National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fastest growing primary

  1. Solar Among the Fastest Growing Job Markets in America | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Among the Fastest Growing Job Markets in America Solar Among the Fastest Growing Job Markets in America November 8, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) -- currently the largest solar photovoltaic power plant in the Eastern United States -- generates enough renewable energy to power approximately 4,500 homes. LISF is located at Brookhaven National Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) -- currently the

  2. Fact #920: April 11, 2016 Electric Charging Stations are the Fastest Growing Type of Alternative Fueling Station- Dataset

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file and dataset for Electric Charging Stations are the Fastest Growing Type of Alternative Fueling Station

  3. Primary coal crushers grow to meet demand

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2009-09-15

    Mine operators look for more throughput with less fines generation in primary crushers (defined here as single role crushers and two stage crushers). The article gives advice on crusher selection and application. Some factors dictating selection include the desired product size, capacity, Hard Grove grindability index, percentage of rock to be freed and hardness of that rock. The hardness of coal probably has greatest impact on product fineness. 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Scientists use world's fastest computer to model materials under extreme

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    conditions Materials under extreme conditions Scientists use world's fastest computer to model materials under extreme conditions Materials scientists are for the first time attempting to create atomic-scale models that describe how voids are created, grow, and merge. October 30, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable

  5. Once the World's Fastest Supercomputer; Central to

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    End of the road for Roadrunner March 29, 2013 Once the World's Fastest Supercomputer; Central to the Success of Stockpile Stewardship LOS ALAMOS, N. M., March 29, 2013-Roadrunner, ...

  6. Fact #920: April 11, 2016 Electric Charging Stations are the Fastest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Growing Type of Alternative Fueling Station | Department of Energy 0: April 11, 2016 Electric Charging Stations are the Fastest Growing Type of Alternative Fueling Station Fact #920: April 11, 2016 Electric Charging Stations are the Fastest Growing Type of Alternative Fueling Station SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week The number of electric charging stations grew from about 3,500 in 2011 to about 40,000 in 2015. It should be noted that beginning in 2011, electric charging stations refers to

  7. Building the World's Fastest Linux Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstone, R; Seager, M

    2003-10-24

    Imagine having 2,304 Xeon processors running day and night solving complex problems. With a theoretical peak of 11.2 teraflops, that is just what the MCR cluster at Lawrence Livermore National Labs (LLNL) is doing. Over the past several years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has deployed a series of increasingly large and powerful Intel-based Linux clusters. The most significant of these is a cluster known as the MCR (Multiprogrammactic Capability Resource). With 1,152 Intel Xeon (2.4 GHz) dual-processor nodes from Linux NetworX and a high performance interconnect from Quadrics, LTD., the MCR currently ranks third on the 21st Top 500 Supercomputer Sites List and is the fastest Linux cluster in the world. This feat was accomplished with a total system cost (hardware including maintenance, in-reconnect, global file system storage) of under $14 million. Although production clusters like the MCR are still custom built supercomputers that require as much artistry as skill, the experiences of LLNL have helped clear an important path for other clusters to follow.

  8. United States Regains Lead with World's Fastest Supercomputer |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Regains Lead with World's Fastest Supercomputer United States Regains Lead with World's Fastest Supercomputer June 18, 2012 - 2:02pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that a supercomputer called Sequoia at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California, received the rank of the world's most powerful computing system. The Top500 list, which annually ranks the world's fastest

  9. Top 500 Recognizes Fastest Supercomputers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    This enables researchers across the scientific arena, from materials to climate change to ... Titan is currently the second fastest supercomputer in the world. Image: Courtesy of ...

  10. Nuclear physicists use video gaming to build Hampton Roads' Fastest...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    0-10-24newsdp-nws-cp-fastest-computer-201010221computer-system-video-games-jeffers... Submitted: Friday, October 22, 2010 - 11:00pm...

  11. Jefferson Lab's Newest Cluster Makes Top500 List of Fastest

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputers | Jefferson Lab Newest Cluster Makes Top500 List of Fastest Supercomputers Jefferson Lab's Newest Cluster Makes Top500 List of Fastest Supercomputers NEWPORT NEWS, VA, November 16, 2016 - For the third time in its history, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is home to one of the world's 500 fastest supercomputers. The SciPhi-XVI supercomputer was just listed as a TOP500 Supercomputer Site on November 14, placing 397th on the 48th edition of the list of the world's

  12. Oak Ridge 'Jaguar' Supercomputer is World's Fastest | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    To net the number-one spot on the TOP500 list of the world's fastest supercomputers, Jaguar's Cray XT5 component was upgraded this fall from four-core to six-core processors and ...

  13. DOE's Oak Ridge Supercomputer Now World's Fastest for Open Science |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Supercomputer Now World's Fastest for Open Science DOE's Oak Ridge Supercomputer Now World's Fastest for Open Science November 10, 2008 - 4:47pm Addthis OAK RIDGE, Tenn. -- The latest upgrade to the Cray XT Jaguar supercomputer at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has increased the system's computing power to a peak 1.64 "petaflops," or quadrillion mathematical calculations per second, making Jaguar the world's first

  14. Top 500 List Recognizes Fastest Supercomputers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    00 List Recognizes Fastest Supercomputers Top 500 List Recognizes Fastest Supercomputers June 30, 2014 - 5:25pm Addthis Titan 1 of 4 Titan Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Titan has a theoretical peak performance of more than 27 petaflops, or more than 27 quadrillion calculations per second. This enables researchers across the scientific arena, from materials to climate change to astrophysics, to acquire unparalleled accuracy in their simulations and achieve research breakthroughs more rapidly

  15. Jefferson Lab Boasts Virginia's Fastest Computer | Jefferson Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Boasts Virginia's Fastest Computer Jefferson Lab Boasts Virginia's Fastest Computer The supercomputer, dubbed 7N, is a cluster computer composed of individual units wired together to function as one. It is built of 396 nodes, or individual computers, each containing two Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) quad-core 1.9 GHz processors with four Gigabytes (GB) of onboard random access memory (RAM). The nodes are connected via a Double Data Rate Infiniband network, which is capable of transferring 20

  16. Scientists use world's fastest computer to simulate nanoscale material

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    failure Nanoscale material failure Scientists use world's fastest computer to simulate nanoscale material failure With this new tool, scientists can better study what nanowires do under stress. October 29, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National

  17. Scientists use world's fastest supercomputer to create the largest HIV

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    evolutionary tree HIV evolutionary tree Scientists use world's fastest supercomputer to create the largest HIV evolutionary tree Researchers are using the supercomputer to analyze vast quantities of genetic sequences from HIV infected people in the hope of zeroing in on possible vaccine target areas. October 27, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering

  18. Scientists use world's fastest supercomputer to explore magnetic

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    reconnection Supercomputer to explore magnetic reconnection Scientists use world's fastest supercomputer to explore magnetic reconnection The focus is to understand the three-dimensional evolution of thin electrical current layers where magnetic reconnection initially develops. October 30, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience,

  19. Positive Energy Solar part of fastest-growing industry in U.S.

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Background Portsmouth Background Portsmouth Site construction - The location in Piketon, Ohio, was chosen in August 1952 to complement the federal government's gaseous diffusion program. Portsmouth Site construction - The location in Piketon, Ohio, was chosen in August 1952 to complement the federal government's gaseous diffusion program. Construction of the site quickly began in 1952. The effort was impressive, and when completed, included nearly 23,000 construction workers logging 69 million

  20. Scientists use world's fastest computer to understand nonlinear physics of

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    high-power lasers Nonlinear physics of high-power lasers Scientists use world's fastest computer to understand nonlinear physics of high-power lasers To achieve fusion scientists must put as much laser energy on target as possible. October 28, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and

  1. Firm Uses DOE's Fastest Supercomputer to Streamline Long-Haul Trucks

    DOE R&D Accomplishments

    2011-03-28

    Sophisticated simulation on the world's fastest computer for science makes trucks more aerodynamic, saves fuel, helps environment.

