydrophobic N-terminus as a signal peptide and a hydrophilic C-terminal domain that is rich in glycine, arginine and proline. Two internal repetitive tridecapeptide fragments (HSVTAGRGGYNRG) exist in the middle of the C-terminal domain and the two nucleotide sequences encoding them are identical. CsCOR1 was localized in the cell walls of transgenic-tobaccos via CsCOR1::GFP fusion approach. The expression of CsCOR1 in tea leaves was enhanced dramatically by both cold- and dehydration-stress. And overexpression of CsCOR1 in transgenic-tobaccos improved obviously the tolerance to salinity and dehydration.

  13. Optical characterization of free electron concentration in heteroepitaxial InN layers using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 transfer-matrix algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Katsidis, C. C.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.

    2013-02-21

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been implemented as a non-destructive, non-invasive, tool for the optical characterization of a set of c-plane InN single heteroepitaxial layers spanning a wide range of thicknesses (30-2000 nm). The c-plane (0001) InN epilayers were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) on GaN(0001) buffer layers which had been grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates. It is shown that for arbitrary multilayers with homogeneous anisotropic layers having their principal axes coincident with the laboratory coordinates, a 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 matrix algebra based on a general transfer-matrix method (GTMM) is adequate to interpret their optical response. Analysis of optical reflectance in the far and mid infrared spectral range has been found capable to discriminate between the bulk, the surface and interface contributions of free carriers in the InN epilayers revealing the existence of electron accumulation layers with carrier concentrations in mid 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} at both the InN surface and the InN/GaN interface. The spectra could be fitted with a three-layer model, determining the different electron concentration and mobility values of the bulk and of the surface and the interface electron accumulation layers in the InN films. The variation of these values with increasing InN thickness could be also sensitively detected by the optical measurements. The comparison between the optically determined drift mobility and the Hall mobility of the thickest sample reveals a value of r{sub H} = 1.49 for the Hall factor of InN at a carrier concentration of 1.11 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} at 300 Degree-Sign {Kappa}.

  14. Optical and structural characterization of nitrogen-rich InN: Transition from nearly intrinsic to strongly n-type degenerate with temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Tran, Nhung; Huy Le, Binh; Fan, Shizhao; Zhao, Songrui; Mi, Zetian; Schmidt, Benjamin A.; Savard, Michel; Gervais, Guillaume; Butcher, Kenneth Scott A.

    2013-12-23

    We report on a detailed study of the structural and optical properties of nonstoichiometric nitrogen-rich InN grown on sapphire substrates, by migration enhanced afterglow deposition. The samples were polycrystalline, with the presence of InN dots. Unusually strong photoluminescence emission was measured at cryogenic temperatures, with the peak energy at ?0.68?eV. Detailed analysis further shows that the sample has very low residual electron density in the range of ?10{sup 16}?cm{sup ?3} at temperatures below 20?K.

  15. Current Conditions Risk Assessment for the 300-FF-5 Groundwater Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Terri B.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Napier, Bruce A.; Peterson, Robert E.; Becker, James M.

    2007-11-01

    This report updates a baseline risk assessment for the 300 Area prepared in 1994. The update includes consideration of changes in contaminants of interest and in the environment that have occurred during the period of interim remedial action, i.e., 1996 to the present, as well as the sub-regions, for which no initial risk assessments have been conducted. In 1996, a record of decision (ROD) stipulated interim remedial action for groundwater affected by releases from 300 Area sources, as follows: (a) continued monitoring of groundwater that is contaminated above health-based levels to ensure that concentrations continue to decrease, and (b) institutional controls to ensure that groundwater use is restricted to prevent unacceptable exposure to groundwater contamination. In 2000, the groundwater beneath the two outlying sub-regions was added to the operable unit. In 2001, the first 5-year review of the ROD found that the interim remedy and remedial action objectives were still appropriate, although the review called for additional characterization activities. This report includes a current conditions baseline ecological and human health risk assessment using maximum concentrations in the environmental media of the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit and downstream conditions at the City of Richland, Washington. The scope for this assessment includes only current measured environmental concentrations and current use scenarios. Future environmental concentrations and future land uses are not considered in this assessment.

  16. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of Six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    J. D. Ludowise

    2006-12-12

    This report provides the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of six solid waste disposal sites (referred to as burial grounds) located in the 300-FF-2 Operable Unit (OU) on the Hanford Site. These six sites (618-1, 618-2, 618-3, 618-7, 618-8, and 618-13 Burial Grounds) were determined to have a total radionuclide inventory (WCH 2005a, WCH 2005d, WCH 2005e and WCH 2006b) that exceeds the DOE-STD-1027 Category 3 threshold quantity (DOE 1997) and are the subject of this analysis. This FHC document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the FHC and commitments for the 300-FF-2 Burial Grounds Remediation Project.

  17. Electronic and thermoelectric properties of InN studied using ab initio density functional theory and Boltzmann transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Borges, P. D. E-mail: lscolfaro@txstate.edu; Scolfaro, L. E-mail: lscolfaro@txstate.edu

    2014-12-14

    The thermoelectric properties of indium nitride in the most stable wurtzite phase (w-InN) as a function of electron and hole concentrations and temperature were studied by solving the semiclassical Boltzmann transport equations in conjunction with ab initio electronic structure calculations, within Density Functional Theory. Based on maximally localized Wannier function basis set and the ab initio band energies, results for the Seebeck coefficient are presented and compared with available experimental data for n-type as well as p-type systems. Also, theoretical results for electric conductivity and power factor are presented. Most cases showed good agreement between the calculated properties and experimental data for w-InN unintentionally and p-type doped with magnesium. Our predictions for temperature and concentration dependences of electrical conductivity and power factor revealed a promising use of InN for intermediate and high temperature thermoelectric applications. The rigid band approach and constant scattering time approximation were utilized in the calculations.

  18. COR-Y12-12/7/2012-21660 DE-AC05-00OR22800 DOE Form

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    COR-Y12-12/7/2012-21660 DE-AC05-00OR22800 DOE Form (04/1991) U.S. Department of Energy Requirements Change Notice No.: NNSA-49 Page 1 of 36 Pages PROJECT: Baseline List of Required Compliance Documents LOCATION: Oak Ridge, Tennessee CONTRACTOR: Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC CONTRACT NO.: DE-AC05-00OR22800, I.85, Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives (December 2000), DEAR 970.5204-2 DATE OF CONTRACT: August 31, 2000 This Requirements Change Notice (RCN) No. NNSA-49

  19. Effects of Ga on the growth of InN on O-face ZnO(0001) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yong Jin; Riechert, Henning; Brandt, Oliver; Korytov, Maxim; Albrecht, Martin

    2012-07-30

    We compare the structural properties of InN and In{sub 0.95}Ga{sub 0.05}N films grown on O-face ZnO(0001) substrates at different temperatures. The small amount of Ga results in dramatic changes in the morphology and structural properties of InN. In particular, inversion domains start to appear at higher temperatures in the In{sub 0.95}Ga{sub 0.05}N film. This process is a consequence of the chemical reaction of ZnO with Ga which can be prevented by choosing the substrate temperature to be 450{sup Degree-Sign }C or below.

  20. Surface radiation survey for the Phase 1 remedial investigation of the 300-FF-1 operable unit on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Teel, S.S.; Olsen, K.B.

    1990-10-01

    This report summarizes Task 3a-1 of the Phase I Remedial Investigation for the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit on the Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. The purpose of the Remedial Investigation is to determine the nature and extent of the risk presented by releases of hazardous substances from the operable unit. The purpose of Task 3a-1 was to locate any areas of contaminated soil outside of operable unit waste facility boundaries. Surface radiation survey and sampling activities in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit were conducted from September 1989 to December 1989 and April 1990 to June 1990. Surveys were conducted primarily using portable Geiger-Muller beta/gamma detectors. As a result, 77 locations were found where radiation occurred above a statistically calculated background estimate. The Ultra Sonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS) was also used to survey a limited area. Analysis of the USRADS data revealed several elevated measurements that were not detected at the same locations with the Geiger-Muller detector. 6 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Evaluation and Screening of Remedial Technologies for Uranium at the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Nimmons, Michael J.

    2007-08-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is presently conducting a re-evaluation of remedies addressing persistent dissolved uranium concentrations in the upper aquifer under the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This work is being conducted as a Phase III feasibility study for the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy. As part of the feasibility study process, a comprehensive inventory of candidate remedial technologies was conducted by PNNL. This report documents the identification and screening of candidate technologies. The screening evaluation was conducted in accordance with guidance and processes specified by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations associated with implementation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act process.

  2. Surface radiation survey and soil sampling of the 300-FF-1 operable unit, Hanford Site, southeastern Washington: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Teel, S.S.; Olsen, K.B.

    1990-10-01

    The methods used for conducting a radiological characterization of the soil surface for the Phase I Remedial Investigation of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) site is presented via a case study. The study site is an operable unit (300-FF-1) located in and adjacent to the 300 Area of the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The operable unit contains liquid and solid waste disposal facilities associated with nuclear fuels fabrication. Continuous surface radiation surveying and soil sampling of selected locations were conducted. Contamination was found in several locations within the operable unit including areas near the liquid and solid waste disposal facilities. Instruments used during surveying included portable beta/gamma (P-11) detectors, and the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System using an NaI (Tl) detector. Laboratory analyses results indicate that above-background radiation levels were primarily due to the presence of uranium. Both types of field instruments used in the study were effective in detecting surface contamination from radionuclides; however, each had specific advantages. Guidelines are presented for the optimum use of these instruments when performing a radiological characterization of the soil surface. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. GLOBAL CORONAL SEISMOLOGY IN THE EXTENDED SOLAR CORONA THROUGH FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY STEREO SECCHI COR1

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ryun-Young; Kramar, Maxim; Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M.; Chae, Jongchul; Zhang, Jie

    2013-10-10

    We present global coronal seismology for the first time, which allows us to determine inhomogeneous magnetic field strength in the extended corona. From the measurements of the propagation speed of a fast magnetosonic wave associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) and the coronal background density distribution derived from the polarized radiances observed by the STEREO SECCHI COR1, we determined the magnetic field strengths along the trajectories of the wave at different heliocentric distances. We found that the results have an uncertainty less than 40%, and are consistent with values determined with a potential field model and reported in previous works. The characteristics of the coronal medium we found are that (1) the density, magnetic field strength, and plasma ? are lower in the coronal hole region than in streamers; (2) the magnetic field strength decreases slowly with height but the electron density decreases rapidly so that the local fast magnetosonic speed increases while plasma ? falls off with height; and (3) the variations of the local fast magnetosonic speed and plasma ? are dominated by variations in the electron density rather than the magnetic field strength. These results imply that Moreton and EIT waves are downward-reflected fast magnetosonic waves from the upper solar corona, rather than freely propagating fast magnetosonic waves in a certain atmospheric layer. In addition, the azimuthal components of CMEs and the driven waves may play an important role in various manifestations of shocks, such as type II radio bursts and solar energetic particle events.

  4. Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of FischerTropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

  5. Annual Review of BPA-Funded Projects in Natural and Artificial Propagation of Salmonids, March 27-29, 1985, Holiday Inn Airport, Portland, Oregon.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-04-01

    The Fish and Wildlife Division of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) hosted a meeting for contractors to present the results of fiscal year 1984 research conducted to implement the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program. The meeting focused on those projects specifically related to natural and artificial propagation of salmonids. The presentations were held at the Holiday Inn Airport in Portland, Oregon, on March 27-29, 1985. This document contains abstracts of the presentations from that meeting. Section 1 contains abstracts on artificial propagation, fish health, and downstream migration, and Section 2 contains abstracts on natural propagation and habitat improvement. The abstracts are indexed by BPA Project Number and by Fish and Wildlife Program Measure. The registered attendees at the meeting are listed alphabetically in Appendix A and by affiliation in Appendix B.

  6. InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well light-emitting diodes with a grading InN composition suppressing the Auger recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tan, Swee Tiam; Ji, Yun; Kyaw, Zabu; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Sun, Xiao Wei E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org; Demir, Hilmi Volkan E-mail: VOLKAN@stanfordalumni.org

    2014-07-21

    In conventional InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), thin InGaN quantum wells are usually adopted to mitigate the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), caused due to strong polarization induced electric field, through spatially confining electrons and holes in small recombination volumes. However, this inevitably increases the carrier density in quantum wells, which in turn aggravates the Auger recombination, since the Auger recombination scales with the third power of the carrier density. As a result, the efficiency droop of the Auger recombination severely limits the LED performance. Here, we proposed and showed wide InGaN quantum wells with the InN composition linearly grading along the growth orientation in LED structures suppressing the Auger recombination and the QCSE simultaneously. Theoretically, the physical mechanisms behind the Auger recombination suppression are also revealed. The proposed LED structure has experimentally demonstrated significant improvement in optical output power and efficiency droop, proving to be an effective solution to this important problem of Auger recombination.

  7. Radiation Characterization Summary: ACRR Central Cavity Free-Field Environment with the 32-Inch Pedestal at the Core Centerline (ACRR-FF-CC-32-cl).

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Lippert, Lance L.; Vehar, David W.; Griffin, Patrick J.

    2015-08-01

    This document presents the facilit y - recommended characteri zation o f the neutron, prompt gamma - ray, and delayed gamma - ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor ( ACRR ) for the cen tral cavity free - field environment with the 32 - inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environmen t is ACRR - FF - CC - 32 - cl. The neutron, prompt gamma - ray , and delayed gamma - ray energy spectra , uncertainties, and covariance matrices are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma - ray fluence profiles within the experiment area of the cavity . Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse operations are presented with conversion examples . Acknowledgements The authors wish to th ank the Annular Core Research Reactor staff and the Radiation Metrology Laboratory staff for their support of this work . Also thanks to David Ames for his assistance in running MCNP on the Sandia parallel machines.

  8. The three-dimensional analysis of hinode polar jets using images from LASCO C2, the STEREO COR2 coronagraphs, and SMEI

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, H.-S.; Jackson, B. V.; Buffington, A.; Hick, P. P.; Shimojo, M.; Sako, N.

    2014-04-01

    Images recorded by the X-ray Telescope on board the Hinode spacecraft are used to provide high-cadence observations of solar jetting activity. A selection of the brightest of these polar jets shows a positive correlation with high-speed responses traced into the interplanetary medium. LASCO C2 and STEREO COR2 coronagraph images measure the coronal response to some of the largest jets, and also the nearby background solar wind velocity, thereby giving a determination of their speeds that we compare with Hinode observations. When using the full Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) data set, we track these same high-speed solar jet responses into the inner heliosphere and from these analyses determine their mass, flow energies, and the extent to which they retain their identity at large solar distances.

  9. ESTIMATING THE ARRIVAL TIME OF EARTH-DIRECTED CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS AT IN SITU SPACECRAFT USING COR AND HI OBSERVATIONS FROM STEREO

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Wageesh; Srivastava, Nandita

    2013-07-20

    Predicting the arrival time and transit speed of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) near the Earth is critical to understanding the solar-terrestrial relationship. Even though STEREO observations now provide multiple views of CMEs in the heliosphere, the true speeds derived from stereoscopic reconstruction of SECCHI coronagraph data are not quite sufficient for accurate forecasting of the arrival time at Earth of a majority of CMEs. This uncertainty is due to many factors that change CME kinematics, such as the interaction of two or more CMEs or the interaction of CMEs with the pervading solar wind. In order to understand the propagation of CMEs, we have used the three-dimensional triangulation method on SECCHI coronagraph (COR2) images and geometric triangulation on the J-maps constructed from Heliospheric Imagers HI1 and HI2 data for eight Earth-directed CMEs observed during 2008-2010. Based on the reconstruction, and implementing the drag-based model for the distance where the CMEs could not be tracked unambiguously in the interplanetary (IP) medium, the arrival time of these CMEs have been estimated. These arrival times have also been compared with the actual arrival times as observed by in situ instruments. The analysis reveals the importance of heliospheric imaging for improved forecasting of the arrival time and direction of propagation of CMEs in the IP medium.

  10. ANL-FF-262i

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    from our foundry's graphite-melted uranium is remote because of the metalIs high carbon content. High purity metal isto be considered a possible solution of many of the...

  11. O10'I'uf^^ff%

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AT 59 AVENUE C, LODI, NEW JERSEY (LN008V) M. G. Yalcintas C. A. Johnson* *Biology Division ... In addi- tion, the authors appreciate the manuscript preparation by J. M. Wyrick, Biology ...

  12. FF CADDCAP_FR1.book

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    contamination are not cost effective. Second, because of the high remediation costs, closure in place with monitoring and institutional controls is the only likely...

  13. Sonoma Mission Inn Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    110C383.15 K 230 F 689.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 1 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 6 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  14. Microsoft Word - Advanced Scholars Program Agenda 2015-FF.docx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    & A nalysis o f S hapes ( Lakshman P rasad) Thursday, A pril 1 6 Making N ext G eneration B iofuel S ystems W ork ( Richard S ayre) Proposal W riting a nd L iving i n N...

  15. Materials Data on Er3InN (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Ho3InN (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Sc3InN (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Dy3InN (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on InN (SG:186) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on InN (SG:186) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. A New Method for Low-Cost Production ff Titanium Alloys for Reducing...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    The University of Utah - Salt Lake City, UT A novel metallurgical process for producing titanium (Ti) components could produce a ten-fold material usage improvement in aircraft and ...

  2. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specification: ACRR Free-Field Environment (ACRR-FF-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity free-field reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 31 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  3. 300-FF-1 Operable Unit physical separation of soils pilot plant study

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1994-01-15

    Alternative Remedial Technologies, Inc. (ART) was selected in a competitive selection process to conduct a pilot study for the physical separation of soils in the North Process Pond of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site. In January 1994, ART mobilized its 15 tons-per-hour pilot plant to the site. The plant was initially staged in a commercial area to allow for pretest inspections and minor modifications. The plant was specifically designed for use as a physical separations unit and consisted of a feed hopper, wet screens, hydrocyclones, as well as settling and dewatering equipment. The plant was supported in the field with prescreening equipment, mobile generators, air compressors, and water storage tanks. The plant was moved into the surface contamination area on March 24, 1994. The testing was conducted during the period March 23, 1994 through April 13, 1994. Two soil types were treated during the testing: a natural soil contaminated with low levels of uranium, cesium, cobalt, and heavy metals, and a natural soil contaminated with a uranium carbonate material that was visually recognizable by the presence of a green sludge material in the soil matrix. The ``green`` material contained significantly higher levels of the same contaminants. Both source materials were treated by the plant in a manner that fed the material, produced clean gravel and sand fractions, and concentrated the contaminants in a sludge cake. Process water was recycled during the operations. The testing was extremely successful in that for both source waste streams, it was demonstrated that volume reductions of greater than 90% could be achieved while also meeting the test performance criteria. The volume reduction for the natural soils averaged a 93.8%, while the ``green`` soils showed a 91.4% volume reduction.

  4. AMENDMENT Of SOLlCJTATlON!MODIFlCATfON OF CONTRACT ll. COrRACT...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... OBLIGATION OF FUNDS (DEC 2000), the amount presently obligated by the Goverent with respect to this contract is 2,151,212, 859.04 i* I Continued... j Except as proVided heroin...

  5. Pulmonary arterial hypertension and cor pulmonale associated with chronic domestic woodsmoke inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, J.; Salas, J.; Martinez-Guerra, M.L.; Gomez, A.; Martinez, C.; Portales, A.; Palomar, A.; Villegas, M.; Barrios, R. )

    1993-01-01

    We describe the clinical, radiologic, functional, and pulmonary hemodynamic characteristics of a group of 30 nonsmoking patients with a lung disease that may be related to intense, long-standing indoor wood-smoke exposure. The endoscopic and some of the pathologic findings are also presented. Intense and prolonged wood-smoke inhalation may produce a chronic pulmonary disease that is similar in many aspects to other forms of inorganic dust-exposure interstitial lung disease. It affects mostly country women in their 60s, and severe dyspnea and cough are the outstanding complaints. The chest roentgenograms show a diffuse, bilateral, reticulonodular pattern, combined with normalized or hyperinflated lungs, as well as indirect signs of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). On the pulmonary function test the patients show a mixed restrictive-obstructive pattern with severe hypoxemia and variable degrees of hypercapnia. Endoscopic findings are those of acute and chronic bronchitis and intense anthracotic staining of the airways appears to be quite characteristic. Fibrous and inflammatory focal thickening of the alveolar septa as well as diffuse parenchymal anthracotic deposits are the most prominent pathologic findings, although inflammatory changes of the bronchial epithelium are also present. The patients had severe PAH in which, as in other chronic lung diseases, chronic alveolar hypoxia may play the main pathogenetic role. However, PAH in wood-smoke inhalation-associated lung disease (WSIALD) appears to be more severe than in other forms of interstitial lung disease and tobacco-related COPD. The patients we studied are a selected group and they may represent one end of the spectrum of the WSIALD.

  6. SpyroCor(tm) Radiant Tube Heater Inserts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    leg releases 30% more energy than the exhaust leg because of convection and radiation heat transfer in the burner leg. With the help of a grant from DOE's Inventions and...

  7. A New Method for Low-Cost Production ff Titanium Alloys for Reducing Energy Consumption of Mechanical Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Project demonstrating the viability of this technology by providing quantitative data that assesses the potential of the technology compared to commercial wrought materials

  8. Acute Cor Pulmonale and Right Heat Failure Complicating Ethanol Ablative Therapy: Anesthetic and Radiologic Considerations and Management

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, Bhiken; Matsumoto, Alan H.

    2013-10-15

    Ethanol is an effective ablative agent used for the treatment of certain solid organ tumors and vascular malformations (VMs). The egress of ethanol beyond the target tissue can be associated with significant changes to the cardiopulmonary system that can lead to cardiac arrest. This article reviews the contemporary role of ethanol in tumor and VM treatment and discusses the physiological mechanisms of acute pulmonary hypertension and cardiovascular collapse. The importance of periprocedural recognition of the hemodynamic changes that can occur with the use of ethanol and the treatment of this condition are discussed.

  9. COR-Y12-12/7/2012-21660 DE-AC05-00OR22800 DOE Form

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... TN DEPT. OF ENVIRONMENT AND CONSERVATION - HAZARDOUS WASTE PROGRAM EP TN 1200 RULES OF THE TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT AND CONSERVATION EP, CP TN 1200-1-13 TENNESSEE ...

  10. Relevant Links

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Institiute(AMRI), UNO Area Hotels Chase Suite Hotel Baton Rouge Extended Stay America Holiday Inn South Baton Rouge Marriott Residence Inns Wyndham Garden Gulf Coast...

  11. Enhanced memory effect via quantum confinement in 16?nm InN nanoparticles embedded in ZnO charge trapping layer

    SciTech Connect

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar; Cimen, Furkan; Alkis, Sabri; Orta, Blend; Alevli, Mustafa; Dietz, Nikolaus; Okyay, Ali K.

    2014-06-23

    In this work, the fabrication of charge trapping memory cells with laser-synthesized indium-nitride nanoparticles (InN-NPs) embedded in ZnO charge trapping layer is demonstrated. Atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers are used as tunnel and blocking oxides. The gate contacts are sputtered using a shadow mask which eliminates the need for any lithography steps. High frequency C-V{sub gate} measurements show that a memory effect is observed, due to the charging of the InN-NPs. With a low operating voltage of 4?V, the memory shows a noticeable threshold voltage (V{sub t}) shift of 2?V, which indicates that InN-NPs act as charge trapping centers. Without InN-NPs, the observed memory hysteresis is negligible. At higher programming voltages of 10?V, a memory window of 5?V is achieved and the V{sub t} shift direction indicates that electrons tunnel from channel to charge storage layer.

  12. Data:Ed3f81ff-1848-460a-9611-fe3dbf7b368e | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    a-9611-fe3dbf7b368e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  13. Data:1f590a33-1ff5-482b-91c2-e8dd847f3b0a | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  14. Acquisition Guide Chapter 42.5

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    ... of the contract management team (project managers, program managers, attorneys, and financial and procurement ... Career Management Program Handbook, CORs must have the COR ...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: MTEM 2014: Malware Technical Exchange

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Meeting: Registration Hotels in Albuquerque ABQ Marriott ABQ Marriott Pyramid North Andaluz Hotel (downtown ABQ) Candlewood Suites ABQ Courtyard Albuquerque Airport Embassy Suites ABQ Hilton Garden Inn Uptown Hyatt Place Uptown Residence Inn Airport

  16. NNMCAB Board Minutes: June 2000 Taos

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the June 28, 2000 Board meeting at Holiday Inn Presentation LANL, Procurement Process, Betty Romero

  17. NNMCAB Board Minutes: September 2011 Taos

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the September 28, 2011 Board meeting at Sagebrush Inn Conference Center Presentation DOE, Long Term Stewardship, Tom Longo

  18. NNMCAB Board Minutes: November 2002 Santa Fe

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the November 20, 2002 Board meeting at Holiday Inn Planning for SSAB Chairs Workshop on Transuranic Waste

  19. NNMCAB Board Minutes: July 2009 Santa Fe

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the July 29, 2009 Board meeting at Holiday Inn Q&A With New Mexico Environment Department

  20. NNMCAB Board Minutes: May 2008 Santa Fe

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the May 22, 2008 Board meeting at Holiday Inn Presentation San Ildefonso, Tribal Risk Assessment, Raymond Martinez

  1. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (BILIWG) Kick-Off Meeting Proceedings Hilton Garden Inn-BWI,Baltimore, MD October 24, 2006 | Department of Energy (BILIWG) Kick-Off Meeting Proceedings Hilton Garden Inn-BWI,Baltimore, MD October 24, 2006 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) Kick-Off Meeting Proceedings Hilton Garden Inn-BWI,Baltimore, MD October 24, 2006 Proceedings from the October 24, 2006 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group Kick-Off Meeting.

  2. ERSUG: July 11 - 12, 1994 (Rockville, Maryland)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ERSUG: July 11 - 12, 1994 (Rockville, Maryland) Dates July 11 - 12, 1994 Location Holiday Inn, Crowne Plaza Rockville, Maryland Presentations Agenda ERSUG Meeting July 11-12, 1994 Holiday Inn, Crowne Plaza Rockville, MD The Energy Research Supercomputer Users' Group (ERSUG) will meet at the Holiday Inn, Crowne Plaza in Rockville, MD on July 11-12, 1994. In the past, this meeting has combined presentations describing work-in-progress at NERSC with lively user discussions in the areas of the

  3. Standard Review Plan - Code of Record | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Standard Review Plan (SRP) on Code of Record (COR) is to provide guidance for a uniform review of the COR for DOE nuclear projects. Standard Review Plan - Code of Record (472.26 ...

  4. Visiting Fermilab - Local Accommodations

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Baymont Inn & Suites 1585 Naperville-Wheaton Road Naperville, Illinois (Approx. 8 miles ... Courtyard by Marriott 1155 E. Diehl Road Naperville, Illinois (Approx. 8 miles from ...

  5. NNMCAB Board Minutes: July 2010 Los Alamos

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the July 28, 2010 Board meeting at Holiday Inn Presentation LANL, Material Disposal Area T Background and Status Update

  6. NNMCAB Board Minutes: July 2011 Los Alamos

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the July 27, 2011 Board meeting at Holiday Inn Presentation LANL, Los Conchas Fire, Dave McInroy Presentation DOE, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, John Heaton

  7. NNMCAB Board Minutes: September 2012 Taos

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the September 26, 2012 Board Meeting at Sagebrush Inn Conference Center Presentation LANL, Chromium Perchlorate Groundwater Plume, Danny Katzman

  8. 2016 UNIVERSITY TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH (UTSR) PROJECT RESEARCH...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    UNIVERSITY TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH (UTSR) PROJECT RESEARCH MEETING ACCOMMODATIONS The Inn at Virginia Tech and Skelton Conference Center 901 Prices Fork Road Blacksburg, VA 24061 ...

  9. Laurens County, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Clinton, South Carolina Cross Hill, South Carolina Fountain Inn, South Carolina Gray Court, South Carolina Joanna, South Carolina Laurens, South Carolina Mountville, South...

  10. NNMCAB Board Minutes: September 2003 Taos

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the September 17, 2003 Board meeting at Sagebrush Inn Conference Center Presentation LANL, 2002 Environmental Surveillance Report, Lars Soholt

  11. NNMCAB Board Minutes: May 2004 Taos

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the May 22, 2004 Board meeting at Sagebrush Inn Conference Center Presentation DOE, Report on the NNMCAB, Ed Wilmot

  12. Verde Biofuels Inc | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Biofuels Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Verde Biofuels Inc Place: Fountain Inn, South Carolina Product: The company is a biodiesel producer and distributor. References:...

  13. NNMCAB Board Minutes: May 2006 Taos

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the May 20, 2006 Board meeting at Sagebrush Inn Conference Center Consideration and Action on EM SSAB Chairs Letters

  14. Webster Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Webster Parish, Louisiana Cotton Valley, Louisiana Cullen, Louisiana Dixie Inn, Louisiana Doyline, Louisiana Dubberly,...

  15. NNMCAB Board Minutes: September 2013 Taos

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the September 25, 2013 Board meeting at Sagebrush Inn Conference Center Presentation DOE Carlsbad Field Office, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Update, George Basabilvazo

  16. NNMCAB Board Minutes: April 2009 Santa Fe

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the April 8, 2009 Board meeting at Holiday Inn Presentation Kerr Laboratory, Well Screen Analysis Report, Steven Acree, Richard Wilkin

  17. Simbach Braunau GEPP | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Home Simbach Braunau GEPP General Information Name Simbach Braunau GEPP Facility Power Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Braunau am Inn; Austria...

  18. Unlocking Plant Metabolic Diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Osbourn, Anne [John Innes Centre

    2014-03-19

    Anne Osbourn, John Innes Centre, UK, at the 9th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 19, 2014 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  19. Pegasus Energietechnik AG | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    AG Place: Mhldorf am Inn, Germany Zip: 84453 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Germany-based renewable energy developer assisting with projects in Europe. References:...

  20. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STRATEGY FOR IMPROVING CONTRACT AND...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives Contracting Officers (COs) and Contracting Officer Representatives (CORs) have distinct roles, responsibilities,...

  1. Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change - Revised Contracting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Officer's Representative Certification (COR) | Department of Energy Career Management Handbook Change - Revised Contracting Officer's Representative Certification (COR) Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change - Revised Contracting Officer's Representative Certification (COR) A recent review of the January 2009 issue of the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Management Program (ACMP) Handbook identified many areas that require an update. Although the ACMP Handbook revisions

  2. Request for Proposal No. DE-SOL-0008470

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Payment of Fixed Fee (1) The FF for the Base Term of the Contract shall be paid monthly at the rate of one-twelfth (112) of the annual FF per month. Such payment amounts ...

  3. ARM Climate Research Facility

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ...wrret1liljclouFF.cN.YYYYMMDD.hhmmss where: XXX the location of the instrument (nsa, sgp, ... Datastream Variable Name Variable Long Name Units XXXmwrlosFF.b1 XXX is all sites tbsky23 ...

  4. Oak Ridge Universities

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Ff E u) Ff l- o ca frl Fl lr1 & o O z fsl Fl U2 F.f z H t H fr H z FI (, z o rI1 H Fl ... A . E O 6 Z (n u2 l Ff tr E vt & fsl F is z cn z o H a ts trl () 2 o q) frl o Fl (J t ...

  5. CX-007991: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wood Pole Replacements Along the Drummond-Macks Inn, Macks Inn-Madison, and Targhee Tap 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line Right-of-ways CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/10/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. CX-009709: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wood Pole Replacements Along the Drummond-Macks Inn, Macks Inn-Madison, and Swan Valley-Teton 115-kilovolt Transmission Line Rights-of-Way CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/29/2012 Location(s): Idaho, Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  7. Crystallographic analysis of human hemoglobin elucidates the structural basis of the potent and dual antisickling activity of pyridyl derivatives of vanillin

    SciTech Connect

    Abdulmalik, Osheiza; Ghatge, Mohini S.; Musayev, Faik N.; Parikh, Apurvasena; Chen, Qiukan; Yang, Jisheng; Nnamani, Ijeoma; Danso-Danquah, Richmond; Eseonu, Dorothy N.; Asakura, Toshio; Abraham, Donald J.; Venitz, Jurgen; Safo, Martin K.

    2011-11-01

    Pyridyl derivatives of vanillin increase the fraction of the more soluble oxygenated sickle hemoglobin and/or directly increase the solubility of deoxygenated sickle hemoglobin. Crystallographic analysis reveals the structural basis of the potent and dual antisickling activity of these derivatives. Vanillin has previously been studied clinically as an antisickling agent to treat sickle-cell disease. In vitro investigations with pyridyl derivatives of vanillin, including INN-312 and INN-298, showed as much as a 90-fold increase in antisickling activity compared with vanillin. The compounds preferentially bind to and modify sickle hemoglobin (Hb S) to increase the affinity of Hb for oxygen. INN-312 also led to a considerable increase in the solubility of deoxygenated Hb S under completely deoxygenated conditions. Crystallographic studies of normal human Hb with INN-312 and INN-298 showed that the compounds form Schiff-base adducts with the N-terminus of the ?-subunits to constrain the liganded (or relaxed-state) Hb conformation relative to the unliganded (or tense-state) Hb conformation. Interestingly, while INN-298 binds and directs its meta-positioned pyridine-methoxy moiety (relative to the aldehyde moiety) further down the central water cavity of the protein, that of INN-312, which is ortho to the aldehyde, extends towards the surface of the protein. These studies suggest that these compounds may act to prevent sickling of SS cells by increasing the fraction of the soluble high-affinity Hb S and/or by stereospecific inhibition of deoxygenated Hb S polymerization.

  8. Microsoft Word - cf16-la-hotel-Info.docx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Macintosh HD:Users:rebecca_j:Desktop:cf16-la-hotel-Info.docx Accommodations Info in Los Alamos There are many wonderful places to stay in Santa Fe as well as the surrounding areas but the following is a list of hotels in Los Alamos: Comfort Inn 2455 Trinity Dr. Los Alamos, NM 87544 505-661-1110 800-992-2694 Hampton Inn & Suites 124 State Rd. 4 Los Alamos, NM 87544 505-672-3838 Holiday Inn Express at Entrada Park 60 Entrada Dr. Los Alamos, NM 87544 505-661-2646 Motel 6 2175 Trinity Dr. Los

  9. livermore field office

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    donation to those in need.

    Livermore Field Office sets core values as part of continuous improvement process http:nnsa.energy.govbloglivermore-field-office-sets-cor...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    pending approval, Other EE, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Roofs, LED Lighting, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    EE, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels, Tankless Water Heater City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    EE, Food Service Equipment, Reflective Roofs, LED Lighting City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Insulation, Windows, Doors, Roofs, Other EE, Reflective Roofs City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  16. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Direct-Use, Other Distributed Generation Technologies City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  17. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Controls, LED Lighting, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  18. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Reflective Roofs, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Other EE, LED Lighting City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Thermostats, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Other EE City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    CustomOthers pending approval, Tankless Water Heater City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    MeasuresWhole Building, Wind (Small), Reflective Roofs City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (Small), Anaerobic Digestion, Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund...

  4. RR-883-CC_book.indb

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Acknowledgments e authors wish to thank Debra Knopman (RAND Corporation), Keith Crane (RAND Cor- poration), Eric Vugrin (Sandia National Laboratory), and Ross Guttromson (Sandia ...

  5. O R I G I N A L S I G N E D B Y

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    with information copies of the correspondence to the COR and the DOE Patent General Counsel (where patent or technical data issues are involved). (b) Patents Correspondence. ...

  6. ORISE Contract, PART I - SCHEDULE, Section G Contract Administration...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Officer's Representative (COR), with an information copy of the correspondence to the DOE Contract Specialist. (b) PatentsTechnical Data Intellectual Property Correspondence. ...

  7. DOE F 473.2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OMB Control No.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... COR overseeing the contract. The printed namesignature and date of the HSO (or Federal employee delegated in writing to sign for the HSO) supporting the DOE Federal Sponsor. ...

  8. DOE HQ F 5631.2

    Energy Saver

    Preemployment checks conducted and the applicant was found suitable for employment. HSO MA COR Routing Symbol ALL SIGNATURES MUST BE TYPEDPRINTED AND SIGNED 11. JUSTIFICATION: ...

  9. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences - Newsletter

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    alcohol-free facility. The Guest House is a 3 floor, 47 room, 71 bed inn (23 rooms with King beds and 24 rooms with 2 ex-long double beds). All rooms have a mini fridge and...

  10. NNMCAB Board Agenda: July 2015 Taos

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda for the July 29, 2015 Board meeting at the Sagebrush Inn Conference Center Presentation DOE, Los Alamos National Laboratory TRU Waste Update, David Nickless Presentation DOE, Overview of EM-LA Projects and Planning, Bob Pfaff

  11. NNMCAB Board Minutes: September 2010 Taos

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the September 29, 2010 Board meeting at Sagebrush Inn Conference Center Presentation LANL, Storm Water Monitoring at LANL and Status of the Storm Water Permit, Steve Veenis Presentation LANL, Air Monitoring at LANL, Andrew Green

  12. NNMCAB Board Minutes: July 29, 2015 Taos

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the July 29, 2015 Board Meeting: At the Sagebrush Inn and Conference Center. Presentation DOE, TRU Waste Update, David Nickless Presentation DOE, Project Overview EM-LA, Robert Pfaff

  13. HERO Ski Trip to Mt. Hood Meadows February

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    If there is enough interest, we may be able to charter a bus to drive us up and back. Stay at the Best Western Plus Hood River Inn which is just 30 miles from Mt. Hood's largest...