  2. Sequoia Ranked as Fastest Supercomputer in the World | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Sequoia Ranked as Fastest Supercomputer in the World Sequoia Ranked as Fastest Supercomputer in the World June 25, 2012 - 2:19pm Addthis A view of one of the aisles of racks that hold Sequoia’s 1.6 million cores. Its 16.32 sustained petaflops and 1.6 petabytes of memory make it the world's fastest supercomputer. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A view of one of the aisles of racks that hold Sequoia's 1.6 million cores. Its 16.32 sustained petaflops and 1.6

  3. U.S. Department of Energy's New Supercomputer is Fastest in the World |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy New Supercomputer is Fastest in the World U.S. Department of Energy's New Supercomputer is Fastest in the World June 9, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis Computer Breaks One Petaflop Barrier WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman today announced that the new Roadrunner supercomputer is the first to achieve a petaflop of sustained performance. Roadrunner will be used by the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to perform calculations

  4. The Five Fastest Supercomputers at the National Labs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The Five Fastest Supercomputers at the National Labs The Five Fastest Supercomputers at the National Labs Addthis Titan 1 of 5 Titan Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Titan has a theoretical peak performance of more than 20 petaflops, or more than 20 quadrillion calculations per second. This will enable researchers across the scientific arena, from materials to climate change to astrophysics, to acquire unparalleled accuracy in their simulations and achieve research breakthroughs more rapidly than

  5. Electrons Fingerprint the Fastest Laser Pulses | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    (SC) Electrons Fingerprint the Fastest Laser Pulses Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 09.07.16 Electrons Fingerprint the Fastest

  6. EXTREME STAR FORMATION IN THE HOST GALAXIES OF THE FASTEST GROWING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AT z = 4.8

    SciTech Connect

    Mor, Rivay; Netzer, Hagai; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Shemmer, Ohad; Lira, Paulina

    2012-04-20

    We report new Herschel observations of 25 z {approx_equal} 4.8 extremely luminous optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Five of the sources have extremely large star-forming (SF) luminosities, L{sub SF}, corresponding to SF rates (SFRs) of 2800-5600 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} assuming a Salpeter initial mass function. The remaining sources have only upper limits on their SFRs, but stacking their Herschel images results in a mean SFR of 700 {+-} 150 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. The higher SFRs in our sample are comparable to the highest observed values so far at any redshift. Our sample does not contain obscured AGNs, which enables us to investigate several evolutionary scenarios connecting supermassive black holes and SF activity in the early universe. The most probable scenario is that we are witnessing the peak of SF activity in some sources and the beginning of the post-starburst decline in others. We suggest that all 25 sources, which are at their peak AGN activity, are in large mergers. AGN feedback may be responsible for diminishing the SF activity in 20 of them, but is not operating efficiently in 5 others.

  7. New Titan Supercomputer Named Fastest in the World | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Titan Supercomputer Named Fastest in the World New Titan Supercomputer Named Fastest in the World November 12, 2012 - 4:37pm Addthis Oak Ridge National Laboratory is home to Titan, the world’s most powerful supercomputer for open science with a theoretical peak performance exceeding 20 petaflops (quadrillion calculations per second). That kind of computational capability—almost unimaginable—is on par with each of the world’s 7 billion people being able to carry out 3 million

  8. 17th Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest SupercomputersReseased

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack J.; Simon,Horst D.

    2001-06-21

    17th Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest Supercomputers Released MANNHEIM, GERMANY; KNOXVILLE, TENN.; BERKELEY, CALIF. In what has become a much-anticipated event in the world of high-performance computing, the 17th edition of the TOP500 list of the world's fastest supercomputers was released today (June 21). The latest edition of the twice-yearly ranking finds IBM as the leader in the field, with 40 percent in terms of installed systems and 43 percent in terms of total performance of all the installed systems. In second place in terms of installed systems is Sun Microsystems with 16 percent, while Cray Inc. retained second place in terms of performance (13 percent). SGI Inc. was third both with respect to systems with 63 (12.6 percent) and performance (10.2 percent).

  9. PPPL team wins 80 million processor hours on nation's fastest supercomputer

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab team wins 80 million processor hours on nation's fastest supercomputer By John Greenwald January 26, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Model of colliding magnetic fields before magnetic reconnection. (Model by Will Fox courtesy of Physical Review Letters 113, 105003 2014) Model of colliding magnetic fields before magnetic reconnection. (Model by Will Fox courtesy of Physical Review Letters 113, 105003 2014) The U.S Department of Energy (DOE)

  10. PPPL team wins 80 million processor hours on nation's fastest supercomputer

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab team wins 80 million processor hours on nation's fastest supercomputer By John Greenwald January 26, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Model of colliding magnetic fields before magnetic reconnection. (Model by Will Fox courtesy of Physical Review Letters 113, 105003 2014) Model of colliding magnetic fields before magnetic reconnection. (Model by Will Fox courtesy of Physical Review Letters 113, 105003 2014) The U.S Department of Energy (DOE)

  11. Growing America's Energy Future

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    emerging U.S. bioenergy industry provides a secure and growing supply of transportation fuels, biopower, and bioproducts produced from a range of abundant, renewable biomass resources. Bioenergy can help ensure a secure, sustainable, and economically sound future by reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil, developing domestic clean energy sources, and generating domestic green jobs. Bioenergy can also help address growing concerns about climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions to

  12. Growing Giant Crystals

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    crystals Growing Giant Crystals A new process similar to making rock candy was developed at NIF to rapidly grow very large crystals that are about 2 cubic feet in size and weigh up to 800 pounds-about the weight of a large grizzly bear! The crystals are made of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (or KDP), a naturally occurring chemical. In crystal form, KDP has good optical properties. Crystal plates have special optical properties, like prisms, that transmit, bend, and break light up into the

  13. Bioproducts and Biofuels - Growing Together! | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and Biofuels - Growing Together Bioproducts and Biofuels - Growing Together Breakout Session 2B-Integration of Supply Chains II: Bioproducts-Enabling Biofuels and Growing the ...

  14. Organization of growing random networks

    SciTech Connect

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S.

    2001-06-01

    The organizational development of growing random networks is investigated. These growing networks are built by adding nodes successively, and linking each to an earlier node of degree k with an attachment probability A{sub k}. When A{sub k} grows more slowly than linearly with k, the number of nodes with k links, N{sub k}(t), decays faster than a power law in k, while for A{sub k} growing faster than linearly in k, a single node emerges which connects to nearly all other nodes. When A{sub k} is asymptotically linear, N{sub k}(t){similar_to}tk{sup {minus}{nu}}, with {nu} dependent on details of the attachment probability, but in the range 2{lt}{nu}{lt}{infinity}. The combined age and degree distribution of nodes shows that old nodes typically have a large degree. There is also a significant correlation in the degrees of neighboring nodes, so that nodes of similar degree are more likely to be connected. The size distributions of the in and out components of the network with respect to a given node{emdash}namely, its {open_quotes}descendants{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ancestors{close_quotes}{emdash}are also determined. The in component exhibits a robust s{sup {minus}2} power-law tail, where s is the component size. The out component has a typical size of order lnt, and it provides basic insights into the genealogy of the network.

  15. Ames Lab 101: Growing Crystals in Space

    ScienceCinema

    Trivedi, Rohit

    2016-07-12

    Rohit Trivedi, distinguished professor of materials science and engineering, discusses his research with NASA to grow crystals in space.

  16. Ames Lab 101: Growing Crystals in Space

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, Rohit

    2011-01-01

    Rohit Trivedi, distinguished professor of materials science and engineering, discusses his research with NASA to grow crystals in space.

  17. What Makes Clouds Form, Grow and Die?

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Makes Clouds Form, Grow and Die? What Makes Clouds Form, Grow and Die? Simulations Show Raindrops Physics May Affect Climate Model Accuracy February 19, 2015 thunderstorm Brazil shuttle NASA 1984 540 PNNL scientists used real-world observations to simulate how small clouds are likely to stay shallow, while larger clouds grow deeper because they mix with less dry air. Pictured are small and large thunderstorms growing over southern Brazil, taken from the space shuttle. Image: NASA Johnson Space

  18. Silicon crystal growing by oscillating crucible technique

    DOEpatents

    Schwuttke, G.H.; Kim, K.M.; Smetana, P.

    1983-08-03

    A process for growing silicon crystals from a molten melt comprising oscillating the container during crystal growth is disclosed.

  19. Engaging and Growing Small Contractor Businesses

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Engaging and Growing Small Contractor Businesses, call slides and discussion summary, November 8, 2012.

  20. Maine Company Growing with Weatherization Work

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maine's BIOSAFE Environmental Services expands into weatherization, assisting low-income families with their services and creating jobs as business grows.

  1. Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014 Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014 The Bioenergy Technologies ...

  2. Growing the Future Bioeconomy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    the Future Bioeconomy Growing the Future Bioeconomy Breakout Session IA-Conversion Technologies I: Industrial Perspectives on Pathways to Advanced Biofuels Growing the Future Bioeconomy Joel Velasco, Senior Vice President, Amyris, Inc velasco_biomass_2014 (3.29 MB) More Documents & Publications Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Amyris, Inc. Biomass IBR Fact Sheet: Amyris, Inc. CX-100755 Categorical Exclusion Determination

  3. Researchers Growing Silicon Films for Solar Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This photograph features Chaz Teplin, left, and Howard Branz, right, scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. They use a hot-wire chemical vapor deposition system to grow silicon...