  14. SREL Reprint #3036

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK 2Molecular Biology, Ume University, SE-901 87 Ume, Sweden 3Department of Molecular Biology, John Innes Centre, Norwich NR4 7UH, UK ...

  15. A D O E En

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    power to enhance clean energy production A D O E En e rg y Inn ov ati o n H ub Nuclear Energy Cover photo: 3D visualizations allow a physical walk-through of the top 20% of...

  16. Notices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... July 15, 2015, 6:00 p.m ...... 870 Williston Road, South Burlington, Vermont 05403. Holiday Inn, Rutland, Vermont ...... July 16, 2015, 6:00 p.m ...

  17. Accommodations

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Plaza All hotels are within walking distance of the covention center and Plaza. The Sage Inn is ideal for Students. Note: Links are provided for more information only. Hotel...

  18. Conferences, workshops, trainings

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    models, leading to breakthrough accuracies in benchmarks for computer vision, language, etc. Jan 11 Mon 8:30 AM Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop Inn and Spa at...

  19. 2016 utsr | netl.doe.gov

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Dates: November 1-3, 2016 Registration Fee: 210.00 98.00 - Entrance Only Venue: The Inn at Virginia Tech and Skelton Conference Center 901 Prices Fork Road Blacksburg, VA 24061 ...

  20. Microsoft Word - Parking.docx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Inn at Virginia Tech and Skelton Conference Center has 381 parking spaces. Parking is free for overnight guests as well as for guests attending the 2016 University Systems Research ...

  1. NNMCAB Board Minutes: September 2014 Taos

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the September 24, 2014 Board meeting at Sagebrush Inn Conference Center Presentation DOE/LANL, Chromium Status, Cheryl Rodriguez, Danny Katzman Presentation LANL, Understanding the What and The Why of February 14, 2014, Jeff Mousseau

  2. NNMCAB Board Minutes: January 2009 Santa Fe

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the January 28, 2009 Board meeting at Holiday Inn Presentation DOE, Implementation on NNMCAB Recommendations, Jeff Casalina Presentation LANL, Well Network Analysis and Characterization of Groundwater at LANL Site, Danny Katzman

  3. This refers to tbe%aspectioa cooducted,ooMlny 2 - 5, 1961. of

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    28, 1959. d. Fused U02 is not stored in+n inert atwos- sphere as described ia paragraph 2(b) of the I license applicatiou dated February 2, 1960. Pursuant to the...

  4. fgr3372.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... of Science, Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Materials Sciences of the ... GaN, a wide direct bandgap semiconductor, and its alloys with AIN and InN, have realized, ...

  5. Agenda CBS Public Meeting-Sacramento

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    David Ballard, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology CONSENT- BASED SITING CONSENT-BASED SITING PUBLIC MEETING Holiday Inn Capitol Plaza-Sacramento 300 J Street Sacramento, CA 95814 April ...

  6. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee Meeting

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC) will hold its next meeting October 27–28, 2015, at the Holiday Inn Capitol in Washington, D.C.

  7. Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop WHEN: Jan 11, 2016 8:30 AM - Jan 13, 2016 5:30 PM WHERE: Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe...

  8. NNMCAB Board Minutes: January 2010 Santa Fe

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the January 27, 2010 Board meeting at Holiday Inn Presentation LANL, Status of Corrective Actions, Dave McInroy Presentation DOE, Natural Resource Damage Assessment, Nancy Werdel

  9. NNMCAB Board Minutes: November 2009 Santa Fe

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the November 18, 2009 Board meeting at Holiday Inn Presentation LANL, Groundwater Monitoring System, Danny Katzman Presentation NNMCAB, Remote Handled 33 Shafts at Area G, Robert Villarreal

  10. Using Computation to Enhance LEDs

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    being developed to harvest light energy from the Sun. Key Challenges: studying the electronic and optical properties of small-diameter InN nanowires using first-principles...

  11. Lodging in Boulder and Louisville, Colorado | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    it is approximately 25 miles north of Golden. Hotels Renaissance Boulder Flatiron Hotel 500 Flatiron Blvd. Broomfield, CO 80021 Phone: 720-587-3014 Comfort Inn 1196 W. Dillon...

  12. NNMCAB Board Agenda: September 2014 Taos

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda of the September 24, 2014 Board meeting at Sagebrush Inn Conference Center Presentation DOE/LANL, Chromium Remediation in Groundwater, Cheryl Rodriguez, Danny Katzman Presentation LANL, Nitrate Salt Waste at LANL, Jeff Mousseau

  13. Physics Informed Machine Learning

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Informed Machine Learning Physics Informed Machine Learning WHEN: Jan 19, 2016 8:00 AM - Jan 22, 2016 4:00 PM WHERE: Inn at Loretto, Santa Fe CATEGORY: Science TYPE:...

  14. Lodging Buildings

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    were then asked to place the building into the following more specific categories: a hotel a motel, inn, or resort a retirement home a shelter, orphanage, or children's home a...

  15. Northern New Mexico Citizens Advisory Board Meeting

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    bi-monthly meeting of the Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board (NNMCAB or CAB) meeting was held on September 30, 2009 at the Holiday Inn, 4048 Cerrillos Road Santa...

  16. 2010's | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC)

    Riccardo Betti Paul C. Canfield Mark B. Chadwick David E. Chavez Amit Goyal Thomas P. Guilderson Lois Curfman McInnes Bernard Matthew Poelker Barry F. Smith Ceremony Recap Last ...

  17. Non-Equilibrium Pathways during Electrochemical Phase Transformations...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    of the active material and its concentration in the composite electrode architecture. ... Figure 1. (Upper panel) Schematic illustration of operando FF TXM-XANES. Electrochemistry ...

  18. Superfluid density and Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition of a spin-orbit-coupled Fulde-Ferrell superfluid

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Cao, Ye; Liu, Xia -Ji; He, Lianyi; Long, Gui -Lu; Hu, Hui

    2015-02-09

    We theoretically investigate the superfluid density and Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) transition of a two-dimensional Rashba spin-orbit-coupled atomic Fermi gas with both in-plane and out-of-plane Zeeman fields. It was recently predicted that, by tuning the two Zeeman fields, the system may exhibit different exotic Fulde-Ferrell (FF) superfluid phases, including the gapped FF, gapless FF, gapless topological FF, and gapped topological FF states. Due to the FF paring, we show that the superfluid density (tensor) of the system becomes anisotropic. When an in-plane Zeeman field is applied along the x direction, the tensor component along the y direction ns,yy is generally larger thanmore » ns,xx in most parameter space. At zero temperature, there is always a discontinuity jump in ns,xx as the system evolves from a gapped FF into a gapless FF state. With increasing temperature, such a jump is gradually washed out. The critical BKT temperature has been calculated as functions of the spin-orbit-coupling strength, interatomic interaction strength, and in-plane and out-of-plane Zeeman fields. We predict that the novel FF superfluid phases have a significant critical BKT temperature, typically at the order of 0.1TF, where TF is the Fermi degenerate temperature. Furthermore, their observation is within the reach of current experimental techniques in cold-atom laboratories.« less

  19. Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Coronado, DOE-RL; Ben Harp, DOE-ORP; John Price, Ecology Action: Agency briefing, letter, ... EPA Action: Project update Context: Uranium treatment progress (300-FF-5) Monitor ...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Joint Venture (United States) Strategic Petroleum Reserve Office, New Orleans, ... body radiotherapy underwent treatment planning for a 7 MV FFF and a 6 MV FF beams to ...

  1. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Alexander W illiams Designation and Certification Manager O ff-Site Branch Division of Eastern Area Programs O ffice of Environmental Restoration Attachment bee: Weston E; :I ...

  2. Uranium Geochemistry in Vadose Zone and Aquifer Sediments from the 300 Area Uranium Plume

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Davis, Jim A.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Qafoku, Nik; Wellman, Dawn M.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2005-07-21

    This report documents research conducted by the RCS Project to update the record of decision for the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit on the Hanford Site.

  3. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Current Versus Voltage

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    of devices, including: open-circuit voltage (Voc), short-circuit current (Isc), fill factor (FF), maximum power output of the device (Pmax), voltage at maximum power...

  4. Phase II Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    DeNovio, Nicole M.; Bryant, Nathan; King, Chrissi B.; Bhark, Eric; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Pickens, John F.; Farnham, Irene; Brooks, Keely M.; Reimus, Paul; Aly, Alaa

    2005-04-01

    This report documents pertinent transport data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Phase II FF CAU transport model.

  5. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier1Adjustment...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    property of type Number. Subproperties This property has the following 34 subproperties: 9 Data:93eeba74-c3bd-499c-89ff-7b8f32af7e3d Data:93eeba74-c3bd-499c-89ff-7b8f32af7e3d...

  6. Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    John McCord

    2004-12-01

    This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

  7. DE-SOL-0008449 REPORTING REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    employee personnel, identified by the Contracting Officer's Representative (COR), who require access to the system on behalf of the U.S. Government. 1.4 DOE Laboratory Personnel- Employees of DOE Laboratory M&O contractors, identified by the COR, who require access to the system in support of Federal Personnel. 1.5 Administrative Contractor Personnel- Employees of non-M&O DOE contractors, identified by the COR, and approved by the Contractor, who require access to the system in support

  8. DE-SOL-0008449 REPORTING REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    employee personnel, identified by the Contracting Officer's Representative (COR), who require access to the system on behalf of the U.S. Government. 1.4 DOE Laboratory Personnel- Employees of DOE Laboratory M&O contractors, identified by the COR, who require access to the system in support of Federal Personnel. 1.5 Administrative Contractor Personnel- Employees of non-M&O DOE contractors, identified by the COR, and approved by the Contractor, who require access to the system in support

  9. Security Informatics Research Challenges for Mitigating Cyber Friendly Fire

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Thomas E.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Roberts, Adam D.

    2014-09-30

    This paper addresses cognitive implications and research needs surrounding the problem of cyber friendly re (FF). We dene cyber FF as intentional o*ensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintentionally harms the mission e*ectiveness of friendly or neutral forces. We describe examples of cyber FF and discuss how it ts within a general conceptual framework for cyber security failures. Because it involves human failure, cyber FF may be considered to belong to a sub-class of cyber security failures characterized as unintentional insider threats. Cyber FF is closely related to combat friendly re in that maintaining situation awareness (SA) is paramount to avoiding unintended consequences. Cyber SA concerns knowledge of a system's topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system and its nodes, the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive and o*ensive countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. We describe a test bed designed to support empirical research on factors a*ecting cyber FF. Finally, we discuss mitigation strategies to combat cyber FF, including both training concepts and suggestions for decision aids and visualization approaches.

  10. Indium nitride: A narrow gap semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K.M.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Lu, H.; Schaff, W.J.

    2002-08-14

    The optical properties of wurtzite InN grown on sapphire substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy have been characterized by optical absorption, photoluminescence, and photomodulated reflectance techniques. All these three characterization techniques show an energy gap for InN between 0.7 and 0.8 eV, much lower than the commonly accepted value of 1.9 eV. The photoluminescence peak energy is found to be sensitive to the free electron concentration of the sample. The peak energy exhibits a very weak hydrostatic pressure dependence and a small, anomalous blueshift with increasing temperature. The bandgap energies of In-rich InGaN alloys were found to be consistent with the narrow gap of InN. The bandgap bowing parameter was determined to be 1.43 eV in InGaN.

  11. Self-annihilation of inversion domains by high energy defects in III-Nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Koukoula, T.; Kioseoglou, J. Kehagias, Th.; Komninou, Ph.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.

    2014-04-07

    Low-defect density InN films were grown on Si(111) by molecular beam epitaxy over an ?1??m thick GaN/AlN buffer/nucleation layer. Electron microscopy observations revealed the presence of inverse polarity domains propagating across the GaN layer and terminating at the sharp GaN/InN (0001{sup }) interface, whereas no inversion domains were detected in InN. The systematic annihilation of GaN inversion domains at the GaN/InN interface is explained in terms of indium incorporation on the Ga-terminated inversion domains forming a metal bonded In-Ga bilayer, a structural instability known as the basal inversion domain boundary, during the initial stages of InN growth on GaN.

  12. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Not Yet Assigned NETLSOD FE SOD 2012 Oct. 2012 - June 2013 Ben Smith (COR) Morgantown, WV B-22A Renovation Renovation will provide new HVAC, roofing, insulation, level concrete...

  13. Yosemite: Proposed Penalty (2014-CE-32015)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Northern Central Distributing, Inc. d/b/a Yosemite Home Décor failed to certify a variety of ceiling fans as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  14. Policy Flash 2012-61 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1 Policy Flash 2012-61 Attached is Policy Flash 2012-61 COR Tool Kit Rescission. Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Lorri Wilkins of the Professional...

  15. II V It.. "/.::::JIJtCl.4 National Nuclear Security Admfnistratlon

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Livermore Site Office PO Box 808, L-293 7000 East Avenue Livermore, Califor.i.a 94551-0808 JAN 14 2014 3250 COR-M0-114...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... to limited cross-reactivity between peach and hazelnut allergens. The differences in epitope regions may contribute to limited cross-reactivity between Cor a 8 and nsLTPs ...

  17. Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change - Revised Contracting...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    (43.19 KB) PF2012-16a.pdf (1.08 MB) More Documents & Publications OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides Personal Property Management Certification Brochure Accessing Online COR Training

  18. OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    528.37 KB) More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - AL2006-07.doc Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change - Revised Contracting Officer's Representative Certification (COR) Personal Property Management Certification Brochure

  19. Contract Number DE-EM0003383, Mod 014 Section G Workers' ...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... It will specify the extent of the COR's authority to act on behalf of the Contracting ... entitled "Changes;" 3. In any manner causes an increase or decrease in the total ...

  20. DE-RP05-01OR22717

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... It will specify the extent of the COR's authority to act on behalf of the Contracting ... entitled "Changes;" (3) In any manner causes an increase or decrease in the total ...

  1. DE-EM0003383

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... It will specify the extent of the COR's authority to act on behalf of the Contracting ... entitled "Changes;" 3. In any manner causes an increase or decrease in the total ...

  2. DOE TRANSCOM Technical Support Services DE-EM0002903 I-1 PART...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... It will specify the extent of the COR's authority to act on behalf of the Contracting ... entitled "Changes;" (3) In any manner causes an increase or decrease in the total ...

  3. Microsoft Word - Acquisition Guide 32 1 - Reviewing and Approving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (ACMP), which is defined in DOE O 361.1B. The Order prescribes training requirements for COs, CSs, and CORs, and includes a requirement for refresher training every two years....

  4. DOE TRANSCOM Technical Support Services DE-EM0002903 SECTION...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... DOE O 205.1B Per occurrence DOE Information COR Workplace Substance Abuse Program DOE O 350.1, Chg. 4 Within 60 days of assuming full responsibility of DOE Approval DOE- EMCBC ...

  5. City of Chicago- Small Business Improvement Fund

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SomerCor 504 Inc. administers the Small Business Improvement Fund for the City of Chicago. The fund utilizes revenue from Tax Increment Financing (TIF) and supports commercial and industrial...

  6. Unorthodox theoretical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Nedd, Sean

    2012-06-20

    The use of the ReaxFF force field to correlate with NMR mobilities of amine catalytic substituents on a mesoporous silica nanosphere surface is considered. The interfacing of the ReaxFF force field within the Surface Integrated Molecular Orbital/Molecular Mechanics (SIMOMM) method, in order to replicate earlier SIMOMM published data and to compare with the ReaxFF data, is discussed. The development of a new correlation consistent Composite Approach (ccCA) is presented, which incorporates the completely renormalized coupled cluster method with singles, doubles and non-iterative triples corrections towards the determination of heats of formations and reaction pathways which contain biradical species.

  7. Publications

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Publications Official releases of Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation publications General Inquiries Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 665-9090 Email All years denote Fiscal Years. Progress Report FY15 FCI Progress Report 2015 (pdf) 2014 (pdf) 2013 (pdf) 2011-2012 (pdf) 2009-2010 (pdf) 2007-2008 (pdf) 2005-2006 (pdf) 2004 (pdf) outSTANDING innOVATION Awards After 2011, the outSTANDING innOVATION Awards booklet and Progress Report were combined into a single

  8. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Shuttles Shuttle service will be provided for TUNL 50 guests according to the following schedule: Friday, Nov. 6 - From noon until 9 PM, shuttles will circulate every half-hour between Residence Inn by Marriott, Hilton Garden Inn, and the French Family Science Center (FFSC). Saturday, Nov. 7: 7:30 AM - 10 AM - Every half-hour between the hotels and FFSC Noon - 3 PM - Every half-hour between the hotels and FFSC 5 PM - 7 PM Every half-hour between the hotels, FFSC, and Trent Semans Center 9 PM -

  9. L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Manager O ff-Site Branch Division of Eastern Area Programs O ffice of Environmental Restoration Attachment FILE COPY bee: Weston Ei Ii Williams reader EM-421 Williams 51 9 -

  10. The Honorable Richard M

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Al,exand,er W illiams (301-427-1719) of my staff. I' Sincerely, - '8 , James W . Wagoner II -Director " "'. '. . O ff-SiteSavannah River Program Division . O ffice of ...

  11. TwentyNinety | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    TwentyNinety Jump to: navigation, search Name: TwentyNinety Place: Farnham, England, United Kingdom Zip: GU9 1FF Product: UK-based manufacturer of wireless junction box PV system....

  12. Y.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' .;-;< 14 ,I> ,,.. &.<,y---.--- * 1 .? 1 c ,-J ..1, j ' ii ,; :I : j' - * - v- e . . *' ' -y " Y. ;: -.-, yl-j ' " : -2 F*;f yTJ IEYii, , .- -.,ir:.l -. ( z;y;,y:' ...

  13. Cyber Friendly Fire: Research Challenges for Security Informatics

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Roberts, Adam D.

    2013-06-06

    This paper addresses cognitive implications and research needs surrounding the problem of cyber friendly fire (FF). We define cyber FF as intentional offensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintention-ally harms the mission effectiveness of friendly or neutral forces. Just as with combat friendly fire, maintaining situation awareness (SA) is paramount to avoiding cyber FF incidents. Cyber SA concerns knowledge of a systems topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system and its nodes, the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive and offensive countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. Mitigation strategies to combat cyber FF including both training concepts and suggestions for decision aids and visualization approachesare discussed.

  14. Microsoft Word - 3m NIM paperv3a.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    poly-vinylidenefluoride with trifluoroethylene. PACS: 87.61.Ff, 87.64.Lg, 63.20.Kr Key words: high resolution photoemission, phonon-electron interactions, Franck-Condon...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomassbiofuel ...

  16. Dr. Wm. E. Mott, Director Environmental 8 Safety Eng. Div.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Wm. E. Mott, Director Environmental 8 Safety Eng. Div. 0f.f ice of Environment (EU- 14) Dept. of Energy Washington, DC 20545 Dear Dr. Mott: MED Warehousing Location The sites ...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio tsub TItsub ff < ... The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, ...

  18. BPA-2011-01595-FOIA Response

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ENl oFF,l g 1ES OF P Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208-3621 PUBLIC AFFAIRS August 2, 20 In reply refer to: DK-7 David...

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory ships last of high-activity drums...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ships last ff high-activity drums to WIPP Los Alamos National Laboratory ships last of high-activity drums to WIPP The November shipment was the final delivery this year to the...

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory again top contributor to United...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Top contributor to United Way ff Santa Fe County Los Alamos National Laboratory again top contributor to United Way of Santa Fe County Laboratory employees and Los Alamos National...

  1. This Appendix Current as of August...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 100-K-36, 1706-KE Chemical Storage Facility Dry Well ... Remaining Sites (1999) 100-K-47* 100-K-47, 1904-K Process ... 300-3 300-3, 300-FF-1 Aluminum Hydroxide Burial Ground ...

  2. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview Program Overview Richard Farmer Richard Farmer ... 2 t t F l ll ff hi hl ffi i di f l d Fuel Cells Address Our Key Energy Challenges ...

  3. 2009 Analysis Platform Review Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, John

    2009-12-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Analysis platform review meeting, held on February 18, 2009, at the Marriott Residence Inn, National Harbor, Maryland.

  4. NNMCAB Board Minutes: May 2003 Taos

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minutes of the May 16, 2003 Board Retreat at Holiday Inn Don Fernando de Taos Presentation NNMCAB Fiscal Year 2003 Accomplishments Presentation DOE/LANL, Environmental Monitoring and Surveillance Groundwater and Surface Water, Ted Taylor Presentation DOE/LANL, Environmental Restoration, Ted Taylor

  5. 2009 Infrastructure Platform Review Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, John

    2009-12-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the U.S. Department of Energy Biomass program‘s Infrastructure platform review meeting, held on February 19, 2009, at the Marriott Residence Inn, National Harbor, Maryland.

  6. 2012 BATTERIES GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, MARCH 4-9, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Harris

    2012-03-09

    The Gordon Research Conference on BATTERIES was held at Four Points Sheraton / Holiday Inn Express, Ventura, California, March 4-9, 2012. The Conference was well-attended with 176 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

  7. Co-localised Raman and force spectroscopy reveal the roles of hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions in defining the mechanical properties of diphenylalanine nano- and micro-tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Sinjab, Faris; Bondakov, Georgi; Notingher, Ioan

    2014-06-23

    An integrated atomic force and polarized Raman microscope were used to measure the elastic properties of individual diphenylalanine (FF) nano- and micro-tubes and to obtain quantitative information regarding the inter-molecular interactions that define their mechanical properties. For individual tubes, co-localised force spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements allowed the calculation of the Young's and shear moduli (25 ± 5 GPa and 0.28 ± 0.05 GPa, respectively) and the contribution of hydrogen bonding network to the Young's modulus (∼17.6 GPa). The π-π interactions between the phenyl rings, dominated by T-type arrangements, were estimated based on previously published X-ray data to only 0.20 GPa. These results provide experimental evidence obtained from individual FF tubes that the network of H-bonds dominates the elastic properties of the FF tubes.

  8. Simultaneous negative refraction and focusing of fundamental frequency and second-harmonic fields by two-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-09-28

    Simultaneous negative refraction for both the fundamental frequency (FF) and second-harmonic (SH) fields in two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals have been found through both the physical analysis and exact numerical simulation. By combining such a property with the phase-matching condition and strong second-order susceptibility, we have designed a SH lens to realize focusing for both the FF and SH fields at the same time. Good-quality non-near field images for both FF and SH fields have been observed. The physical mechanism for such SH focusing phenomena has been disclosed, which is different from the backward SH generation as has been pointed out in the previous investigations. In addition, the effect of absorption losses on the phenomena has also been discussed. Thus, potential applications of these phenomena to biphotonic microscopy technique are anticipated.

  9. Quasi-phase-matching of the dual-band nonlinear left-handed metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yahong Song, Kun; Gu, Shuai; Liu, Zhaojun; Guo, Lei; Zhao, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Xin

    2014-11-17

    We demonstrate a type of nonlinear meta-atom creating a dual-band nonlinear left-handed metamaterial (DNLHM). The DNLHM operates at two distinct left-handed frequency bands where there is an interval of one octave between the two center frequencies. Under the illumination of a high-power signal at the first left-handed frequency band corresponding to fundamental frequency (FF), second-harmonic generation (SHG) is observed at the second left-handed band. This means that our DNLHM supports backward-propagating waves both at FF and second-harmonic (SH) frequency. We also experimentally demonstrate quasi-phase-matching configurations for the backward SHG. This fancy parametric process can significantly transmits the SH generated by an incident FF wave.

  10. FACT SHEET U.S. Department of Energy ARM Mobile Facility

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    t a * r - m * - HarmI cf r * f f - -* f * * - s - g pf -*L n sf af * L - t f w * - p L f * arm a f f f L - - - * * - * f - * - f f* i- -L arm m f f f * HamfI f -* - f * - - * - * f * - R - *L - - - - - L f f * * t * f f L amf L * * f - RPP * - f L amfRL * * f * * f - - o RP P c -* * - * f f * f *L * f - * -* - *L - -*L - * * *L amf * * f -* a- - * f f * * f * - -* - * amf - f * - f f - - fM b * * f - f L amf * - f f - - ff * - - f s - - - * * f f ff f -- - *L - * * * f f f f -M* f * ff - * - * *

  11. Stranski-Krastanov InN/InGaN quantum dots grown directly on Si(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Soto Rodriguez, Paul E. D. Aseev, Pavel; Gómez, Victor J.; Kumar, Praveen; Ul Hassan Alvi, Naveed; Calleja, Enrique; Morales, Francisco M.; Senichev, Alexander; Lienau, Christoph; Nötzel, Richard

    2015-01-12

    The authors discuss and demonstrate the growth of InN surface quantum dots on a high-In-content In{sub 0.73}Ga{sub 0.27}N layer, directly on a Si(111) substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy reveal uniformly distributed quantum dots with diameters of 10–40 nm, heights of 2–4 nm, and a relatively low density of ∼7 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}. A thin InN wetting layer below the quantum dots proves the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Near-field scanning optical microscopy shows distinct and spatially well localized near-infrared emission from single surface quantum dots. This holds promise for future telecommunication and sensing devices.

  12. Microsoft Word - Cohort 3 Syllabus.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    07/11/2016 Lab-Corps Cohort 3 | Summer 2016 Wednesday, July 6 - Thursday, August 25, 2016 Golden, Colorado - Webinar - Washington, D.C. At-a-Glance Schedule Kickoff Meeting WebEx Session Wednesday, July 6, 12:00 - 2:00 pm Welcome and Program Kickoff Table Mountain Inn Golden, CO Tuesday, July 12, 3:00 - 9:30pm All day workshops Table Mountain Inn Golden, CO Wednesday, July 13, 8:00am - 9:30pm Thursday, July 14, 8:00am - 9:30pm Friday, July 15, 8:30am - 2:00pm WebEx sessions Wednesdays, 7/6,

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.10 Hotels/Motels

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    1 2003 Floorspace and Energy Consumption for Hotels and Motels/Inns (1) Hotels Motels/Inns Average Electricity Consumption(kBtus/SF): 61.3 40.5 Average Natural Gas Consumption(kBtus/SF): 50.7 42.2 Average Fuel Oil Consumption(kBtus/SF)(2): 5.4 36.6 Total Energy Consumption (quads) 0.21 0.08 Average Energy Consumption (thousand Btu/SF): 110.0 74.9 Total Floorspace (billion SF): 1.90 1.05 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Averages for fuel souces include only the floorspace that use a given fuel. 2) For

  14. Atomic-scale electronic structure of the cuprate d-symmetry form factor density wave state

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    M. H. Hamidian; Kim, Chung Koo; Edkins, S. D.; Davis, J. C.; Mackenzie, A. P.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.; Lawler, M. J.; Kim, E. -A.; Sachdev, S.; et al

    2015-10-26

    Research on high-temperature superconducting cuprates is at present focused on identifying the relationship between the classic ‘pseudogap’ phenomenon1, 2 and the more recently investigated density wave state3–13. This state is generally characterized by a wavevector Q parallel to the planar Cu–O–Cu bonds 4–13 along with a predominantly d-symmetry form factor 14–17 (dFF-DW). To identify the microscopic mechanism giving rise to this state 18–30, one must identify the momentum-space states contributing to the dFF-DW spectral weight, determine their particle–hole phase relationship about the Fermi energy, establish whether they exhibit a characteristic energy gap, and understand the evolution of all these phenomenamore » throughout the phase diagram. Here we use energy-resolved sublattice visualization14 of electronic structure and reveal that the characteristic energy of the dFF-DW modulations is actually the ‘pseudogap’ energy Δ1. Moreover, we demonstrate that the dFF-DW modulations at E = –Δ1 (filled states) occur with relative phase π compared to those at E = Δ1 (empty states). Lastly, we show that the conventionally defined dFF-DW Q corresponds to scattering between the ‘hot frontier’ regions of momentum-space beyond which Bogoliubov quasiparticles cease to exist30–32. These data indicate that the cuprate dFF-DW state involves particle–hole interactions focused at the pseudogap energy scale and between the four pairs of ‘hot frontier’ regions in momentum space where the pseudogap opens.« less

  15. Atomic-scale electronic structure of the cuprate d-symmetry form factor density wave state

    SciTech Connect

    M. H. Hamidian; Kim, Chung Koo; Edkins, S. D.; Davis, J. C.; Mackenzie, A. P.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.; Lawler, M. J.; Kim, E. -A.; Sachdev, S.; Fujita, K.

    2015-10-26

    Research on high-temperature superconducting cuprates is at present focused on identifying the relationship between the classic ‘pseudogap’ phenomenon1, 2 and the more recently investigated density wave state3–13. This state is generally characterized by a wavevector Q parallel to the planar Cu–O–Cu bonds 4–13 along with a predominantly d-symmetry form factor 14–17 (dFF-DW). To identify the microscopic mechanism giving rise to this state 18–30, one must identify the momentum-space states contributing to the dFF-DW spectral weight, determine their particle–hole phase relationship about the Fermi energy, establish whether they exhibit a characteristic energy gap, and understand the evolution of all these phenomena throughout the phase diagram. Here we use energy-resolved sublattice visualization14 of electronic structure and reveal that the characteristic energy of the dFF-DW modulations is actually the ‘pseudogap’ energy Δ1. Moreover, we demonstrate that the dFF-DW modulations at E = –Δ1 (filled states) occur with relative phase π compared to those at E = Δ1 (empty states). Lastly, we show that the conventionally defined dFF-DW Q corresponds to scattering between the ‘hot frontier’ regions of momentum-space beyond which Bogoliubov quasiparticles cease to exist30–32. These data indicate that the cuprate dFF-DW state involves particle–hole interactions focused at the pseudogap energy scale and between the four pairs of ‘hot frontier’ regions in momentum space where the pseudogap opens.

  16. A multiresolution spatial parametrization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions.

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet; Michalak, Anna M.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2013-04-01

    The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. To that end, we construct a multiresolution spatial parametrization for fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2), to be used in atmospheric inversions. Such a parametrization does not currently exist. The parametrization uses wavelets to accurately capture the multiscale, nonstationary nature of ffCO2 emissions and employs proxies of human habitation, e.g., images of lights at night and maps of built-up areas to reduce the dimensionality of the multiresolution parametrization. The parametrization is used in a synthetic data inversion to test its suitability for use in atmospheric inverse problem. This linear inverse problem is predicated on observations of ffCO2 concentrations collected at measurement towers. We adapt a convex optimization technique, commonly used in the reconstruction of compressively sensed images, to perform sparse reconstruction of the time-variant ffCO2 emission field. We also borrow concepts from compressive sensing to impose boundary conditions i.e., to limit ffCO2 emissions within an irregularly shaped region (the United States, in our case). We find that the optimization algorithm performs a data-driven sparsification of the spatial parametrization and retains only of those wavelets whose weights could be estimated from the observations. Further, our method for the imposition of boundary conditions leads to a 10computational saving over conventional means of doing so. We conclude with a discussion of the accuracy of the estimated emissions and the suitability of the spatial parametrization for use in inverse problems with a significant degree of regularization.

  17. 303-K Storage Facility closure plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-15

    Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 303-K Storage Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 303-K Storage Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 303-K Storage Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 303-K Storage Facility. The 303-K Storage Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5.

  18. Slide 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Containment Technologies Presented by: T. J. Simpkin/M. J. Truex Location: Shilo Inn, Richland, Washington Date: June 7, 2011 CHPRC1106-08B HNF-49887-VA HNF-49887-VA General Response Action - Containment Technologies General Description * Physically isolate contaminants or limit water movement through contaminated zones to slow their movement sufficiently to meet groundwater remediation goals 2 State of Development * Has been applied as a remedy for waste sites, but not for the deep vadose zone

  19. Slide 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ex Situ Treatment and Disposal Presented by: T. A. DeBiase/J. R. Schneider Location: Shilo Inn, Richland, Washington Date: June 7, 2011 CHPRC006-08C HNF-49888-VA HNF-49888-VA General Response Action - Ex Situ Treatment and Disposal General Description * Apply a treatment to excavated contaminated soil that degrades or immobilizes the contaminants * Dispose of the treated soil 2 HNF-49888-VA Technology - Ex Situ Vitrification General Description * Apply electrical energy to melt and convert

  20. Slide 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ Treatment Presented by: T. J. Simpkin/M. J. Truex Location: Shilo Inn, Richland, Washington Date: June 7, 2011 CHPRC1106-08D HNF-49889-VA HNF-49889-VA General Response Action - In Situ Treatment General Description * Apply a treatment to contaminants in the ground that degrades them or slows their movement sufficiently to meet groundwater remediation goals 2 State of Development * In situ treatment has been applied as a remedy for saturated zones and for some vadose zone applications

  1. Slide 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Removal, Excavation Methods Presented by: J. R. Schneider/T. A. DeBiase Location: Shilo Inn, Richland, Washington Date: June 7, 2011 CHPRC1106-08E HNF-49890-VA HNF-49890-VA General Response Action - Removal, Excavation Methods General Description * Excavation is advanced by using earthmoving equipment * Overlying clean soil is removed and stockpiled * Contaminated soil is removed and disposed * Clean stockpiled soil is replaced to extent possible * Excavation sides are sloped or supported *

  2. Agenda12810 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC)

    8, 2010 Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings NSAC Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (78KB) NP Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees NP Home Meetings December 8, 2010 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Meeting December 8, 2010 Where: Holiday Inn National Airport Hotel, Shenandoah Ballroom I & II, 2650 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA, Phone Number: 703-684-7200. Purpose/Topics: Perspectives

  3. History | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    About Energy.gov » History History What's New in History July 13, 2016: DOE Receives Chairman's Award for Achievement in Historic Preservation July 13, 2016: DOE Receives Chairman's Award for Achievement in Historic Preservation The ACHP presents DOE and two local partners with the Chairman's Award for Historic Preservation for their efforts to restore and reuse the historic Alexander Inn in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The "Guest House" was built to accommodate officials visiting the Oak

  4. Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop WHEN: Jan 11, 2016 8:30 AM - Jan 13, 2016 5:30 PM WHERE: Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trail Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 USA CONTACT: Ivan Vitev CATEGORY: Science TYPE: Conference INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description This workshop will bring together senior researchers, postdoctoral fellows and talented graduate students to discuss the exciting recent developments and future directions in high energy

  5. Science Events

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Science Events Learn about our science by coming to Frontiers in Science lectures, catch Cafe Scientific events in your community, or come to sicence events at the Bradbury Science Museum. Sep 27 Tue 7:00 AM Systems Approaches in Immunology Inn and Spa at Loretto - Santa Fe, NM Advancements in immunology can be made through the development of theoretical and experimental techniques supplying models that bring together phenomena at different levels of complexity to study mechanisms that

  6. Roane County

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Let us pamper you at Whitestone Country Inn. Spend the day playing on Watts Bar Lake. Immerse yourself in the story of the Manhattan Project- one that changed the world forever. Natural beauty and recreation are part of the good life here in Roane County. Located in the Tennessee Valley with a Great Smoky Mountains backdrop, we enjoy four true seasons, generally mild temperatures and miles of picturesque waterfront. Roane County is home to inviting waterways, opportunities for adventure and

  7. Physics Informed Machine Learning

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Informed Machine Learning Physics Informed Machine Learning WHEN: Jan 19, 2016 8:00 AM - Jan 22, 2016 4:00 PM WHERE: Inn at Loretto, Santa Fe CATEGORY: Science TYPE: Conference INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description A revolution in statistics and machine learning (ML) is underway. Modern algorithms can now learn high level abstractions via hierarchical models, leading to breakthrough accuracies in benchmarks for computer vision, language, etc. Underlying these advances is a strong

  8. Present and Future Computing Requirements for PETSc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    and Future Computing Requirements for PETSc Jed Brown jedbrown@mcs.anl.gov Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado Boulder NERSC ASCR Requirements for 2017 2014-01-15 Extending PETSc's Hierarchically Nested Solvers ANL Lois C. McInnes, Barry Smith, Jed Brown, Satish Balay UChicago Matt Knepley IIT Hong Zhang LBL Mark Adams Linear solvers, nonlinear solvers, time integrators, optimization methods (merged TAO)

  9. Microsoft Word - DVZ Technologies Public Information Exchange Summary.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    DVZ Technologies Public Information Exchange June 7, 2011 Location: Shilo Inn, Richland, WA Opening Session - Flip Chart Notes Comments  Excavation technologies are good to approximately 40 ft. and make a big footprint. Develop some cost curves to get general understanding of cost/benefit.  Excavation can be cheap and quick.  Lots of deep vadose zone problems are black and white at 60 to 120 ft, but not at 250 ft.  Good technology screening process important. Need to categorize and

  10. Visualizations Image Gallery

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Visualizations Visualizations Image Gallery Chensantacruz Unusual Death for Ancient Stars chombocrunch2shalehi-res.jpg Resolved Steady-State Flow in Fractured Shale inn-nano-wire-pr-green.png Indium Nitride Nanostructures For More Efficient LEDs combustionmodeling1.jpg Turbulent Combustion Simulations lic-b-427-hr-crop-small.png Turbulence in Solar Wind corecollapserotator2 Explosion Mechanism in Core-Collapse Supernovae OpenMSINERSC.jpg OpenMSI: Mass Spectrometry Images of 3 Lipids Across a

  11. Systems Approaches in Immunology

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    September » Systems Approaches in Immunology Systems Approaches in Immunology WHEN: Sep 27, 2016 7:00 AM - Sep 28, 2016 5:00 PM WHERE: Inn and Spa at Loretto Santa Fe, NM CATEGORY: Community Science TYPE: Conference INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Advancements in immunology can be made through the development of theoretical and experimental techniques supplying models that bring together phenomena at different levels of complexity to study mechanisms that arise at the systems level.

  12. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Accommodations Blocks of rooms for reunion attendees have been reserved in Durham at two locations in close proximity to the Duke campus. The recommendated choices are listed in order. 1) Residence Inn by Marriott, Deadline October 16, 2015. 1108 West Main Street, Durham, NC 27701 This is a new Marriott which will open this fall close to downtown on the West Main Street near the Duke's East Campus. We suggest this hotel as the first choice for your accommodation. This location provides easy

  13. TEAM CUMBERLAND MEETING - November 13, 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    November 13, 2013 TEAM CUMBERLAND MEETING - November 13, 2013 Team Cumberland meeting was held on November 13, 2013 at The Inn at Opryland located at 2401 Music Valley Dr., Nashville, Tennessee. Documents Available for Download Team Cumberland Meeting Agenda (14.83 KB) Center Hill Project Update (2.42 MB) Wolf Creek Dam Update (1.97 MB) Customer Funding Project Report (1004.64 KB) Hydroelectric Design Center Introduction (2.16 MB) More Documents & Publications TEAM CUMBERLAND MEETING -

  14. TEAM CUMBERLAND MEETING - September 16, 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    6, 2015 TEAM CUMBERLAND MEETING - September 16, 2015 Team Cumberland Meeting was held on September 16, 2015 at The Inn at Opryland in Nashville, Tennessee. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD Team Cumberland Agenda, Sept 16, 2015 (403.61 KB) Water Management Environmental Restrictions (3.94 MB) Generation Outages Scheduling Impact (149.33 KB) Hydropower Optimization (900.76 KB) Customer Funding Progress Report (591.86 KB) Old Hickory Rehabilitation Analysis (256.51 KB) Wolf Creek Rehabilitation

  15. History | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    About Energy.gov » History History What's New in History July 13, 2016: DOE Receives Chairman's Award for Achievement in Historic Preservation July 13, 2016: DOE Receives Chairman's Award for Achievement in Historic Preservation The ACHP presents DOE and two local partners with the Chairman's Award for Historic Preservation for their efforts to restore and reuse the historic Alexander Inn in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The "Guest House" was built to accommodate officials visiting the Oak

  16. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    , 1. CONTRACT ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4 . REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15 PROJECT NO. (ff applicable) 0250 See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 05003 7. ADMINISTERED BY (ff other than Item 6) coDE jo5003 NNSA/Los Alamos Site Off ice NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office Los Alamos Site Off ice 3747 West Jemez Road 3747 West Jemez Road Los Alamos NM 87544 Los Alamos NM 87544 8.

  17. Design Forward and Fast Forward Semi-Annual Review

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    at the new Computational Research and Theory (CRT) Building at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on September 21-25, 2015. Under the initiatives, AMD, Cray, IBM, Intel Federal and NVIDIA will work to advance extreme-scale computing technology on the path to exascale. AGENDA MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM: Intel (FF2) 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM: Intel (DF1 & DF2) TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM: Cray (FF2) 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM: Cray (DF1 & DF2) WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 8:00 AM -

  18. SECTION G

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Occupational Medical Services at Hanford G-1 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS G.1 CORRESPONDENCE PROCEDURES ............................................................................................. G-2 G.2 SUBMISSION OF VOUCHERS/INVOICES .................................................................................... G-2 G.3 DOE CONTRACTING OFFICER'S REPRESENTATIVE (COR).................................................... G-4 G.4 CONTRACT

  19. Acquisition Career Management Program Handbook, Partial Revision of Chapter 11, Contracting Officer's Representative

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this flash is to provide interim guidance for certifying and appointing Contracting Officer's Representatives. This guidance complies with the Office of Federal Procurement Policy memorandum, Revisions to the Federal Acquisition Certification for Contracting Officer's Representatives (FAC-COR), dated September 6, 2011 with an effective date of January 1, 2012.

  20. BPA-2014-00440-FOIA Response

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Munro Freedom of InformationPrivacy Act Officer e rLOCI y .. . u ... T5VWC e7.5 ffA< . . .. .dr7 74 cyi 4A iQ,i t?21 ,sS.Jgoi,&'9-, L.JM .thxayi 4 . i.. iIy 7 ...

  1. IY:ILrnr IR-rl?l'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AD.&?: Ilrucllr(trrrbrr --ti- arfhn at 10 Qrrd 3Ptmet al-0 auQr&&JBd ?I I ff, ... IZ1It.,-dJL1r----h I-I-L crrQrrlwlwrm4,aQR-oDe,LhJmvsornedoQuPrntrt 1 u,alm*. ...

  2. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... half-width df, a band between f and f (ref. 51). b2 2Bt2 VPdf erf v df ff (f - fm)' (df)2 . (4) here Bt2 is the wave amplitude in units of Tesla and erf is the error function. ...

  3. ENVIROISSUES PAGE

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Local Government Meynard ?1hU1a Pam Laen RoDer Larson Jerry Peltier Jim Curdy Bob Parks ... HBl1ford Pr.j.t Office " .713 Jidwin. uile4 Ff COrulcTtsUS ArlVloo 168 Ro:hland, W ...

  4. PDSF User Meeting 06-02-15.pptx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    o ff S eptember 3 0 th * Please s tart m oving y our d ata t o H PSS n ow Scientific Linux 7 Is On PDSF * Can a ccess w ith export C HOSsl71 ( or s etenv C HOS s l71) chos *...

  5. SITES ELIHlNAlED FRCil FUW' ~1WWk'l ffi LY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I?%7 STGTE m rtExm ICmFIED cm&B fi re3xf.H ROJECT TIM % HER M JWDlCTICd Cf M W.&f&t ff NIF, Ml TtE FKILIIY If0 LICWSES TO WRE ffiDliXClIVE tt%iML. IVJ R&w mm IS h-m. STTE SW...

  6. Self-assembled peptide nanotubes as electronic materials: An evaluation from first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Akdim, Brahim E-mail: ruth.pachter@us.af.mil; Pachter, Ruth E-mail: ruth.pachter@us.af.mil; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2015-05-04

    In this letter, we report on the evaluation of diphenylalanine (FF), dityrosine (YY), and phenylalanine-tryptophan (FW) self-assembled peptide nanotube structures for electronics and photonics applications. Realistic bulk peptide nanotube material models were used in density functional theory calculations to mimic the well-ordered tubular nanostructures. Importantly, validated functionals were applied, specifically by using a London dispersion correction to model intertube interactions and a range-separated hybrid functional for accurate bandgap calculations. Bandgaps were found consistent with available experimental data for FF, and also corroborate the higher conductance reported for FW in comparison to FF peptide nanotubes. Interestingly, the predicted bandgap for the YY tubular nanostructure was found to be slightly higher than that of FW, suggesting higher conductance as well. In addition, the band structure calculations along the high symmetry line of nanotube axis revealed a direct bandgap for FF. The results enhance our understanding of the electronic properties of these material systems and will pave the way into their application in devices.

  7. Microsoft Word - QER Lori LeBlanc 05 27 2014.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Quadrennial E nergy R eview Stakeholder M eeting 3 New O rleans, L A May 2 7, 2 014 ... I 'd l ike t o s tart o ff b y saluting the A dministration a nd t he D epartment o f E ...

  8. MicroBooNE TPC Wires Image Map

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Aa 424 425 426 427 Bb 428 429 430 Cc 431 432 433 Dd 434 435 Ee 436 437 Ff 438 439 440 Gg 441 442 443 Hh 444 445 446 Ii 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 Jj 458 459 460 ...

  9. Appendix B Landfill Inspection Forms...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... N RIM PIPE FF 62080 747563.09 2081656.31 5974.16 PIPE GG 0.02 -0.01 0.01 62039 747563.11 2081656.30 5974.17 N RIM PIPE GG 62083 747741.61 2081226.18 6013.16 PIPE HH 0.06 0.06 ...

  10. Appendix B Landfill Inspection Forms and Survey Data

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... PIPE FF 13501 747563.10 2081656.31 5974.17 N RIM PIPE GG -0.03 0.03 0.00 13447 747563.08 2081656.34 5974.17 N RIM PIPE GG 13505 747741.64 2081226.20 6013.16 N RIM PIPE HH -0.08 ...

  11. Reservations | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    smith R.smith smith Mon Aug 18 09:00:00 2013 -0500 (CDT) 24:00 Allowed MIR-00000-73FF1-16384 > qsub -q R.smith -t 60 -n 1024 myprog.exe Once the reservation is...

  12. U S Dept of Energy SoE Statement 2014.docx8-7

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... b y 2 02,000 i n the years 2010 and 2030. I n a ddition, t he r eport s tates t hat ... o ff s hore d rilling. The State of New Mexico can - a nd s hould - b e a l eader i n e ...

  13. A test on reactive force fields for the study of silica dimerization reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Moqadam, Mahmoud; Riccardi, Enrico; Trinh, Thuat T.; Åstrand, Per-Olof; Erp, Titus S. van

    2015-11-14

    We studied silica dimerization reactions in the gas and aqueous phase by density functional theory (DFT) and reactive force fields based on two parameterizations of ReaxFF. For each method (both ReaxFF force fields and DFT), we performed constrained geometry optimizations, which were subsequently evaluated in single point energy calculations using the other two methods. Standard fitting procedures typically compare the force field energies and geometries with those from quantum mechanical data after a geometry optimization. The initial configurations for the force field optimization are usually the minimum energy structures of the ab initio database. Hence, the ab initio method dictates which structures are being examined and force field parameters are being adjusted in order to minimize the differences with the ab initio data. As a result, this approach will not exclude the possibility that the force field predicts stable geometries or low transition states which are realistically very high in energy and, therefore, never considered by the ab initio method. Our analysis reveals the existence of such unphysical geometries even at unreactive conditions where the distance between the reactants is large. To test the effect of these discrepancies, we launched molecular dynamics simulations using DFT and ReaxFF and observed spurious reactions for both ReaxFF force fields. Our results suggest that the standard procedures for parameter fitting need to be improved by a mutual comparative method.

  14. Stellar age spreads in clusters as imprints of cluster-parent clump densities

    SciTech Connect

    Parmentier, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Pfalzner, S.

    2014-08-20

    It has recently been suggested that high-density star clusters have stellar age distributions much narrower than that of the Orion Nebula Cluster, indicating a possible trend of narrower age distributions for denser clusters. We show this effect to likely arise from star formation being faster in gas with a higher density. We model the star formation history of molecular clumps in equilibrium by associating a star formation efficiency per free-fall time, ?{sub ff}, to their volume density profile. We focus on the case of isothermal spheres and we obtain the evolution with time of their star formation rate. Our model predicts a steady decline of the star formation rate, which we quantify with its half-life time, namely, the time needed for the star formation rate to drop to half its initial value. Given the uncertainties affecting the star formation efficiency per free-fall time, we consider two distinct values: ?{sub ff} = 0.1 and ?{sub ff} = 0.01. When ?{sub ff} = 0.1, the half-life time is of the order of the clump free-fall time, ?{sub ff}. As a result, the age distributions of stars formed in high-density clumps have smaller full-widths at half-maximum than those of stars formed in low-density clumps. When the star formation efficiency per free-fall time is 0.01, the half-life time is 10 times longer, i.e., 10 clump free-fall times. We explore what happens if the duration of star formation is shorter than 10?{sub ff}, that is, if the half-life time of the star formation rate cannot be defined. There, we build on the invariance of the shape of the young cluster mass function to show that an anti-correlation between the clump density and the duration of star formation is expected. We therefore conclude that, regardless of whether the duration of star formation is longer than the star formation rate half-life time, denser molecular clumps yield narrower star age distributions in clusters. Published densities and stellar age spreads of young clusters and star

  15. Optimization of leaf margins for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using a flattening filter-free beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wakai, Nobuhide; Sumida, Iori; Otani, Yuki; Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Masatoshi

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The authors sought to determine the optimal collimator leaf margins which minimize normal tissue dose while achieving high conformity and to evaluate differences between the use of a flattening filter-free (FFF) beam and a flattening-filtered (FF) beam. Methods: Sixteen lung cancer patients scheduled for stereotactic body radiotherapy underwent treatment planning for a 7 MV FFF and a 6 MV FF beams to the planning target volume (PTV) with a range of leaf margins (?3 to 3 mm). Forty grays per four fractions were prescribed as a PTV D95. For PTV, the heterogeneity index (HI), conformity index, modified gradient index (GI), defined as the 50% isodose volume divided by target volume, maximum dose (Dmax), and mean dose (Dmean) were calculated. Mean lung dose (MLD), V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for the lung (defined as the volumes of lung receiving at least 20 and 5 Gy), mean heart dose, and Dmax to the spinal cord were measured as doses to organs at risk (OARs). Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: HI was inversely related to changes in leaf margin. Conformity index and modified GI initially decreased as leaf margin width increased. After reaching a minimum, the two values then increased as leaf margin increased (V shape). The optimal leaf margins for conformity index and modified GI were ?1.1 0.3 mm (mean 1 SD) and ?0.2 0.9 mm, respectively, for 7 MV FFF compared to ?1.0 0.4 and ?0.3 0.9 mm, respectively, for 6 MV FF. Dmax and Dmean for 7 MV FFF were higher than those for 6 MV FF by 3.6% and 1.7%, respectively. There was a positive correlation between the ratios of HI, Dmax, and Dmean for 7 MV FFF to those for 6 MV FF and PTV size (R = 0.767, 0.809, and 0.643, respectively). The differences in MLD, V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for lung between FFF and FF beams were negligible. The optimal leaf margins for MLD, V20 Gy, and V5 Gy for lung were ?0.9 0.6, ?1.1 0.8, and ?2.1 1.2 mm, respectively, for 7 MV FFF compared to ?0.9 0.6, ?1.1 0

  16. Kalman-filtered compressive sensing for high resolution estimation of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions from sparse measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet; Michalak, Anna M.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2013-09-01

    The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. The limited nature of the measured data leads to a severely-underdetermined estimation problem. If the estimation is performed at fine spatial resolutions, it can also be computationally expensive. In order to enable such estimations, advances are needed in the spatial representation of ffCO2 emissions, scalable inversion algorithms and the identification of observables to measure. To that end, we investigate parsimonious spatial parameterizations of ffCO2 emissions which can be used in atmospheric inversions. We devise and test three random field models, based on wavelets, Gaussian kernels and covariance structures derived from easily-observed proxies of human activity. In doing so, we constructed a novel inversion algorithm, based on compressive sensing and sparse reconstruction, to perform the estimation. We also address scalable ensemble Kalman filters as an inversion mechanism and quantify the impact of Gaussian assumptions inherent in them. We find that the assumption does not impact the estimates of mean ffCO2 source strengths appreciably, but a comparison with Markov chain Monte Carlo estimates show significant differences in the variance of the source strengths. Finally, we study if the very different spatial natures of biogenic and ffCO2 emissions can be used to estimate them, in a disaggregated fashion, solely from CO2 concentration measurements, without extra information from products of incomplete combustion e.g., CO. We find that this is possible during the winter months, though the errors can be as large as 50%.

  17. High efficiency, radiation-hard solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ager III, J.W.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2004-10-22

    The direct gap of the In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N alloy system extends continuously from InN (0.7 eV, in the near IR) to GaN (3.4 eV, in the mid-ultraviolet). This opens the intriguing possibility of using this single ternary alloy system in single or multi-junction (MJ) solar cells of the type used for space-based surveillance satellites. To evaluate the suitability of In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N as a material for space applications, high quality thin films were grown with molecular beam epitaxy and extensive damage testing with electron, proton, and alpha particle radiation was performed. Using the room temperature photoluminescence intensity as a indirect measure of minority carrier lifetime, it is shown that In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N retains its optoelectronic properties at radiation damage doses at least 2 orders of magnitude higher than the damage thresholds of the materials (GaAs and GaInP) currently used in high efficiency MJ cells. This indicates that the In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N is well-suited for the future development of ultra radiation-hard optoelectronics. Critical issues affecting development of solar cells using this material system were addressed. The presence of an electron-rich surface layer in InN and In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N (0 < x < 0.63) was investigated; it was shown that this is a less significant effect at large x. Evidence of p-type activity below the surface in Mg-doped InN was obtained; this is a significant step toward achieving photovoltaic action and, ultimately, a solar cell using this material.

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites (CAU No. 443)

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    O E /N V- - 48 3- R E V 1 U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office E nv i r onm ent al R es t or at i on D i v i s i on N ev ada E nv i r onm ent al R es t or at i on Pr oj ect Cor r ect i v e Act i on Inv es t i gat i on Pl an f or t he Cent r al N ev ada Tes t Ar ea S u bs u r f ace S i t es ( Cor r ect i v e Act i on U ni t N o. 443) Cont r ol l ed Copy N o. : R ev i s i on N o. : 1 Febr u ar y 1999 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Available to the

  19. Preparation and reactivity of macrocyclic rhodium(III) alkyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Carraher, Jack M.; Ellern, Arkady; Bakac, Andreja

    2013-09-21

    Macrocyclic rhodium(II) complexes LRh(H2O)(2+) (L = L-1 = cyclam and L-2 = meso-Me-6-cyclam) react with alkyl hydroperoxides RC(CH3)(2)OOH to generate the corresponding rhodium(III) alkyls L(H2O)RhR2+ (R = CH3, C2H5, PhCH2). Methyl and benzyl complexes can also be prepared by bimolecular group transfer from alkyl cobaloximes (dmgH)(2)(H2O) CoR and (dmgBF(2))(2)(H2O) CoR (R = CH3, PhCH2) to LRh(H2O)(2+). The new complexes were characterized by solution NMR and by crystal structure analysis. They exhibit great stability in aqueous solution at room temperature, but undergo efficient Rh-C bond cleavage upon photolysis. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The dynamic character of the polar solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B. V.; Yu, H.-S.; Buffington, A.; Hick, P. P. E-mail: hsyu@ucsd.edu E-mail: pphick@ucsd.edu

    2014-09-20

    The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph C2 and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) COR2A coronagraph images, when analyzed using correlation tracking techniques, show a surprising result in places ordinarily thought of as 'quiet' solar wind above the poles in coronal hole regions. Instead of the static well-ordered flow and gradual acceleration normally expected, coronagraph images show outflow in polar coronal holes consisting of a mixture of intermittent slow and fast patches of material. We compare measurements of this highly variable solar wind from C2 and COR2A images and show that both coronagraphs measure essentially the same structures. Measurements of the mean velocity as a function of height of these structures are compared with mass flux determinations of the solar wind outflow in the large polar coronal hole regions and give similar results.

  1. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Qian, Y.; Rasch, P. J.; Easter, R. C.; Ma, P. -L.; Singh, B.; Huang, J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-01-07

    Black carbon (BC) particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source–receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fatemore » of BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation of the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source–receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on seasons and the locations in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in Himalayas and Central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to Northeast Plateau in all seasons and Southeast Plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching Northwest Plateau, especially in the summer. Although local emissions only contribute about 10% to

  2. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition, and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Qian, Y.; Rasch, P. J.; Easter, R. C.; Ma, P. -L.; Singh, B.; Huang, J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-06-08

    Black carbon (BC) particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source–receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source-tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fate ofmore » BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation in the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source–receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on season and location in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer, when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in the Himalayas and central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to the northeast plateau in all seasons and southeast plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching the northwest plateau, especially in the summer. Although local emissions only contribute about

  3. Quantifying sources, transport, deposition, and radiative forcing of black carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rudong; Wang, Hailong; Qian, Yun; Rasch, Philip J.; Easter, Richard C.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Black carbon (BC)particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source-receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. In this study, we use the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a newly developed source tagging technique, nudged towards the MERRA meteorological reanalysis, to characterize the fate of BC particles emitted from various geographical regions and sectors. Evaluated against observations over the HTP and surrounding regions, the model simulation shows a good agreement in the seasonal variation of the near-surface airborne BC concentrations, providing confidence to use this modeling framework for characterizing BC source- receptor relationships. Our analysis shows that the relative contributions from different geographical regions and source sectors depend on seasons and the locations in the HTP. The largest contribution to annual mean BC burden and surface deposition in the entire HTP region is from biofuel and biomass (BB) emissions in South Asia, followed by fossil fuel (FF) emissions from South Asia, then FF from East Asia. The same roles hold for all the seasonal means except for the summer when East Asia FF becomes more important. For finer receptor regions of interest, South Asia BB and FF have the largest impact on BC in Himalayas and Central Tibetan Plateau, while East Asia FF and BB contribute the most to Northeast Plateau in all seasons and Southeast Plateau in the summer. Central Asia and Middle East FF emissions have relatively more important contributions to BC reaching Northwest Plateau, especially in the summer. Although the HTP local emissions only contribute about 10% of BC in

  4. DepoNet

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    DRAFT TANK CLOSURE AND WASTE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT PUBLIC HEARING DATE: FEBRUARY 23, 2010 6:00 p.m. RED LION INN AT THE PARK 303 WEST NORTH RIVER DRIVE SPOKANE, WA 99206 James Parham, Facilitator PANEL MEMBERS: Ms. Mary Beth Burandt, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection Jeff Lyon, Washington State Department of Ecology, Hanford Project Office Nationwide Scheduling Toll Free: 1.800.337.6638 Facsimile: 1.973.355.3094 www.deponet.com Public Hearing February 23,

  5. Universal bandgap bowing in group III nitride alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K.M.; Ager III, J.W.; Li, S.X.; Haller, E.E.; Lu, H.; Schaff, W.J.

    2002-08-06

    The energy gaps of MBE-grown wurtzite-structure In{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}N alloys with x {le} 0.25 have been measured by absorption and photoluminescence experiments. The results are consistent with the recent discovery of a narrow bandgap of {approx}0.8 eV for InN. A bowing parameter of 3 eV was determined from the composition dependence of these bandgaps. Combined with previously reported data of InGaN and AlGaN, these results show a universal relationship between the bandgap variations of group III nitride alloys and their compositions.

  6. Agenda053003 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC)

    May 30, 2003 Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings NSAC Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (78KB) NP Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees NP Home Meetings May 30, 2003 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Meeting Friday, May 30, 2003 Where: Comfort Inn 1211 Glebe Road Arlington, VA Phone #: (703) 247-3399 (A few blocks from the NSF and the Ballston Orange Line Metro Station) Purpose: The primary purpose

  7. Agenda112901 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC)

    29-30, 2001 Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings NSAC Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (78KB) NP Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees NP Home Meetings November 29-30, 2001 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Meeting November 29-30, 2001 Holiday Inn 550 C Street, SW Washington, D.C. Preliminary Agenda November 29, 2001 Session 1 8:30 a.m. Welcome James Symons 8:40 a.m. Report from DOE 9:05 a.m. Report

  8. TTW 12-1-05

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    , 2005 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 11-30-05) 4,110 Shipments received since opening 33,321 Cubic meters of waste disposed 72,865 Containers disposed in the underground Upcoming Holiday Parties WTS Kid's Party December 3 - 12:00 p.m. Mall Cinema Movies offered: Zathura (PG) and Harry Potter (PG-13) WTS Christmas Party December 3 - 5:30 p.m. Walter Gerrells Performing Arts & Exhibition Centre Annex CTAC Holiday Party December 12 - 6:00 p.m. Stevens Inn NMED issues draft permit The New Mexico

  9. Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board Meeting

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    29, 2015 1:00 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. Sagebrush Inn Conference Center 1508 Paseo del Pueblo Sur Taos, New Mexico 87571 AGENDA Time Action Presenter 1:00 p.m. Call to Order Lee Bishop, DDFO Welcome and Introductions Doug Sayre, Chair Welcome to the Town of Taos Council Member Andrew T. Gonzales Approval of Agenda Approval of Minutes of May 20, 2015 1:10 p.m. Old Business a. Written Reports - See Packet Enclosures (5 minutes) b. Other items 1:20 p.m. New Business a. Report from Nominating Committee

  10. STEAB April Meeting Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    APRIL MEETING AGENDA April 28 - 29, 2015 Hilton Garden Inn Downton Austin 500 N Interstate 35, Austin, TX 78701 Rio Grande Conference Room DAY 1 - April 28 th 8:00 - 8:45 Breakfast, hotel meeting room 8:45 - 9:00 Agenda and Tour Overview Monica and Frank 9:00 - 9:45 Overview of the Office of Technology Transitions (teleconference) Jetta Wong, DOE 9:45 - 10:00 Austin, TX Overview and Highlights Dub Taylor 10:00 - 10:30 HUD Follow-up (teleconference) Kevin Bush, HUD 10:30 - 10:45 Break 10:45 -

  11. Report on the technical workshop on WTI incinerator risk issues. Held in Washington, DC on December 8-9, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The report includes information and materials from a peer review workshop organized by EPA's Risk Assessment Forum (RAF) for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response and Region 5. The meeting was held in Washington, DC, at the Holiday Inn Capitol on December 8-9, 1993. The subject of the peer review was a draft project plan prepared by EPA Region 5 for assessing risk at an incinerator operated by Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) in East Liverpool, Ohio. The peer review panel was convened to evaluate the project plan as the scientific foundation for a risk assessment, which will be used in setting final permit conditions for the WTI facility.

  12. 2016 Princeton-CEFRC-CI Summer School on Combustion - Schedule of Events

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton-CEFRC-CI Summer School on Combustion - Schedule of Events Sunday, June 19 th 13:00 - 17:00 Check In (Butler College) 18:30 - 20:30 Welcome Dinner/BBQ (Frick Chemistry Building) Monday, June 20 th - Friday June 24 th (see schedule below for special events) 08:45 - 09:45 Morning Lectures 09:45 - 10:00 Break 10:00 - 11:00 Morning Lectures Continues 11:00 - 11:15 Break 11:15 - 12:15 Morning Lectures Continues 12:15 - 14:00 Lunch Break (Tiger Inn Eating Club*) [Tuesday(21 st June): 12:15 -

  13. Microsoft Word - Consolidated Verbatim Transcript CBS Meeting Sacramento California Transcripts_Final

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Holiday Inn Capitol Plaza Sacramento 300 J Street Sacramento, CA 95814 April 26, 2016 VERBATIM TRANSCRIPT Mr. Jim Hamilton. Good afternoon. And for those in later time zones via webinar, good evening. Welcome, and thank you for being here today. My name is Jim Hamilton. I'm an advisor to the Department of Energy's Consent-Based Siting Team and my role here today is to help us all to have a good, open, productive conversation. To start off we have a few housekeeping issues I want to talk about

  14. International Atomic Energy Agency specialists meeting on experience in ageing, maintenance, and modernization of instrumentation and control systems for improving nuclear power plant availability

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the proceedings of the Specialist`s Meeting on Experience in Aging, Maintenance and Modernization of Instrumentation and Control Systems for Improving Nuclear Power Plant Availability that was held at the Ramada Inn in Rockville, Maryland on May 5--7, 1993. The Meeting was presented in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the International Atomic Energy Agency. There were approximately 65 participants from 13 countries at the Meeting. Individual reports have been cataloged separately.

  15. R

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    R eal Estate esources Rental Sellers Realty 119 Charles Seivers Blvd. Clinton, TN 37716 (865) 457-4110 www.sellers-realty.com Canterfield of Oak Ridge 200 Bus Terminal Rd. Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (865) 425-9966 www.canterfieldofoakridge.com Greenfield Senior Living 360 Laboratory Rd. Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (865) 483-1314 www.greenfieldseniorliving.com Guest House at Alexander Inn 210 East Madison Rd. Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (865) 399-2891 www.ssmgrp.com Meadowview Senior Living 111 Acuff Lane Clinton, TN

  16. PRESENT:

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    PUBLIC MEETING + + + + + FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14, 1997 + + + + + WASHINGTON, D.C. The Committee met in the Clark Room of the Capital Holiday Inn, 550 C Street, S.W., at 10:30 a.m., G. Campbell Watkins, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: G. CAMPBELL WATKINS, Chair DANIEL A. RELLES, Vice Chair DAVID R. BELLHOUSE R. SAMPRIT CHATTERJEE BRENDA G. COX CAROL A. GOTWAY CRAWFORD PHILIP HANSEN CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG ROY W. WHITMORE INVITED GUESTS: SEYMOUR SUDMAN RICHARD TABORS EIA STAFF PRESENT: JAY HAKES, EIA

  17. WIPP UPDATE: April 6, 2014

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2014 There is not a WIPP Recovery update today. Please go to the WIPP Recovery webpage at www.wipp.energy.gov for information on recent recovery activities. Community Meetings Scheduled April 9 - WIPP update to Carlsbad Rotary Club at 12 p.m. Location: Stevens Inn, 1829 S. Canal St. April 10 - Carlsbad Mayor Dale Janway and DOE will co-host a Town Hall meeting Thursday, April 10, featuring updates on WIPP recovery activities. The town hall meetings are held at 5:30 p.m. every Thursday at the

  18. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Awards Ceremony for 2011 Award Winners (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary)

    2016-07-12

    The winners for 2011 of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award were recognized in a ceremony held May 21, 2012. Dr. Steven Chu and others spoke of the importance of the accomplishments and the prestigious history of the award. The recipients of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award for 2011 are: Riccardo Betti (University of Rochester); Paul C. Canfield (Ames Laboratory); Mark B. Chadwick (Los Alamos National Laboratory); David E. Chavez (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Amit Goyal (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Thomas P. Guilderson (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Lois Curfman McInnes (Argonne National Laboratory); Bernard Matthew Poelker (Thomas Jeffereson National Accelerator Facility); and Barry F. Smith (Argonne National Laboratory).

  19. Agenda CBS Public Meeting-Sacramento

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    David Ballard, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology CONSENT- BASED SITING CONSENT-BASED SITING PUBLIC MEETING Holiday Inn Capitol Plaza-Sacramento 300 J Street Sacramento, CA 95814 April 26, 2016 4:00-5:00 PM Informal Open House and Poster Session (Before Meeting Begins) 5:00-5:15 PM Welcoming Remarks Robert Weisenmiller, Chair to the California Energy Commission 5:15-5:30 PM Moving Forward with Consent-Based Siting John Kotek, Acting Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy

  20. National Targets Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Nov 2011 For instructions on how to use the table and footnotes, see page 2 Education 144 63% 58 K-12 School College/University (campus level) 244 63% 104 Food Sales 570 86% 193 Grocery Store/Food Market Convenience store (with or without gas station) 657 90% 228 Food Service 575 59% 267 Restaurant/Cafeteria 434 53% 207 Fast Food 1170 64% 418 Inpatient Health Care (Hospital) Lodging 163 61% 72 Dormitory/Fraternity/Sorority Hotel/Motel/Inn Mall (Strip and Enclosed) 247 71% 94 Nursing/Assisted

  1. BOUT++: Performance Characterization and Recent Advances in Design

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    BOUT++: Performance Characterization and Recent Advances in Design Sean Farley, 1,2 Ben Dudson, 3 Praveen Narayanan, 4 Lois Curfman McInnes, 1 Maxim Umansky, 5 Xueqiao Xu, 5 Satish Balay, 1 John Cary, 6 Alice Koniges, 4 Carol Woodward, 5 Hong Zhang 1 Edge Localized Modes ￿ Fast (∼ 100µs) eruption from the edge of tokamak plasmas ￿ If uncontrolled in ITER, these would release ∼ 20 MJ ￿ World-wide effort to understand and control these events The BOUT++ Simulation Code ￿ Based on BOUT

  2. Summary of proceedings: Oklahoma and Texas wind energy forum, April 2-3, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S. C.; Ball, D. E.

    1981-06-01

    The Wind Energy Forum for Oklahoma and Texas was held at the Amarillo Quality Inn in Amarillo, Texas on April 2-3, 1981. Its purpose was to bring together the diverse groups involved in wind energy development in the Oklahoma and Texas region to explore the future commercial potential and current barriers to achieving this potential. Major topics of discussion included utility interconnection of wind machines and the buy-back rate for excess power, wind system reliability and maintenance concerns, machine performance standards, and state governmental incentives. A short summary of each presentation is included.

  3. SOUTHEASTERN FEDERAL POWER ALLIANCE Allatoona Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Allatoona Project 1138 GA Highway 20 Spur, Cartersville, GA 30121 September 14-15, 2016 September 14, 2016: Meet at the Fairfield Inn & Suites, Interstate 75, Exit 288 at 3:15 p.m. Caravan to Allatoona Powerplant. Following the tour we will travel to Dutch-treat dinner at Appalachian Grill, 14 East Church Street, Cartersville, GA. September 15, 2016: Meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. in the conference room of the Allatoona Project Management Office. Breaks will be announced based on agenda

  4. Innovation Prize

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sinha and team win Richard P. Feynman Innovation Prize September 23, 2014 Swept Frequency Acoustic Interferometry, the base technology behind the R&D 100 Award-winning Safire(tm) oil field sensor technology, was named by the Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation as the most innovative technology coming out of the Laboratory this year. Dipen Sinha and a team of researchers received the award last week during the Feynman Center's annual OutSTANDING InnOVATION celebration, which honors the

  5. ERSUG Meeting: June 25-26, 1996 (Germantown, MD)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ERSUG Meeting: June 25-26, 1996 (Germantown, MD) Dates June 25, 26th, 1996 Location The Hampton Inn Germantown, MD Notes and Action Items ERSUG Action Items from June 1996 meeting at Germantown, MD Get DOE staff on mailers for broadcast of ERSUG issues Responsibility: Kendall and Kitchens Review and comment on ERSUG Proposal to SAC Responsibility: All of ERSUG Comments to Rick Kendall by July 17th email: ra_kendall@pnl.gov Fax : (509) 375-6631 Review and comment on Requirements Document

  6. Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2008-01 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2008-01 Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2008-01 PF2008-51.pdf (2.93 MB) PF2008-51a - Attachment - Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2008-01 - Implementation Guidance for the Government-wide Research Terms and Conditions (495 KB) More Documents & Publications Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change - Revised Contracting Officer's Representative Certification (COR) Acquisition Letter/ Financial Assistance Letter (AL/FAL 2010-05) - Contract Periods of

  7. DOE TRANSCOM Technical Support Services DE-EM0002903 SECTION J - LIST OF ATTACHMENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ACRONYM LIST Acronym Description TRANSCOM Transportation Tracking and Communications System 8(a) Section 8(a) of the Small Business Act ADR Alternative Dispute Resolution CBFO Carlsbad Field Office CCR Central Contractor Registration CFR Code of Federal Regulations CLIN Contract Line Item Number CO Contracting Officer COR Contracting Officer Representative CPARS Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System DEAR Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation DOE Department of Energy DPLH

  8. Microsoft Word - Attachment B - Reporting Requirements.docx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    DE-SOL-0003339 J.1 ATTACHMENT B - REPORTING REQUIREMENTS REPORTING REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST 1. AWARDEE: 2. IDENTIFICATION NUMBER: REPORT SUBMISSION: Reports shall be submitted to the electronic addresses indicated in the NETL-identified distribution list provided in the post award debriefing. Electronic copies of each report must be submitted to the Contract Specialist (CS) and Contracting Officer's Representative (COR). 4. PLANNING AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS FORM NO. FREQ. NO. OF COPIES FORM NO.

  9. SES CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    3 (11-03) SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE CANDIDATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SESCDP) Developmental Assignment Opportunity DATE: NAME OF SES CANDIDATE: TITLE: ASSIGNMENT NUMBER: ASSIGNMENT BEGINS: ENDS: TELEPHONE NUMBER: FAX NUMBER: EMAIL ADDRESS: ASSIGNMENT LOCATION HOST ORGANIZATION: PURPOSE OF ASSIGNMENT: ASSIGNMENT POSITION: ASSIGNMENT DUTIES: EXECUTIVE COR QUALIFICATIONS TO BE ADDRESSED: OFFICE ADDRESS: TELEPHONE NUMBER: FAX NUMBER: E-MAIL ADDRESS: 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE

  10. TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2-16 DATE: December 22, 2011 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBJECT: Acquisition Career Management Handbook Change - Revised Contracting Officer's Representative Certification (COR) SUMMARY: A recent review of the January 2009 issue of the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Management Program (ACMP) Handbook identified many areas that require an update. Although

  11. DOE ORP Contracting Officer Representatives - Hanford Site

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE ORP Contracting Officer Representatives Office of River Protection About ORP ORP Projects & Facilities Newsroom Contracts & Procurements ORP Contracts & Procurements Home DOE-ORP Contract Management Plans DOE-ORP Prime Contracts DOE-ORP Contracting Officers DOE ORP Contracting Officer Representatives DOE ORP Purchase Card Buyers Contact ORP DOE ORP Contracting Officer Representatives Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size DESIGNATED COR

  12. DOE RL Contracting Officer Representatives - Hanford Site

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Officer Representatives DOE-RL Contracts/Procurements RL Contracts & Procurements Home Prime Contracts Current Solicitations Other Sources DOE RL Contracting Officers DOE RL Contracting Officer Representatives DOE RL Contracting Officer Representatives Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size CO/COR Contract Number Company Acronym Limitations CHAPIN, DOUGLAS DE-DT0002699 CNG DE-DT0002699, CASCADE NATURAL GAS PIPELINE EIS (DOE/EIS-0476) PHASE 1, WITH

  13. DOE RL Contracting Officers - Hanford Site

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Officers DOE-RL Contracts/Procurements RL Contracts & Procurements Home Prime Contracts Current Solicitations Other Sources DOE RL Contracting Officers DOE RL Contracting Officer Representatives DOE RL Contracting Officers Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size CO/COR Limitations Head of Contracting Activity (HCA) SURASH, JACK Contracting Officers APLET-ZELEN, MARCY PROCUREMENT CONTRACTS, INCLUDING INTERAGENCY AGREEMENTS, and SALES CONTRACTS NOT

  14. Morphological and kinematic evolution of three interacting coronal mass ejections of 2011 February 13-15

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Wageesh; Srivastava, Nandita

    2014-10-10

    During 2011 February 13-15, three Earth-directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs) launched in succession were recorded as limb CMEs by STEREO/SECCHI coronagraphs (COR). These CMEs provided an opportunity to study their geometrical and kinematic evolution from multiple vantage points. In this paper, we examine the differences in geometrical evolution of slow and fast CMEs during their propagation in the heliosphere. We also study their interaction and collision using STEREO/SECCHI COR and Heliospheric Imager (HI) observations. We have found evidence of interaction and collision between the CMEs of February 15 and 14 in the COR2 and HI1 field of view (FOV), respectively, while the CME of February 14 caught up with the CME of February 13 in the HI2 FOV. By estimating the true mass of these CMEs and using their pre- and post-collision dynamics, the momentum and energy exchange between them during the collision phase are studied. We classify the nature of the observed collision between the CMEs of February 14 and 15 as inelastic, reaching close to the elastic regime. Relating imaging observations with in situ WIND measurements at L1, we find that the CMEs move adjacent to each other after their collision in the heliosphere and are recognized as distinct structures in in situ observations. Our results highlight the significance of HI observations in studying CME-CME collision for the purpose of improved space weather forecasting.