  4. Growing Americas Energy Future

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    America's Energy Future The emerging U.S. bioenergy industry provides a secure and growing supply of transportation fuels, biopower, and bioproducts from a range of biomass resources. Abundant, renewable bioenergy can help secure America's energy future, reducing our dependence on foreign oil and ensur- ing American prosperity while protecting the environment. Bioenergy can also help mitigate growing concerns about climate change by having an impact in decreasing green- house gas emissions,

  5. Forecasting municipal solid waste generation in a fast-growing urban region with system dynamics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Dyson, Brian; Chang, N.-B. . E-mail: nchang@even.tamuk.edu

    2005-07-01

    Both planning and design of municipal solid waste management systems require accurate prediction of solid waste generation. Yet achieving the anticipated prediction accuracy with regard to the generation trends facing many fast-growing regions is quite challenging. The lack of complete historical records of solid waste quantity and quality due to insufficient budget and unavailable management capacity has resulted in a situation that makes the long-term system planning and/or short-term expansion programs intangible. To effectively handle these problems based on limited data samples, a new analytical approach capable of addressing socioeconomic and environmental situations must be developed and applied for fulfilling the prediction analysis of solid waste generation with reasonable accuracy. This study presents a new approach - system dynamics modeling - for the prediction of solid waste generation in a fast-growing urban area based on a set of limited samples. To address the impact on sustainable development city wide, the practical implementation was assessed by a case study in the city of San Antonio, Texas (USA). This area is becoming one of the fastest-growing regions in North America due to the economic impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The analysis presents various trends of solid waste generation associated with five different solid waste generation models using a system dynamics simulation tool - Stella[reg]. Research findings clearly indicate that such a new forecasting approach may cover a variety of possible causative models and track inevitable uncertainties down when traditional statistical least-squares regression methods are unable to handle such issues.

  6. Prealloyed catalyst for growing silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Shalek, Peter D. (Los Alamos, NM); Katz, Joel D. (Niagara Falls, NY); Hurley, George F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A prealloyed metal catalyst is used to grow silicon carbide whiskers, especially in the .beta. form. Pretreating the metal particles to increase the weight percentages of carbon or silicon or both carbon and silicon allows whisker growth to begin immediately upon reaching growth temperature.

  7. World's Fastest Supercomputer Combination Unveiled For National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... to NNSA's effort to ensure the safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear deterrent. ... and enhancing the safety, security, reliability and performance of the U.S. nuclear ...

  8. Los Alamos supercomputer remains fastest in world

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... System enhancements to Roadrunner have boosted the computer's speed since its initial listing in the TOP500 last June. The secret to Roadrunner's record-breaking performance is its ...

  9. Spring Forward: Top Strategies for Growing and Scaling Your Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Spring Forward: Top Strategies for Growing and Scaling Your Program (301) Spring Forward: Top Strategies for Growing and Scaling Your Program (301) May 2

  10. ESnet's Fasterdata Site Growing in Scope, Popularity in Increasingly...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ESnet's Fasterdata Site Growing in Scope, Popularity in Increasingly Data-Driven World ... Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net ESnet's Fasterdata Site Growing in Scope, ...

  11. Influence of drought on growing season carbon and water cycling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Influence of drought on growing season carbon and water cycling with changing land cover ... Title: Influence of drought on growing season carbon and water cycling with changing land ...

  12. Los Alamos develops new technique for growing high-efficiency...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Growing high-efficiency perovskite solar cells Los Alamos develops new technique for growing high-efficiency perovskite solar cells Researchers reveal a new solution-based ...

  13. Land Management Practices More Critical as Biofuels Use Grows

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Management Practices More Critical as Biofuels Use Grows Land Management Practices More Critical as Biofuels Use Grows Climate Simulations Run at NERSC Show Cultivation Causes ...

  14. About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    You are here Home About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future The U.S. ...

  15. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Canastota`

    DOEpatents

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-05-15

    A distinct male cultivar of Salix sachalinensis.times.S. miyabeana named `Canastota`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 2.7-fold more woody biomass than its female parent (Salix sachalinensis `SX61`), 28% greater woody biomass yield than its male parent (Salix miyabeana `SX64`), and 20% greater woody biomass yield than a standard production cultivar, Salix dasyclados `SV1` when grown in the same field for the same length of time (two growing seasons after coppice) in Tully, N.Y. `Canastota` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. `Canastota` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by willow sawfly.

  16. Turkey opens electricity markets as demand grows

    SciTech Connect

    McKeigue, J.; Da Cunha, A.; Severino, D. [Global Business Reports (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Turkey's growing power market has attracted investors and project developers for over a decade, yet their plans have been dashed by unexpected political or financial crises or, worse, obstructed by a lengthy bureaucratic approval process. Now, with a more transparent retail electricity market, government regulators and investors are bullish on Turkey. Is Turkey ready to turn the power on? This report closely examine Turkey's plans to create a power infrastructure capable of providing the reliable electricity supplies necessary for sustained economic growth. It was compiled with on-the-ground research and extensive interview with key industrial and political figures. Today, hard coal and lignite account for 21% of Turkey's electricity generation and gas-fired plants account for 50%. The Alfin Elbistan-B lignite-fired plant has attracted criticism for its lack of desulfurization units and ash dam facilities that have tarnished the industry's image. A 1,100 MW hard-coal fired plant using supercritical technology is under construction. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  17. India's Energy [In]Security and Growing Competition from China...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    India's Energy InSecurity and Growing Competition from China Citation Details In-Document Search Title: India's Energy InSecurity and Growing Competition from China You are ...

  18. Financing the Growing American Auto Industry | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Growing American Auto Industry Financing the Growing American Auto Industry March 26, 2015 - 12:01am Addthis Peter W. Davidson Peter W. Davidson Former Executive Director of ...

  19. Biomass Fueling America’s Growing Clean Energy Economy

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Biomass is the most abundant biological material on the planet. It is renewable; it grows almost everywhere; and it provides fuel, power, chemicals, and many other products. Find out how biomass is helping grow America's clean energy economy.

  20. #YearofAction: Growing the Clean Energy Economy | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    YearofAction: Growing the Clean Energy Economy YearofAction: Growing the Clean Energy Economy January 29, 2014 - 6:03pm Addthis During the State of the Union address, President ...

  1. Bioproducts: Enabling Biofuels and Growing the Bioeconomy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Bioproducts: Enabling Biofuels and Growing the Bioeconomy Bioproducts: Enabling Biofuels and Growing the Bioeconomy Breakout Session 2B-Integration of Supply Chains II: Bioproducts-Enabling Biofuels and Growing the Bioeconomy Bioproducts: Enabling Biofuels and Growing the Bioeconomy Katy Christiansen and Nichole Fitzgerald, AAAS Fellows, Bioenergy Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy christiansen_and_fitzgerald_biomass_2014 (691.62 KB) More Documents & Publications

  2. On carbon footprints and growing energy use

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-06-01

    Could fractional reductions in the carbon footprint of a growing organization lead to a corresponding real reduction in atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions in the next ten years? Curtis M. Oldenburg, head of the Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program of LBNLs Earth Sciences Division, considers his own organization's carbon footprint and answers this critical question? In addressing the problem of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and climate change, it is essential that we understand which activities are producing GHGs and the scale of emission for each activity, so that reduction efforts can be efficiently targeted. The GHG emissions to the atmosphere of an individual or group are referred to as the carbon footprint. This terminology is entirely appropriate, because 85% of the global marketed energy supply comes from carbon-rich fossil fuel sources whose combustion produces CO{sub 2}, the main GHG causing global climate change. Furthermore, the direct relation between CO2 emissions and fossil fuels as they are used today makes energy consumption a useful proxy for carbon footprint. It would seem to be a simple matter to reduce energy consumption across the board, both individually and collectively, to help reduce our carbon footprints and therefore solve the energyclimate crisis. But just how much can we reduce carbon footprints when broader forces, such as growth in energy use, cause the total footprint to simultaneously expand? In this feature, I present a calculation of the carbon footprint of the Earth Sciences Division (ESD), the division in which I work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and discuss the potential for reducing this carbon footprint. It will be apparent that in terms of potential future carbon footprint reductions under projections of expected growth, ESD may be thought of as a microcosm of the situation of the world as a whole, in which alternatives to the business-as-usual use of fossil fuels are needed if absolute

  3. Growing America's Energy Future Factsheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Future Factsheet Growing America's Energy Future Factsheet The emerging U.S. bioenergy industry provides a secure and growing supply of transportation fuels, biopower, and bioproducts produced from a range of abundant, renewable biomass resources. overview_factsheet.pdf (133.31 KB) More Documents & Publications Growing America's Energy Future Webinar: Bioproducts in the Federal Bioeconomy Portfolio Webinar Conversion Factsheet

  4. Integrated primary/secondary Pb smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Zunkel, A.D.; Taylor, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The existing primary and secondary lead smelting processes have become uneconomic and cannot meet the current and proposed environmental standards. In the majority of plants retrofit programs will not solve the problems in the long term. A concept has been developed, however, which integrates the primary and secondary lead smelting operations in one plant - following the traditional approach used in the copper and nickel industries. The outlined processes provide an economic, environmentally acceptable method of returning scrap, particularly scrap batteries, to the circuit, thereby solving the growing and serious environmental problem facing most industrial nations.

  5. Primary enzyme quantitation

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1982-03-04

    The disclosure relates to the quantitation of a primary enzyme concentration by utilizing a substrate for the primary enzyme labeled with a second enzyme which is an indicator enzyme. Enzyme catalysis of the substrate occurs and results in release of the indicator enzyme in an amount directly proportional to the amount of primary enzyme present. By quantifying the free indicator enzyme one determines the amount of primary enzyme present.

  6. Training Veterans to Work in the Rapidly Growing Solar Industry |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Training Veterans to Work in the Rapidly Growing Solar Industry Training Veterans to Work in the Rapidly Growing Solar Industry June 26, 2015 - 12:40pm Addthis Training Veterans to Work in the Rapidly Growing Solar Industry Minh Le Minh Le Deputy Director, Solar Energy Technologies Office As the cost of solar energy continues to drop, it could become one of the cheapest electricity sources by 2030-and the solar job market will continue to flourish. In 2014, one out of

  7. Y-12 grows and expands in the 1950s

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    grows and expands in the 1950's The Alloy Development Program that Harold Cofer and others supported from a maintenance standpoint was one of the key programs in Y-12. The COLEX...

  8. Fact #567: April 20, 2009 Cars are Growing Older

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The median age of cars continues to grow in 2008 while the median age of light trucks has remained fairly constant over the last ten years. The average age for all trucks, which includes heavy...

  9. Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Boilers Market will grow due...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy Concerns to Push Global Market to Grow at 8.1% CAGR from 2013 to 2019 Oil Shale Market is Estimated to Reach USD 7,400.70 Million by 2022 more Group members (32)...

  10. A volunteer opportunity that'll grow on you

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    A Volunteer Opportunity That'll Grow on You Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: Dec. 2015-Jan. 2016 all...

  11. Learn How To Grow Your Business Through Government Contracting

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    OPEN for Government Contracts presents: Summit for Success is a FREE event hosted by American Express OPEN. The "Grow Your Business Through Government Contracting” events are FREE, day-long events focusing on small business government contracting.

  12. Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    4: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's

  13. About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future The U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) establishes partnerships with key public and private stakeholders to develop and demonstrate technologies for producing cost-competitive advanced biofuels from non-food biomass resources, including cellulosic biomass, algae, and wet waste (e.g. biosolids).

  14. About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future About the Bioenergy Technologies Office: Growing America's Energy Future The U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) establishes partnerships with key public and private stakeholders to develop and demonstrate technologies for producing cost-competitive advanced biofuels from non-food biomass resources, including cellulosic biomass, algae, and wet waste (e.g. biosolids).

  15. Growing Energy - How Biofuels Can Help End America's Oil Dependence |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Growing Energy - How Biofuels Can Help End America's Oil Dependence Growing Energy - How Biofuels Can Help End America's Oil Dependence America's oil dependence threatens our national security, economy, and environment. We consume 25 percent of the world's total oil production, but we have 3 percent of its known reserves. We spend tens of billions of dollars each year to import oil from some of the most unstable regions of the world. This costly habit endangers our

  16. Berkeley Lab Scientists Grow Atomically Thin Transistors and Circuits |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Berkeley Lab Scientists Grow Atomically Thin Transistors and Circuits Berkeley Lab Scientists Grow Atomically Thin Transistors and Circuits July 12, 2016 - 10:29am Addthis This schematic shows the chemical assembly of two-dimensional crystals. Graphene is first etched into channels and the TMDC molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) begins to nucleate around the edges and within the channel. On the edges, MoS2 slightly overlaps on top of the graphene. Finally, further growth

  17. Better Buildings Challenge Continues to Grow | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Continues to Grow Better Buildings Challenge Continues to Grow June 18, 2012 - 9:49am Addthis Heather Zichal, Deputy Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change, at the 23rd Annual Energy Efficiency Forum in Washington, D.C. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Efficiency Forum. Heather Zichal, Deputy Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change, at the 23rd Annual Energy Efficiency Forum in Washington, D.C. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Efficiency Forum. Maria Tikoff Vargas

  18. Land Management Practices More Critical as Biofuels Use Grows

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Management Practices More Critical as Biofuels Use Grows Land Management Practices More Critical as Biofuels Use Grows Climate Simulations Run at NERSC Show Cultivation Causes Carbon Loss in Soil August 3, 2015 Angela Hardin, (630) 252-5501, media@anl.gov LandManagement (a) Total SOC simulated by CLM-Crop over the contiguous United States. (b) Total SOC from the IGBP over the same domain as in (a). (c) Percent difference between (a) and (b). The handling of agricultural crop residues

  19. Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    4: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Agenda Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Agenda Tuesday, July 29, 2014 7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m. Breakfast and Registration 8:00 a.m.-8:20 a.m. Welcome and Introduction Jonathan Male, Director, Bioenergy Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy 8:20 a.m.-9:00 a.m. Morning Keynotes David Danielson, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy Byron Paez, Deputy Director for Deputy Assistant Secretary of the

  20. Greater fuel diversity needed to meet growing US electricity demand

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, B.; Mullins, S.

    2008-01-15

    Electricity demand is growing in the USA. One way to manage the uncertainty is to diversity fuel sources. Fuel sources include coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewable energy sources. Tables show actual and planned generation projects by fuel types. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Growing and Sustaining Communities with Bioenergy- Text-Alt Version

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    From Vero Beach, Florida, to Hugoton, Kansas, to Emmetsburg, Iowa, cellulosic ethanol biorefineries have had major impacts on communities and their residents. In other areas, bioenergy has significant potential to transform current and establish new industry. This short video illustrates how biorefineries and other bioenergy developments can benefit citizens, businesses, and whole communities, helping America’s rural economies grow and thrive.

  2. Process for growing silicon carbide whiskers by undercooling

    DOEpatents

    Shalek, P.D.

    1987-10-27

    A method of growing silicon carbide whiskers, especially in the [beta] form, is disclosed using a heating schedule wherein the temperature of the atmosphere in the growth zone of a furnace is first heated to or beyond the growth temperature and then is cooled to or below the growth temperature to induce nucleation of whiskers at catalyst sites at a desired point in time which results in the selection. 3 figs.

  3. Process for growing silicon carbide whiskers by undercooling

    DOEpatents

    Shalek, Peter D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01

    A method of growing silicon carbide whiskers, especially in the .beta. form, using a heating schedule wherein the temperature of the atmosphere in the growth zone of a furnace is first heated to or beyond the growth temperature and then is cooled to or below the growth temperature to induce nucleation of whiskers at catalyst sites at a desired point in time which results in the selection.

  4. Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of 2014 | Department of Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014 Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014 The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) forms cost-share public-private partnerships to help sustainably develop cost-competitive biofuels and bioproducts in the United States from non-food biomass resources. accomplishments_two_pager_2014.pdf (194.5 KB) More Documents & Publications Bioenergy Technologies Office FY 2016

  5. Sunflower power: grow your fuel to produce your food

    SciTech Connect

    Bruwer, J.J.

    1980-10-01

    The use of sunflower seed oil as a substitute for or extender of tractor diesel fuel is being considered by South Africa. South Afric already grows 500,000 hectares of sunflowers and even on marginal soil unsuitable for cereal grains such as maize and wheat, the crop yields well. Preliminary tests showed that most diesel engines started and operated almost normally on 100% sunflower seed oil.