  15. Data Package of Samples Collected for Hydrogeologic and Geochemical Characterization: 300 Area RI/FS Sediment Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, Michael J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Williams, Benjamin D.

    2011-05-01

    This is a data package for sediment samples received from the 300 FF 5 OU. This report was prepared for CHPRC. Between August 16, 2010 and April 25, 2011 sediment samples were received from 300-FF-5 for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

  16. SPECTROSCOPIC REDSHIFTS OF GALAXIES WITHIN THE FRONTIER FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ebeling, Harald; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; Barrett, Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    We present a catalog of 1921 spectroscopic redshifts measured in the fields of the massive galaxy clusters MACSJ0416.12403 (z = 0.397), MACSJ0717.5+3745 (z = 0.546), and MACSJ1149.5+2223 (z = 0.544), i.e., three of the four clusters selected by Space Telescope Science Institute as the targets of the Frontier Fields (FFs) initiative for studies of the distant Universe via gravitational lensing. Compiled in the course of the Massive Cluster Survey project (MACS) that detected the FF clusters, this catalog is provided to the community for three purposes: (1) to allow the identification of cluster members for studies of the galaxy population of these extreme systems, (2) to facilitate the removal of unlensed galaxies and thus reduce shear dilution in weak-lensing analyses, and (3) to improve the calibration of photometric redshifts based on both ground- and spacebased observations of the FF clusters.

  17. Scenarios for the ATF2 Ultra-Low Betas Proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, Eduardo; Tomas, Rogelio; Bambade, Philip; Kuroda, Shigeru; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji; Parker, Brett; Seryi, Andrei; White, Glen; Woodley, Mark; /SLAC

    2012-06-29

    The current ATF2 Ultra-Low beta proposal was designed to achieve 20nm vertical IP beam size without considering the multipolar components of the FD magnets. In this paper we describe different scenarios that avoid the detrimental effect of these multipolar errors to the beam size at the interaction point (IP). The simplest approach consists in modifying the optics, but other solutions are studied as the introduction of super-conducting wigglers to reduce the emittance or the replacement of the normal-conducting focusing quadrupole in the Final Doublet (NC-QF1FF) with a super-conducting quadrupole one (SC-QF1FF). These are fully addressed in the paper.

  18. Scenarios For The ATF2 Ultra-Low Betas Proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Marin E.; Parker B.; Tomas R. Bambade Kuroda S. Okugi T. Tauchi T. Terunuma N. Urakawa J. Seryi A. White G. Woodley M.

    2010-05-23

    The current ATF2 Ultra-Low beta proposal was designed to achieve 20nm vertical IP beam size without considering the multipolar components of the FD magnets. In this paper we describe different scenarios that avoid the detrimental effect of these multipolar errors to the beam size at the interaction point (IP). The simplest approach consists in modifying the optics, but other solutions are studied as the introduction of super-conducting wigglers to reduce the emittance or the replacement of the normal-conducting focusing quadrupole in the Final Doublet (NC-QF1FF) with a super-conducting quadrupole one (SC-QF1FF). These are fully addressed in the paper.

  19. Proximity induced vortices and long-range triplet supercurrents in ferromagnetic Josephson junctions and spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Alidoust, Mohammad; Halterman, Klaus

    2015-03-28

    Using a spin-parameterized quasiclassical Keldysh-Usadel technique, we theoretically study supercurrent transport in several types of diffusive ferromagnetic (F)/superconducting (S) configurations with differing magnetization textures. We separate out the even- and odd-frequency components of the supercurrent within the low proximity limit and identify the relative contributions from the singlet and triplet channels. We first consider inhomogeneous one-dimensional Josephson structures consisting of a uniform bilayer magnetic S/F/F/S structure and a trilayer S/F/F/F/S configuration, in which case the outer F layers can have either a uniform or conical texture relative to the central uniform F layer. Our results demonstrate that for supercurrents flowing perpendicular to the F/F interfaces, incorporating a conical texture yields the most effective way to observe the signatures of long-ranged spin-triplet supercurrents. We also consider three different types of finite-sized two-dimensional magnetic structures subjected to an applied magnetic field normal to the junction plane: a S/F/S junction with uniform magnetization texture and two S/F/F/S configurations with differing F/F bilayer arrangements. In one case, the F/F interface is parallel with the S/F junction interfaces while in the other case, the F/F junction is oriented perpendicular to the S/F interfaces. We then discuss the proximity vortices and corresponding spatial maps of currents inside the junctions. For the uniform S/F/S junction, we analytically calculate the magnetic field induced supercurrent and pair potential in both the narrow and wide junction regimes, thus providing insight into the variations in the Fraunhofer diffraction patterns and proximity vortices when transitioning from a wide junction to a narrow one. Our extensive computations demonstrate that the induced long-range spin-triplet supercurrents can deeply penetrate uniform F/F bilayers when spin-singlet supercurrents flow parallel to the

  20. Using Measurements of Fill Factor at High Irradiance to Deduce Heterobarrier Band Offsets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J. M.; Steiner, M. A.; Kanevce, A.

    2011-07-01

    Using a 2D device simulation tool, we examine the high irradiance behavior of a single junction, GaAs concentrator cell as a function of the doping in the back surface confinement layer. The confinement layer is designed to be a barrier for both holes and electrons in the base of the solar cell. For a p-type base we show that the FF of the cell at high concentrations is a strong function of both the magnitude of the valence band offset and the doping level in the barrier. In short, for a given valence band offset (VBO), there is a critical barrier doping, below which the FF drops rapidly with lower doping. This behavior is confirmed experimentally for a GaInP/GaAs double heterostructure solar cell where the critical doping concentration (at 500 suns) in the back surface confinement layer is ~1e18 cm-3 for a VBO of 300 meV.

  1. Inter-atomic force constants of BaF{sub 2} by diffuse neutron scattering measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuma, Takashi Makhsun,; Sakai, Ryutaro; Xianglian; Takahashi, Haruyuki; Basar, Khairul; Igawa, Naoki; Danilkin, Sergey A.

    2015-04-16

    Diffuse neutron scattering measurement on BaF{sub 2} crystals was performed at 10?K and 295?K. Oscillatory form in the diffuse scattering intensity of BaF{sub 2} was observed at 295?K. The correlation effects among thermal displacements of F-F atoms were obtained from the analysis of oscillatory diffuse scattering intensity. The force constants among neighboring atoms in BaF{sub 2} were determined and compared to those in ionic crystals and semiconductors.

  2. A multi-stimuli responive, self-assembling, boronic acid dipeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Brad Howard; Martinez, Alina Marissa; Wheeler, Jill S.; McKenzie, Bonnie B.; Miller, Lance Lee; Wheeler, David R.; Spoerke, Erik David

    2015-08-11

    Modification of the dipeptide of phenylalanine, FF, with a boronic acid (BA) functionality imparts unique aqueous self-assembly behavior that responds to multiple stimuli. Changes in pH and ionic strength are used to trigger hydrogelation via the formation of nanoribbon networks. Thus, we show for the first time that the binding of polyols to the BA functionality can modulate a peptide between its assembled and disassembled states.

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - 300 Area Perspective.pptx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Area Perspective 300 Area Perspective River and Plateau Committee February 15, 2012 February 15, 2012 John B. Price Business/Research Park in N Richland h d l h High Density Residential is the norm MSA Bldg and Townhouses "Smartpark" includes Townhouses High Density Residential Infiltration from Impervious Areas & Irrigation Townhouses Grass Townhouse Townhouses Grass Bare Ground from Construction Storm Sewer Asphalt Grass Grate p Remediated 1100 Area -Industrial Area f h l ff

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - Phil.Duffy.salishan4

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate prediction for decision support: intellectual and computational challenges computational challenges Phili B D ff Philip B. Duffy Climate Central, Inc. climatecentral.org Who Am I? * Physicist * Climate research since 1990 * Climate research since 1990 * Mostly modeling * Recent focus on societal impacts of climate * Recent focus on societal impacts of climate change, esp. in California. THIS TALK APPROVED FOR climatecentral.org Thanks for dinner! Outline * Origins of climate modeling -

  5. Quantifying sources of black carbon in Western North America using observationally based analysis and an emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Hegg, D. A.; Qian, Y.; Doherty, S. J.; Dang, C.; Ma, P.-L.; Rasch, P. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-05-04

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5), equipped with a technique to tag black carbon (BC) emissions by source regions and types, has been employed to establish source-receptor relationships for atmospheric BC and its deposition to snow over Western North America. The CAM5 simulation was conducted with meteorological fields constrained by reanalysis for year 2013 when measurements of BC in both near-surface air and snow are available for model evaluation. We find that CAM5 has a significant low bias in predicted mixing ratios of BC in snow but only a small low bias in predicted atmospheric concentrations over the Northwest USA andmore » West Canada. Even with a strong low bias in snow mixing ratios, radiative transfer calculations show that the BC-in-snow darkening effect is substantially larger than the BC dimming effect at the surface by atmospheric BC. Local sources contribute more to near-surface atmospheric BC and to deposition than distant sources, while the latter are more important in the middle and upper troposphere where wet removal is relatively weak. Fossil fuel (FF) is the dominant source type for total column BC burden over the two regions. FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomass/biofuel (BB) is larger than FF. An observationally based Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of the snow-impurity chemistry is conducted to quantitatively evaluate the CAM5 BC source-type attribution. While CAM5 is qualitatively consistent with the PMF analysis with respect to partitioning of BC originating from BB and FF emissions, it significantly underestimates the relative contribution of BB. In addition to a possible low bias in BB emissions used in the simulation, the model is likely missing a significant source of snow darkening from local soil found in the observations.« less

  6. NEMS Modeling of Coal Plants

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    NEMS Modeling of Coal Plants Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewable Analysis Laura Martin June 14, 2016 Washington, DC 2 EMM Structure EFD ECP EFP ELD Laura Martin Washington, DC, June 14, 2016 Electricity Load and Demand Submodule Liquid Fuels Market Module Model inputs for coal plants 3 * Existing coal plants - plant specific inputs - Fixed and variable operating and maintenance costs, annual capital additions - Retrofit costs (capital and O&M) - FGD, DSI, SCR, SNCR, CCS, FF -

  7. Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) Quality Assurance Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-02-20

    The scope of the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) is to provide technical and integration support to Fluor Hanford, Inc., including operable unit investigations at 300-FF-5 and other groundwater operable units, strategic integration, technical integration and assessments, remediation decision support, and science and technology. This Quality Assurance Management Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Fluor Hanford, Inc. Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project).

  8. Quantifying sources of black carbon in Western North America using observationally based analysis and an emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rudong; Wang, Hailong; Hegg, D. A.; Qian, Yun; Doherty, Sarah J.; Dang, Cheng; Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Fu, Qiang

    2015-11-18

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5), equipped with a technique to tag black carbon (BC) emissions by source regions and types, has been employed to establish source-receptor relationships for atmospheric BC and its deposition to snow over Western North America. The CAM5 simulation was conducted with meteorological fields constrained by reanalysis for year 2013 when measurements of BC in both near-surface air and snow are available for model evaluation. We find that CAM5 has a significant low bias in predicted mixing ratios of BC in snow but only a small low bias in predicted atmospheric concentrations over the Northwest USA and West Canada. Even with a strong low bias in snow mixing ratios, radiative transfer calculations show that the BC-in-snow darkening effect is substantially larger than the BC dimming effect at the surface by atmospheric BC. Local sources contribute more to near-surface atmospheric BC and to deposition than distant sources, while the latter are more important in the middle and upper troposphere where wet removal is relatively weak. Fossil fuel (FF) is the dominant source type for total column BC burden over the two regions. FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomass/biofuel (BB) is larger than FF. An observationally based Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of the snow-impurity chemistry is conducted to quantitatively evaluate the CAM5 BC source-type attribution. While CAM5 is qualitatively consistent with the PMF analysis with respect to partitioning of BC originating from BB and FF emissions, it significantly underestimates the relative contribution of BB. In addition to a possible low bias in BB emissions used in the simulation, the model is likely missing a significant source of snow darkening from local soil found in the observations.

  9. TIFF Image Writer patch for OpenSceneGraph

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2012-01-05

    This software consists of code modifications to the open-source OpenSceneGraph software package to enable the creation of TlFF images containing 16 bit unsigned data. They also allow the user to disable compression and set the DPI tags in the resulting TIFF Images. Some image analysis programs require uncompressed, 16 bit unsigned input data. These code modifications allow programs based on OpenSceneGraph to write out such images, improving connectivity between applications.

  10. Notices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    7 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 190 / Friday, September 30, 2016 / Notices Dated: September 26, 2016. C. Mora, Commander, Judge Advocate General's Corps, U.S. Navy, Federal Register Liaison Officer. [FR Doc. 2016-23649 Filed 9-29-16; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3810-FF-P DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION [Docket No.: ED-2016-ICCD-0106] Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Targeted Teacher Shortage Areas AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE), Department of Education (ED).

  11. Ten Projects Awarded NERSC Allocations under DOE's ALCC Program

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ten Projects Awarded NERSC Allocations under DOE's ALCC Program Ten Projects Awarded NERSC Allocations under DOE's ALCC Program June 24, 2014 43251113992ff3baa1edb NERSC Computer Room. Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt, LBNL Under the Department of Energy's (DOE) ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) program, 10 research teams at national laboratories and universities have been awarded 382.5 million hours of computing time at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The

  12. Project quality assurance plant: Sodium storage facility, project F-031

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, J.W.; Shank, D.R.

    1994-11-01

    The Sodium Storage Facility Project Quality Assurance Plan delineates the quality assurance requirements for construction of a new facility, modifications to the sodium storage tanks, and tie-ins to the FFTF Plant. This plan provides direction for the types of verifications necessary to satisfy the functional requirements within the project scope and applicable regulatory requirements determined in the Project Functional Design Criteria (FDC), WHC-SD-FF-FDC-009.

  13. Quantifying sources of black carbon in western North America using observationally based analysis and an emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Hegg, D. A.; Qian, Y.; Doherty, S. J.; Dang, C.; Ma, P.-L.; Rasch, P. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-11-18

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5), equipped with a technique to tag black carbon (BC) emissions by source regions and types, has been employed to establish source–receptor relationships for atmospheric BC and its deposition to snow over western North America. The CAM5 simulation was conducted with meteorological fields constrained by reanalysis for year 2013 when measurements of BC in both near-surface air and snow are available for model evaluation. We find that CAM5 has a significant low bias in predicted mixing ratios of BC in snow but only a small low bias in predicted atmospheric concentrations over northwestern USA and westernmore » Canada. Even with a strong low bias in snow mixing ratios, radiative transfer calculations show that the BC-in-snow darkening effect is substantially larger than the BC dimming effect at the surface by atmospheric BC. Local sources contribute more to near-surface atmospheric BC and to deposition than distant sources, while the latter are more important in the middle and upper troposphere where wet removal is relatively weak. Fossil fuel (FF) is the dominant source type for total column BC burden over the two regions. FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomass/biofuel (BB) is larger than FF. An observationally based positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the snow-impurity chemistry is conducted to quantitatively evaluate the CAM5 BC source-type attribution. While CAM5 is qualitatively consistent with the PMF analysis with respect to partitioning of BC originating from BB and FF emissions, it significantly underestimates the relative contribution of BB. In addition to a possible low bias in BB emissions used in the simulation, the model is likely missing a significant source of snow darkening from local soil found in the observations.« less

  14. Spectroscopic manifestations of local crystal distortions in excited 4f states in crystals of huntite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Malakhovskii, A. V.; Gnatchenko, S. L.; Kachur, I. S.; Piryatinskaya, V. G.; Sukhachev, A. L.; Sokolov, A. E.; Strokova, A. Ya.; Kartashev, A. V.; Temerov, V. L.

    2013-01-15

    Optical absorption spectra of YbAl{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4}, TmAl{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} and TbFe{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} trigonal crystals have been studied in temperature range 2-300 K. Temperature behavior of absorption lines parameters has shown, that during some f-f transitions the local environment of rare earth ions undergo distortions, which are absent in the ground state.

  15. High-Efficiency Polycrystalline CdTe Thin-Film Solar Cells with an Oxygenated Amorphous CdS (a-CdS:O) Window Layer: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.; Dhere, R. G.; Yan, Y.; Romero, M. J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, J.; DeHart, C.; Duda, A.; Perkins, C.; To, B.

    2002-05-01

    In the conventional CdS/CdTe device structure, the poly-CdS window layer has a bandgap of {approx}2.4 eV, which causes absorption in the short-wavelength region. Higher short-circuit current densities (Jsc) can be achieved by reducing the CdS thickness, but this can adversely impact device open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF). Also, poly-CdS film has about 10% lattice mismatch related to the CdTe film, which limits the improvement of device Voc and FF. In this paper, we report a novel window material: oxygenated amorphous CdS film (a-CdS:O) prepared at room temperature by rf sputtering. The a-CdS:O film has a higher optical bandgap (2.5-3.1 eV) than the poly-CdS film and an amorphous structure. The preliminary device results have demonstrated that Jsc of the CdTe device can be greatly improved while maintaining higher Voc and FF. We have fabricated a CdTe cell demonstrating an NREL-confirmed Jsc of 25.85 mA/cm2 and a total-area efficiency of 15.4%.

  16. Simulations of the quart (101-bar1)/water interface: A comparison of classical force fields, ab initi molecular dynamics, and x-ray reflectivity experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, Adam; Fenter, Paul; Kubicki, James D.; Wesolowski, David J; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the (1011) surface of quartz interacting with bulk liquid water are performed using three different classical force fields, Lopes et al., ClayFF, and CHARMM water contact angle (CWCA), and compared to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and X-ray reflectivity (XR) results. The axial densities of the water and surface atoms normal to the surface are calculated and compared to previous XR experiments. Favorable agreement is shown for all the force fields with respect to the position of the water atoms. Analyses such as the radial distribution functions between water and hydroxyl atoms and the average cosine of the angle between the water dipole vector and the normal of the surface are also calculated for each force field. Significant differences are found between the different force fields from such analyses, indicating differing descriptions of the structured water in the near vicinity of the surface. AIMD simulations are also performed to obtain the water and hydroxyl structure for comparison among the predictions of the three classical force fields to better understand which force field is most accurate. It is shown that ClayFF exhibits the best agreement with the AIMD simulations for water hydroxyl radial distribution functions, suggesting that ClayFF treats the hydrogen bonding more accurately.

  17. Improved control system of the thyristor flicker suppressor for the KEK 12-GeV PS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, S.; Baba, H.; Mikawa, K.; Sato, H.; Sueno, T.

    1983-08-01

    Thyristor control system of the 20 MVar flicker suppressor has been improved essentially. The previous feed forward (FF) loop with each single phase reactive current detector of the MR magnet power supply was exchanged to the present by both FF- and NFB-loops. The FF-loops consists of a three phase reactive power detector of the MPS and a forcing pattern generator on the fast but steady line voltage flicker, sag and surge. The NFB-loops control by the slow parts of the flicker and the unbalanced line voltages. These detectors of the reactive power, the voltage flicker and the unbalance have been developed. Sampled voltage flicker data with 12 bit ADC are processed by Z-80A micro computer system and the forcing pattern is generated by the system through 12 bit DAC into the loop. A typical voltage flicker including sag and surge has been reduced within + or - 1.5%, about 1/3 compared to the previous, at 66 kV primary line.

  18. Design and package of a {sup 14}CO{sub 2} field analyzer The Global Monitor Platform (GMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, Michelle; Marino, Bruno D.V.; Gronniger, Glen

    2011-08-01

    Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is widely accepted as a means to reduce and eliminate the fossil fuel CO{sub 2} (ff- CO{sub 2}) emissions from coal fired power plants. Success of CCS depends on near zero leakage rates over decadal time scales. Currently no commercial methods to determine leakage of ff-CO{sub 2} are available. The Global Monitor Platform (GMP) field analyzer provides high precision analysis of CO{sub 2} isotopes [12C (99%), 13C (<1%), 14C (1.2x10-10 %)] that can differentiate between fossil and biogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. Fossil fuels contain no {sup 14}C; their combustion should lower atmospheric amounts on local to global scales. There is a clear mandate for monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) of CCS systems nationally and globally to verify CCS integrity, treaty verification (Kyoto Protocol) and to characterize the nuclear fuel cycle. Planetary Emissions Management (PEM), working with the National Secure Manufacturing Center (NSMC), has the goal of designing, ruggedizing and packaging the GMP for field deployment. The system will conduct atmosphere monitoring then adapt the system to monitor water and soil evaluations. Measuring {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in real time will provide quantitative concentration data for ff-CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere and CCS leakage detection. Initial results will be discussed along with design changes for improved detection sensitivity and manufacturability.

  19. A density functional tight binding/force field approach to the interaction of molecules with rare gas clusters: Application to (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}){sup +/0}Ar{sub n} clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Iftner, Christophe; Simon, Aude; Korchagina, Kseniia; Rapacioli, Mathias; Spiegelman, Fernand

    2014-01-21

    We propose in the present paper a SCC-DFTB/FF (Self-Consistent-Charge Density Functional based Tight Binding/Force-Field) scheme adapted to the investigation of molecules trapped in rare gas environments. With respect to usual FF descriptions, the model involves the interaction of quantum electrons in a molecule with rare gas atoms in an anisotropic scheme. It includes polarization and dispersion contributions and can be used for both neutral and charged species. Parameters for this model are determined for hydrocarbon-argon complexes and the model is validated for small hydrocarbons. With the future aim of studying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Ar matrices, extensive benchmark calculations are performed on (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}){sup +/0}Ar{sub n} clusters against DFT and CCSD(T) calculations for the smaller sizes, and more generally against other experimental and theoretical data. Results on the structures and energetics (isomer ordering and energy separation, cohesion energy per Ar atom) are presented in detail for n = 18, 13, 20, 27, and 30, for both neutrals and cations. We confirm that the clustering of Ar atoms leads to a monotonous decrease of the ionization potential of benzene for n ? 20, in line with previous experimental and FF data.

  20. Anisotropy of the nitrogen conduction states in the group III nitrides studied by polarized x-ray absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K. |; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Gullikson, E.M.

    1997-04-01

    Group III nitrides (AlN, GaN, and InN) consist of the semiconductors which appear recently as a basic materials for optoelectronic devices active in the visible/ultraviolet spectrum as well as high-temperature and high-power microelectronic devices. However, understanding of the basic physical properties leading to application is still not satisfactory. One of the reasons consists in unsufficient knowledge of the band structure of the considered semiconductors. Several theoretical studies of III-nitrides band structure have been published but relatively few experimental studies have been carried out, particularly with respect to their conduction band structure. This motivated the authors to examine the conduction band structure projected onto p-states of the nitrogen atoms for AlN, GaN and InN. An additional advantage of their studies is the availability of the studied nitrides in two structures, hexagonal (wurtzite) and cubic (zincblende). This offers an opportunity to gain information about the role of the anisotropy of electronic band states in determining various physical properties.

  1. SU-E-T-625: Use and Choice of Ionization Chambers for the Commissioning of Flattened and Flattening-Filter-Free Photon Beams: Determination of Recombination Correction Factor (ks)

    SciTech Connect

    Stucchi, C; Mongioj, V; Carrara, M; Pignoli, E; Bonfantini, F; Bresolin, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the recombination effect for some ionization chambers to be used for linacs commissioning for Flattened Filter (FF) and Flattening Filter Free (FFF) photon beams. Methods: A Varian TrueBeam linac with five photon beams was used: 6, 10 and 15 MV FF and 6 and 10 MV FFF. Measurements were performed in a water tank and in a plastic water phantom with different chambers: a mini-ion chamber (IC CC01, IBA), a plane-parallel ion chamber (IC PPC05, IBA) and two Farmer chambers (NE2581 and FPC05-IBA). Measurement conditions were Source- Surface Distance of 100 cm, two field sizes (10x10 and 40x40 cm2) and five depths (1cm, maximum buildup, 5cm, 10cm and 20cm). The ion recombination factors (kS), obtained from the Jaffe's plots (voltage interval 50-400 V), were evaluated at the recommended operating voltage of +300V. Results: Dose Per Pulse (DPP) at dmax was 0.4 mGy/pulse for FF beams, 1.0 mGy/pulse and 1.9 mGy/pulse for 6MV and 10 MV FFF beams respectively. For all measurement conditions, kS ranged between 0.996 and 0.999 for IC PPC05, 0.997 and 1.008 for IC CC01. For the FPC05 IBA Farmer IC, kS varied from 1.001 to 1.011 for FF beams, from 1.004 to 1.015 for 6 MV FFF and from 1.009 to 1.025 for 10 MV FFF. Whereas, for NE2581 IC the values ranged from 1.002 to 1.009 for all energy beams and measurement conditions. Conclusion: kS depends on the chamber volume and the DPP, which in turn depends on energy beam but is independent of dose rate. Ion chambers with small active volume can be reliably used for dosimetry of FF and FFF beams even without kS correction. On the contrary, for absolute dosimetry of FFF beams by Farmer ICs it is necessary to evaluate and apply the kS correction. Partially supported by Lega Italiana Lotta contro i Tumori (LILT)

  2. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Projects 1 * CEN & CHE: Arc Flash - $2.47M * BAR: Generator Cooling Water Piping Replacement - $2.6M * BAR, CEN, CHE, COR, DAL, JPP & OLD: Security System Replacement (Joint) - $3.0M * OLD: Transformer Oil Leak - $569K * WOL: Spillway Gate Machinery Rehab (Joint) - $3.69M FY17 Funded Projects 2 * BAR: Hydropower Monolith Leaks - $100K * CEN: Design Powerhouse Ventilation - $150K * CEN, CHE, DAL, JPP & LAU: SCADA System Replacement - $500K * WOL: Investigate & Repair

  3. FEMP Best Practices and Lessons Learned for Federal Agency ESPC Projects: Acquisition Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    3. ACQUISITION PLANNING 3.1 Define the roles and responsibilities of every ESPC acquisition team member and identify gaps that need to be filled. The rule of thumb is to include on the team all parties who could affect or be affected by the project, at least for periodic consultation. At a minimum, the team should include an agency CO with sufficient warrant, the COR, officials whose approval is required, a budget officer, and legal counsel. 3.2 To avoid miscommunication and maintain

  4. Untitled

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Shadi$Dayeh Integrated$Electronics$and$Biointerfaces$Laboratory Department$of$Electrical$and$Computer$Engineering University$of$California$San$Diego Integrated$Flexible$Technologies for$Wearables$and$CorJcal$Implants Thursday,$August$11,$2016 2:00$p.m.$O$3:00$p.m. Sig$Hecker$Conference$Room$(TA3$O$0032$room$134) Abstract: Muta%ng high technologies with portable and flexible features that can be worn by or implanted into a user can lead to unprecedented applica%ons, connect objects together and

  5. U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration Post Office Box 2050 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8009 Mr. Darrel P. Kohlhorst President and General Manager September 28, 2011 Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12 , LLC Post Office Box 2009 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8001 Dear Mr. Kohlhorst: COR-Y12-9/29/2011-52548 CONTRACT DE-AC05-000R22800, FISCAL YEAR 2012 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION PLAN, BABCOCK AND WILCOX TECHNICAL SERVICES Y-12, LLC Enclosed is a copy of the Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Performance

  6. DOE Form

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    11991) PROJECT: U.S. Department of Energy Requirements Change Notice Baseline List of Required Compliance Documents CONTRACTOR: Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC CONTRACT NO. : DE-AC05-000R22800, 1.85, Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives (December 2 000), DEAR 970.5204-2 COR-NP0-60 ESH-6.6.2013-515290 No.: NNSA-51 Page 1 of 34 Pages LOCATION : Oak Ridge, Tennessee DATE OF CONTRACT: August 31, 2000 This Requirements Change Notice (RCN) No. NNSA-51 incorporates, into Section J,

  7. Microsoft Word - Contract Sections B-H.DOC

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    G Page G-1 Section G Contract Administration Data Table of Contents Section Page G.1 Billing Instructions G-2 G.2 RL Property Administration G-3 G.3 Contracting Officer's Representative (COR) Technical Direction - Notification of Changes G-3 G.4 Modification Authority G-5 Occupational Health Services Part I Contract No. DE-AC06-04RL14383 Section G Page G-2 G.1 Billing Instructions a. Public Voucher The Contractor shall submit to the Government a monthly Public Voucher (SF-1034). Vouchers are to

  8. DOE_PPPL_Section G_M007

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    G M007 i PART I SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE NO. G.1 - DOE CONTRACTING OFFICER G-1 G.2 - DOE CONTRACTING OFFICER'S REPRESENTATIVE (COR) G-1 G.3 - CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION G-1 G.4 - REPORTING PROCEDURES G-2 G.5 - INDIRECT CHARGES G-2 Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section G M007 G-1 PART I SECTION G - CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA G.1 - DOE CONTRACTING OFFICER For the definition of Contracting Officer see Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) 2.101. The Contracting

  9. CAPTAIN

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    MCKEESPORT COR AOPOLIS-MOON REDHAW ST. CLAIR SC ROGGSFIELD FRANKLIN -OAK FOREST RIMERSBURG RENNERD AL E GREENVILL E PAT MOS CRABTR EE BLAC K ASH ROYALT ON N BAKERSTOWN QUEEN ROU GH RUN LUCAS BLAC K H ILL CRESTON WAT TSVILLE WADSWORTH -NORT H OAKLAN D HOM EWORT H UNIT Y ESSELBRUN ALAMED A PAR K-CROOKED RU CHERRY GROVE FRENC HTOWN ST EWART RUN MILL C REEK GLENF IELD-MOU NT NEBO HICKORY E HARRISVILLE E LEST ER GRIGGS CORNERS EN GLAN D WEST VIL LE LAKE BAILEY LAKE OAKFORD BR UNSWICK N HOR ACE

  10. Cyber Friendly Fire

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Roberts, Adam D.

    2011-09-01

    Cyber friendly fire (FF) is a new concept that has been brought to the attention of Department of Defense (DoD) stakeholders through two workshops that were planned and conducted by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and research conducted for AFRL by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. With this previous work in mind, we offer a definition of cyber FF as intentional offensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintentionally harms the mission effectiveness of friendly or neutral forces. Just as with combat friendly fire, a fundamental need in avoiding cyber FF is to maintain situation awareness (SA). We suggest that cyber SA concerns knowledge of a system's topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system (and that populate the nodes), the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive (and offensive) countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. A training implication is to raise awareness and understanding of these critical knowledge units; an approach to decision aids and/or visualizations is to focus on supporting these critical knowledge units. To study cyber FF, we developed an unclassified security test range comprising a combination of virtual and physical devices that present a closed network for testing, simulation, and evaluation. This network offers services found on a production network without the associated costs of a real production network. Containing enough detail to appear realistic, this virtual and physical environment can be customized to represent different configurations. For our purposes, the test range was configured to appear as an Internet-connected Managed Service Provider (MSP) offering specialized web applications to the general public. The

  11. Proliferation Risks of Magneetic Fusion Energy: Clandestine Production, Covert Production and Breakout

    SciTech Connect

    A. Glaser and R.J. Goldston

    2012-03-13

    Nuclear proliferation risks from magnetic fusion energy associated with access to weapon-usable materials can be divided into three main categories: (1) clandestine production of weapon-usable material in an undeclared facility, (2) covert production of such material inn a declared facility, and (3) use of a declared facility in a breakout scenario, in which a state begins production of fissile material without concealing the effort. In this paper we address each of these categories of risks from fusion. For each case, we find that the proliferation risk from fusion systems can be much lower than the equivalent risk from fission systems, if the fusion system is designed to accommodate appropriate safeguards.

  12. Workshop on Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, M.; Arsenault, F.; Patterson, M.; Gaal, M.

    1993-09-01

    These are the proceedings of the Public Workshop on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety. The workshop was held at the Holiday Inn, Bethesda, on April 27 and 28, 1993. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an opportunity for public and industry input to the program. The workshop addressed the institutionalization of the program to review regulations with the purpose of eliminating those that are marginal. The objective is to avoid the dilution of safety efforts. One session was devoted to discussion of the framework for a performance-based regulatory approach. In addition, panelists and attendees discussed scope, schedules and status of specific regulatory items: containment leakage testing requirements, fire protection requirements, requirements for environmental qualification of electrical equipment, requests for information under 10CFR50.54(f), requirements for combustible gas control systems, and quality assurance requirements.

  13. The structure, dynamics, and star formation rate of the Orion nebula cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C.; Jaehnig, Karl

    2014-11-01

    The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues to the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, which is consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances, the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the interstellar medium density, which is estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content of the ONC is insufficient by a factor ?1.8 to reproduce the observed velocity dispersion from virialized motions, in agreement with previous assessments that the ONC is moderately supervirial. This may indicate recent gas dispersal. Based on the latest estimates for the age spread in the system and our density profiles, we find that at the half-mass radius, 90% of the stellar population formed within ?5-8 free-fall times (t {sub ff}). This implies a star formation efficiency per t {sub ff} of ?{sub ff} ? 0.04-0.07 (i.e., relatively slow and inefficient star formation rates during star cluster formation).

  14. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; et al

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find themore » optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.« less

  15. Investigating the Quartz (1010)/Water Interface using Classical and

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, A A; Wesolowski, David J; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    Two different terminations of the (1010) surface of quartz (R and ) interacting with water are simulated by classical (CMD) (using two different force fields) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and compared with previously published X-ray reflectivity (XR) experiments. Radial distribution functions between hydroxyl and water show good agreement between AIMD and CMDusing the ClayFF force field for both terminations. The Lopes et al. (Lopes, P. E. M.; Murashov, V.; Tazi, M.; Demchuk, E.; MacKerell, A. D. J. Phys. Chem. B 2006, 110, 27822792) force field (LFF), however, underestimates the extent of hydroxylwater hydrogen bonding. The termination is found to contain hydroxylhydroxyl hydrogen bonds; the quartz surface hydroxyl hydrogens and oxygens that hydrogen bond with each other exhibit greatly reduced hydrogen bonding to water. Conversely, the hydroxyl hydrogen and oxygens that are not hydrogen bonded to other surface hydroxyls but are connected to those that are show a considerable amount of hydrogen bonding to water. The electron density distribution of an annealed surface of quartz (1010) obtained by XR is in qualitative agreement with electron densities calculated byCMDand AIMD. In all simulation methods, the interfacial water peak appears farther from the surface than observed by XR. Agreement among AIMD, LFF, and XR is observed for the relaxation of the near-surface atoms; however, ClayFF shows a larger discrepancy. Overall, results show that for both terminations of (1010), LFF treats the near-surface structure more accurately whereas ClayFF treats the interfacial water structure more accurately. It is shown that the number of hydroxyl and water hydrogen bonds to the bridging SiOSi oxygens connecting the surface silica groups to the rest of the crystal is much greater for the R than the termination. It is suggested that this may play a role in the greater resistance to dissolution of the termination than that of the R termination.

  16. Computational Capabilities for Predictions of Interactions at the Grain Boundary of Refractory Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Debasis; Kwak, Shaun; Vasenkov, Alex; Shin, Yun Kyung; Duin, Adri van

    2014-09-30

    New high performance refractory alloys are critically required for improving efficiency and decreasing CO2 emissions of fossil energy systems. The development of these materials remains slow because it is driven by a trial-and-error experimental approach and lacks a rational design approach. Atomistic Molecular Dynamic (MD) design has the potential to accelerate this development through the prediction of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of new materials. The success of MD simulations depends critically on the fidelity of interatomic potentials. This project, in collaboration with Penn State, has focused on developing and validating high quality quantum mechanics based reactive potentials, ReaxFF, for Ni-Fe-Al-Cr-O-S system. A larger number of accurate density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to generate data for parameterizing the ReaxFF potentials. These potentials were then used in molecular dynamics (MD) and molecular dynamics-Monte Carlo (MD-MC) for much larger system to study for which DFT calculation would be prohibitively expensive, and to understand a number of chemical phenomena Ni-Fe-Al-Cr-O-S based alloy systems . These include catalytic oxidation of butane on clean Cr2O3 and pyrite/Cr2O3, interfacial reaction between Cr2O3 (refractory material) and Al2O3 (slag), cohesive strength of at the grain boundary of S-enriched Cr compared to bulk Cr and Ssegregation study in Al, Al2O3, Cr and Cr2O3 with a grain structure. The developed quantum based ReaxFF potential are available from the authors upon request. During this project, a number of papers were published in peer-reviewed journals. In addition, several conference presentations were made.

  17. Computational Capabilities for Predictions of Interactions at the Grain Boundary of Refractory Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Debasis; Kwak, Shaun; Vasenkov, Alex; Shin, Yun Kyung; Duin, Adri van

    2014-09-30

    New high performance refractory alloys are critically required for improving efficiency and decreasing CO2 emissions of fossil energy systems. The development of these materials remains slow because it is driven by a trial-and-error experimental approach and lacks a rational design approach. Atomistic Molecular Dynamic (MD) design has the potential to accelerate this development through the prediction of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of new materials. The success of MD simulations depends critically on the fidelity of interatomic potentials. This project, in collaboration with Penn State, has focused on developing and validating high quality quantum mechanics based reactive potentials, ReaxFF, for Ni-Fe-Al-Cr-O-S system. A larger number of accurate density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to generate data for parameterizing the ReaxFF potentials. These potentials were then used in molecular dynamics (MD) and molecular dynamics-Monte Carlo (MD-MC) for much larger system to study for which DFT calculation would be prohibitively expensive, and to understand a number of chemical phenomena Ni-Fe-Al-Cr-O-S based alloy systems . These include catalytic oxidation of butane on clean Cr2O3 and pyrite/Cr2O3, interfacial reaction between Cr2O3 (refractory material) and Al2O3 (slag), cohesive strength of at the grain boundary of S-enriched Cr compared to bulk Cr and Ssegregation study in Al, Al2O3, Cr and Cr2O3 with a grain structure. The developed quantum based ReaxFF potential are available from the authors upon request. During this project, a number of papers were published in peer-reviewed journals. In addition, several conference presentations were made.

  18. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Mesoscale Phase Distribution in Li-ion Battery Electrode Materials May 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure Figure 1a) Chemical phase map obtained by linear combination fitting of XANES data at each pixel acquired with FF TXM at Beam Line 6-2 for a particle with nominal composition of Li0.74FePO4. b) STEM image of a fully delithiated sample. Figure adapted from Boesenberg et al. 2013 Li-ion batteries are key devices in the effort to develop efficient

  19. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 11. CONTRACT ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (ff applicable) 0259 See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 05003 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) coDE 105003 NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office u. s. Department of Energy u. s. Department of Energy NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office Los Alamos Site Off ice 3747 West Jemez Road 3747 West Jemez Road Los Alamos NM 87544 Los Alamos NM 87544 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - 15_Liu_ARM_STM_indirect.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    i di t ff t ld l d Aerosol indirect effect on cold clouds Xiaohong Liu (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Paul DeMott (Colorado State University) Some evidence for alteration of ice l d b i ft i i clouds by aircraft emissions * Soot associated with increasing ice concentrations in i f h d t t b bl d t i ft regions of enhanced soot most probably due to aircraft (Ström and Ohlsson, 1998); Ice effective radius reduced by 10-30% perturbed by aircraft (Kristensson et al., 2000) 2000) * Trend

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - HAB RAP 618-10-11 8-12-09.pptx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    - Richland Operations Office 618-10 & 11 Burial Ground Remediation Planning Chris Smith, Deputy Federal Project Director, River Corridor Closure Project August 12, 2009 618 10/11 B i l G d Department of Energy - Richland Operations Office 618-10/11 Burial Grounds * Burial grounds operated in support of 300 Area work 618 10 d f 1953 1964 * 618-10 operated from 1953-1964. * 12 trenches and 94 VPUs * 618-11 operated from 1962-1967 * 3 trenches and 54 VPUs and 5 caissons * 300-FF-2 ROD provided

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - LID Presentation_Biohabitats NSI [Compatibility Mode]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Challenges: Landscape and Fire The Challenges: Landscape and Fire The Challenge The Challenge Urban Influences Urban Influences 70% of SMA's in the Los Alamos/Pueblo Watershed are impacted by urban areas. p y 50% have potential for public influence Some SMA's are heavily impacted by runoff /run-on from urbanized areas areas. Techniques LANL are already using Techniques LANL are already using Erosion & Sedimentation Controls M t f R d R ff Management of Run-on and Run-off Minimization of

  3. News | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    August 31, 2016 371D2FF300000578-3734814-Once_the_glass_is_switched_from_clear_to_dark_or_vice_versa_the_-a-24_1470926891322 Are curtains drawing to a close? Glass that switches from transparent to opaque may soon replace the need for blinds August 11, 2016 103863303-GettyImages-shade.tech. Self-shading window shifts from transparent to opaque with new tech March 21, 2016 MIT-Tisdale-3-secrets Nanocrystal self-assembly sheds its secrets - A new approach gives a real-time look at how the complex

  4. Chlorine enhancement of SO{sub 2} removal efficiency in a spray dryer absorber/fabric filter pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Jefcoat, I.A.; Stewart, C.L.; Pearson, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    The presence of chloride ions in a flue gas has been shown to increase the removal efficiency of SO{sub 2} in a spray dryer absorber/fabric filter (SDA/FF). The quantification of this effect has not been reported previously. A 90 cfm gas-fired pilot plant was used at the University to simulate burning coals containing various weight percent chloride. Results from the study were in agreement with those found in the literature. A predictive model was developed for the incremental removal efficiency, which was found to be dependent on the time to SO{sub 2} ratio and weight percent chloride in the coal.

  5. Asymmetric Anderson model and spin excitations in the Kondo insulator YbB{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect

    Barabanov, A. F.; Maksimov, L. A.

    2009-07-15

    A cluster problem is analyzed as an example demonstrating that the observed three-mode behavior of spin-triplet excitations in YbB{sub 12} can be described by the asymmetric Anderson model with insulating singlet ground state. In the case of an infinite system, it is argued that the behavior of the f subsystem can be analyzed by using an effective Hamiltonian H{sub J} with direct antiferromagnetic f-f exchange interaction. The spin excitation spectrum is shown to have a minimum at the antiferromagnetic vector, as observed experimentally. A distinctive feature of the analysis is the use of singlet and triplet basis operators.

  6. A study of cryogenic techniques for operating hydrogen masers. Interim report, 1 July 1979-31 January 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Vessot, R.F.C.

    1980-02-01

    Cryogenic Techniques are applied to the Atomic Hydrogen Maser Frequency Standard to extend the storage time of the atoms and reduce the thermal noise accompanying the signal and within the resonance linewidth. Oscillation has been achieved below 25K using wall coatings of frozen CF 4. A pair of new masers is under construction so that frequency stability improvement can be measured. Stability at the 10 to the -16th power level in Delta f/f for averaging time intervals of 1,000 seconds is expected at temperatures below 30K.

  7. Approximate photochemical dynamics of azobenzene with reactive force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Hartke, Bernd

    2013-12-14

    We have fitted reactive force fields of the ReaxFF type to the ground and first excited electronic states of azobenzene, using global parameter optimization by genetic algorithms. Upon coupling with a simple energy-gap transition probability model, this setup allows for completely force-field-based simulations of photochemical cis?trans- and trans?cis-isomerizations of azobenzene, with qualitatively acceptable quantum yields. This paves the way towards large-scale dynamics simulations of molecular machines, including bond breaking and formation (via the reactive force field) as well as photochemical engines (presented in this work)

  8. RAP - Transcribed Flipcharts

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    February 9, 2016 Groundwater Update  Final report on 300-FF-5 sequestration test in May 2016 o DOE to provide update to RAP Update on 618-10 Burial Ground Vertical Pipe Units  Question on cost figures, follow-up from DOE-RL  Distribute incident report to committee, facilitation team to coordinate with DOE  Potential update in August/September 2016 o Status of augering/excavation and other updates Environmental Restoration and Disposal Facility (ERDF) Update  Brief update on cap

  9. RAP Committee 3-Month Work Plan

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    6/14/16 Facilitator notes in blue July August September Call placeholder: Tuesday, July 12, 1:30 p.m. Committee meeting placeholder: Tuesday, August 9 Call placeholder: Tuesday, August 16, 1:30 p.m. Call placeholder: Tuesday, September 27, 1:30 p.m.  Planning call  Groundwater 300-FF-5 final report results o Mike Kline, DOE-RL, subject matter expert  100 D/H o Work plan release expected in July timeframe o Receive an update from agency representatives o Revisit already drafted advice

  10. Observation of coherently enhanced tunable narrow-band terahertz transition radiation from a relativistic sub-picosecond electron bunch train

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Piot, P.; Sun, Y. -E; Maxwell, T. J.; Ruan, J.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Rihaoui, M. M.; Thurman-Keup, R.

    2011-06-27

    We experimentally demonstrate the production of narrow-band (?f/f ~ =20% at f ~ = 0.5 THz) THz transition radiation with tunable frequency over [0.37, 0.86] THz. The radiation is produced as a train of sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches transits at the vacuum-aluminum interface of an aluminum converter screen. We also show a possible application of modulated beams to extend the dynamical range of a popular bunch length diagnostic technique based on the spectral analysis of coherent radiation.

  11. OR I GI N A L S I GN E D B Y CONTINATION HEETIREFERENCE

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTINATION HEETIREFERENCE NO OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO DE-AC27-08RV14800/064 2AG OF NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR WASHINGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS LLC ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT (A) (B) (C) (D) (F)(F Obligated Amount for this Modification: $53, 327, 186.59 New Total Obdigated Amount for this Award: $1, 181,248,170.41 incremental Funded Amount changed: from $1, 127, 920, 983.82 to $1,181,248,170.41 Account code: WRPS Fund 01250 Appr Year 2007 Aiottee 34

  12. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, A.K.

    1984-09-07

    This disclosure relates to separation of aerosol particles from gas samples withdrawn from within a contained atmosphere, such as containment vessels for nuclear reactors or other process equipment where remote gaseous sampling is required. It is specifically directed to separation of dense aerosols including particles of any size and at high mass loadings and high corrosivity. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract DE-AC06-76FF02170 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

  13. Direct Analysis of JV-Curves Applied to an Outdoor-Degrading CdTe Module (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, D; Kurtz, S.; Ulbrich, C.; Gerber, A.; Rau, U.

    2014-03-01

    We present the application of a phenomenological four parameter equation to fit and analyze regularly measured current density-voltage JV curves of a CdTe module during 2.5 years of outdoor operation. The parameters are physically meaningful, i.e. the short circuit current density Jsc, open circuit voltage Voc and differential resistances Rsc, and Roc. For the chosen module, the fill factor FF degradation overweighs the degradation of Jsc and Voc. Interestingly, with outdoor exposure, not only the conductance at short circuit, Gsc, increases but also the Gsc(Jsc)-dependence. This is well explained with an increase in voltage dependent charge carrier collection in CdTe.

  14. LARGE-SCALE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET DISTURBANCES ASSOCIATED WITH A LIMB CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.; Auchere, F.; Vial, J.-C.; Tang, Y. H.; Zong, W. G.

    2010-01-10

    We present composite observations of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and the associated large-scale extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) disturbances on 2007 December 31 by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) and COR1 coronagraph on board the recent Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory mission. For this limb event, the EUV disturbances exhibit some typical characteristics of EUV Imaging Telescope waves: (1) in the 195 A bandpass, diffuse brightenings are observed propagating oppositely away from the flare site with a velocity of approx260 km s{sup -1}, leaving dimmings behind; (2) when the brightenings encounter the boundary of a polar coronal hole, they stop there to form a stationary front. Multi-temperature analysis of the propagating EUV disturbances favors a heating process over a density enhancement in the disturbance region. Furthermore, the EUVI-COR1 composite display shows unambiguously that the propagation of the diffuse brightenings coincides with a large lateral expansion of the CME, which consequently results in a double-loop-structured CME leading edge. Based on these observational facts, we suggest that the wave-like EUV disturbances are a result of magnetic reconfiguration related to the CME liftoff rather than true waves in the corona. Reconnections between the expanding CME magnetic field lines and surrounding quiet-Sun magnetic loops account for the propagating diffuse brightenings; dimmings appear behind them as a consequence of volume expansion. X-ray and radio data provide us with complementary evidence.

  15. Mechanisms and observations of coronal dimming for the 201 August 7 event

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, James Paul; Woods, T. N.; Caspi, A.; Thompson, B. J.; Hock, R. A.

    2014-07-01

    Coronal dimming of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission has the potential to be a useful forecaster of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). As emitting material leaves the corona, a temporary void is left behind which can be observed in spectral images and irradiance measurements. The velocity and mass of the CMEs should impact the character of those observations. However, other physical processes can confuse the observations. We describe these processes and the expected observational signature, with special emphasis placed on the differences. We then apply this understanding to a coronal dimming event with an associated CME that occurred on 2010 August 7. Data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) are used for observations of the dimming, while the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory's Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory's COR1 and COR2 are used to obtain velocity and mass estimates for the associated CME. We develop a technique for mitigating temperature effects in coronal dimming from full-disk irradiance measurements taken by EVE. We find that for this event, nearly 100% of the dimming is due to mass loss in the corona.

  16. IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. II. RELATION TO SOFT X-RAY FLARES AND FILAMENT ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M.; Vrsnak, B.

    2012-08-10

    Using high time cadence images from the STEREO EUVI, COR1, and COR2 instruments, we derived detailed kinematics of the main acceleration stage for a sample of 95 coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in comparison with associated flares and filament eruptions. We found that CMEs associated with flares reveal on average significantly higher peak accelerations and lower acceleration phase durations, initiation heights, and heights, at which they reach their peak velocities and peak accelerations. This means that CMEs that are associated with flares are characterized by higher and more impulsive accelerations and originate from lower in the corona where the magnetic field is stronger. For CMEs that are associated with filament eruptions we found only for the CME peak acceleration significantly lower values than for events that were not associated with filament eruptions. The flare rise time was found to be positively correlated with the CME acceleration duration and negatively correlated with the CME peak acceleration. For the majority of the events the CME acceleration starts before the flare onset (for 75% of the events) and the CME acceleration ends after the soft X-ray (SXR) peak time (for 77% of the events). In {approx}60% of the events, the time difference between the peak time of the flare SXR flux derivative and the peak time of the CME acceleration is smaller than {+-}5 minutes, which hints at a feedback relationship between the CME acceleration and the energy release in the associated flare due to magnetic reconnection.

  17. Tomographic imaging using poissonian detector data

    DOEpatents

    Aspelmeier, Timo; Ebel, Gernot; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2013-10-15

    An image reconstruction method for reconstructing a tomographic image (f.sub.j) of a region of investigation within an object (1), comprises the steps of providing detector data (y.sub.i) comprising Poisson random values measured at an i-th of a plurality of different positions, e.g. i=(k,l) with pixel index k on a detector device and angular index l referring to both the angular position (.alpha..sub.l) and the rotation radius (r.sub.l) of the detector device (10) relative to the object (1), providing a predetermined system matrix A.sub.ij assigning a j-th voxel of the object (1) to the i-th detector data (y.sub.i), and reconstructing the tomographic image (f.sub.j) based on the detector data (y.sub.i), said reconstructing step including a procedure of minimizing a functional F(f) depending on the detector data (y.sub.i) and the system matrix A.sub.ij and additionally including a sparse or compressive representation of the object (1) in an orthobasis T, wherein the tomographic image (f.sub.j) represents the global minimum of the functional F(f). Furthermore, an imaging method and an imaging device using the image reconstruction method are described.

  18. Efficient solution-processed small molecule: Cadmium selenide quantum dot bulk heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Vinay; Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 ; Upreti, Tanvi; Chand, Suresh

    2013-12-16

    We report bulk heterojunction solar cells based on blends of solution-processed small molecule [7,7?-(4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-silolo[3,2-b:4,5-b?]dithiophene-2,6-diyl) bis(6-fluoro-4-(5?-hexyl-[2,2?-bithiophen]-5yl)benzo[c] [1,2,5] thiadiazole)] p-DTS(FBTTh{sub 2}){sub 2}: Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) (70:30, 60:40, 50:50, and 40:60) in the device configuration: Indium Tin Oxide /poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)/p-DTS(FBTTh{sub 2}){sub 2}: CdSe/Ca/Al. The optimized ratio of p-DTS(FBTTh{sub 2}){sub 2}:CdSe::60:40 leads to a short circuit current density (J{sub sc})?=?5.45?mA/cm{sup 2}, open circuit voltage (V{sub oc})?=?0.727?V, and fill factor (FF)?=?51%, and a power conversion efficiency?=?2.02% at 100 mW/cm{sup 2} under AM1.5G illumination. The J{sub sc} and FF are sensitive to the ratio of p-DTS(FBTTh{sub 2}){sub 2}:CdSe, which is a crucial factor for the device performance.

  19. Effects of the surroundings and conformerisation of n-dodecane molecules on evaporation/condensation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Gun’ko, Vladimir M.; Nasiri, Rasoul; Sazhin, Sergei S.

    2015-01-21

    The evaporation/condensation coefficient (β) and the evaporation rate (γ) for n-dodecane vs. temperature, gas pressure, gas and liquid density, and solvation effects at a droplet surface are analysed using quantum chemical density functional theory calculations of several ensembles of conformers of n-dodecane molecules in the gas phase (hybrid functional ωB97X-D with the cc-pVTZ and cc-pVDZ basis sets) and in liquid phase (solvation method: SMD/ωB97X-D). It is shown that β depends more strongly on a number of neighbouring molecules interacting with an evaporating molecule at a droplet surface (this number is estimated through changes in the surface Gibbs free energy of solvation) than on pressure in the gas phase or conformerisation and cross-conformerisation of molecules in both phases. Thus, temperature and the surrounding effects at droplet surfaces are the dominant factors affecting the values of β for n-dodecane molecules. These values are shown to be similar (at reduced temperatures T/T{sub c} < 0.8) or slightly larger (at T/T{sub c} > 0.8) than the values of β calculated by the molecular dynamics force fields (MD FF) methods. This endorses the reliability of the previously developed classical approach to estimation of β by the MD FF methods, except at temperatures close to the critical temperature.

  20. Development of a 2.0 eV AlGaInP Solar Cell Grown by OMVPE

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Emmett E.; Simon, John; Geisz, John F.; Olavarria, Waldo; Young, Michelle; Duda, Anna; Dippo, Pat; Friedman, Daniel J.; Steiner, Myles A.

    2015-06-14

    AlGaInP solar cells with a bandgap (Eg) of ~2.0 eV are developed for use in next-generation multijunction photovoltaic devices. This material system is of great interest for both space and concentrator photovoltaics due to its high bandgap, which enables the development of high-efficiency five-junction and six-junction devices and is also useful for solar cells operated at elevated temperatures. In this work, we explore the conditions for the Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (OMVPE) growth of AlGaInP and study their effects on cell performance. A ~2.0 eV AlGaInP solar cell is demonstrated with an open circuit voltage (VOC) of 1.59V, a bandgap-voltage offset (WOC) of 420mV, a fill factor (FF) of 88.0%, and an efficiency of 14.8%. These AlGaInP cells have attained a similar FF, WOC and internal quantum efficiency (IQE) to the best upright GaInP cells grown in our lab to date.

  1. Performance of electrostatic precipitators and fabric filter particulate controls on oil-fired electric utility boilers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McRanie, R.D.; Baker, S.S. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    Of the 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) listed in Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, 11 are metals commonly found in particulate emissions from oil-fired boilers. In light of the potential future need for additional control of particulate emissions from oil-fired units, a white paper was prepared documenting the extent of particulate and HAPs emissions and the state-of-the-art in the use of electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and fabric filter (FF) technologies to control their emissions from oil-fired boilers. The white paper is based on EPRI research on particulate emissions from oil-fired boilers and a survey of ESP and FF manufacturers. The EPRI ESPM{trademark} performance model was used to estimate the particulate control effectiveness of oil-fired ESPs. The white paper describes the characteristics of oil ash, summarizes particulate and HAPs emission rates for oil-fired boilers, and projects the particulate and HAPs removal effectiveness for baghouses and different sized ESPs. Information on oil-fired ESP operation and maintenance requirements and overall costs is included.

  2. Molecular dynamics study of combustion reactions in supercritical environment. Part 1: Carbon dioxide and water force field parameters refitting and critical isotherms of binary mixtures

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Masunov, Artem E.; Atlanov, Arseniy Alekseyevich; Vasu, Subith S.

    2016-10-04

    Oxy-fuel combustion process is expected to drastically increase the energy efficiency and enable easy carbon sequestration. In this technology the combustion products (carbon dioxide and water) are used to control the temperature and nitrogen is excluded from the combustion chamber, so that nitrogen oxide pollutants do not form. Therefore, in oxycombustion the carbon dioxide and water are present in large concentrations in their transcritical state, and may play an important role in kinetics. The computational chemistry methods may assist in understanding these effects, and Molecular Dynamics with ReaxFF force field seem to be a suitable tool for such a study.more » Here we investigate applicability of the ReaxFF to describe the critical phenomena in carbon dioxide and water and find that several nonbonding parameters need adjustment. We report the new parameter set, capable to reproduce the critical temperatures and pressures. Furthermore, the critical isotherms of CO2/H2O binary mixtures are computationally studied here for the first time and their critical parameters are reported.« less

  3. In-situ gamma-ray assay of the west cell line in the 235-F plutonium fuel form facility

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, A. H.; Diprete, D.

    2014-09-01

    On August 29th, 2013, scientists from SRNL took a series of in-situ gamma-ray measurements in the maintenance trench beneath Cells 6-9 on the west line of the PuFF facility using an uncollimated, highpurity germanium detector. The detector efficiency was estimated using a combination of MCNP simulations and empirical measurements. Data analysis was performed using three gamma-rays emitted by Pu-238 (99.85 keV, 152.7 keV, and 766.4 keV) providing three independent estimates of the mass of Pu-238 holdup in each of the cells. The weighted mean of these three results was used as the best estimate of Pu-238 holdup in the West Cell Line of PuFF. The results of the assay measurements are found in the table below along with the results from the scoping assay performed in 2006. All uncertainties in this table (as well as the rest of the report) are given as 1σ. The total holdup in the West Cell Line was 2.4 ± 0.7 grams. This result is 0.6 g higher than the previous estimate, a 0.4σ difference.

  4. TOWARD UNDERSTANDING STELLAR RADIAL VELOCITY JITTER AS A FUNCTION OF WAVELENGTH: THE SUN AS A PROXY

    SciTech Connect

    Marchwinski, Robert C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Robertson, Paul; Ramsey, Lawrence; Harder, Jerald E-mail: suvrath@astro.psu.edu E-mail: lwr@psu.edu

    2015-01-01

    Using solar spectral irradiance measurements from the SORCE spacecraft and the F/F' technique, we have estimated the radial velocity (RV) scatter induced on the Sun by stellar activity as a function of wavelength. Our goal was to evaluate the potential advantages of using new near-infrared (NIR) spectrographs to search for low-mass planets around bright F, G, and K stars by beating down activity effects. Unlike M dwarfs, which have higher fluxes and therefore greater RV information content in the NIR, solar-type stars are brightest at visible wavelengths, and, based solely on information content, are better suited to traditional optical RV surveys. However, we find that the F/F' estimated RV noise induced by stellar activity is diminished by up to a factor of four in the NIR versus the visible. Observations with the upcoming future generation of NIR instruments can be a valuable addition to the search for low-mass planets around bright FGK stars in reducing the amount of stellar noise affecting RV measurements.

  5. A New Method of Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectrum Unfolding

    SciTech Connect

    Zeynalova, O. V. [Moscow State Institute of Radioengineering, Electronics and Automation, Moscow (Russian Federation); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Zeynalov, Sh. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S. [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium)

    2010-11-25

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics along with associated digital signal processing algorithms. The goal was to find out the reasons of a long time existing discrepancy between theoretical calculations and the measurements of prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission dependence on the total kinetic energy (TKE) of fission fragments (FF). On the one hand the {sup 252}Cf(sf) reaction is one of the main references for nuclear data, on the other hand the understanding of PFN emission mechanism is very important for nuclear fission theory. Using a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber for fission fragment (FF) detection and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in total about 10{sup 7} fission fragment-neutron coincidences have been registered. Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12 bit waveform digitizer. The signal waveforms have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. For the first time the dependence of the number of emitted neutrons as a function of total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fragments is in very good agreement with theoretical calculations in the range of TKE from 140-220 MeV.

  6. Structures, Mechanisms, and Kinetics of Ammoxidation and Selective Oxidation of Propane Over the M2 Phase of MoVNbTeO Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, William A.; Liu, Lianchi; Mueller, Jonathan E.; Pudar, Sanja; Nielsen, Robert J.

    2011-05-04

    We report here first-principles-based predictions of the structures, mechanisms, and activation barriers for propane activation by the M2 phase of the MoVNbTeO multi-metal oxide catalysts capable of the direct conversion of propane to acrylonitrile. Our approach is to combine extensive quantum mechanical (QM) calculations to establish the mechanisms for idealized representations of the surfaces for these catalytic systems and then to modify the parameters in the ReaxFF reactive force field for molecular dynamics (MD) calculations to describe accurately the activation barriers and reaction mechanisms of the chemical reactions over complex mixed metal oxides. The parameters for ReaxFF are derived entirely from QM without the use of empirical data so that it can be applied to novel systems on which there is little or no data. To understand the catalysis in these systems it is essential to determine the surface structures that control the surface chemistry. High quality three-dimensional (3D) Rietveld structures are now available for the M1 and M2 phases of the MoVNbTeO catalysts.

  7. Hybrid tandem photovoltaic devices with a transparent conductive interconnecting recombination layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taehee; Choi, Jin Young; Jeon, Jun Hong; Kim, Youn-Su; Kim, Bong-Soo; Lee, Doh-Kwon; Kim, Honggon; Han, Seunghee; Kim, Kyungkon

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: ► This work enhanced power conversion efficiency of the hybrid tandem solar cell from 1.0% to 2.6%. ► The interfacial series resistance of the tandem solar cell was eliminated by inserting ITO layer. ► This work shows the feasibility of the highly efficient hybrid tandem solar cells. -- Abstract: We demonstrate hybrid tandem photovoltaic devices with a transparent conductive interconnecting recombination layer. The series-connected hybrid tandem photovoltaic devices were developed by combining hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and polymer-based organic photovoltaics (OPVs). In order to enhance the interfacial connection between the subcells, we employed highly transparent and conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) thin layer. By using the ITO interconnecting layer, the power conversion efficiency of the hybrid tandem solar cell was enhanced from 1.0% (V{sub OC} = 1.041 V, J{sub SC} = 2.97 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF = 32.3%) to 2.6% (V{sub OC} = 1.336 V, J{sub SC} = 4.65 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF = 41.98%) due to the eliminated interfacial series resistance.

  8. PROPERTIES AND BEHAVIOR OF 238PU RELEVANT TO DECONTAMINATION OF BUILDING 235-F

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.; Kane, M.

    2009-11-24

    This report was prepared to document the physical, chemical and radiological properties of plutonium oxide materials that were processed in the Plutonium Fuel Form Facility (PuFF) in building 235-F at the Savannah River Plant (now known as the Savannah River Site) in the late 1970s and early 1980s. An understanding of these properties is needed to support current project planning for the safe and effective decontamination and deactivation (D&D) of PuFF. The PuFF mission was production of heat sources to power Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in space craft. The specification for the PuO{sub 2} used to fabricate the heat sources required that the isotopic content of the plutonium be 83 {+-} 1% Pu-238 due to its high decay heat of 0.57 W/g. The high specific activity of Pu-238 (17.1 Ci/g) due to alpha decay makes this material very difficult to manage. The production process produced micron-sized particles which proved difficult to contain during operations, creating personnel contamination concerns and resulting in the expenditure of significant resources to decontaminate spaces after loss of material containment. This report examines high {sup 238}Pu-content material properties relevant to the D&D of PuFF. These relevant properties are those that contribute to the mobility of the material. Physical properties which produce or maintain small particle size work to increase particle mobility. Early workers with {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} felt that, unlike most small particles, Pu-238 oxide particles would not naturally agglomerate to form larger, less mobile particles. It was thought that the heat generated by the particles would prevent water molecules from binding to the particle surface. Particles covered with bound water tend to agglomerate more easily. However, it is now understood that the self-heating effect is not sufficient to prevent adsorption of water on particle surfaces and thus would not prevent agglomeration of particles. Operational

  9. Global carbon budget 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Peters, G. P.; Ciais, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Jones, S. D.; Sitch, S.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Boden, T. A.; Bopp, L.; Bozec, Y.; Canadell, J. G.; Chini, L. P.; Chevallier, F.; Cosca, C. E.; Harris, I.; Hoppema, M.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Jain, A. K.; Johannessen, T.; Kato, E.; Keeling, R. F.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Koven, C.; Landa, C. S.; Landschützer, P.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Marland, G.; Mathis, J. T.; Metzl, N.; Nojiri, Y.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Peng, S.; Peters, W.; Pfeil, B.; Poulter, B.; Raupach, M. R.; Regnier, P.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Salisbury, J. E.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Segschneider, J.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Werf, G. R.; Viovy, N.; Wang, Y.-P.; Wanninkhof, R.; Wiltshire, A.; Zeng, N.

    2015-05-08

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates, consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, respectively, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover-change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models forced by observed climate, CO2, and land-cover-change (some including nitrogen–carbon interactions). We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from

  10. TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2013-06-13

    A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

  11. Evaluation of various interpolants available in DICE.

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Daniel Z.; Reu, Phillip L.; Crozier, Paul

    2015-02-01

    This report evaluates several interpolants implemented in the Digital Image Correlation Engine (DICe), an ima ge cor relation software package developed by Sandia. By interpolants we refer to the basis functions used to represent discrete pixel inten sity data as a continuous signal. Inte rpolation is used to determine intensity values in an image at non - pixel locations. It is also used, in some cases, to evaluate the x and y gradients of the image intensities. Intensity gradients subsequently guid e the optimization process. The goal of this report is to inform analysts as to the characteristics of each interpolant and provide guidance towards the best interpolant for a given dataset. This work also serves as an initial verification of each of the i nterpolants implemented.

  12. Electromagnetic radiation absorbers and modulators comprising polyaniline

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Arthur J.; Ginder, John M.; Roe, Mitchell G.; Hajiseyedjavadi, Hamid

    1992-01-01

    A composition for absorbing electromagnetic radiation, wherein said electromagnetic radiation possesses a wavelength generally in the range of from about 1000 Angstroms to about 50 meters, wherein said composition comprises a polyaniline composition of the formula ##STR1## where y can be equal to or greater than zero, and R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are independently selected from the group containing of H, --OCH.sub.3, --CH.sub.3, --F, --Cl, --Br, --I, NR.sup.3 .sub.2, --NHCOR.sup.3, --OH, --O.sup.-, SR.sup.3, --OCOR.sup.3, --NO.sub.2, --COOH, --COOR.sup.3, --COR.sup.3, --CHO, and --CN, where R.sup.3 is a C.sub.1 to C.sub.8 alkyl, aryl or aralkyl group.

  13. Short time proton dynamics in bulk ice and in porous anode solid oxide fuel cell materials

    SciTech Connect

    Basoli, Francesco; Senesi, Roberto; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Licoccia, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen reduction and incorporation into solid electrolytes and the reverse reaction of oxygen evolution play a cru-cial role in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) applications. However a detailed un derstanding of the kinetics of the cor-responding reactions, i.e. on reaction mechanisms, rate limiting steps, reaction paths, electrocatalytic role of materials, is still missing. These include a thorough characterization of the binding potentials experienced by protons in the lattice. We report results of Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS) measurements of the vibrational state of the protons in Ni- YSZ highly porous composites (75% to 90% ), a ceramic-metal material showing a high electrical conductivity and ther mal stability, which is known to be most effectively used as anodes for solid ox ide fuel cells. The results are compared with INS and Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) experiments on the proton binding states in bulk ice.

  14. Eddy-Covariance and auxiliary measurements, NGEE-Barrow, 2012-2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Torn, Margaret; Billesbach, Dave; Raz-Yaseef, Naama

    2014-03-24

    The EC tower is operated as part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment-Arctic (NGEE) at Barrow, Alaska. The tower is collecting flux data from the beginning of the thaw season, early June, and until conditions are completely frozen, early November. The tower is equipped with a Gill R3-50 Sonic Anemometer, LI-7700 (CH4) sensor, a LI-7500A (CO2/H2O) sensor, and radiation sensors (Kipp and Zonen CNR-4 (four component radiometer), two LiCor LI-190 quantum sensors (PAR upwelling and downwelling), and a down-looking Apogee SI-111 infrared radiometer (surface temperature)). The sensors are remotely controlled, and communication with the tower allows us to retrieve information in real time.

  15. A sparse reconstruction method for the estimation of multi-resolution emission fields via atmospheric inversion

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ray, J.; Lee, J.; Yadav, V.; Lefantzi, S.; Michalak, A. M.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.

    2015-04-29

    Atmospheric inversions are frequently used to estimate fluxes of atmospheric greenhouse gases (e.g., biospheric CO2 flux fields) at Earth's surface. These inversions typically assume that flux departures from a prior model are spatially smoothly varying, which are then modeled using a multi-variate Gaussian. When the field being estimated is spatially rough, multi-variate Gaussian models are difficult to construct and a wavelet-based field model may be more suitable. Unfortunately, such models are very high dimensional and are most conveniently used when the estimation method can simultaneously perform data-driven model simplification (removal of model parameters that cannot be reliably estimated) and fitting.more » Such sparse reconstruction methods are typically not used in atmospheric inversions. In this work, we devise a sparse reconstruction method, and illustrate it in an idealized atmospheric inversion problem for the estimation of fossil fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions in the lower 48 states of the USA. Our new method is based on stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP), a method used to reconstruct compressively sensed images. Our adaptations bestow three properties to the sparse reconstruction procedure which are useful in atmospheric inversions. We have modified StOMP to incorporate prior information on the emission field being estimated and to enforce non-negativity on the estimated field. Finally, though based on wavelets, our method allows for the estimation of fields in non-rectangular geometries, e.g., emission fields inside geographical and political boundaries. Our idealized inversions use a recently developed multi-resolution (i.e., wavelet-based) random field model developed for ffCO2 emissions and synthetic observations of ffCO2 concentrations from a limited set of measurement sites. We find that our method for limiting the estimated field within an irregularly shaped region is about a factor of 10 faster than conventional approaches. It also

  16. Phosphorylation at tyrosine 114 of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is required for adipogenesis in response to high fat diet

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Yuan-Hung; Ho, Po-Chun; Chen, Min-Shan; Hugo, Eric; Ben-Jonathan, Nira; Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3223 Eden Avenue, Kettering Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0056 ; Wang, Shao-Chun; Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3223 Eden Avenue, Kettering Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0056

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is phosphorylated at Y114. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phospho-Y114 of PCNA is not required for cell proliferation for normal growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MCE during adipogenesis is abolished in the lack of the phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homozygous Y114F mice are resistant to high fat diet induced obesity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results shed light on the interface between proliferation and differentiation. -- Abstract: Clonal proliferation is an obligatory component of adipogenesis. Although several cell cycle regulators are known to participate in the transition between pre-adipocyte proliferation and terminal adipocyte differentiation, how the core DNA synthesis machinery is coordinately regulated in adipogenesis remains elusive. PCNA (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) is an indispensable component for DNA synthesis during proliferation. Here we show that PCNA is subject to phosphorylation at the highly conserved tyrosine residue 114 (Y114). Replacing the Y114 residue with phenylalanine (Y114F), which is structurally similar to tyrosine but cannot be phosphorylated, does not affect normal animal development. However, when challenged with high fat diet, mice carrying homozygous Y114F alleles (PCNA{sup F/F}) are resistant to adipose tissue enlargement in comparison to wild-type (WT) mice. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) harboring WT or Y114F mutant PCNA proliferate at similar rates. However, when subjected to adipogenesis induction in culture, PCNA{sup F/F} MEFs are not able to re-enter the cell cycle and fail to form mature adipocytes, while WT MEFs undergo mitotic clonal expansion in response to the adipogenic stimulation, accompanied by enhanced Y114 phosphorylation of PCNA, and differentiate to mature adipocytes. Consistent with the function of Y114 phosphorylation in clonal proliferation in adipogenesis, fat tissues isolated from WT

  17. Molecular and Electronic Structure of Cyclic Trinuclear Gold(I) Carbeniate Complexes: Insights for Structure/Luminescence/Conductivity Relationships

    SciTech Connect

    McDougaldJr, Roy N; Chilukuri, Bhaskar; Jia, Huiping; Perez, Michael R; Rabaa, Hassan; Wang, Xiaoping; Nesterov, Vladimir; Cundari, Thomas R.; Gnade, Bruce E; Omary, Mohammad A

    2014-01-01

    An experimental and computational study of correlations between solid-state structure and optical/electronic properties of cyclotrimeric gold(I) carbeniates, [Au-3(RN=COR')(3)] (R, R' = H, Me, Bu-n, or (c)Pe), is reported. Synthesis and structural and photophysical characterization of novel complexes [Au-3(MeN=(COBu)-Bu-n)(3)], [Au-3((BuN)-Bu-n=COMe)(3)], [Au-3((BuN)-Bu-n=(COBu)-Bu-n)(3)], and [Au-3((c)PeN=COMe)(3)] are presented. Changes in R and R' lead to distinctive variations in solid-state stacking, luminescence spectra, and conductive properties. Solid-state emission and excitation spectra for each complex display a remarkable dependence on the solid-state packing of the cyclotrimers. The electronic structure of [Au-3(RN=COR')(3)] was investigated via molecular and solid-state simulations. Calculations on [Au-3(HN=COH)(3)] models indicate that the infinitely extended chain of eclipsed structures with equidistant Au-Au intertrimer aurophilic bonding can have lower band gaps, smaller Stokes shifts, and reduced reorganization energies (lambda). The action of one cyclotrimer as a molecular nanowire is demonstrated via fabrication of an organic field effect transistor and shown to produce a p-type field effect. Hole transport for the same cyclotrimer-doped within a poly(9-vinylcarbazole) host-produced a colossal increase in current density from similar to 1 to similar to 1000 mA/cm(2). Computations and experiments thus delineate the complex relationships between solid-state morphologies, electronic structures, and optoelectronic properties of gold(I) carbeniates.