  6. One Direction: Researchers grow nanocircuitry with semiconducting graphene

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    nanoribbons | Argonne National Laboratory Contact Us For more information, contact Justin H.S. Breaux at (630) 252-5823 or media@anl.gov. Connect Follow Argonne on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and LinkedIn. For inquiries on commercializing Argonne technology or partnering with Argonne to solve your R&D or production challenges, contact partners@anl.gov. One Direction: Researchers grow nanocircuitry with semiconducting graphene nanoribbons By Justin H.S. Breaux * October 13, 2015 Tweet

  7. COLLOQUIUM: Are Mushrooms the Next Polymers?: Growing Plastic Replacements

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    with Fungi | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab March 20, 2013, 4:15pm to 6:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Are Mushrooms the Next Polymers?: Growing Plastic Replacements with Fungi Mr. Gavin McIntyre Ecovative Design LLC Colloquium Committee: The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 2016-2017 Colloquium Committee is comprised of the following people. Please feel free to contact them by e-mail regarding any possible speakers or topics for future colloquia. Carol Ann Austin,

  8. Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    POET-DSM's Project LIBERTY cellulosic ethanol biorefinery in Emmetsburg, Iowa, was made possible with $100 million in BETO cost-shared funding. Photo courtesy POET-DSM. Growing America's Energy Future: Bioenergy Technologies Office Successes of 2014 The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) forms cost-share public-private partnerships to help sustainably develop cost- competitive biofuels and bioproducts in the United States from non-food biomass resources. The potential exists to sustainably

  9. Diamond proves useful material for growing graphene | Argonne Leadership

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Facility Diamond proves useful material for growing graphene Author: Bob Grant, Freelance Writer September 16, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google E-mail Printer-friendly version Graphene is the stuff of the future. For years, researchers and technologists have been predicting the utility of the one-atom-thick sheets of pure carbon in everything from advanced touch screens and semiconductors to long-lasting batteries and next-generation solar cells. But graphene's unique

  10. Process for growing epitaxial gallium nitride and composite wafers

    DOEpatents

    Weber, Eicke R.; Subramanya, Sudhir G.; Kim, Yihwan; Kruger, Joachim

    2003-05-13

    A novel growth procedure to grow epitaxial Group III metal nitride thin films on lattice-mismatched substrates is proposed. Demonstrated are the quality improvement of epitaxial GaN layers using a pure metallic Ga buffer layer on c-plane sapphire substrate. X-ray rocking curve results indicate that the layers had excellent structural properties. The electron Hall mobility increases to an outstandingly high value of .mu.>400 cm.sup.2 /Vs for an electron background concentration of 4.times.10.sup.17 cm.sup.-3.

  11. Growing Cutting-edge X-ray Optics

    ScienceCinema

    Ray Conley

    2013-07-17

    Ever imagined that an Xbox controller could help open a window into a world spanning just one billionth of a meter? Brookhaven Lab's Ray Conley grows cutting-edge optics called multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) one atomic layer at a time to focus high-energy x-rays to within a single nanometer. To achieve this focusing feat, Ray uses a massive, custom-built atomic deposition device, an array of computers, and a trusty Xbox controller. These lenses will be deployed at the Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source II, due to begin shining super-bright light on pressing scientific puzzles in 2015

  12. Apparatus for growing HgI.sub.2 crystals

    DOEpatents

    Schieber, Michael M.; Beinglass, Israel; Dishon, Giora

    1978-01-01

    A method and horizontal furnace for vapor phase growth of HgI.sub.2 crystals which utilizes controlled axial and radial airflow to maintain the desired temperature gradients. The ampoule containing the source material is rotated while axial and radial air tubes are moved in opposite directions during crystal growth to maintain a desired distance and associated temperature gradient with respect to the growing crystal, whereby the crystal interface can advance in all directions, i.e., radial and axial according to the crystallographic structure of the crystal. Crystals grown by this method are particularly applicable for use as room-temperature nuclear radiation detectors.

  13. Idaho Cleanup Project grows its workforce to complete ARRA work

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Idaho Cleanup Project grows its workforce to complete ARRA work CWI President and CEO John Fulton greets newly hired ICP employees at a June orientation session in Idaho Falls. Over a hundred new faces have already joined the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) workforce, both in offices and at work sites across DOE's Idaho Site. The ICP is ramping up its workforce to complete new work scope assigned to the ICP under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). As of June 27, 143 new workers have

  14. ESnet's Fasterdata Site Growing in Scope, Popularity in Increasingly

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Data-Driven World Fasterdata Site Growing in Scope, Popularity in Increasingly Data-Driven World News & Publications ESnet News Media & Press Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Contact Us Media Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 5849 or Media@es.net Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback:

  15. New Titan Supercomputer Named Fastest in the World | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    using technologies first developed for video game systems like Xbox 360 and PlayStation ... In video games, this capacity enables them to update the pixels on a display to make the ...

  16. A Pilot Plant: The Fastest Path to Commercial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Goldston

    2010-03-03

    Considerable effort has been dedicated to determining the possible properties of a magneticconfinement fusion power plant, particularly in the U.S.1, Europe2 and Japan3. There has also been some effort to detail the development path to fusion energy, particularly in the U.S.4 Only limited attention has been given, in Japan5 and in China6, to the options for a specific device to form the bridge from the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, ITER, to commercial fusion energy. Nor has much attention been paid, since 2003, to the synergies between magnetic and inertial fusion energy development. Here we consider, at a very high level, the possibility of a Qeng ? 1 Pilot Plant, with linear dimensions ~ 2/3 the linear dimensions of a commercial fusion power plant, as the needed bridge. As we examine the R&D needs for such a system we find significant synergies between the needs for the development of magnetic and inertial fusion energy.

  17. PHOTOS: 10 Years, 10 Breakthroughs at Argonne's Fastest Supercomputer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Image: Courtesy of CERN. Adding renewables to the electric grid 8 of 10 Adding renewables to the electric grid Adding renewable energy to the electric grid is tricky, because solar ...

  18. PPPL team wins 80 million processor hours on nation's fastest...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... For more information, please visit science.energy.gov. Contact Info PPPL Office of Communications Email: PPPLOOC@pppl.gov Phone: 609-243-2755 Download Select and View High ...

  19. Scientists use world's fastest supercomputer to model origins...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Kevin Roark Communications Office (505) 665-9202 Email One of the largest-ever computer models explores dark matter and dark energy, two cosmic constituents that remain a mystery ...

  20. Scientists use world's fastest computer to model materials under...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... For instance, gas gun experiments launch a "flyer plate" impactor at a target sample whose thickness is typically several millimeters, while simulations struggled to reach hundreds ...

  1. Far East LPG sales will grow faster than in West

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-30

    LPG sales through 2010 in regions east of the Suez Canal (East of Suez) will grow at more than twice those in regions west of the canal. East-of-Suez sales will grow at more than 4.0%/year, compared to slightly less than 2.0%/year growth in sales West of Suez. East-of-Suez sales will reach 92 million tons/year (tpy) by 2010, accounting for 39% of the worldwide total. This share was 31% in1995 and only 27% in 1990. LPG sales worldwide will reach 192 million tons in 2000 and 243 million tpy by 2010. In 1995, they were 163 million tons. These are some of the major conclusions of a recent study by Frank R. Spadine, Christine Kozar, and Rudy Clark of New York City-based consultant Poten and Partners Inc. Details of the study are in the fall report ``World Trade in LPG 1990--2010``. This paper discusses demand segments, seaborne balance, Western sources, largest trading region, North American supplies, and other supplies.

  2. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y.

    1997-04-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years.

  3. The three-dimensional morphology of growing dendrites

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Gibbs, J. W.; Mohan, K. A.; Gulsoy, E. B.; Shahani, A. J.; Xiao, X.; Bouman, C. A.; De Graef, M.; Voorhees, P. W.

    2015-07-03

    The processes controlling the morphology of dendrites have been of great interest to a wide range of communities, since they are examples of an out-of-equilibrium pattern forming system, there is a clear connection with battery failure processes, and their morphology sets the properties of many metallic alloys. We determine the three-dimensional morphology of free growing metallic dendrites using a novel X-ray tomographic technique that improves the temporal resolution by more than an order of magnitude compared to conventional techniques. These measurements show that the growth morphology of metallic dendrites is surprisingly different from that seen in model systems, the morphologymore » is not self-similar with distance back from the tip, and that this morphology can have an unexpectedly strong influence on solute segregation in castings. These experiments also provide benchmark data that can be used to validate simulations of free dendritic growth.« less

  4. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Tully Champion`

    DOEpatents

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-08-28

    A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.S. miyabeana named `Tully Champion`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 25% more woody biomass than two current production clones (Salix dasyclados `SV1` and Salix miyabeana `SX64`), more than 2.5-fold greater biomass than one of its parents (Salix miyabeana `SX67`), and nearly 3-fold more biomass than another production clone (Salix sacchalinensis, `SX61`) when grown in the same field for the same length of time (two growing seasons after coppice) in Tully, N.Y. `Tully Champion` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested repeatedly after two to four years of growth. `Tully Champion` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.

  5. The three-dimensional morphology of growing dendrites

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, J. W.; Mohan, K. A.; Gulsoy, E. B.; Shahani, A. J.; Xiao, X.; Bouman, C. A.; De Graef, M.; Voorhees, P. W.

    2015-07-03

    The processes controlling the morphology of dendrites have been of great interest to a wide range of communities, since they are examples of an out-of-equilibrium pattern forming system, there is a clear connection with battery failure processes, and their morphology sets the properties of many metallic alloys. We determine the three-dimensional morphology of free growing metallic dendrites using a novel X-ray tomographic technique that improves the temporal resolution by more than an order of magnitude compared to conventional techniques. These measurements show that the growth morphology of metallic dendrites is surprisingly different from that seen in model systems, the morphology is not self-similar with distance back from the tip, and that this morphology can have an unexpectedly strong influence on solute segregation in castings. These experiments also provide benchmark data that can be used to validate simulations of free dendritic growth.