  18. The magnetic field of active region 11158 during the 2011 February 12-17 flares: Differences between photospheric extrapolation and coronal forward-fitting methods

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Sun, Xudong; Liu, Yang E-mail: xudongs@stanford.edu

    2014-04-10

    We developed a coronal nonlinear force-free field (COR-NLFFF) forward-fitting code that fits an approximate nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) solution to the observed geometry of automatically traced coronal loops. In contrast to photospheric NLFFF codes, which calculate a magnetic field solution from the constraints of the transverse photospheric field, this new code uses coronal constraints instead, and this way provides important information on systematic errors of each magnetic field calculation method, as well as on the non-force-freeness in the lower chromosphere. In this study we applied the COR-NLFFF code to NOAA Active Region 11158, during the time interval of 2011 February 12-17, which includes an X2.2 GOES-class flare plus 35 M- and C-class flares. We calculated the free magnetic energy with a 6 minute cadence over 5 days. We find good agreement between the two types of codes for the total nonpotential E{sub N} and potential energy E{sub P} but find up to a factor of 4 discrepancy in the free energy E {sub free} = E{sub N} – E{sub P} and up to a factor of 10 discrepancy in the decrease of the free energy ΔE {sub free} during flares. The coronal NLFFF code exhibits a larger time variability and yields a decrease of free energy during the flare that is sufficient to satisfy the flare energy budget, while the photospheric NLFFF code shows much less time variability and an order of magnitude less free-energy decrease during flares. The discrepancy may partly be due to the preprocessing of photospheric vector data but more likely is due to the non-force-freeness in the lower chromosphere. We conclude that the coronal field cannot be correctly calculated on the basis of photospheric data alone and requires additional information on coronal loop geometries.

  19. CKow -- A More Transparent and Reliable Model for Chemical Transfer to Meat and Milk

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; McKone, Thomas E.; Jolliet, Olivier

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study is to increase the understanding and transparency of chemical biotransfer modeling into meat and milk and explicitly confront the uncertainties in exposure assessments of chemicals that require such estimates. In cumulative exposure assessments that include food pathways, much of the overall uncertainty is attributable to the estimation of transfer into biota and through food webs. Currently, the most commonly used meat and milk-biotransfer models date back two decades and, in spite of their widespread use in multimedia exposure models few attempts have been made to advance or improve the outdated and highly uncertain Kow regressions used in these models. Furthermore, in the range of Kow where meat and milk become the dominant human exposure pathways, these models often provide unrealistic rates and do not reflect properly the transfer dynamics. To address these issues, we developed a dynamic three-compartment cow model (called CKow), distinguishing lactating and non-lactating cows. For chemicals without available overall removal rates in the cow, a correlation is derived from measured values reported in the literature to predict this parameter from Kow. Results on carry over rates (COR) and biotransfer factors (BTF) demonstrate that a steady-state ratio between animal intake and meat concentrations is almost never reached. For meat, empirical data collected on short term experiments need to be adjusted to provide estimates of average longer term behaviors. The performance of the new model in matching measurements is improved relative to existing models--thus reducing uncertainty. The CKow model is straight forward to apply at steady state for milk and dynamically for realistic exposure durations for meat COR.

  20. TRANSFORMING THE SRS ENVIRONMENTAL BUSINESS: COMMUNICATION AND APPLIED PROJECT MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Saldivar, E.

    2010-01-20

    A process for communicating information relating to core business functions that also encourages improving internal communications has been established at SRS. This process continues to grow and strengthen as the multiple Contractors, Regulators and DOE-SR relationships mature. A number of management communication tools have been initiated, retooled, rebooted or continued with enhancements to ensure appropriate information is communicated to all levels with environmental responsibility at SRS. The types of information that are the focus of this improved process are feedback from the customer and from informational exchange forums (i.e., Challenge Opportunity and Resolution (COR), SRS Regulatory Integration Team (SRIT), Environmental Quality Management Division (EQMD), Senior Environmental Managers Council (SEMC), etc.). These forums, SRS environmental functions centralization, and the creation of a Regulatory Integration process allows for cross-functional decision making, problem solving and information sharing that involves the field organizations, Environmental Compliance Authorities (ECA), Subject Matter Experts (SME), DOE and the Regulators. Numerous examples of effective decision-making and problem solving will be shared. Lessons Learned involving inadequate communications and the resulting impacts on the environment, customer satisfaction, and relationships will also be discussed. Additionally, the focus on improved communications also includes maintaining awareness of business activities. The tools being utilized to facilitate the continuing improvement of internal communications include weekly staff meetings for all individuals within the organization, quarterly ECA and SME meeting, quarterly Regulatory Integration & Environmental Services (RI&ES) All-Hands meetings hosted by the Director, bi-weekly EQMD and EQMD Lite meetings with the customer, bi-annual SRIT meetings, and COR meetings on an as need basis. In addition, an existing Required Reading Program

  1. Slide 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jonathan A. Dowell DOE-RL Assistant Manager for River and Plateau S a fe a n d E ff e c ti v e C le a n u p th a t P ro te c ts th e C o lu m b ia R iv e r  Re du ce s the Ac tiv e Sit e Fo otp rin t of Cle an up to 75 Sq ua re Mi les (58 6 to 75 )  Sig nif ica ntl y Re du ce s Lo ng -Te rm Mo rtg ag e Co sts  At Co mp let ion , Sh ifts Em ph as is an d Re so urc es to Fu ll Sc ale Cle an up of the Ce ntr al Pla tea u (75 sq ua re mi les )  Re du ce s Co sts by "R igh t Siz ing

  2. Single Spin Asymmetries of Inclusive Hadrons Produced in Electron Scattering from a Transversely Polarized 3He Target

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Allada, Kalyan; Zhao, Yongxiang; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Bradshaw, Peter; Bosted, Peter; Camsonne, Alexandre; et al

    2014-04-01

    We report the first measurement of target single-spin asymmetries (AN) in the inclusive hadron production reaction, e + 3He??h+X, using a transversely polarized 3 He target. The experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a 5.9-GeV electron beam. Three types of hadrons (?, K and proton) were detected in the transverse hadron momentum range 0.54 T F for pions was -0.29 FF+ and K+. Amorenegative asymmetry is observed for ?. The magnitudes of the asymmetries follow |A? |? +|K +|. The K and proton asymmetries are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties. The ?+ and ? asymmetries measured for the 3He target and extracted for neutrons are opposite in sign with a small increase observed as a function of pT.less

  3. Multiple routes for vortex depinning in amorphous thin film superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Groenbech-Jensen, N.; Bishop, A.R.; Dominquez, D.

    1996-07-01

    ffWe present simulations of vortex dynamics in amorphous two-dimensional thin film superconductors, using a new exact method to evaluate long range interactions between vortices. We find that the onset of vortex motion is dominated by filamentary channels of flow. There are multiple patterns of filamentary flow which are stable in a wide range of bias current. As a consequence, there are multiple steps in the differential resistance, each step corresponding to a different pattern of filamentary flow. This results in a strong history dependence of the depinning current and current voltage characteristics. Our results are in agreement with recent experiments on amorphous Mo{sub 77}Ge{sub 23} thin films.

  4. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I . (-J&l ,J z-i2 Ff?,c Y / . June 24, 1953 +a-. "0 !I 2 F 4s 21' + p; 3: h $7 . . a- d :Q 4. 4 'i @j $w J 9. 10. 11. p - ",..-- AU~ORIZA'PION. Project Number bth0a8 ana SC~ eontempmed uf D &to be fabricated on a sub- bv ~CrELftnc.~~o~~, Ohio. These will 1 . be JY?kilrnefl kn TWV Estf~tea Ma~pswer Required gHezn Months) A. Technical A- B. Non-Technical starting Da&e4 Tllne 1 1 Q<J- Estlmated Completfon Dat&uFUSt 1. y5-5? Estim23a Total Cost j-__.-- 1 . . (A) Salaries

  5. Research News January 2015, Issue 4

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Cathode Infiltration Improves Fuel Cell Performance page 3 the ENERGY lab NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY From NETL's Office of Research & Development Researchnews April 2015, Issue 7 2 FE AT U RE ST O RY : C a th o d e In fi lt ra ti o n Im p ro v e F u e l C e ll P e rf o F ro m N E T L' s O ff ic e o f R e s e a rc h & D e v e lo p m e n t R e s e a r c h n e w s Ap ril 20 15 , Is su e 7 Contents April 2015, Issue 7 2 Editorial: NETL's In-House Research Competencies 3 Feature

  6. Research News January 2015, Issue 4

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Flowing Free: Promoting Chemical Looping Combustion page 3 the ENERGY lab NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY From NETL's Office of Research & Development Researchnews January 2015, Issue 4 2 FE AT U RE ST O RY : F lo w in g F re e : P ro m o ti n g C h e m ic a l L o o p in g C o m b u s ti o n pa ge 3 F ro m N E T L' s O ff ic e o f R e s e a rc h & D e v e lo p m e n t R e s e a r c h n e w s Ja nu ar y 20 15 , Is su e 4 Contents January 2015, Issue 4 2 Editorial: Integrating Safety

  7. Recovery Act: Molecular Simulation of Dissolved Inorganic Carbons for Underground Brine CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, William

    2012-11-30

    To further our understanding and develop the method for measuring the DICs under geological sequestration conditions, we studied the infrared spectra of DICs under high pressure and temperature conditions. First principles simulations of DICs in brine conditions were performed using a highly optimized ReaxFF-DIC forcefield. The thermodynamics stability of each species were determined using the 2PT method, and shown to be consistent with the Reax simulations. More importantly, we have presented the IR spectra of DIC in real brine conditions as a function of temperature and pressure. At near earth conditions, we find a breaking of the O-C-O bending modes into asymmetric and symmetric modes, separated by 100cm{sup -1} at 400K and 5 GPa. These results can now be used to calibrate FTIR laser measurements.

  8. Singlet-triplet Hamiltonian for spin excitations in a Kondo insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Barabanov, A. F.; Maksimov, L. A.

    2010-08-15

    In the nonsymmetric version of the periodic Anderson model for a Kondo insulator, an effective singlet-triplet Hamiltonian H{sub s-t} with indirect antiferromagnetic f-f exchange is constructed, which makes it possible to analyze the dynamic magnetic susceptibility {chi}{sub f}(k, {omega}) of f electrons. Hamiltonian H{sub s-t} is used to describe the experimentally observed dispersion of the three-level spin excitation spectrum in YbB{sub 12}. A distinguishing feature of this analysis is the introduction of small-radius singlet and triplet collective f-d excitations that form low- and high-lying spin bands during motion over the lattice.

  9. On the explanation and calculation of anomalous reflood hydrodynamics in large PWR cores

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    Reflood hydrodynamics from large-scale (1:20) test facilities in Japan have yielded apparently anomalous behavior relative to FLECHT tests. Namely, even at reflooding rates below one inch per second, very large liquid volume fractions (10-15%) exist above the quench fronts shortly after flood begins; thus cladding temperature excursions are terminated early in the reflood phase. This paper discusses an explanation for this behavior: liquid films on the core's unheated rods. The experimental findings are shown to be correctly simulated with a new four-field (vapor, films, droplets) version of the best-estimate TRAC-PF1 computer code, TRAC-FF. These experimental and analytical findings have important implications for PWR large-break LOCA licensing.

  10. Reduced yield stress for zirconium exposed to iodine: Reactive force field simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Matthew L.; Taylor, Christopher D.; van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2014-11-04

    Iodine-induced stress-corrosion cracking (ISCC), a known failure mode for nuclear fuel cladding, occurs when iodine generated during the irradiation of a nuclear fuel pellet escapes the pellet through diffusion or thermal cracking and chemically interacts with the inner surface of the clad material, inducing a subsequent effect on the cladding’s resistance to mechanical stress. To complement experimental investigations of ISCC, a reactive force field (ReaxFF) compatible with the Zr-I chemical and materials systems has been developed and applied to simulate the impact of iodine exposure on the mechanical strength of the material. The study shows that the material’s resistance to stress (as captured by the yield stress of a high-energy grain boundary) is related to the surface coverage of iodine, with the implication that ISCC is the result of adsorption-enhanced decohesion.

  11. Reduced yield stress for zirconium exposed to iodine: Reactive force field simulation

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Rossi, Matthew L.; Taylor, Christopher D.; van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2014-11-04

    Iodine-induced stress-corrosion cracking (ISCC), a known failure mode for nuclear fuel cladding, occurs when iodine generated during the irradiation of a nuclear fuel pellet escapes the pellet through diffusion or thermal cracking and chemically interacts with the inner surface of the clad material, inducing a subsequent effect on the cladding’s resistance to mechanical stress. To complement experimental investigations of ISCC, a reactive force field (ReaxFF) compatible with the Zr-I chemical and materials systems has been developed and applied to simulate the impact of iodine exposure on the mechanical strength of the material. The study shows that the material’s resistance tomore » stress (as captured by the yield stress of a high-energy grain boundary) is related to the surface coverage of iodine, with the implication that ISCC is the result of adsorption-enhanced decohesion.« less

  12. Amorphous/crystalline silicon interface passivation: Ambient-temperature dependence and implications for solar cell performance

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Seif, Johannes P.; Krishnamani, Gopal; Demaurex, Benedicte; Ballif, Christophe; Wolf, Stefaan De

    2015-03-02

    Silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells feature amorphous silicon passivation films, which enable very high voltages. We report how such passivation increases with operating temperature for amorphous silicon stacks involving doped layers and decreases for intrinsic-layer-only passivation. We discuss the implications of this phenomenon on the solar cell's temperature coefficient, which represents an important figure-of-merit for the energy yield of devices deployed in the field. We show evidence that both open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) are affected by these variations in passivation and quantify these temperature-mediated effects, compared with those expected from standard diode equations. We confirm that devicesmore » with high Voc values at 25°C show better high-temperature performance. Thus, we also argue that the precise device architecture, such as the presence of charge-transport barriers, may affect the temperature-dependent device performance as well.« less

  13. Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells: Temperature Impact on Passivation and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Seif, J.; Krishnamani, G.; Demaurex, B.; Martin de Nicholas, S.; Holm, N.; Ballif, C.; De Wolf, S.

    2015-03-23

    Photovoltaic devices deployed in the field can reach operation temperatures (T) as high as 90 °C [1]. Hence, their temperature coefficients (TC1) are of great practical importance as they determine their energy yield. In this study we concentrate on T-related lifetime variations of amorphous/crystalline interfaces and study their influence on the TCs of the individual solar cell parameters. We find that both the open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) are influenced by these lifetime variations. However, this is only a minor effect compared to the dominant increase of the intrinsic carrier density and the related increase in dark saturation current density. Additionally, in this paper we will show that the TCVoc does not depend solely on the initial value of the Voc [2, 3], but that the structure of the device has to be considered as well.

  14. Ab initio investigation of electronic and vibrational contributions to linear and nonlinear dielectric properties of ice

    SciTech Connect

    Casassa, S.; Baima, J.; Mahmoud, A.; Kirtman, B.

    2014-06-14

    Electronic and vibrational contributions to the static and dynamic (hyper)polarizability tensors of ice XI and model structures of ordinary hexagonal ice have been theoretically investigated. Calculations were carried out by the finite field nuclear relaxation method for periodic systems (FF-NR) recently implemented in the CRYSTAL code, using the coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham approach (CPKS) for evaluating the required electronic properties. The effect of structure on the static electronic polarizabilities (dielectric constants) and second-hyperpolarizabilities is minimal. On the other hand, the vibrational contributions to the polarizabilities were found to be significant. A reliable evaluation of these (ionic) contributions allows one to discriminate amongst ice phases characterized by different degrees of proton-order, primarily through differences caused by librational motions. Transverse static and dynamic vibrational (hyper)polarizabilities were found by extrapolating calculations for slabs of increasing size, in order to eliminate substantial surface contributions.

  15. Optimizing Technology to Reduce Mercury and Acid Gas Emissions from Electric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

    2005-01-31

    Revised maps and associated data show potential mercury, sulfur, and chlorine emissions for U.S. coal by county of origin. Existing coal mining and coal washing practices result in a 25% reduction of mercury in U.S. coal before it is delivered to the power plant. Selection of low-mercury coal is a good mercury control option for plants having hot-side ESP, cold-side ESP, or hot-side ESP/FGD emission controls. Chlorine content is more important for plants having cold-side ESP/FGD or SDA/FF controls; optimum net mercury capture is indicated where chlorine is between 500 and 1000 ppm. Selection of low-sulfur coal should improve mercury capture where carbon in fly ash is used to reduce mercury emissions.

  16. Treatability Test Plan for 300 Area Uranium Stabilization through Polyphosphate Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Bruce A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2007-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a study into possible options for stabilizing uranium at the 300 Area using polyphosphate injection. As part of this effort, PNNL will perform bench- and field-scale treatability testing designed to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to reduced uranium concentrations in the groundwater to meet drinking water standards (30 ug/L) in situ. This technology works by forming phosphate minerals (autunite and apatite) in the aquifer that directly sequester the existing aqueous uranium in autunite minerals and precipitates apatite minerals for sorption and long term treatment of uranium migrating into the treatment zone, thus reducing current and future aqueous uranium concentrations. Polyphosphate injection was selected for testing based on technology screening as part of the 300-FF-5 Phase III Feasibility Study for treatment of uranium in the 300-Area.

  17. Development of EEM based siliconwater and silicawater wall potentials for non-reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Junghan; Iype, Eldhose; Frijns, Arjan J.H.; Nedea, Silvia V.; Steenhoven, Anton A. van

    2014-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of heat transfer in gases are computationally expensive when the wall molecules are explicitly modeled. To save computational time, an implicit boundary function is often used. Steele's potential has been used in studies of fluidsolid interface for a long time. In this work, the conceptual idea of Steele's potential was extended in order to simulate watersilicon and watersilica interfaces. A new wall potential model is developed by using the electronegativity-equalization method (EEM), a ReaxFF empirical force field and a non-reactive molecular dynamics package PumMa. Contact angle simulations were performed in order to validate the wall potential model. Contact angle simulations with the resulting tabulated wall potentials gave a siliconwater contact angle of 129, a quartzwater contact angle of 0, and a cristobalitewater contact angle of 40, which are in reasonable agreement with experimental values.

  18. Parametric systems analysis for tandem mirror hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.; Chapin, D.L.; Chi, J.W.H.

    1980-09-01

    Fusion fission systems, consisting of fissile producing fusion hybrids combining a tandem mirror fusion driver with various blanket types and net fissile consuming LWR's, have been modeled and analyzed parametrically. Analysis to date indicates that hybrids can be competitive with mined uranium when U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ cost is about 100 $/lb., adding less than 25% to present day cost of power from LWR's. Of the three blanket types considered, uranium fast fission (UFF), thorium fast fission (ThFF), and thorium fission supressed (ThFS), the ThFS blanket has a modest economic advantage under most conditions but has higher support ratios and potential safety advantages under all conditions.

  19. Probe of field collapse in a-Si:H solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Crandall, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    The authors study the effect of illumination intensity on solar cell performance in a-Si:H solar cells. They find that the fill factor strongly depends on light intensity. As they increase the illumination intensity from low levels to one sun they observe a decrease in fill factor of approximately 15% in as grown cells. The authors attribute this effect to electric field collapse inside the cell. They propose that photogenerated space charge (free and trapped charge) increases with light intensity and causes field collapse. They describe the origin of space charge and the associated capacitance-photocapacitance. They measure the photocapacitance as a barometer to probe the collapsed field. The authors obtain a good agreement between photocapacitance experiments and theory. They also explore the light intensity dependence of photocapacitance and explain the decrease of FF with the increasing light intensity.

  20. Three-Dimensional Groundwater Models of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site, Washington State

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark D.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Chen, Yousu

    2008-09-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed field-scale groundwater flow and transport simulations of the 300 Area to support the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit Phase III Feasibility Study. The 300 Area is located in the southeast portion of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State. Historical operations involving uranium fuel fabrication and research activities at the 300 Area have contaminated engineered liquid-waste disposal facilities, the underlying vadose zone, and the uppermost aquifer with uranium. The main objectives of this research were to develop numerical groundwater flow and transport models to help refine the site conceptual model, and to assist assessment of proposed alternative remediation technologies focused on the 300 Area uranium plume.

  1. AllEHDMetfl' Of' SOllCITATIONJMCIDIFICATION 01' CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AllEHDMetfl' Of' SOllCITATIONJMCIDIFICATION 01' CONTRACT 11. CONTRACT DCOOI! 1- Of PAOE8 i I s4 2 AllENOMENTIMOOll'ICATICN NO. 3 EFnelMi DAT£ 4 Al!OUISll~REO NO r ~QJECT NO. (I.,,,,,...,, 0084 09/J0/2014 6.lllU£08Y CClDI! 05004 7. ADMHSTEN:O BY f/f_,_...,., CODE I NNSA/Kansas City Site O[fico U.S. Dopartment of Enarqy NNSA/Kansas City SJ.te Office P.O. BOK 410202 Kansas City MO 6414l*0202 8. N.w& ANDADDA&SI OF CONTRACTOR,_ ,-......,.. --ZIPOodol ~ M. AMENDMENT OF SOUCITATIOH NO.

  2. P

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Image P rocessing O ccupancy S ensing Luigi G en5le P olese, C ommercial B uildings R esearch Na5onal R enewable E nergy L aboratory September 10, 2013 2 The O ccupancy S ensing P roblem * Problem: * Current o ccupancy d etec/on t echnologies* infer o ccupancy v ia m o/on * False n ega/ves r esult i n o ccupant d iscomfort, f alse p osi/ves i n e nergy waste * Sensors a re u ndertuned o r e ven d efeated, t rading o ff e nergy s avings * Sensors h ave v ery l imited r ange * Sensors p erform a s

  3. Drilling Specifications: Well Installations in the 300 Area to Support PNNL’s Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2008-01-21

    Part of the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFC) will be installation of a network of high density borings and wells to monitor migration of fluids and contaminants (uranium), both in groundwater and vadose zone, away from an surface infiltration plot (Figure A-1). The infiltration plot will be located over an area of suspected contamination at the former 300 Area South Process Pond (SPP). The SPP is located in the southeastern portion of the Hanford Site, within the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with the support of FH shall stake the well locations prior to the start of drilling. Final locations will be based on accessibility and will avoid any surface or underground structures or hazards as well as surface contamination.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of annealed ZnO surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    The effect of thermally annealing a slab of wurtzite ZnO, terminated by two surfaces, (0001) (which is oxygen-terminated) and (0001{sup ¯}) (which is Zn-terminated), is investigated via molecular dynamics simulation by using reactive force field (ReaxFF). We found that upon heating beyond a threshold temperature of ∼700 K, surface oxygen atoms begin to sublimate from the (0001) surface. The ratio of oxygen leaving the surface at a given temperature increases as the heating temperature increases. A range of phenomena occurring at the atomic level on the (0001) surface has also been explored, such as formation of oxygen dimers on the surface and evolution of partial charge distribution in the slab during the annealing process. It was found that the partial charge distribution as a function of the depth from the surface undergoes a qualitative change when the annealing temperature is above the threshold temperature.

  5. Amorphous/crystalline silicon interface passivation: Ambient-temperature dependence and implications for solar cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Seif, Johannes P.; Krishnamani, Gopal; Demaurex, Benedicte; Ballif, Christophe; Wolf, Stefaan De

    2015-03-02

    Silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells feature amorphous silicon passivation films, which enable very high voltages. We report how such passivation increases with operating temperature for amorphous silicon stacks involving doped layers and decreases for intrinsic-layer-only passivation. We discuss the implications of this phenomenon on the solar cell's temperature coefficient, which represents an important figure-of-merit for the energy yield of devices deployed in the field. We show evidence that both open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) are affected by these variations in passivation and quantify these temperature-mediated effects, compared with those expected from standard diode equations. We confirm that devices with high Voc values at 25°C show better high-temperature performance. Thus, we also argue that the precise device architecture, such as the presence of charge-transport barriers, may affect the temperature-dependent device performance as well.

  6. The CHPRC Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) Quality Assurance Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, N. J.

    2009-04-03

    The scope of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, LLC (CHPRC) Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) is for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory staff to provide technical and integration support to CHPRC. This work includes conducting investigations at the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit and other groundwater operable units, and providing strategic integration, technical integration and assessments, remediation decision support, and science and technology. The projects under this Master Project will be defined and included within the Master Project throughout the fiscal year, and will be incorporated into the Master Project Plan. This Quality Assurance Management Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the CHPRC Groundwater and Technical Integration Support (Master Project) and all releases associated with the CHPRC Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project. The plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

  7. Amorphous/crystalline silicon interface passivation: Ambient-temperature dependence and implications for solar cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Seif, Johannes P.; Krishnamani, Gopal; Demaurex, Benedicte; Ballif, Christophe; Wolf, Stefaan De

    2015-03-02

    Silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells feature amorphous silicon passivation films, which enable very high voltages. We report how such passivation increases with operating temperature for amorphous silicon stacks involving doped layers and decreases for intrinsic-layer-only passivation. We discuss the implications of this phenomenon on the solar cell's temperature coefficient, which represents an important figure-of-merit for the energy yield of devices deployed in the field. We show evidence that both open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) are affected by these variations in passivation and quantify these temperature-mediated effects, compared with those expected from standard diode equations. We confirm that devices with high Voc values at 25C show better high-temperature performance. Thus, we also argue that the precise device architecture, such as the presence of charge-transport barriers, may affect the temperature-dependent device performance as well.

  8. Efficient Crystalline Si Solar Cell with Amorphous/Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction as Back Contact: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, B.; Wang, Q.; Shan, W.

    2012-06-01

    We study an amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction (Si HJ) as a back contact in industrial standard p-type five-inch pseudo-square wafer to replace Al back surface field (BSF) contact. The best efficiency in this study is over 17% with open-circuit (Voc) of 0.623 V, which is very similar to the control cell with Al BSF. We found that Voc has not been improved with the heterojunction structure in the back. The typical minority carrier lifetime of these wafers is on the order of 10 us. We also found that the doping levels of p-layer affect the FF due to conductivity and band gap shifting, and an optimized layer is identified. We conclude that an amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction can be a very promising structure to replace Al BSF back contact.

  9. A Study of the Stability and Characterization Plutonium Dioxide and Chemical Characterization [of] Rocky Flats and Los Alamos Plutonium-Containing Incinerator Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, A.K.; Boettger, J.C.; Behrens, Robert G.

    1999-11-29

    In the presentation ''A Study of the Stability and Characterization of Plutonium Dioxide'', the authors discuss their recent work on actinide stabilities and characterization, in particular, plutonium dioxide PuO{sub 2}. Earlier studies have indicated that PuO{sub 2} has the fluorite structure of CaF{sub 2} and typical oxide semiconductor properties. However, detailed results on the bulk electronic structure of this important actinide oxide have not been available. The authors have used all-electron, full potential linear combinations Gaussian type orbitals fitting function (LCGTO-FF) method to study PuO{sub 2}. The LCGTO-FF technique characterized by its use of three independent GTO basis sets to expand the orbitals, charge density, and exchange-correlation integral kernels. Results will be presented on zero pressure using both the Hedin-Lundquist local density approximation (LDA) model or the Perdew-Wang generalized gradient approximation (GGA) model. Possibilities of different characterizations of PuO{sub 2} will be explored. The paper ''Chemical Characterization Rocky Flats and Los Alamos Plutonium-Containing Incinerator Ash'' describes the results of a comprehensive study of the chemical characteristics of virgin, calcined and fluorinated incinerator ash produced at the Rocky Flats Plant and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory prior to 1988. The Rocky Flats and Los Alamos virgin, calcined, and fluorinated ashes were also dissolved using standard nitrate dissolution chemistry. Corresponding chemical evaluations were preformed on the resultant ash heel and the results compared with those of the virgin ash. Fluorination studies using FT spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool were also performed to evaluate the chemistry of phosphorus, sulfur, carbon, and silicon containing species in the ash. The distribution of plutonium and other chemical elements with the virgin ash, ash heel, fluorinated ash, and fluorinated ash heel particulates were studied in detail using

  10. Harnessing Structure-Property Relationships for Poly(alkyl thiophene)-Fullerene Derivative Thin Filmsto Optimize Performance in Photovoltaic Devices

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Deb, Nabankur; Li, Bohao; Skoda, Maximilian; Rogers, Sarah; Sun, Yan; Gong, Xiong; Karim, Alamgir; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Bucknall, David G.

    2016-02-08

    Nanoscale bulk heterojunction (BHJ) systems, consisting of fullerenes dispersed in conjugated polymers as the active component, have been actively studied over the last decades in order to produce high performance organic photovoltaics (OPVs). A significant role in device efficiency is played by the active layer morphology, but despite considerable study, a full understanding of the exact role that morphology plays and therefore a definitive method to produce and control an ideal morphology is lacking. In order to understand the BHJ phase behavior and associated morphology in these devices, we have used neutron reflection, together with grazing incidence X-ray and neutronmore » scattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine the morphology of the BHJ active layer in functional devices. We have studied nine model BHJ systems based on mixtures of three poly(3-alkyl thiophenes, P3AT) (A=butyl, hexyl, octyl) blended with three different fullerene derivatives, which provides variations in crystallinity and miscibility within the BHJ composite. In studying properties of functional devices, we show a direct correlation between the observed morphology within the BHJ layer and the device performance metrics, i.e., the short-circuit current (JSC), fill factor (FF), open-circuit voltage (VOC) and overall power conversion efficiency (PCE). Using these model systems, the effect of typical thermal annealing processes on the BHJ morphology through the film thickness as a function of the polythiophene-fullerene mixtures and different electron transport layer interfaces has been determined. It is shown that fullerene enrichment occurs at both the electrode interfaces after annealing. The degree of fullerene enrichment is found to strongly correlate with JSC and to a lesser degree with FF. Finally, based on these findings we demonstrate that by deliberately adding a fullerene layer at the electron transport layer interface, JSC can be increased by up to 20

  11. Precision Measurement of the proton neutral weak form factors at Q{sup 2} ~ 0.1 GeV{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa Kaufman

    2007-02-01

    This thesis reports the HAPPEX measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry for longitudinally polarized electrons elastically scattered from protons in a liquid hydrogen target. The measurement was carried out in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility using a beam energy E = 3 GeV and scattering angle <θ{sub lab}> = 6◦. The asymmetry is sensitive to the weak neutral form factors from which we extract the strange quark electric and magnetic form factors (G{sup s}{sub E} and G{sup s}{sub M}) of the proton. The measurement was conducted during two data-taking periods in 2004 and 2005. This thesis describes the methods for controlling the helicity-correlated beam asymmetries and the analysis of the raw asymmetry. The parity-violating asymmetry has been measured to be A{sub PV} = −1.14± 0.24 (stat)±0.06 (syst) ppm at = 0.099 GeV{sup 2} (2004), and A{sub PV} = −1.58±0.12 (stat)±0.04 (syst) ppm at = 0.109 GeV{sup 2} (2005). The strange quark form factors extracted from the asymmetry are G{sup s}{sub E} + 0.080G{sup s}{sub M} = 0.030 ± 0.025 (stat) ± 0.006 (syst) ± 0.012 (FF) (2004) and G{sup s}{sub E} +0.088G{sup s}{sub M} = 0.007±0.011 (stat)±0.004 (syst)±0.005 (FF) (2005). These results place the most precise constraints on the strange quark form factors and indicate little strange dynamics in the proton.

  12. A sparse reconstruction method for the estimation of multiresolution emission fields via atmospheric inversion

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ray, J.; Lee, J.; Yadav, V.; Lefantzi, S.; Michalak, A. M.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a sparse reconstruction scheme that can also be used to ensure non-negativity when fitting wavelet-based random field models to limited observations in non-rectangular geometries. The method is relevant when multiresolution fields are estimated using linear inverse problems. Examples include the estimation of emission fields for many anthropogenic pollutants using atmospheric inversion or hydraulic conductivity in aquifers from flow measurements. The scheme is based on three new developments. Firstly, we extend an existing sparse reconstruction method, Stagewise Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (StOMP), to incorporate prior information on the target field. Secondly, we develop an iterative method that uses StOMP tomore » impose non-negativity on the estimated field. Finally, we devise a method, based on compressive sensing, to limit the estimated field within an irregularly shaped domain. We demonstrate the method on the estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions in the lower 48 states of the US. The application uses a recently developed multiresolution random field model and synthetic observations of ffCO2 concentrations from a limited set of measurement sites. We find that our method for limiting the estimated field within an irregularly shaped region is about a factor of 10 faster than conventional approaches. It also reduces the overall computational cost by a factor of two. Further, the sparse reconstruction scheme imposes non-negativity without introducing strong nonlinearities, such as those introduced by employing log-transformed fields, and thus reaps the benefits of simplicity and computational speed that are characteristic of linear inverse problems.« less

  13. Bell Canyon Test (BCT) cement grout development report

    SciTech Connect

    Gulick, C.W. Jr.; Boa, J.A. Jr.; Buck, A.D.

    1980-12-01

    Development of the cement grout for the Bell Canyon Test was accomplished at the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES), Vicksburg, Mississippi. Initial development work centered on a saltwater grout with Class H cement, fly ash, and an expansive additive. Testing of the saltwater grout showed suitable properties except for the interface between anhydrite rock and grout in small core samples. Higher than expected permeability occurred at the interface because of space between the grout and the anhydrite; the space was produced as a result of allowing the specimens to dry. A change to freshwater grout and proper care to prevent the specimens from drying alleviated this condition. The BCT-1FF freshwater grout mixture was used in both the plug ONE and ONEX field grouting operations. Testing of the development grout mixtures was also done at Dowell, Pennsylvania State University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Results of the testing and evaluation by the four laboratories are included in the report. Field batching, mixing, and placement of the grout at the plug locations for both plug ONE and ONEX were satisfactory with adequate quality control. The freshwater grout mixture maintained adequate flow characteristics for pumpability for 3 1/2 h during each of the two field operations. Physical property and expansivity data for the field samples through 90 days' age are in general agreement with laboratory development data. A large number of samples were obtained for inclusion in the long-term durability studies and the geochemical programs. The high-density, low water-cement ratio expansive grout (BCT-1FF) is considered to be an excellent candidate for plugging boreholes at most locations (except through halite sections).

  14. Experimental study on the thorium-loaded accelerator-driven system at the Kyoto Univ. critical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Pyeon, C. H.; Yagi, T.; Lim, J. Y.; Misawa, T.

    2012-07-01

    The experimental study on the thorium-loaded accelerator-driven system (ADS) is conducted in the Kyoto Univ. Critical Assembly (KUCA). The experiments are carried out in both the critical and subcritical states for attaining the reaction rates of the thorium capture and fission reactions. In the critical system, the thorium plate irradiation experiment is carried out for the thorium capture and fission reactions. From the results of the measurements, the thorium fission reactions are obtained apparently in the critical system, and the C/E values of reaction rates show the accuracy of relative difference of about 30%. In the ADS experiments with 14 MeV neutrons and 100 MeV protons, the subcritical experiments are carried out in the thorium-loaded cores to obtain the capture reaction rates through the measurements of {sup 115}In(n, {gamma}){sup 116m}In reactions. The results of the experiments reveal the difference between the reaction rate distributions for the change in not only the neutron spectrum but also the external neutron source. The comparison between the measured and calculated reaction rate distributions demonstrates a discrepancy of the accuracy of reaction rate analyses of thorium capture reactions through the thorium-loaded ADS experiments with 14 MeV neutrons. Hereafter, kinetic experiments are planned to be carried out to deduce the delayed neutron decay constants and subcriticality using the pulsed neutron method. (authors)

  15. INSPECTION MEANS FOR INDUCTION MOTORS

    DOEpatents

    Williams, A.W.

    1959-03-10

    an appartus is descripbe for inspcting electric motors and more expecially an appartus for detecting falty end rings inn suqirrel cage inductio motors while the motor is running. In its broua aspects, the mer would around ce of reference tedtor means also itons in the phase ition of the An electronic circuit for conversion of excess-3 binary coded serial decimal numbers to straight binary coded serial decimal numbers is reported. The converter of the invention in its basic form generally coded pulse words of a type having an algebraic sign digit followed serially by a plurality of decimal digits in order of decreasing significance preceding a y algebraic sign digit followed serially by a plurality of decimal digits in order of decreasing significance. A switching martix is coupled to said input circuit and is internally connected to produce serial straight binary coded pulse groups indicative of the excess-3 coded input. A stepping circuit is coupled to the switching matrix and to a synchronous counter having a plurality of x decimal digit and plurality of y decimal digit indicator terminals. The stepping circuit steps the counter in synchornism with the serial binary pulse group output from the switching matrix to successively produce pulses at corresponding ones of the x and y decimal digit indicator terminals. The combinations of straight binary coded pulse groups and corresponding decimal digit indicator signals so produced comprise a basic output suitable for application to a variety of output apparatus.

  16. Electronic transport through Al/InN nanowire/Al junctions

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Lu, Tzu -Ming; Wang, George T.; Pan, Wei; Zhao, S.; Mi, Z.