  6. Growing Brazilian demand to spur gas network in South America

    SciTech Connect

    Deffarges, E.H. ); Maurer, L.I.A. )

    1993-01-18

    A recent combination in South America of economic and geopolitical factors is prompting development of a new integrated gas-pipeline network in the continent's Southern Cone. The crucial factors include privatization, regional integration, economic growth, and environmental concerns. The area, Latin America's largest regional entity, includes Brazil (population 150 million and a 1990 GNP of about $375 billion, 9th largest in the world), Argentina (population 32 million and the third largest Latin American economy after Brazil and Mexico), Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay. Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay are members of the MercoSur economic bloc whose objective is to develop free trade in the region. There are very few integrated pipeline networks in the world. Besides the giant North American system, with hundreds of producers and pipelines, there is only one other large integrated network. It connects continental European countries to their outside suppliers such as Norway, the C.I.S., and Algeria. The emergence of a new pipeline system is therefore important for the natural-gas industry worldwide and even more so if it occurs in a region now growing rapidly after a decade of economic difficulties.

  7. Interest grows in African oil and gas opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, D.

    1997-05-12

    As African countries continue a slow drift towards democratic government and market economics, the continent is increasingly attractive to international oil and gas companies. Though Africa remains politically diverse, and its volatile politics remains a major barrier to petroleum companies, a number of recent developments reflect its growing significance for the industry. Among recent projects and events reflecting changes in Africa: oil and gas exporter Algeria has invited foreign oil companies to help develop major gas discoveries, with a view to boosting exports to Europe; oil and gas producer Egypt invited foreign companies to explore in the Nile Delta region, and the result appears to be a flowering world scale gas play; west African offshore exploration has entered deep water and new areas, and a number of major projects are expected in years to come; Nigeria`s reputation as a difficult place to operate has been justified by recent political and civil events, but a long-planned liquefied natural gas (LNG) export plant is being built there; South Africa, which has returned to the international scene after years of trade isolation because of apartheid, is emerging as a potential driver for energy industry schemes throughout the continent. Activities are discussed.

  8. Soviet Union oil sector outlook grows bleaker still

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-12

    This paper reports on the outlook for the U.S.S.R's oil sector which grows increasingly bleak and with it prospects for the Soviet economy. Plunging Soviet oil production and exports have analysts revising near term oil price outlooks, referring to the Soviet oil sector's self-destructing and Soviet oil production in a freefall. County NatWest, Washington, citing likely drops in Soviet oil production and exports (OGJ, Aug. 5, p. 16), has jumped its projected second half spot price for West Texas intermediate crude by about $2 to $22-23/bbl. Smith Barney, New York, forecasts WTI postings at $24-25/bbl this winter, largely because of seasonally strong world oil demand and the continued collapse in Soviet oil production. It estimates the call on oil from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries at more than 25 million b/d in first quarter 1992. That would be the highest level of demand for OPEC oil since 1980, Smith Barney noted.

  9. U. S. oil spill law to cause growing tanker problem

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.B.

    1991-09-30

    This paper reports on tanker owners which face a growing dilemma on the issue of oil spill liability. The U.S. Oil Pollution Act, passed last year in the wake of the March 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, was intended to reduce risk of and damage from such accidents. However, in addition to phasing in double hulls on most tankers operating in U.S. waters, the law substantially increases shipowner's liability for spills. And the federal law does not preempt state liability laws, which in most cases amount to unlimited liability for spill cleanup. Rather than face potentially unlimited liability in the event of a spill, tanker owners worldwide are exercising a number of options to shield themselves. Some of those options could increase the potential for oil spills, industry officials warn. The act also threatens to shatter the international alliance among shippers. A report by Drewry Shipping Consultants Ltd., London, says the law could have a devastating effect on operating practices. Tanker owners and operators have voiced the most opposition to the new spill law and the shackles it places on them. Now the industry that insures tankers has spoken up about is increased liability, and it too may launch a boycott.

  10. Biotechnology and genetic optimization of fast-growing hardwoods

    SciTech Connect

    Garton, S.; Syrkin-Wurtele, E.; Griffiths, H.; Schell, J.; Van Camp, L.; Bulka, K. )

    1991-02-01

    A biotechnology research program was initiated to develop new clones of fast-growing Populus clones resistant to the herbicide glyphosate and resistant to the leaf-spot and canker disease caused by the fungus Septoria musiva. Glyphosate-resistant callus was selected from stem segments cultured in vitro on media supplemented with the herbicide. Plants were regenerated from the glyphosate-resistant callus tissue. A portion of plants reverted to a glyphosate susceptible phenotype during organogenesis. A biologically active filtrate was prepared from S. musiva and influenced fresh weight of Populus callus tissue. Disease-resistant plants were produced through somaclonal variation when shoots developed on stem internodes cultured in vitro. Plantlets were screened for disease symptoms after spraying with a suspension of fungal spores. A frequency of 0.83 percent variant production was observed. Genetically engineered plants were produced after treatment of plant tissue with Agrobacterium tumefasciens strains carrying plasmid genes for antibiotic resistance. Transformers were selected on media enriched with the antibiotic, kanamycin. Presence of foreign DNA was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Protoplasts of popular were produced but did not regenerate into plant organs. 145 refs., 12 figs., 36 tabs.

  11. Energy Department Reports Highlight Trends of Growing U.S. Wind...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Trends of Growing U.S. Wind Energy Industry Energy Department Reports Highlight Trends of Growing U.S. Wind Energy Industry August 10, 2015 - 1:18pm Addthis In 2014, U.S. turbines ...

  12. EIA: High Oil Prices, GHG Controls Would Help Clean Energy Grow...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    EIA: High Oil Prices, GHG Controls Would Help Clean Energy Grow EIA: High Oil Prices, GHG Controls Would Help Clean Energy Grow April 1, 2009 - 11:35am Addthis The growth of...

  13. Mechanistic Selection and Growth of Twinned Bicrystalline Primary Si in Near Eutectic Al-Si Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Choonho Jung

    2006-12-12

    Morphological evolution and selection of angular primary silicon is investigated in near-eutectic Al-Si alloys. Angular silicon arrays are grown directionally in a Bridgman furnace at velocities in the regime of 10{sup -3} m/sec and with a temperature gradient of 7.5 x 10{sup 3} K/m. Under these conditions, the primary Si phase grows as an array of twinned bicrystalline dendrites, where the twinning gives rise to a characteristic 8-pointed star-shaped primary morphology. While this primary Si remains largely faceted at the growth front, a complex structure of coherent symmetric twin boundaries enables various adjustment mechanisms which operate to optimize the characteristic spacings within the primary array. In the work presented here, this primary silicon growth morphology is examined in detail. In particular, this thesis describes the investigation of: (1) morphological selection of the twinned bicrystalline primary starshape morphology; (2) primary array behavior, including the lateral propagation of the starshape grains and the associated evolution of a strong <100> texture; (3) the detailed structure of the 8-pointed star-shaped primary morphology, including the twin boundary configuration within the central core; (4) the mechanisms of lateral propagation and spacing adjustment during array evolution; and (5) the thermosolutal conditions (i.e. operating state) at the primary growth front, including composition and phase fraction in the vicinity of the primary tip.

  14. Partnering with Utilities and Other Program Administrators to Sustain and Grow Your Energy Efficiency Initiatives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This presentation contains information on Partnering with Utilities and Other Program Administrators to Sustain and Grow Your Energy Efficiency Initiatives.

  15. Growing Crystaline Sapphire Fibers By Laser Heated Pedestal Techiques

    DOEpatents

    Phomsakha, Vongvilay; Chang, Robert S. F.; Djeu, Nicholas I.

    1997-03-04

    An improved system and process for growing crystal fibers comprising a means for creating a laser beam having a substantially constant intensity profile through its cross sectional area, means for directing the laser beam at a portion of solid feed material located within a fiber growth chamber to form molten feed material, means to support a seed fiber above the molten feed material, means to translate the seed fiber towards and away from the molten feed material so that the seed fiber can make contact with the molten feed material, fuse to the molten feed material and then be withdrawn away from the molten feed material whereby the molten feed material is drawn off in the form of a crystal fiber. The means for creating a laser beam having a substantially constant intensity profile through its cross sectional area includes transforming a previously generated laser beam having a conventional gaussian intensity profile through its cross sectional area into a laser beam having a substantially constant intensity profile through its cross sectional area by passing the previously generated laser beam through a graded reflectivity mirror. The means for directing the laser beam at a portion of solid feed material is configured to direct the laser beam at a target zone which contains the molten feed material and a portion of crystal fiber drawn off the molten feed material by the seed fiber. The means to support the seed fiber above the molten feed material is positioned at a predetermined height above the molten feed material. This predetermined height provides the seed fiber with sufficient length and sufficient resiliency so that surface tension in the molten feed material can move the seed fiber to the center of the molten feed material irrespective of where the seed fiber makes contact with the molten feed material. The internal atmosphere of the fiber growth chamber is composed substantially of Helium gas.

  16. Primary ion sources for EBIS

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, R.

    2001-03-21

    This paper gives an introduction into the topic of primary ion sources that can be used to feed ions of normally solid elements into EBIS devices. Starting with a set of typical requirements for primary ion sources, some major types of ion generators are discussed first, with emphasis on their working principles rather than trying to give a fully representative listing of used and proposed generators. Beam-transport issues between primary ion source and EBIS are then examined, and generic characteristics of suitable beam-formation and transport systems are explained.

  17. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M.; Urabe, Y.

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  18. Neustar White Paper: When Smart Grids Grow Smart Enough to Solve Crimes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Neustar White Paper: When Smart Grids Grow Smart Enough to Solve Crimes Neustar White Paper: When Smart Grids Grow Smart Enough to Solve Crimes Smart Grid data access Neustar White Paper: When Smart Grids Grow Smart Enough to Solve Crimes (48.39 KB) More Documents & Publications NBP RFI: Data Access Comments of Avista Corporation on DOE Request for Information-Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Customers and the Smart Grid: Data Access, Third

  19. Primary Energy Ventures | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Name: Primary Energy Ventures Place: Oak Brook, Illinois Zip: 60523 Product: Primary Energy Ventures is a privately held developer,...

  20. Primary & Secondary Navigation Menus (help/navigation)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Services Site Navigation Aids Primary & Secondary Navigation Menus The primary navigation menus are located in the black horizontal navigation bars at the top and bottom of...

  1. Growing the Tool Box for Medical Imaging: The Selenium-72/Arsenic...

    Office of Science (SC)

    Growing the Tool Box for Medical Imaging: The Selenium-72Arsenic-72 Generator Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding ...

  2. Partnering with Utilities and Other Program Administrators to Sustain-Grow Your Energy Efficiency Initiatives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document contains the transcript for the Partnering with Utilities and Other Program Administrators to Sustain and Grow Your Energy Efficiency Initiatives webinar held on May 8, 2013.

  3. Spring Forward: Top Strategies for Growing and Scaling Your Program (301)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Spring Forward: Top Strategies for Growing and Scaling Your Program (301), call slides and discussion summary.

  4. Lead-free primary explosives

    DOEpatents

    Huynh, My Hang V.

    2010-06-22

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula (cat).sub.Y[M.sup.II(T).sub.X(H.sub.2O).sub.6-X].sub.Z, where T is 5-nitrotetrazolate, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  5. GROW HOME

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Upstate Buffalo, New York, isn’t typically associated with gardens. More people probably envision Buffalo covered in the lake-effect snow of Lake Erie than in greenery. But the Solar Decathlon 2015...

  6. Fact #867: April 6, 2015 Car-Sharing and Ride-Summoning Are a Growing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Phenomenon - Dataset | Department of Energy 7: April 6, 2015 Car-Sharing and Ride-Summoning Are a Growing Phenomenon - Dataset Fact #867: April 6, 2015 Car-Sharing and Ride-Summoning Are a Growing Phenomenon - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Car-Sharing and Ride-Summoning Are a Growing Phenomenon fotw#867_web.xlsx (21.33 KB) More Documents & Publications Fact #856 January 19, 2015 Plug-in and Hybrid Cars Receive High Scores for Owner Satisfaction - Dataset Fact #924: May 9, 1916

  7. Science.gov: Still Strong, Growing in 10th Anniversary Year ...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    December 5, 2012 Science.gov: Still Strong, Growing in 10th Anniversary Year Washington, DC - Science.gov, known for its groundbreaking search and retrieval of government science ...

  8. Growing Graphene Ribbons in One Direction | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Growing Graphene Ribbons in One Direction Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 06.07.16 Growing Graphene Ribbons in One Direction New

  9. Solar Ready Vets: Preparing Our Veterans to Join the Growing Solar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Workforce | Department of Energy Ready Vets: Preparing Our Veterans to Join the Growing Solar Workforce Solar Ready Vets: Preparing Our Veterans to Join the Growing Solar Workforce April 6, 2015 - 2:27pm Addthis Last Friday at Hill Air Force Base in Utah, President Obama announced the expansion of the Solar Ready Vets program, a joint effort between the Department of Energy and Department of Defense to train active military personnel for careers in the solar energy industry. | White House

  10. Better Buildings Challenge to Cut Energy Waste Grows by 1 Billion Square

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Feet | Department of Energy to Cut Energy Waste Grows by 1 Billion Square Feet Better Buildings Challenge to Cut Energy Waste Grows by 1 Billion Square Feet May 9, 2014 - 11:01am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan and the Administration's Better Buildings Challenge, the Energy Department announced today that Better Buildings Challenge partners are on track to meet their energy performance goals in their second year, saving

  11. Algae Education Helping Grow Jobs of the Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Algae Education Helping Grow Jobs of the Future Algae Education Helping Grow Jobs of the Future August 30, 2016 - 3:30pm Addthis The Algae Technology Education Consortium (ATEC) is developing opportunities for education and training for next-generation jobs in the algal industry. | <em>Photo courtesy of ATEC</em> The Algae Technology Education Consortium (ATEC) is developing opportunities for education and training for next-generation jobs in the algal industry. | Photo courtesy of

  12. BEDES Adoption Continues to Grow and New Version Released | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy BEDES Adoption Continues to Grow and New Version Released BEDES Adoption Continues to Grow and New Version Released October 24, 2016 - 12:05pm Addthis bto_bedes_logo_102416.png In order to consistently exchange information on building characteristics and energy use data between tools and databases, several organizations have signed up to use the Building Energy Data Exchange Specification (BEDES) in their software applications, totaling 16 BEDES-compliant products since inception. The

  13. Picture of the Week: Growing a greener future with algal biofuels

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Growing a greener future with algal biofuels At the New Mexico Consortium, Los Alamos scientists are using genetic engineering to improve algae strains for increased biomass yield and carbon capture efficiency. September 6, 2015 x x View larger version Growing a greener future with algal biofuels At the New Mexico Consortium, Los Alamos scientists are using genetic engineering to improve algae strains for increased biomass yield and carbon capture efficiency. Algal biomass can be converted to

  14. Los Alamos develops new technique for growing high-efficiency perovskite

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    solar cells Growing high-efficiency perovskite solar cells Los Alamos develops new technique for growing high-efficiency perovskite solar cells Researchers reveal a new solution-based hot-casting technique that allows growth of highly efficient and reproducible solar cells from large-area perovskite crystals. January 29, 2015 Scientists Aditya Mohite, left, and Wanyi Nie are perfecting a crystal production technique to improve perovskite crystal production for solar cells at Los Alamos

  15. Energy Dept. Report Finds Major Potential to Grow Clean, Sustainable U.S.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydropower | Department of Energy Dept. Report Finds Major Potential to Grow Clean, Sustainable U.S. Hydropower Energy Dept. Report Finds Major Potential to Grow Clean, Sustainable U.S. Hydropower April 29, 2014 - 9:15am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on the Obama Administration's commitment to an all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Energy Department and its Oak Ridge National Laboratory released a renewable energy resource assessment today detailing the

  16. Renewable Energy Data Book Details Growing Industry in 2012 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Renewable Energy Data Book Details Growing Industry in 2012 Renewable Energy Data Book Details Growing Industry in 2012 December 4, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) on November 21 released the 2012 Renewable Energy Data Book on behalf of the Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The annual report is an important assessment of U.S. energy statistics for 2012, including renewable electricity, worldwide renewable

  17. Attendance Continues to Grow for 8th Portsmouth Science Alliance Event |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Attendance Continues to Grow for 8th Portsmouth Science Alliance Event Attendance Continues to Grow for 8th Portsmouth Science Alliance Event September 29, 2016 - 2:30pm Addthis PIKETON, Ohio ̶ More than 1,400 students and educators are anticipated for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) 8th Science Alliance event, scheduled for October 4-6, 2016 at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio. That record number of expected attendees continues a trend of

  18. Fact #744: September 10, 2012 Average New Light Vehicle Price Grows Faster

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    than Average Used Light Vehicle Price | Department of Energy 4: September 10, 2012 Average New Light Vehicle Price Grows Faster than Average Used Light Vehicle Price Fact #744: September 10, 2012 Average New Light Vehicle Price Grows Faster than Average Used Light Vehicle Price In 2011 the average used light vehicle price was 36% higher than in 1990, while the average new light vehicle price was 67% higher than it was in 1990. The average price of a used vehicle had been between $6,000 and

  19. Fact #867: April 6, 2015 Car-Sharing and Ride-Summoning Are a Growing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Phenomenon | Department of Energy 7: April 6, 2015 Car-Sharing and Ride-Summoning Are a Growing Phenomenon Fact #867: April 6, 2015 Car-Sharing and Ride-Summoning Are a Growing Phenomenon Car-sharing programs are not new to the United States, but have grown significantly over the last five years in an effort to provide an alternative to car ownership. Typically, car-sharing programs have membership requirements and hourly rates, unlike the rental-car business. Car-sharing programs may have a

  20. Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford January 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation’s field station, located in Mission, Ore., will be home to one-of-a-kind research and development for revegetation efforts. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation's field station, located in Mission, Ore., will be home to one-of-a-kind research and development for revegetation

  1. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Total Primary Energy Detail

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Energy Consumption and Graph Total Primary Energy Consumption Graph Detail and Data Table 1979 to 1992 primary consumption trend with 95% confidence ranges 1979 to 1992 primary...