    2016-02-01

    We report non-linear electronic transport measurement of Al/Si-doped n-type InN nanowire/Al junctions performed at T = 0.3 K, below the superconducting transition temperature of the Al electrodes. The proximity effect is observed in these devices through a strong dip in resistance at zero bias. In addition to the resistance dip at zero bias, several resistance peaks can be identified at bias voltages above the superconducting gap of the electrodes, while no resistance dip is observed at the superconducting gap. The resistance peaks disappear as the Al electrodes turn normal beyond the critical magnetic field except one which remains visible atmore » fields several times higher than critical magnetic field. An unexpected non-monotonic magnetic field dependence of the peak position is observed. As a result, we discuss the physical origin of these observations and propose that the resistance peaks could be the McMillan-Rowell oscillations arising from different closed paths localized near different regions of the junctions.« less

  17. JV Task 125-Mercury Measurement in Combustion Flue Gases Short Course

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Laudal

    2008-09-30

    The short course, designed to train personnel who have an interest in measuring mercury in combustion flue gases, was held twice at the Drury Inn in Marion, Illinois. The short course helped to provide attendees with the knowledge necessary to avoid the many pitfalls that can and do occur when measuring mercury in combustion flue gases. The first short course, May 5-8, 2008, included both a classroom-type session and hands-on demonstration of mercury-sampling equipment. The hands-on demonstration of equipment was staged at Southern Illinois Power Cooperative. Not including the Illinois Clean Coal Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy project managers, there were 12 attendees. The second short course was conducted September 16-17, 2008, but only included the classroom portion of the course; 14 people attended. In both cases, lectures were provided on the various mercury measurement methods, and interaction between attendees and EERC research personnel to discuss specific mercury measurement problems was promoted. Overall, the response to the course was excellent.

  18. Underground storage tank integrated demonstration: Evaluation of pretreatment options for Hanford tank wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Colton, N.G.; Jones, E.O.

    1993-06-01

    Separation science plays a central role inn the pretreatment and disposal of nuclear wastes. The potential benefits of applying chemical separations in the pretreatment of the radioactive wastes stored at the various US Department of Energy sites cover both economic and environmental incentives. This is especially true at the Hanford Site, where the huge volume (>60 Mgal) of radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks could be partitioned into a very small volume of high-level waste (HLW) and a relatively large volume of low-level waste (LLW). The cost associated with vitrifying and disposing of just the HLW fraction in a geologic repository would be much less than those associated with vitrifying and disposing of all the wastes directly. Futhermore, the quality of the LLW form (e.g., grout) would be improved due to the lower inventory of radionuclides present in the LLW stream. In this report, we present the results of an evaluation of the pretreatment options for sludge taken from two different single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site-Tanks 241-B-110 and 241-U-110 (referred to as B-110 and U-110, respectively). The pretreatment options examined for these wastes included (1) leaching of transuranic (TRU) elements from the sludge, and (2) dissolution of the sludge followed by extraction of TRUs and {sup 90}Sr. In addition, the TRU leaching approach was examined for a third tank waste type, neutralized cladding removal waste.

  19. Nanostructured High Performance Ultraviolet and Blue Light Emitting Diodes for Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Arto V. Nurmikko; Jung Han

    2005-09-30

    We report on research results in this project which synergize advanced material science approaches with fundamental optical physics concepts pertaining to light-matter interaction, with the goal of solving seminal problems for the development of very high performance light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the blue and near ultraviolet for Solid State Lighting applications. Accomplishments in the second 12 month contract period include (i) new means of synthesizing AlGaN and InN quantum dots by droplet heteroepitaxy, (ii) synthesis of AlGaInN nanowires as building blocks for GaN-based microcavity devices, (iii) progress towards direct epitaxial alignment of the dense arrays of nanowires, (iv) observation and measurements of stimulated emission in dense InGaN nanopost arrays, (v) design and fabrication of InGaN photonic crystal emitters, and (vi) observation and measurements of enhanced fluorescence from coupled quantum dot and plasmonic nanostructures. The body of results is presented in this report shows how a solid foundation has been laid, with several noticeable accomplishments, for innovative research, consistent with the stated milestones.

  20. Proceedings of the 1996 spring technical conference of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division. Volume 2: Engine design and engine systems; ICE-Volume 26-2

    SciTech Connect

    Uzkan, T.

    1996-12-31

    Although the cost of the petroleum crude has not increased much within the last decade, the drive to develop internal combustion engines is still continuing. The basic motivation of this drive is to reduce both emissions and costs. Recent developments in computer chip production and information management technology have opened up new applications in engine controls and monitoring. The development of new information is continuing at a rapid pace. Some of these research and development results were presented at the 1996 Spring Technical Conference of the ASME Internal Combustion Engine Division in Youngstown, Ohio, April 21--24, 1996. The papers presented covered various aspects of the design, development, and application of compression ignition and spark ignition engines. The conference was held at the Holiday Inn Metroplex Complex and hosted by Altronic Incorporated of Girard, Ohio. The written papers submitted to the conference have been published in three conference volumes. Volume 2 includes the papers on the topics of engine design, engine systems, and engine user experience.

  1. Program Abstracts: Formation and Growth of Atmospheric Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Peter H. McMurry; Markku Kulmala

    2006-09-07

    DOE provided $11,000 to sponsor the Workshop on New Particle Formation in the Atmosphere, which was held at The Riverwood Inn and Conference Center near Minneapolis, MN from September 7 to 9, 2006. Recent work has shown that new particle formation is an important atmospheric process that must be better understood due to its impact on cloud cover and the Earth's radiation balance. The conference was an informal gathering of atmospheric and basic scientists with expertise pertinent to this topic. The workshop included discussions of: atmospheric modeling; computational chemistry pertinent to clustering; ions and ion induced nucleation; basic laboratory and theoretical studies of nucleation; studies on neutral molecular clusters; interactions of organic compounds and sulfuric acid; composition of freshly nucleated particles. Fifty six scientists attended the conference. They included 27 senior scientists, 9 younger independent scientists (assistant professor or young associate professor level), 7 postdocs, 13 graduate students, 10 women, 35 North Americans (34 from the U.S.), 1 Asian, and 20 Europeans. This was an excellent informal workshop on an important topic. An effort was made to include individuals from communities that do not regularly interact. A number of participants have provided informal feedback indicating that the workshop led to research ideas and possible future collaborations.

  2. Noise correlation in CBCT projection data and its application for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hua; Ouyang, Luo; Wang, Jing E-mail: jing.wang@utsouthwestern.edu; Ma, Jianhua E-mail: jing.wang@utsouthwestern.edu; Huang, Jing; Chen, Wufan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To study the noise correlation properties of cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection data and to incorporate the noise correlation information to a statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT. Methods: In this study, the authors systematically investigated the noise correlation properties among detector bins of CBCT projection data by analyzing repeated projection measurements. The measurements were performed on a TrueBeam onboard CBCT imaging system with a 4030CB flat panel detector. An anthropomorphic male pelvis phantom was used to acquire 500 repeated projection data at six different dose levels from 0.1 to 1.6 mAs per projection at three fixed angles. To minimize the influence of the lag effect, lag correction was performed on the consecutively acquired projection data. The noise correlation coefficient between detector bin pairs was calculated from the corrected projection data. The noise correlation among CBCT projection data was then incorporated into the covariance matrix of the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion for noise reduction of low-dose CBCT. Results: The analyses of the repeated measurements show that noise correlation coefficients are nonzero between the nearest neighboring bins of CBCT projection data. The average noise correlation coefficients for the first- and second-order neighbors are 0.20 and 0.06, respectively. The noise correlation coefficients are independent of the dose level. Reconstruction of the pelvis phantom shows that the PWLS criterion with consideration of noise correlation (PWLS-Cor) results in a lower noise level as compared to the PWLS criterion without considering the noise correlation (PWLS-Dia) at the matched resolution. At the 2.0 mm resolution level in the axial-plane noise resolution tradeoff analysis, the noise level of the PWLS-Cor reconstruction is 6.3% lower than that of the PWLS-Dia reconstruction. Conclusions: Noise is correlated among nearest neighboring

  3. Dosimetric evaluation of three adaptive strategies for prostate cancer treatment including pelvic lymph nodes irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cantin, Audrey; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Lachance, Bernard; Foster, William; Goudreault, Julie

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: The movements of the prostate relative to the pelvic lymph nodes during intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment can limit margin reduction and affect the protection of the organs at risk (OAR). In this study, the authors performed an analysis of three adaptive treatment strategies that combine information from both bony and gold marker registrations. The robustness of those treatments against the interfraction prostate movements was evaluated. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on five prostate cancer patients with 7–13 daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). The clinical target volumes (CTVs) consisting of pelvic lymph nodes, prostate, and seminal vesicles as well as the OARs were delineated on each CBCT and the initial CT. Three adaptive strategies were analyzed. Two of these methods relied on a two-step patient positioning at each fraction. First step: a bony registration was used to deliver the nodal CTV prescription. Second step: a gold marker registration was then used either to (1) complete the dose delivered to the prostate (complement); (2) or give almost the entire prescription to the prostate with a weak dose gradient between the targets to compensate for possible motions (gradient). The third method (COR) used a pool of precalculated plans based on images acquired at previous treatment fractions. At each new fraction, a plan is selected from that pool based on the daily position of prostate center-of-mass. The dosimetric comparison was conducted and results are presented with and without the systematic shift in the prostate position on the CT planning. The adaptive strategies were compared to the current clinical standard where all fractions are treated with the initial nonadaptive plan. Results: The minimum daily prostate D{sub 95%} is improved by 2%, 9%, and 6% for the complement, the gradient, and the COR approaches, respectively, compared to the nonadaptive method. The average nodal CTV D{sub 95%} remains constant across the

  4. THREE-DIMENSIONAL SHAPE AND EVOLUTION OF TWO ERUPTIVE FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ting; Zhang Jun; Yang Shuhong; Zhao Hui E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.c E-mail: v00975@phys.nthu.edu.t

    2010-09-01

    On 2009 September 26, a dramatic and large filament (LF) eruption and a small filament (SF) eruption were observed in the He II 304 A line by the two EUVI telescopes aboard the STEREO A and B spacecraft. The LF heads out into space and becomes the bright core of a gradual coronal mass ejection (CME), while the eruption of the SF is characterized by motions of the filament materials. Using stereoscopic analysis of EUVI data, we reconstruct the three-dimensional shape and evolution of two eruptive filaments. For the first time, we investigate the true velocities and accelerations of 12 points along the axis of the LF, and find that the velocity and acceleration vary with the measured location. The highest points among the 12 points are the fastest in the first half hour, and then the points at the low-latitude leg of the LF become the fastest. For the SF, it is an asymmetric whip-like filament eruption, and the downward motions of the material lead to the disappearance of the former high-latitude endpoint and the formation of a new low-latitude endpoint. Based on the temporal evolution of the two filaments, we infer that the two filaments lie in the same filament channel. By combining the EUVI, COR1, and COR2 data of STEREO A together, we find that there is no impulsive or fast acceleration in this event. It displays a weak and persistent acceleration for more than 17 hr. The average velocity and acceleration of the LF are 101.8 km s{sup -1} and 2.9 m s{sup -2}, respectively. The filament eruptions are associated with a slow CME with an average velocity of 177.4 km s{sup -1}. The velocity of the CME is nearly 1.6 times as large as that of the filament material. This event is one example of a gradual filament eruption associated with a gradual CME. In addition, the moving direction of the LF changes from a non-radial to a nearly radial direction with a variation of inclination angle of nearly 38.{sup 0}2.

  5. Twenty-first workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-26

    PREFACE The Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at the Holiday Inn, Palo Alto on January 22-24, 1996. There were one-hundred fifty-five registered participants. Participants came from twenty foreign countries: Argentina, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Sixty-six papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into twenty sessions concerning: reservoir assessment, modeling, geology/geochemistry, fracture modeling hot dry rock, geoscience, low enthalpy, injection, well testing, drilling, adsorption and stimulation. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bobbie Bishop-Gollan, Tom Box, Jim Combs, John Counsil, Sabodh Garg, Malcolm Grant, Marcel0 Lippmann, Jim Lovekin, John Pritchett, Marshall Reed, Joel Renner, Subir Sanyal, Mike Shook, Alfred Truesdell and Ken Williamson. Jim Lovekin gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet and highlighted the exciting developments in the geothermal field which are taking place worldwide. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager.

  6. Metallic impurities in gallium nitride grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Krueger, J.; Kisielowski, C.

    1997-04-01

    Transition metals are often encountered in trace amounts in semiconductors. They have been extensively studied in most elemental and compound systems, since they form deep donor and/or acceptor levels which usually degrade the electronic and optical material properties. Only very little is known about transition metals in recent III-V semiconducting materials, such as GaN, AlN and InN. These few studies have been done exclusively on Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) or Hybrid Vapor Phase Epitaxy HVPE-grown GaN. Preliminary x-ray fluorescence studies at the Advanced Light Source, beamline 10.3.1, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have revealed that GaN materials grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) have Fe, Ni and Cr as the dominant transition metal contaminants. This finding is commensurate with the extremely high concentrations of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen (up to 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}) measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Preliminary work using the mapping capabilities of the x-ray fluorescence microprobe revealed the metal impurities were inhomogeneously distributed over the film. Future work of this collaboration will be to find a correlation between the existence of transition metals in MBE films, as revealed by x-ray fluorescence, and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra taken in the infrared region. Also, the authors will make use of the 1 {mu}m spatial resolution of x-ray microprobe to locate the contaminants in relation to structural defects in the GaN films. Because of the large strain caused by the lattice mismatch between the GaN films and the substrates, the films grow in a columnar order with high densities of grain boundaries and dislocations. These structural defects offer preferential sites for metal precipitation or agglomeration which could degrade the optical properties of this material more so than if the impurities were left dissolved in the GaN.

  7. In-situ gamma-ray assay of the east cell line in the 235-F Plutonium fuel form facility

    SciTech Connect

    Diprete, D.

    2015-08-21

    On September 17th -19th , 2013, scientists from SRNL took a series of in-situ gamma-ray measurements in the maintenance trench beneath Cells 1-5 on the east line of the PuFF facility using a well-collimated, high-purity germanium detector. The cell interiors were assayed along with the furnaces and storage coolers that protrude beneath the cells. The detector efficiency was estimated using a combination of MCNP simulations and empirical measurements. Data analysis was performed using three gamma-rays emitted by Pu-238 (99.85 keV, 152.7 keV, and 766.4 keV) providing three independent estimates of the mass of Pu-238 holdup in each of the cells. The weighted mean of these three results was used as the best estimate of Pu-238 holdup in the East Cell Line of PuFF. The results of the assay measurements are found in the table on the following page along with the results from the scoping assay performed in 2006. All uncertainties in this table (as well as the rest of the report) are reported at 1σ. Summing the assay results and treating MDAs as M238Pu= 0 ± MDA, the total holdup in the East Cell Line was 240 ± 40 grams. This result is 100 grams lower than the previous estimate, a 0.55σ difference. The uncertainty in the Pu-238 holdup is also reduced substantially relative to the 2006 scoping assay. However, the current assay results are in agreement with the 2006 scoping assay results due to the large uncertainty associated with the 2006 scoping assays. The current assay results support the conclusion that the 2006 results bound the Pu-238 mass in Cells 1-5. These results should be considered preliminary since additional measurements of the East Cell line are scheduled for 2017 and 2018. Those measurements will provide detailed information about the distribution of Pu-238 in the cells to be used to refine the results of the current assay.

  8. Polycrystalline thin film cadmium telluride solar cells fabricated by electrodeposition. Annual technical report, 20 March 1995--19 March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Trefny, J.U.; Mao, D.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop improved processes for fabricating CdTe/CdS polycrystalline thin-film solar cells. Researchers used electrodeposition to form CdTe; electrodeposition is a non-vacuum, low-cost technique that is attractive for economic, large-scale production. During the past year, research and development efforts focused on several steps that are most critical to the fabricating high-efficiency CdTe solar cells. These include the optimization of the CdTe electrodeposition process, the effect of pretreatment of CdS substrates, the post-deposition annealing of CdTe, and back-contact formation using Cu-doped ZnTe. Systematic investigations of these processing steps have led to a better understanding and improved performance of the CdTe-based cells. Researchers studied the structural properties of chemical-bath-deposited CdS thin films and their growth mechanisms by investigating CdS samples prepared at different deposition times; investigated the effect of CdCl{sub 2} treatment of CdS films on the photovoltaic performance of CdTe solar cells; studied Cu-doped ZnTe as a promising material for forming stable, low-resistance contacts to the p-type CdTe; and investigated the effect of CdTe and CdS thickness on the photovoltaic performance of the resulting cells. As a result of their systematic investigation and optimization of the processing conditions, researchers improved the efficiency of CdTe/CdS cells using ZnTe back-contact and electrodeposited CdTe. The best CdTe/CdS cell exhibited a V{sub oc} of 0.778 V, a J{sub sc} of 22.4 mA/cm{sup 2}, a FF of 74%, and an efficiency of 12.9% (verified at NREL). In terms of individual parameters, researchers obtained a V{sub oc} over 0.8 V and a FF of 76% on other cells.

  9. OPTIMIZING TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE MERCURY AND ACID GAS EMISSIONS FROM ELECTRIC POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

    2005-10-01

    Maps showing potential mercury, sulfur, chlorine, and moisture emissions for U.S. coal by county of origin were made from publicly available data (plates 1, 2, 3, and 4). Published equations that predict mercury capture by emission control technologies used at U.S. coal-fired utilities were applied to average coal quality values for 169 U.S. counties. The results were used to create five maps that show the influence of coal origin on mercury emissions from utility units with: (1) hot-side electrostatic precipitator (hESP), (2) cold-side electrostatic precipitator (cESP), (3) hot-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (hESP/FGD), (4) cold-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (cESP/FGD), and (5) spray-dry adsorption with fabric filter (SDA/FF) emission controls (plates 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9). Net (lower) coal heating values were calculated from measured coal Btu values, and estimated coal moisture and hydrogen values; the net heating values were used to derive mercury emission rates on an electric output basis (plate 10). Results indicate that selection of low-mercury coal is a good mercury control option for plants having hESP, cESP, or hESP/FGD emission controls. Chlorine content is more important for plants having cESP/FGD or SDA/FF controls; optimum mercury capture is indicated where chlorine is between 500 and 1000 ppm. Selection of low-sulfur coal should improve mercury capture where carbon in fly ash is used to reduce mercury emissions. Comparison of in-ground coal quality with the quality of commercially mined coal indicates that existing coal mining and coal washing practice results in a 25% reduction of mercury in U.S. coal before it is delivered to the power plant. Further pre-combustion mercury reductions may be possible, especially for coal from Texas, Ohio, parts of Pennsylvania and much of the western U.S.

  10. Inhibitory Effect of Furanic and Phenolic Compounds on Exoelectrogenesis in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell Bioanode

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2016-09-09

    Furanic and phenolic compounds are 20 lignocellulose-derived compounds known to inhibit to H2- and ethanol- producing microorganisms in dark fermentation. Bioelectrochemical conversion of furanic and phenolic compounds to electricity or H2 has recently been demonstrated as a productive method to use these compounds. However, potential inhibitory effect of furanic and phenolic compounds on exoelectrogenesis in bioelectrochemical systems is not well understood. This study systematically investigated the inhibitory effect of furfural (FF), 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), syringic acid (SA), vanillic acid (VA), and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) on exoelectrogenesis in the bioanode of a microbial electrolysis cell. A mixture of these five compounds atmore » an increasing initial total concentration from 0.8 to 8.0 g/L resulted in current decrease up to 91%. The observed inhibition primarily affected exoelectrogenesis, instead of non-exoelectrogenic biotransformation pathways (e.g., fermentation) of the five compounds. Furthermore, the parent compounds at a high concentration, as opposed to their biotransformation products, were responsible for the observed inhibition. Tests with individual compounds show that all five parent compounds contributed to the observed inhibition by the mixture. The IC50 (concentration resulting in 50% current decrease) was estimated as 2.7 g/L for FF, 3.0 g/L for HMF, 1.9 g/L for SA, 2.1 g/L for VA and 2.0 g/L for HBA. Nevertheless, these compounds below their non-inhibitory concentrations jointly resulted in significant inhibition as a mixture. Catechol and phenol, which were persistent biotransformation products of the mixture, inhibited exoelectrogens at high concentrations, but to a lesser extent than the parent compounds. Recovery of exoelectrogenesis from inhibition by all compounds was observed, except for catechol, which resulted in irreversible inhibition. The reversibility of inhibition, as well as the observed difference in recovery

  11. High efficiency thin film CdTe and a-Si based solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Compaan, A. D.; Deng, X.; Bohn, R. G.

    2000-01-04

    This report describes work done by the University of Toledo during the first year of this subcontract. During this time, the CdTe group constructed a second dual magnetron sputter deposition facility; optimized reactive sputtering for ZnTe:N films to achieve 10 ohm-cm resistivity and {approximately}9% efficiency cells with a copper-free ZnTe:N/Ni contact; identified Cu-related photoluminescence features and studied their correlation with cell performance including their dependence on temperature and E-fields; studied band-tail absorption in CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1{minus}x} films at 10 K and 300 K; collaborated with the National CdTe PV Team on (1) studies of high-resistivity tin oxide (HRT) layers from ITN Energy Systems, (2) fabrication of cells on the HRT layers with 0, 300, and 800-nm CdS, and (3) preparation of ZnTe:N-based contacts on First Solar materials for stress testing; and collaborated with Brooklyn College for ellipsometry studies of CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1{minus}x} alloy films, and with the University of Buffalo/Brookhaven NSLS for synchrotron X-ray fluorescence studies of interdiffusion in CdS/CdTe bilayers. The a-Si group established a baseline for fabricating a-Si-based solar cells with single, tandem, and triple-junction structures; fabricated a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe triple-junction solar cells with an initial efficiency of 9.7% during the second quarter, and 10.6% during the fourth quarter (after 1166 hours of light-soaking under 1-sun light intensity at 50 C, the 10.6% solar cells stabilized at about 9%); fabricated wide-bandgap a-Si top cells, the highest Voc achieved for the single-junction top cell was 1.02 V, and top cells with high FF (up to 74%) were fabricated routinely; fabricated high-quality narrow-bandgap a-SiGe solar cells with 8.3% efficiency; found that bandgap-graded buffer layers improve the performance (Voc and FF) of the narrow-bandgap a-SiGe bottom cells; and found that a small amount of oxygen partial pressure ({approximately}2 {times} 10

  12. Measurement of the Antineutrino Double-Differential Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Scattering Cross Section at MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments, such as DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande, hope to measure charge-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector. In order to do this, they must dramatically reduce their current levels of uncertainty, particularly those due to neutrino-nucleus interaction models. As CP violation is a measure of the difference between the oscillation properties of neutrinos and antineutrinos, data about how the less-studied antineutrinos interact is especially valuable. We present the MINERvA experiment's first double-differential scattering cross sections for antineutrinos on scintillator, in the few-GeV range relevant to experiments such as DUNE and NOvA. We also present total antineutrino-scintillator quasi-elastic cross sections as a function of energy, which we compare to measurements from previous experiments. As well as being useful to help reduce oscillation experiments' uncertainty, our data can also be used to study the prevalence of various cor relation and final-state interaction effects within the nucleus. We compare to models produced by different model generators, and are able to draw first conclusions about the predictions of these models.

  13. GeoChip 3.0 as a high-thoughput tool for analyzing microbial community composition, structure, and functional activity

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z.; Deng, Y.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Tu, Q.; Xu, M.; Hemme, C.L.; Li, X.; Wu, L.; Gentry, T.J.; Yin, Y.; Liebich, J.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2010-04-01

    A new generation of functional gene arrays (FGAs; GeoChip 3.0) has been developed, with {approx}28,000 probes covering approximately 57,000 gene variants from 292 functional gene families involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycles, energy metabolism, antibiotic resistance, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. GeoChip 3.0 also has several other distinct features, such as a common oligo reference standard (CORS) for data normalization and comparison, a software package for data management and future updating and the gyrB gene for phylogenetic analysis. Computational evaluation of probe specificity indicated that all designed probes would have a high specificity to their corresponding targets. Experimental analysis with synthesized oligonucleotides and genomic DNAs showed that only 0.0036-0.025% false-positive rates were observed, suggesting that the designed probes are highly specific under the experimental conditions examined. In addition, GeoChip 3.0 was applied to analyze soil microbial communities in a multifactor grassland ecosystem in Minnesota, USA, which showed that the structure, composition and potential activity of soil microbial communities significantly changed with the plant species diversity. As expected, GeoChip 3.0 is a high-throughput powerful tool for studying microbial community functional structure, and linking microbial communities to ecosystem processes and functioning.

  14. Coupled-cluster representation of Green function employing modified spectral resolutions of similarity transformed Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Karol; Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Shelton, William A.

    2014-09-07

    In this paper we discuss a new formalism for producing an analytic coupled-cluster (CC) Greens function that renders a highly scalable computational accurate method for producing an analytic coupled-cluster Greens function for an N-electron system by shifting the poles of similarity transformed Hamiltonians represented in N?1 and N +1 electron Hilbert spaces. Simple criteria are derived for the states in N ?1 and N + 1 electron spaces that are then corrected in the spectral resolution of the cor- responding matrix representations of the similarity transformed Hamiltonian. The accurate description of excited state processes within a Greens function formalism would be of significant importance to a number of scientific communities ranging from physics and chemistry to engineering and the biological sciences. This is because the Greens function methodology provides a direct path for not only calculating prop- erties whose underlying origins come from coupled many-body interactions but it also provides a straightforward path for calculating electron transport, response and correlation functions that allows for a direct link with experiment. As a special case of this general formulation, we discuss the application of this technique for Greens function defined by the CCSD (CC with singles and doubles) representation of the ground-state wave function.

  15. Overexpression of Late Embryogenesis Abundant 14 enhances Arabidopsis salt stress tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Fengjuan Qi, Shengdong Li, Hui Liu, Pu Li, Pengcheng Wu, Changai Zheng, Chengchao Huang, Jinguang

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: It is the first time to investigate the biological function of AtLEA14 in salt stress response. AtLEA14 enhances the salt stress tolerance both in Arabidopsis and yeast. AtLEA14 responses to salt stress by stabilizing AtPP2-B11, an E3 ligase, under normal or salt stress conditions. - Abstract: Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are implicated in various abiotic stresses in higher plants. In this study, we identified a LEA protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtLEA14, which was ubiquitously expressed in different tissues and remarkably induced with increased duration of salt treatment. Subcellular distribution analysis demonstrated that AtLEA14 was mainly localized in the cytoplasm. Transgenic Arabidopsis and yeast overexpressing AtLEA14 all exhibited enhanced tolerance to high salinity. The transcripts of salt stress-responsive marker genes (COR15a, KIN1, RD29B and ERD10) were overactivated in AtLEA14 overexpressing lines compared with those in wild type plants under normal or salt stress conditions. In vivo and in vitro analysis showed that AtLEA14 could effectively stabilize AtPP2-B11, an important E3 ligase. These results suggested that AtLEA14 had important protective functions under salt stress conditions in Arabidopsis.

  16. Beryllium Related Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, R F

    2008-12-23

    In recent months, LLNL has identified, commenced, and implemented a series of interim controls, compensatory measures, and initiatives to ensure worker safety, and improve safety processes with regards to potential worker exposure to beryllium. Many of these actions have been undertaken in response to the NNSA Independent Review (COR-TS-5/15/2008-8550) received by LLNL in November of 2008. Others are the result of recent discoveries, events or incidents, and lessons learned, or were scheduled corrective actions from earlier commitments. Many of these actions are very recent in nature, or are still in progress, and vary in the formality of implementation. Actions are being reviewed for effectiveness as they progress. The documentation of implementation, and review of effectiveness, when appropriate, of these actions will be addressed as part of the formal Corrective Action Plan addressing the Independent Review. The mitigating actions taken fall into the following categories: (1) Responses to specific events/concerns; (2) Development of interim controls; (3) Review of ongoing activities; and (4) Performance improvement measures.

  17. GROUND LEVEL ENHANCEMENT IN THE 2014 JANUARY 6 SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, N.; Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Mkel, P.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Davila, J. M.

    2014-07-20

    We present a study of the 2014 January 6 solar energetic particle event which produced a small ground level enhancement (GLE), making it the second GLE of this unusual solar cycle 24. This event was primarily observed by the South Pole neutron monitors (increase of ?2.5%) while a few other neutron monitors recorded smaller increases. The associated coronal mass ejection (CME) originated behind the western limb and had a speed of 1960kms{sup 1}. The height of the CME at the start of the associated metric type II radio burst, which indicates the formation of a strong shock, was measured to be 1.61 Rs using a direct image from STEREO-A/EUVI. The CME height at the time of the GLE particle release (determined using the South Pole neutron monitor data) was directly measured as 2.96 Rs based on STEREO-A/COR1 white-light observations. These CME heights are consistent with those obtained for GLE71, the only other GLE of the current cycle, as well as cycle-23 GLEs derived using back-extrapolation. GLE72 is of special interest because it is one of only two GLEs of cycle 24, one of two behind-the-limb GLEs, and one of the two smallest GLEs of cycles 23 and 24.

  18. Finding of no significant impact: Changes in the sanitary sludge land application program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1042) that evaluates potential impacts of proposed changes in the sanitary sludge land application program on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Changes in lifetime sludge land application limits and radionuclide loading are proposed, and two new sources of sewage sludge from DOE facilities would be transported to the City of Oak Ridge Publicly Owned Treatment Works (COR POTW). Lifetime sludge land application limits would increase from 22 tons/acre to 50 tons/acre, which is the limit approved and permitted by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). With the approval of TDEC, the permissible radiological dose from sludge land application would change from the current limit of 2x background radionuclide concentrations in receiving soils to a risk-based dose limit of 4 millirem (mrem) per year for the maximally exposed individual. Sludge land application sites would not change from those that are currently part of the program. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not necessary, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 70 refs., 2 figs., 17 tabs.

  19. Implementation and Evaluation of the Virtual Fields Method: Determining Constitutive Model Parameters From Full-Field Deformation Data.

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Sharlotte Lorraine Bolyard; Scherzinger, William M.

    2014-09-01

    The Virtual Fields Method (VFM) is an inverse method for constitutive model parameter identication that relies on full-eld experimental measurements of displacements. VFM is an alternative to standard approaches that require several experiments of simple geometries to calibrate a constitutive model. VFM is one of several techniques that use full-eld exper- imental data, including Finite Element Method Updating (FEMU) techniques, but VFM is computationally fast, not requiring iterative FEM analyses. This report describes the im- plementation and evaluation of VFM primarily for nite-deformation plasticity constitutive models. VFM was successfully implemented in MATLAB and evaluated using simulated FEM data that included representative experimental noise found in the Digital Image Cor- relation (DIC) optical technique that provides full-eld displacement measurements. VFM was able to identify constitutive model parameters for the BCJ plasticity model even in the presence of simulated DIC noise, demonstrating VFM as a viable alternative inverse method. Further research is required before VFM can be adopted as a standard method for constitu- tive model parameter identication, but this study is a foundation for ongoing research at Sandia for improving constitutive model calibration.

  20. How well can future CMB missions constrain cosmic inflation?

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jérôme; Vennin, Vincent; Ringeval, Christophe E-mail: christophe.ringeval@uclouvain.be

    2014-10-01

    We study how the next generation of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurement missions (such as EPIC, LiteBIRD, PRISM and COrE) will be able to constrain the inflationary landscape in the hardest to disambiguate situation in which inflation is simply described by single-field slow-roll scenarios. Considering the proposed PRISM and LiteBIRD satellite designs, we simulate mock data corresponding to five different fiducial models having values of the tensor-to-scalar ratio ranging from 10{sup -1} down to 10{sup -7}. We then compute the Bayesian evidences and complexities of all Encyclopædia Inflationaris models in order to assess the constraining power of PRISM alone and LiteBIRD complemented with the Planck 2013 data. Within slow-roll inflation, both designs have comparable constraining power and can rule out about three quarters of the inflationary scenarios, compared to one third for Planck 2013 data alone. However, we also show that PRISM can constrain the scalar running and has the capability to detect a violation of slow roll at second order. Finally, our results suggest that describing an inflationary model by its potential shape only, without specifying a reheating temperature, will no longer be possible given the accuracy level reached by the future CMB missions.

  1. Chemical stability of melt-cast refractories in K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 7/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ melt

    SciTech Connect

    Abanin, V.I.; Federov, A.A.; Malyavin, A.G.; Ketov, A.N.

    1983-02-20

    Melts based on V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ are promising as catalysts for conversion of sulfur dioxide and thermocatalytic decomposition of spent sulfuric acid. The high chemical activity of such media with respect to metallic materials necessitates development of new materials of construction not based on metals. The purpose of the present work was to study the influence the composition and structure of melt-cast refractories on their chemical stability in K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 7/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ melts. The chemical stability of refractories based on SiO/sub 2/ in K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 7/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ melt is raised by the presence of chain calcium silicates with pyroxene and pyroxenoid chains, and lowered in presence of the oxides of zirconium, zinc, and cobalt in the materials. Fused quartz, cor-93, cast stone of diopside composition, and basalt-dolomite cast stone have high chemical stability in K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 7/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ melt and can be recommended as construction materials for equipment used for thermocatalytic decomposition of spent sulfuric acid.

  2. Catalysts For Hydrogenation And Hydrosilylation Methods Of Making And Using The Same

    DOEpatents

    Dioumaev, Vladimir K.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2004-05-18

    A compound is provided including an organometallic complex represented by the formula I: wherein M is an atom of molybdenum or tangsten, Cp is substituted or unsubstituted cyclopentadienyl radical represented by the formula [C.sub.5 Q.sup.1 Q.sup.2 Q.sup.3 Q.sup.4 Q.sup.5 ], wherein Q.sup.1 to Q.sup.5 are independently selected from the group consisting of H radical, C.sub.1-20 hydrocarbyl radical, substituted hydrocarbyl radical, halogen radical, halogen-substituted hydrocarbyl radical, --OR, --C(O)R', --CO.sub.2 R', --SiR'.sub.3 and --NR'R", wherein R' and R" are independently selected from the group consisting of H radical, C.sub.1-20 hydrocarbyl radical, halogen radical, and halogen-substituted hydrocarbyl radical, wherein said Q.sup.1 to Q.sup.5 radicals are optionally linked to each other to form a stable bridging group, NHC is any N-heterocyclic carbene ligand, L is either any neutral electron donor ligand, wherein k is a number from 0 to 1 or L is an anionic ligand wherein k is 2, and A.sup.- is an anion. Processes using the organometallic complex as catalyst for hydrogenation of aldehydes and ketones are provided. Processes using the organometallic complex as catalyst for the hydrosilylation of aldehydes, ketones and esters are also provided.

  3. CHARACTERISTICS OF KINEMATICS OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION DURING THE 2010 AUGUST 1 CME-CME INTERACTION EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, Manuela; Rollett, Tanja; Bein, Bianca; Moestl, Christian; Veronig, Astrid M.; Flor, Olga; Vrsnak, Bojan; Zic, Tomislav; De Koning, Curt A.; Liu, Ying; Bosman, Eckhard; Davies, Jackie A.; Bothmer, Volker; Harrison, Richard; Nitta, Nariaki; Bisi, Mario; Eastwood, Jonathan; Forsyth, Robert; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2012-04-10

    We study the interaction of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI COR and heliospheric imager (HI) data. We obtain the direction of motion for both CMEs by applying several independent reconstruction methods and find that the CMEs head in similar directions. This provides evidence that a full interaction takes place between the two CMEs that can be observed in the HI1 field of view. The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived by combining remote observations with in situ measurements of the CME at 1 AU. The speed profile of the faster CME (CME2; {approx}1200 km s{sup -1}) shows a strong deceleration over the distance range at which it reaches the slower, preceding CME (CME1; {approx}700 km s{sup -1}). By applying a drag-based model we are able to reproduce the kinematical profile of CME2, suggesting that CME1 represents a magnetohydrodynamic obstacle for CME2 and that, after the interaction, the merged entity propagates as a single structure in an ambient flow of speed and density typical for quiet solar wind conditions. Observational facts show that magnetic forces may contribute to the enhanced deceleration of CME2. We speculate that the increase in magnetic tension and pressure, when CME2 bends and compresses the magnetic field lines of CME1, increases the efficiency of drag.

  4. IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. I. STATISTICS AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION SOURCE REGION CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M.; Muhr, N.; Kienreich, I.; Utz, D.

    2011-09-10

    We use high time cadence images acquired by the STEREO EUVI and COR instruments to study the evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from their initiation through impulsive acceleration to the propagation phase. For a set of 95 CMEs we derived detailed height, velocity, and acceleration profiles and statistically analyzed characteristic CME parameters: peak acceleration, peak velocity, acceleration duration, initiation height, height at peak velocity, height at peak acceleration, and size of the CME source region. The CME peak accelerations we derived range from 20 to 6800 m s{sup -2} and are inversely correlated with the acceleration duration and the height at peak acceleration. Seventy-four percent of the events reach their peak acceleration at heights below 0.5 R{sub sun}. CMEs that originate from compact sources low in the corona are more impulsive and reach higher peak accelerations at smaller heights. These findings can be explained by the Lorentz force, which drives the CME accelerations and decreases with height and CME size.

  5. Correction of the Chromaticity up to Second Order for MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    H. K. Sayed, S.A. Bogacz, P. Chevtsov

    2010-03-01

    The proposed electron collider lattice exhibits low ?- functions at the Interaction Point (IP) (?x?100mm ? ?y? 20 mm) and rather large equilibrium momentum spread of the collider ring (?p/p = 0.00158). Both features make the chromatic corrections of paramount importance. Here the chromatic effects of the final focus quadruples are cor- rected both locally and globally. Local correction features symmetric sextupole families around the IP, the betatron phase advances from the IP to the sextupoles are chosen to eliminate the second order chromatic aberration. Global interleaved families of sextupoles are placed in the figure-8 arc sections, and non-interleaved families at straight sec- tion making use of the freely propagated dispersion wave from the arcs. This strategy minimizes the required sex- tupole strength and eventually leads to larger dynamic aper- ture of the collider. The resulting spherical aberrations induced by the sextupoles are mitigated by design; the straight and arc sections optics features an inverse identity transformation between sextupoles in each pair.

  6. CONFRRM Solar Energy Resource Data: Data from the Cooperative Network for Renewable Resource Measurements

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Cooperative Network for Renewable Resource Measurements (CONFRRM) is a cooperative effort between NREL and other agencies to conduct long-term solar radiation and wind measurements at selected locations in the United States. CONFRRM expands the geographic coverage of measurement locations and provides high quality data for determining site-specific resources, as well as data for the validation and testing of models to predict available resources based on meteorological or satellite data. Twelve sites are currently active in the CONFRRM network. CONFRRM complements and provides additional geographic coverage to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Integrated Surface Irradiance Study (ISIS) network. Solar data elements measured and reported by the CONFRRM sites include global horizontal irradiance (GHI), direct normal irradiance (DNI), diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI), and global horizontal irradiance measured with a LI-COR pyranometer. Meteorological data include air temperature, relative humidity, pressure, wind speed, wind direction and peak wind speed. Data logger temperature and battery voltage may also be reported. Prior to January 1, 1996, five CONFRRM sites together with South Caroline State College in Orangeburg, South Carolina, made up the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Solar Radiation Monitoring Network, located in the Southeastern United States. In January 1997 the HBCU sites became part of CONFRRM.

  7. Generation of Organic Radicals During Photocatalytic Reactions on TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.; Deskins, N. Aaron; Zehr, Robert T.; Dupuis, Michel

    2011-04-01

    Using a variety of organic carbonyl molecules (R1C(O)R2) and the rutile TiO2(110) surface as a model photocatalyst, we demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically that ejection of organic radicals from TiO2 surfaces is likely a prevalent reaction process occurring during heterogeneous photooxidationof organic molecules. Organic carbonyls react with coadsorbed oxygen species to form organic diolates which are more strongly bound to TiO2 than are the parent carbonyls. The parent carbonyls, when bound to TiO2(110) in an ?1 configuration, are photo-inactive. However, the diolates are shown to photodecompose by ejection one of the two R substituents from the surface into the gas phase, leaving behind the carboxylate of the other R group. Theoretical calculations using DFT show that in most cases the choice of which R group is ejected can be predicted based on the C-R bond energies and, to a lesser extent, the stability of the ejected R group.

  8. Tracking the CME-driven shock wave on 2012 March 5 and radio triangulation of associated radio emission

    SciTech Connect

    Magdaleni?, J.; Marqu, C.; Mierla, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Krupar, V.; Maksimovi?, M.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 2012 March 5 solar eruptive event, with an emphasis on the radio triangulation of the associated radio bursts. The main points of the study are reconstruction of the propagation of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using radio observations and finding the relative positions of the CME, the CME-driven shock wave, and its radio signatures. For the first time, radio triangulation is applied to different types of radio bursts in the same event and performed in a detailed way using goniopolarimetric observations from STEREO/Waves and WIND/Waves spacecraft. The event on 2012 March 5 was associated with a X1.1 flare from the NOAA AR 1429 situated near the northeast limb, accompanied by a full halo CME and a radio event comprising long-lasting interplanetary type II radio bursts. The results of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the CME (using SOHO/LASCO, STEREO COR, and HI observations), and modeling with the ENLIL cone model suggest that the CME-driven shock wave arrived at 1 AU at about 12:00 UT on March 7 (as observed by SOHO/CELIAS). The results of radio triangulation show that the source of the type II radio burst was situated on the southern flank of the CME. We suggest that the interaction of the shock wave and a nearby coronal streamer resulted in the interplanetary type II radio emission.

  9. Multichromophoric energy sensitization of C{sub 60} for organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Bartynski, Andrew N.; Trinh, Cong; Kirlikovali, Kent O.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2014-09-15

    In organic photovoltaics (OPVs), photocurrent generation is limited by absorption and exciton diffusion in the active layer. In this work, we describe the energy sensitization of C{sub 60} simultaneously by two chromophores at high volume concentrations (50%). This sensitization strategy takes advantage of the intense absorption of the sensitizers and the exceptional electron conduction and exciton diffusion length of C{sub 60} resulting in a 30% increase in photoresponse of the C{sub 60}-based sensitized acceptor layer between ??=?450?nm and 670?nm and power conversion efficiency under simulated AM 1.5?G illumination. In (2,4-bis[4-(N,N-diphenylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine)/C{sub 60} devices, sensitization results in an increase in J{sub SC} from 6.5??0.2?mA/cm{sup 2} to 8.6??0.2?mA/cm{sup 2} without compromising V{sub OC} or FF. These results demonstrate the robust nature of this sensitization scheme and its broad potential for application in OPVs.

  10. Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2012-11-01

    The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

  11. SUPER-B LATTICE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Raimondi, P.; Piminov, P.; Sinyatkin, S.; Nosochkov, Y.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The SuperB asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is designed for 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} luminosity and beam energies of 6.7 and 4.18 GeV for e{sup +} and e{sup -} respectively. The High and Low Energy Rings (HER and LER) have one Interaction Point (IP) with 66 mrad crossing angle. The 1258 m rings fit to the INFN-LNF site at Frascati. The ring emittance is minimized for the high luminosity. The Final Focus (FF) chromaticity correction is optimized for maximum transverse acceptance and energy bandwidth. Included Crab Waist sextupoles suppress betatron resonances induced in the collisions with a large Piwinski angle. The LER Spin Rotator sections provide longitudinally polarized electron beam at the IP. The lattice is flexible for tuning the machine parameters and compatible with reusing the PEP-II magnets, RF cavities and other components. Details of the lattice design are presented.

  12. A study of the applicability of ZnO thin-films as anti-reflection coating on Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} thin-films solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Abhijit; Patel, Malkeshkumar; Tripathi, Brijesh; Kumar, Manoj

    2012-06-25

    Transparent ZnO thin-films are prepared using the RF magnetron sputtering and spray pyrolysis techniques on the glass substrates. Reflectance spectra and thin films heights are measured using spectrophotometer and stylus surface profiler, respectively. Measured optical data is used for investigating the effect of the ZnO prepared by above two processes on the performance of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin films solar cell (TFSC). One dimensional simulation approach is considered using the simulation program, SCAPS. External quantum efficiency and J-V characteristics of CZTS TFSC is simulated on the basis of optical reflectance data of ZnO films with and without ZnO thin-films as antireflection coating (ARC). Study shows that ARC coated CZTS TFSC provides a better fill factor (FF) as compared to other ARC material such as MgF{sub 2}. Sprayed ZnO thin-films as ARC show comparable performance with the sputtered samples.

  13. Characterization of uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) with Raman spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Wellons, Matthew S.

    2016-03-22

    The Raman spectrum of uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) is unambiguously characterized with multiple Raman excitation laser sources for the first time. Across different laser excitation wavelengths, UF4 demonstrates 16 distinct Raman bands within the 50-400 cm-1 region. The observed Raman bands are representative of various F-F vibrational modes. UF4 also shows intense fluorescent bands in the 325 – 750 nm spectral region. Comparison of the UF4 spectrum with the ZrF4 spectrum, its crystalline analog, demonstrates a similar Raman band structure consistent with group theory predictions for expected Raman bands. Additionally, a demonstration of combined scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and in situmore » Raman spectroscopy microanalytical measurements of UF4 particulates shows that despite the inherent weak intensity of Raman bands, identification and characterization are possible for micron-sized particulates with modern instrumentation. The published well characterized UF4 spectrum is extremely relevant to nuclear materials and nuclear safeguard applications.« less

  14. Control of benzene waste NESHAP emissions from a petroleum refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Truelove, R.D. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper discusses the control of benzene emissions from a petroleum refinery as regulated by the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAO) Subpart FF - National Standard for Benzene Waste Operations. This regulation is complex and confusing, but it provides flexibility to achieve compliance through various strategies to control benzene emissions. The first step to achieve compliance with the benzene waste NESHAP is understanding the regulation itself. Therefore, this paper summarizes the regulation to provide the reader with sufficient background to understand why specific controls are required for specific processes. The flexibility provided by the regulation to achieve compliance is not always readily apparent. This paper summarizes some of these subtleties. The author's involvement with an industry trade association in meetings with the Environmental Protection Agency during the development of the regulation allows some of EPA's expressions of their intent and internal interpretation to also be contained in the summary. The second step to achieve compliance with the benzene waste NESHAP is to actually design and operate a cost effective solution for a specific set of existing conditions within a refinery. This paper provides a case study of the equipment necessary to achieve compliance with the substantive requirements of the regulation at a large, integrated refinery. The retrofit requirements are very specific to the circumstances of this facility. Therefore, they will not be a universal, cost effective means of compliance for other refineries.

  15. Global Carbon Budget 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Le Quéré, C.; Moriarty, R.; Andrew, R. M.; Canadell, J. G.; Sitch, S.; Korsbakken, J. I.; Friedlingstein, P.; Peters, G. P.; Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; Houghton, R. A.; House, J. I.; Keeling, R. F.; Tans, P.; Arneth, A.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Barbero, L.; Bopp, L.; Chang, J.; Chevallier, F.; Chini, L. P.; Ciais, P.; Fader, M.; Gkritzalis, T.; Harris, I.; Hauck, J.; Ilyina, T.; Jain, A. K.; Kato, E.; Kitidis, V.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Landschützer, P.; Lauvset, S. K.; Lefèvre, N.; Lenton, A.; Lima, I. D.; Metzl, N.; Millero, F.; Munro, D. R.; Murata, A.; Nabel, J. E. M. S.; Nakaoka, S.; Nojiri, Y.; O'Brien, K.; Olsen, A.; Ono, T.; Pérez, F. F.; Pfeil, B.; Pierrot, D.; Poulter, B.; Rehder, G.; Rödenbeck, C.; Saito, S.; Schuster, U.; Schwinger, J.; Séférian, R.; Steinhoff, T.; Stocker, B. D.; Sutton, A. J.; Takahashi, T.; Tilbrook, B.; van der Laan-Luijkx, I. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; van Heuven, S.; Vandemark, D.; Viovy, N.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-12-07

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We also discuss changes compared to previous estimates as well as consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover-change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. Moreover, the mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models forced by observed climate, CO2, and land-cover change (some including nitrogen–carbon interactions). We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - HAB 2012 Final.pptx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    fe a n d E ff e c ti v e C le a n u p th a t P ro te c ts th e C o lu m b ia R iv e r Re du ce s th e Ac tiv e Sit e Fo ot pr int of Cl ea nu p to 75 Sq ua re Mi les (5 86 to 75 ) Sig ni fic an tly Re du ce s Lo ng -T erm Mo rtg ag e Co st s At Co m pl eti on , Sh ift s Em ph as is an d Re so ur ce s to Fu ll of th e Ce nt ra l Pla tea u (7 5 sq ua re m ile s) Re du ce s Co st s by "R i Mi ss io Ri ch la nd O pe ra tio ns Of fic e B & C Ar ea Inte rim Saf e Sto rag e f N Ar ea Inte rim

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - HAB1111-Dowellfinalnobu.pptx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    fe a n d E ff e c ti v e C le a n u p th a t P ro te c ts th e C o lu m b ia R iv e r ¾ Re du ce s th e Ac tiv e Sit e Fo ot pr int of Cl ea nu p to 75 Sq ua re Mi les (5 86 to 75 ) ¾ Sig ni fic an tly Re du ce s Lo ng -T erm Mo rtg ag e Co st s ¾ At Co m pl eti on , Sh ift s Em ph as is an d Re so ur ce s to Fu ll of th e Ce nt ra l Pla tea u (7 5 sq ua re m ile s) ¾ Re du ce s Co st s by "R i Mi ss io Ri ch la nd O pe ra tio ns Of fic e B & C Ar ea 9 Inte rim Saf e Sto rag e f 9 N

  18. Facile method for synthesis of TiO{sub 2} film and its application in high efficiency dye sensitized-solar cell (DSSC)

    SciTech Connect

    Widiyandari, Hendri Gunawan, S. K.V.; Suseno, Jatmiko Endro; Purwanto, Agus; Diharjo, Kuncoro

    2014-02-24

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) is a device which converts a solar energy to electrical energy. Different with semiconductor thin film based solar cell, DSSC utilize the sensitized-dye to absorb the photon and semiconductor such as titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and zinc oxide (ZnO) as a working electrode photoanode. In this report, the preparation of TiO{sub 2} film using a facile method of spray deposition and its application in DSSC have been presented. TiO{sub 2} photoanode was synthesized by growing the droplet of titanium tetraisopropoxide diluted in acid solution on the substrate of conductive glass flourine-doped tin oxide (FTO) with variation of precursor volume. DSSC was assemblied by sandwiching both of photoanode electrode and platinum counter electrode subsequently filling the area between these electrodes with triodine/iodine electrolite solution as redox pairs. The characterization of the as prepared DSSC using solar simulator (AM 1.5G, 100 mW/cm{sup 2}) and I-V source meter Keithley 2400 showed that the performance of DSSC was affected by the precursor volume.. The overall conversion efficiency of DSSC using the optimum TiO{sub 2} film was about 1.97% with the open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of 0.73 V, short circuit current density (J{sub sc}) of 4.61 mA and fill factor (FF) of 0.58.

  19. R and D in France and in Western Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Bastin, A.J.F. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper deals with worldwide electric utility R and D, but focuses on France first, and not on Western Europe as a whole. Apart from the fact that the R and D of European utilities hardly show a homogeneous set, there are four basic reasons. To begin with, France represents roughly 20 percent of Western Europe by itself. Germany, now extended to the late DDR, is the only country to have a larger share. Second, Electricite de France (EDF) is the largest electric utility worldwide, with annual sales of about 410 TWh. Third, EDF has consistently shown one of the lowest electricity prices: as an average .44 FF par kWh (about $.08 per kWh) which comes up on comparing the 410 TWh sales with a 165 GFF turnover. Beyond these three points, which are more or less permanent, it appears that both EDF and its R and D division have been stable over the last three years. So the French power system is the largest subsystem in Western Europe where a single well-defined R and D policy can be described and assessed; this is what the authors are going to do now.

  20. Equations of state of anhydrous AlF{sub 3} and AlI{sub 3}: Modeling of extreme condition halide chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Stavrou, Elissaios; Zaug, Joseph M. Bastea, Sorin; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Radousky, Harry B.; Armstrong, Michael R.; Roberts, Sarah K.; Plaue, Jonathan W.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2015-06-07

    Pressure dependent angle-dispersive x-ray powder diffraction measurements of alpha-phase aluminum trifluoride (?-AlF{sub 3}) and separately, aluminum triiodide (AlI{sub 3}) were conducted using a diamond-anvil cell. Results at 295 K extend to 50 GPa. The equations of state of AlF{sub 3} and AlI{sub 3} were determined through refinements of collected x-ray diffraction patterns. The respective bulk moduli and corresponding pressure derivatives are reported for multiple orders of the Birch-Murnaghan (B-M), finite-strain (F-f), and higher pressure finite-strain (G-g) EOS analysis models. Aluminum trifluoride exhibits an apparent isostructural phase transition at approximately 12 GPa. Aluminum triiodide also undergoes a second-order atomic rearrangement: applied stress transformed a monoclinically distorted face centered cubic (fcc) structure into a standard fcc structural arrangement of iodine atoms. Results from semi-empirical thermochemical computations of energetic materials formulated with fluorine containing reactants were obtained with the aim of predicting the yield of halogenated products.

  1. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ^ I 1' . _ .t. /' L* x ,! " - p. iI C/-f-j i c, -q iGJbr%pq 22, 19&i 40:m Clli ;xmn r;. Cre?ltz J t E Y"* kL ss&LJl L' fJ i:~-q::~ i;<-t;j.!;z;:, 1 :,'. :; pctl;c-it nt a tsst of the ::3fr iZQviQ@l QT<*rl,l$jiOn t;rCso t!t t!lO 13 "; ?! i'@ t?'lS 2.2' I'"!'\Y ir, colw~bus with plome bill&S SO?' l"c fro?1 i:ol .T. ThO ~3X.~:nri.*,ellti FfB ~tt-?%-:Oti fOF 9 heYi., BQIpdPpJ 21. !?PeBait'k "~..j,;PC~ 1 .r. LOi~lr.tl 0" RU335li, ~iJrj.~~uioll

  2. Many-electron hyperpolarizability density analysis: Application to the dissociation process of one-dimensional H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano Masayoshi; Nagao Hidemi; Yamaguchi Kizashi |

    1997-02-01

    A method for density analysis of static polarizabilities ({alpha}) and second hyperpolarizabilities ({gamma}) on the basis of the finite-field (FF) many-electron wave packets (MEWP) method is developed and applied to evaluation of the longitudinal {alpha} and {gamma} in the dissociation process for a one-dimensional H{sub 2} model. Remarkable increases in {alpha} and {gamma} are observed in the intermediate dissociation region. The internuclear distance where the {gamma} is maximized is also found to be larger than that where the {alpha} is maximized. In order to elucidate the characteristics of {alpha} and {gamma} in the dissociation process, we extract their classical pictures describing displacements of two-electron configurations by using (hyper)polarizability densities on the two-electron coordinate plane. It is suggested from these classical pictures that the polarization in the ionic structure contributes primarily to the enhancement of (hyper)polarizability in the intermediate dissociation region, while the polarization in the diradical structure causes the decrease of the (hyper)polarizability at a large internuclear distance. This implies that the experimental search for species with chemical bonds in the intermediate correlation regime is important and interesting in relation to the molecular design of nonlinear optical materials. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Fullerene C{sub 70} as a p-type donor in organic photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Taojun; Wang, Xiao-Feng E-mail: zrhong@ucla.edu Sano, Takeshi; Kido, Junji E-mail: zrhong@ucla.edu; Hong, Ziruo E-mail: zrhong@ucla.edu; Li, Gang; Yang, Yang

    2014-09-01

    Fullerenes and their derivatives have been widely used as n-type materials in organic transistor and photovoltaic devices. Though it is believed that they shall be ambipolar in nature, there have been few direct experimental proofs for that. In this work, fullerene C{sub 70}, known as an efficient acceptor, has been employed as a p-type electron donor in conjunction with 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile as an electron acceptor in planar-heterojunction (PHJ) organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. High fill factors (FFs) of more than 0.70 were reliably achieved with the C{sub 70} layer even up to 100 nm thick in PHJ cells, suggesting the superior potential of fullerene C{sub 70} as the p-type donor in comparison to other conventional donor materials. The optimal efficiency of these unconventional PHJ cells was 2.83% with a short-circuit current of 5.33 mA/cm{sup 2}, an open circuit voltage of 0.72 V, and a FF of 0.74. The results in this work unveil the potential of fullerene materials as donors in OPV devices, and provide alternative approaches towards future OPV applications.

  4. Comment on “Towards high efficiency thin-film crystalline silicon solar cells: The roles of light trapping and non-radiative recombinations” [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 094501 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Abenante, L.

    2015-01-14

    In the above paper, an analytical approach including a new solution to the differential diffusion equation in illuminated quasi-neutral regions (QNR) is exploited to calculate the short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}), open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}), fill factor (FF), and efficiency (η) of light-trapping (LT) c-Si solar cells with a given structure. Comparisons with numerical results calculated by the Silvaco ATLAS device simulator in the same LT cells show that the analytical results are systematically overestimated. According to the authors, the inaccuracies in J{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and η are due to the fact that assuming ideal collection from space-charge region (SCR) and using the superposition approximation introduce systematic errors into analytical models. In this comment, an analytical approach using reported solutions to the transport equations in QNR and SCR, where ideal collection from SCR is assumed and the superposition approximation is used, is shown to agree with both the Silvaco and PC1d numerical approaches in calculating J{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and η, in the same LT devices as considered in the commented paper. Reasons for the inaccuracies detected in the commented paper are suggested.

  5. The 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, N. J.

    2009-04-29

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a group of expert collaborators are using the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site 300 Area uranium plume within the footprint of the 300-FF-5 groundwater operable unit as a site for an Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC). The IFRC is entitled Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on the Hanford Site 300 Area Uranium Plume Project. The theme is investigation of multi-scale mass transfer processes. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research that relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements/approaches needed to characterize and model a mass transfer-dominated system. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the 300 Area IFRC Project. This plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

  6. Extended asymmetric hot region formation due to shockwave interactions following void collapse in shocked high explosive

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Shan, Tzu -Ray; Wixom, Ryan R.; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2016-08-11

    In both continuum hydrodynamics simulations and also multimillion atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations of shockwave propagation in single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) containing a cylindrical void, we observed the formation of an initial radially symmetric hot spot. By extending the simulation time to the nanosecond scale, however, we observed the transformation of the small symmetric hot spot into a longitudinally asymmetric hot region extending over a much larger volume. Performing reactive molecular dynamics shock simulations using the reactive force field (ReaxFF) as implemented in the LAMMPS molecular dynamics package, we showed that the longitudinally asymmetric hot region was formed bymore » coalescence of the primary radially symmetric hot spot with a secondary triangular hot zone. We showed that the triangular hot zone coincided with a double-shocked region where the primary planar shockwave was overtaken by a secondary cylindrical shockwave. The secondary cylindrical shockwave originated in void collapse after the primary planar shockwave had passed over the void. A similar phenomenon was observed in continuum hydrodynamics shock simulations using the CTH hydrodynamics package. Furthermore, the formation and growth of extended asymmetric hot regions on nanosecond timescales has important implications for shock initiation thresholds in energetic materials.« less

  7. Inclusive and Exclusive |Vub|

    SciTech Connect

    Petrella, Antonio; /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara

    2011-11-17

    The current status of the determinations of CKM matrix element |V{sub ub}| via exclusive and inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays is reviewed. The large datasets collected at the B-Factories, and the increased precision of theoretical calculations have allowed an improvement in the determination of |V{sub ub}|. However, there are still significant uncertainties. In the exclusive approach, the most precise measurement of the pion channel branching ratio is obtained by an untagged analysis. This very good precision can be reached by tagged analyses with more data. The problem with exclusive decays is that the strong hadron dynamics can not be calculated from first principles and the determination of the form factor has to rely on light-cone sum rules or lattice QCD calculations. The current data samples allow a comparison of different FF models with data distributions. With further developments on lattice calculations, the theoretical error should shrink to reach the experimental one. The inclusive approach still provides the most precise |V{sub ub}| determinations. With new theoretical calculations, the mild (2.5{sigma}) discrepancy with respect to the |V{sub ub}| value determined from the global UT fit has been reduced. As in the exclusive approach, theoretical uncertainties represent the limiting factor to the precision of the measurement. Reducing the theoretical uncertainties to a level comparable with the statistical error is challenging. New measurements in semileptonic decays of charm mesons could increase the confidence in theoretical calculations and related uncertainties.

  8. Characterization of uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) with Raman spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Wellons, Matthew S.

    2016-03-22

    The Raman spectrum of uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) is unambiguously characterized with multiple Raman excitation laser sources for the first time. Across different laser excitation wavelengths, UF4 demonstrates 16 distinct Raman bands within the 50-400 cm-1 region. The observed Raman bands are representative of various F-F vibrational modes. UF4 also shows intense fluorescent bands in the 325 – 750 nm spectral region. Comparison of the UF4 spectrum with the ZrF4 spectrum, its crystalline analog, demonstrates a similar Raman band structure consistent with group theory predictions for expected Raman bands. Additionally, a demonstration of combined scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and in situmore » Raman spectroscopy microanalytical measurements of UF4 particulates shows that despite the inherent weak intensity of Raman bands, identification and characterization are possible for micron-sized particulates with modern instrumentation. The published well characterized UF4 spectrum is extremely relevant to nuclear materials and nuclear safeguard applications.« less

  9. High-efficiency, flexible CdTe solar cells on ultra-thin glass substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Mahabaduge, H. P.; Rance, W. L.; Burst, J. M.; Reese, M. O.; Gessert, T. A.; Metzger, W. K.; Barnes, T. M.; Meysing, D. M.; Wolden, C. A.; Li, J.; Beach, J. D.; Garner, S.

    2015-03-30

    Flexible, high-efficiency, low-cost solar cells can enable applications that take advantage of high specific power, flexible form factors, lower installation and transportation costs. Here, we report a certified record efficiency of 16.4% for a flexible CdTe solar cell that is a marked improvement over the previous standard (14.05%). The improvement was achieved by replacing chemical-bath-deposited CdS with sputtered CdS:O and also replacing the high-temperature sputtered ZnTe:Cu back contact layer with co-evaporated and rapidly annealed ZnTe:Cu. We use quantum efficiency and capacitance-voltage measurements combined with device simulations to identify the reasons for the increase in efficiency. Both device simulations and experimental results show that higher carrier density can quantitatively account for the increased open circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) and Fill Factor (FF), and likewise, the increase in short circuit current density (J{sub SC}) can be attributed to the more transparent CdS:O.

  10. INTERPRETATION OF THE ARCADE 2 ABSOLUTE SKY BRIGHTNESS MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Seiffert, M.; Levin, S. M.; Fixsen, D. J.; Kogut, A.; Wollack, E.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Mirel, P.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2011-06-10

    We use absolutely calibrated data between 3 and 90 GHz from the 2006 balloon flight of the ARCADE 2 instrument, along with previous measurements at other frequencies, to constrain models of extragalactic emission. Such emission is a combination of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) monopole, Galactic foreground emission, the integrated contribution of radio emission from external galaxies, any spectral distortions present in the CMB, and any other extragalactic source. After removal of estimates of foreground emission from our own Galaxy, and an estimated contribution of external galaxies, we present fits to a combination of the flat-spectrum CMB and potential spectral distortions in the CMB. We find 2{sigma} upper limits to CMB spectral distortions of {mu} < 6 x 10{sup -4} and |Y{sub ff}| < 1 x 10{sup -4}. We also find a significant detection of a residual signal beyond that, which can be explained by the CMB plus the integrated radio emission from galaxies estimated from existing surveys. This residual signal may be due to an underestimated galactic foreground contribution, an unaccounted for contribution of a background of radio sources, or some combination of both. The residual signal is consistent with emission in the form of a power law with amplitude 18.4 {+-} 2.1 K at 0.31 GHz and a spectral index of -2.57 {+-} 0.05.

  11. Signatures of Planck corrections in a spiralling axion inflation model

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, John

    2015-05-08

    The minimal sub-Planckian axion inflation model accounts for a large scalar-to-tensor ratio via a spiralling trajectory in the field space of a complex field Φ. Here we consider how the predictions of the model are modified by Planck scale-suppressed corrections. In the absence of Planck corrections the model is equivalent to a ϕ{sup 4/3} chaotic inflation model. Planck corrections become important when the dimensionless coupling ξ of |Φ|{sup 2} to the topological charge density of the strongly-coupled gauge sector FF{sup ~} satisfies ξ∼1. For values of |Φ| which allow the Planck corrections to be understood via an expansion in powers of |Φ|{sup 2}/M{sub Pl}{sup 2}, we show that their effect is to produce a significant modification of the tensor-to-scalar ratio from its ϕ{sup 4/3} chaotic inflation value without strongly modifying the spectral index. In addition, to leading order in |Φ|{sup 2}/M{sub Pl}{sup 2}, the Planck modifications of n{sub s} and r satisfy a consistency relation, Δn{sub s}=−Δr/16. Observation of these modifications and their correlation would allow the model to be distinguished from a simple ϕ{sup 4/3} chaotic inflation model and would also provide a signature for the influence of leading-order Planck corrections.

  12. Oxygen Incorporation During Fabrication of Substrate CdTe Photovoltaic Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Duenow, J. N.; Dhere, R. G.; Kuciauskas, D.; Li, J. V.; Pankow, J. W.; DeHart, C. M.; Gessert, T. A.

    2012-06-01

    Recently, CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices fabricated in the nonstandard substrate configuration have attracted increasing interest because of their potential compatibility with flexible substrates such as metal foils and polymer films. This compatibility could lead to the suitability of CdTe for roll-to-roll processing and building-integrated PV. Currently, however, the efficiencies of substrate CdTe devices reported in the literature are significantly lower ({approx}6%-8%) than those of high-performance superstrate devices ({approx}17%) because of significantly lower open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF). In our recent device development efforts, we have found that processing parameters required to fabricate high-efficiency substrate CdTe PV devices differ from those necessary for traditional superstrate CdTe devices. Here, we investigate how oxygen incorporation in the CdTe deposition, CdCl2 heat treatment, CdS deposition, and post-deposition heat treatment affect device characteristics through their effects on the junction. By adjusting whether oxygen is incorporated during these processing steps, we have achieved Voc values greater than 860 mV and efficiencies greater than 10%.

  13. Effect of Hysteresis on Measurements of Thin-Film Cell Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, D.; del Cueto, J.

    2011-03-01

    Transient or hysteresis effects in polycrystalline thin film CdS/CdTe cells are a function of pre-measurement voltage bias and whether Cu is introduced as an intentional dopant during back contact fabrication. When Cu is added, the current-density (J) vs. voltage (V) measurements performed in a reverse-to-forward voltage direction will yield higher open-circuit voltage (Voc), up to 10 mV, and smaller short-circuit current density (Jsc), by up to 2 mA/cm2, relative to scanning voltage in a forward-to-reverse direction. The variation at the maximum power point, Pmax, is however small. The resulting variation in FF can be as large as 3%. When Cu is not added, hysteresis in both Voc and Jsc is negligible however Pmax hysteresis is considerably greater. This behavior corroborates observed changes in depletion width, Wd, derived from capacitance (C) vs voltage (V) scans. Measured values of Wd are always smaller in reverse-to-forward voltage scans, and conversely, larger in the forward-to-reverse voltage direction. Transient ion drift (TID) measurements performed on Cu-containing cells do not show ionic behavior suggesting that capacitance transients are more likely due to electronic capture-emission processes. J-V curve simulation using Pspice shows that increased transient capacitance during light-soak stress at 100 degrees C correlates with increased space-charge recombination. Voltage-dependent collection however was not observed to increase with stress in these cells.

  14. Evidence for an unorthodox firing sequence employed by the Berlin Painter. Deciphering ancient ceramic firing conditions through high-resolution material characterization and replication

    SciTech Connect

    Cianchetta, I.; Trentelman, K.; Maish, J.; Saunders, D.; Foran, B.; Walton, M.; Sciau, Ph.; Wang, T.; Pouyet, E.; Cotte, M.; Meirer, F.; Liu, Y.; Pianetta, P.; Mehta, A.

    2014-12-10

    XANES spectroscopy was used to complement the results previously obtained with Raman spectroscopy by the same group to determine the firing conditions used in the production of a single vessel painted by the Berlin Painter in the 5th century B.C. The vessel, part of the collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum, presents a complicated layered architecture of black and red gloss, with different stratigraphies present on the interior and exterior surfaces. The study of two samples, one each from the interior and exterior surface of the vessel, was performed with the complementary analytical techniques of X-ray nano- and micro-spectroscopy (X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and full-field transmission X-ray micro-spectroscopy (FF-XANES) across the Fe K edge), and supported by a replication study. The replicates, made in a laboratory furnace providing complete control over the firing temperature and oxygen partial pressure, provided a paradigm for the comparison of the mineralogical phases observed in the ancient samples, which led to a deeper understanding of the firing conditions necessary for the production of the Berlin Painter's vessel. Our results confirm the necessity of multiple firings and painting applications to obtain the Berlin Painter's architecture and provide a further example of the multiplicity of techniques and practices employed by the potters of the Kerameikos in ancient Athens.

  15. Evidence for an unorthodox firing sequence employed by the Berlin Painter. Deciphering ancient ceramic firing conditions through high-resolution material characterization and replication

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Cianchetta, I.; Trentelman, K.; Maish, J.; Saunders, D.; Foran, B.; Walton, M.; Sciau, Ph.; Wang, T.; Pouyet, E.; Cotte, M.; et al

    2014-12-10

    XANES spectroscopy was used to complement the results previously obtained with Raman spectroscopy by the same group to determine the firing conditions used in the production of a single vessel painted by the Berlin Painter in the 5th century B.C. The vessel, part of the collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum, presents a complicated layered architecture of black and red gloss, with different stratigraphies present on the interior and exterior surfaces. The study of two samples, one each from the interior and exterior surface of the vessel, was performed with the complementary analytical techniques of X-ray nano- and micro-spectroscopymore » (X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and full-field transmission X-ray micro-spectroscopy (FF-XANES) across the Fe K edge), and supported by a replication study. The replicates, made in a laboratory furnace providing complete control over the firing temperature and oxygen partial pressure, provided a paradigm for the comparison of the mineralogical phases observed in the ancient samples, which led to a deeper understanding of the firing conditions necessary for the production of the Berlin Painter's vessel. Our results confirm the necessity of multiple firings and painting applications to obtain the Berlin Painter's architecture and provide a further example of the multiplicity of techniques and practices employed by the potters of the Kerameikos in ancient Athens.« less

  16. The isolated anatase for dye sensitized solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ilmi, Irfan; Kartin, Indriana; Suyanta; Ohtani, Bunsho; Wang, Kunlei

    2015-09-30

    The isolation of crystallite anatase from commercial TiO{sub 2} P25 Degussa was investigated. The aim of this research was to study of isolated anatase based DSSC as an effort to develop industrial DSSC. The crystal phase, crystallite size and crystal shape both of original P25 and isolated anatase were characterized by XRD and TEM. By observing DSSC parameters such as FF, Jsc and Voc resulted in cell test, the efficiency of samples based DSSC was known. The isolation of anatase crystal was done by dissolving P25 in ammonia catalyzed hydrogen peroxide solution for 15 hours followed by washing and drying. DSSC cell performance was evaluated by applying the isolated anantase and original P25 as photoanode in the Gratzel cell system. The observation of cell efficiency was measured under 100 mW /cm{sup 2} with active area 1.5 cm{sup 2}. X-ray diffraction pattern showed obviously that no rutile contaminant in produced isolated anatase. TEM image shows typical anatase crystal with the particle size 21 nm. Surface area measurement exhibits that surface area of isolated anatase was 64.7m{sup 2}/g. I-V measurement showed that the efficiency of anatase based cell and P25 based cell is 0.79% and 0.51% respectively.

  17. Di-hadron production at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; et. al.,

    2014-10-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has been used extensively in recent years as an important testing ground for QCD. Studies so far have concentrated on better determination of parton distribution functions, distinguishing between the quark and antiquark contributions, and understanding the fragmentation of quarks into hadrons. Hadron pair (di-hadron) SIDIS provides information on the nucleon structure and hadronization dynamics that complement single hadron SIDIS. Di-hadrons allow the study of low- and high-twist distribution functions and Dihadron Fragmentation Functions (DiFF). Together with the twist-2 PDFs ( f1, g1, h1), the Higher Twist (HT) e and hL functions are very interesting because they offer insights into the physics of the largely unexplored quark-gluon correlations, which provide access into the dynamics inside hadrons. The CLAS spectrometer, installed in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab, has collected data using the CEBAF 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on longitudinally polarized solid NH3 targets. Preliminary results on di-hadron beam-, target- and double-spin asymmetries will be presented.

  18. Economic comparison of pulsed electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters in coal fired utility plants

    SciTech Connect

    Caputo, A.C.; Pelagagge, P.M.

    1997-12-31

    Electrostatic precipitators (ESP) and fabric filters (FF) are the main air pollution control systems utilized to clean dust laden fumes from utility boilers. The choice among these systems depends from the specific site conditions such as dust characteristics, required efficiency, gas flowrate and temperature. ESP are generally characterized by higher capital investments and lower operating charges, while the opposite may be said for baghouses. As a consequence, ESP present higher total costs when high specific collection areas are required, as happens in the case of low-sulfur high-resistivity dust. However, significant reductions in both capital investment and operating charges may be obtained with pulsed energization of precipitators working in severe back corona conditions. This possibility greatly enlarges the field of applications in which SP are a lower cost option compared to fabric filters. In the paper an economic comparison of pulse energized ESP, with conventional ESP, reverse-air, shaker, and pulse-jet baghouses is performed. A mapping of the operating conditions in which the adoption of each examined control technology is economically convenient is also defined.

  19. The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-31

    The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

  20. New Precision Limit on the Strange Vector Form Factors of the Proton

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Z.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Baturin, P.; Bellini, V.; Benesch, J.; Beminiwattha, R.; Benmokhtar, F.; et al

    2012-03-01

    The parity-violating cross-section asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from unpolarized protons has been measured at a four-momentum transfer squared Q2 = 0.624 GeV2 and beam energy Eb = 3.48 GeV to be APV = -23.80 ± 0.78 (stat) ± 0.36 (syst) parts per million. This result is consistent with zero contribution of strange quarks to the combination of electric and magnetic form factors GEs + 0.517 GMs = 0.003 ± 0.010 (stat) ± 0.004 (syst) ± 0.009 (ff), where the third error is due to the limits of precision on the electromagnetic form factors and radiative corrections.more » With this measurement, the world data on strange contributions to nucleon form factors are seen to be consistent with zero and not more than a few percent of the proton form factors.« less