  2. Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a fast growing cyanobacterial chassis for biosynthesis using light and CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jingjie; Liberton, Michelle; Cliften, Paul F.; Head, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Brand, Jerry J.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2015-01-30

    Photosynthetic microbes are of emerging interest as production organisms in biotechnology because they can grow autotrophically using sunlight, an abundant energy source, and CO2, a greenhouse gas. Important traits for such microbes are fast growth and amenability to genetic manipulation. Here we describe Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a unicellular cyanobacterium capable of rapid autotrophic growth, comparable to heterotrophic industrial hosts such as yeast. Synechococcus 2973 can be readily transformed for facile generation of desired knockout and knock-in mutations. Genome sequencing coupled with global proteomics studies revealed that Synechococcus 2973 is a close relative of the widely studied cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, an organism that grows more than two times slower. A small number of nucleotide changes are the only significant differences between the genomes of these two cyanobacterial strains. Thus, our study has unraveled genetic determinants necessary for rapid growth of cyanobacterial strains of significant industrial potential.

  3. Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a fast growing cyanobacterial chassis for biosynthesis using light and CO2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yu, Jingjie; Liberton, Michelle; Cliften, Paul F.; Head, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Brand, Jerry J.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2015-01-30

    Photosynthetic microbes are of emerging interest as production organisms in biotechnology because they can grow autotrophically using sunlight, an abundant energy source, and CO2, a greenhouse gas. Important traits for such microbes are fast growth and amenability to genetic manipulation. Here we describe Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a unicellular cyanobacterium capable of rapid autotrophic growth, comparable to heterotrophic industrial hosts such as yeast. Synechococcus 2973 can be readily transformed for facile generation of desired knockout and knock-in mutations. Genome sequencing coupled with global proteomics studies revealed that Synechococcus 2973 is a close relative of the widely studied cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatusmore » PCC 7942, an organism that grows more than two times slower. A small number of nucleotide changes are the only significant differences between the genomes of these two cyanobacterial strains. Thus, our study has unraveled genetic determinants necessary for rapid growth of cyanobacterial strains of significant industrial potential.« less

  4. Contoured inner after-heater shield for reducing stress in growing crystalline bodies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.

    1996-09-24

    An apparatus for growing hollow crystalline bodies by the EFG process, comprising an EFG die having a top surface shaped for growing a hollow crystalline body having a cross-sectional configuration in the shape of a polygon having n faces, and a radiation shield adjacent to and surrounded by the top end surface of the die, characterized in that the shield has an inner edge defining a similar polygon with n sides, and the inner edge of the shield is notched so that the spacing between the n faces and the n sides is greatest between the central portions of the n faces and the n sides, whereby the greater spacing at the central portions helps to reduce lateral temperature gradients in the crystalline body that is grown by use of the die.

  5. NREL Releases Renewable Energy Data Book Detailing Growing Industry in 2012

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    - News Releases | NREL Releases Renewable Energy Data Book Detailing Growing Industry in 2012 November 21, 2013 The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has released the 2012 Renewable Energy Data Book on behalf of the Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The annual report is an important assessment of U.S. energy statistics for 2012, including renewable electricity, worldwide renewable energy development, clean energy investments, and data on specific

  6. NREL's Impact Grows Through the Clean Energy Solutions Center and the New

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Clean Energy Design Studio - Continuum Magazine | NREL NREL's Impact Grows Through the Clean Energy Solutions Center and the New Clean Energy Design Studio The Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) helps governments design and adopt policies and programs that support the deployment of clean energy technologies. South Africa and Antigua & Barbuda are two examples of the Solutions Center helping advance climate change goals around the globe. And the next big thing in clean

  7. Cloud Properties from Doppler Radar Spectra - a Growing Suite of Information Extraction Algorithms

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    from Doppler Radar Spectra - a Growing Suite of Information Extraction Algorithms Edward Luke 1 , Pavlos Kollias 2 , Matthew Shupe 3 , Karen Johnson 1 , Eugene Clothiaux 4 1. Brookhaven National Laboratory 2. McGill University 3. CIRES/NOAA/ETL 4. Penn State University C F B A E D Lidar Prediction Algorithm Depolarization C F B A E D Backscatter DOPPLER RADAR SPECTRA HYDROMETEOR PHASE CLASSIFICATION MIXED LIQUID SOLID MIXED LIQUID SOLID Shupe Multi-instrument Technique Doppler Radar Spectra

  8. Science.gov: Still Strong, Growing in 10th Anniversary Year | OSTI, US Dept

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information December 5, 2012 Science.gov: Still Strong, Growing in 10th Anniversary Year Washington, DC - Science.gov, known for its groundbreaking search and retrieval of government science information, is celebrating its 10th Anniversary. Through federated one-stop search of U.S. government science information, the portal offers free access to research and development results from 17 organizations within 13 federal science agencies. Science.gov

  9. How Does Your Garden Grow? Study Identifies Instigators of Plant Growth |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) How Does Your Garden Grow? Study Identifies Instigators of Plant Growth Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) Community Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000

  10. World oil inventories forecast to grow significantly in 2016 and 2017

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    World oil inventories forecast to grow significantly in 2016 and 2017 Global oil inventories are expected to continue strong growth over the next two years which should keep oil prices low. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said world oil stocks are likely to increase by 1.6 million barrels per day this year and by 600,000 barrels per day next year. The higher forecast for inventory builds are the result of both higher global oil production and less oil

  11. Method of growing films by flame synthesis using a stagnation-flow reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hahn, D.W.; Edwards, C.F.

    1998-11-24

    A method is described for stabilizing a strained flame in a stagnation flow reactor. By causing a highly strained flame to be divided into a large number of equal size segments it is possible to stablize a highly strained flame that is on the verge of extinction, thereby providing for higher film growth rates. The flame stabilizer is an annular ring mounted coaxially and coplanar with the substrate upon which the film is growing and having a number of vertical pillars mounted on the top surface, thereby increasing the number of azimuthal nodes into which the flame is divided and preserving an axisymmetric structure necessary for stability. 5 figs.

  12. Method of growing films by flame synthesis using a stagnation-flow reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hahn, David W.; Edwards, Christopher F.

    1998-01-01

    A method of stabilizing a strained flame in a stagnation flow reactor. By causing a highly strained flame to be divided into a large number of equal size segments it is possible to stablize a highly strained flame that is on the verge of extinction, thereby providing for higher film growth rates. The flame stabilizer is an annular ring mounted coaxially and coplanar with the substrate upon which the film is growing and having a number of vertical pillars mounted on the top surface, thereby increasing the number of azimuthal nodes into which the flame is divided and preserving an axisymmetric structure necessary for stability.

  13. Solar Photovoltaic Economic Development: Building and Growing a Local PV Industry, August 2011 (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. photovoltaic (PV) industry is forecast to grow, and it represents an opportunity for economic development and job creation in communities throughout the United States. This report helps U.S. cities evaluate economic opportunities in the PV industry. It serves as a guide for local economic development offices in evaluating their community?s competitiveness in the solar PV industry, assessing the viability of solar PV development goals, and developing strategies for recruiting and retaining PV companies to their areas.

  14. Development of nonlinearity in a growing self-excited dust-density wave

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, T. M.; Goree, J.

    2011-01-15

    The development of nonlinearity is observed in a naturally occurring planar dust-density wave. As it propagates through a dusty plasma, the wave grows and harmonics are generated. The amplitudes, wave numbers, and growth rates are measured for the fundamental and its harmonics. The energy in the harmonic modes exhibits a strong exponential increase with diminishing gas pressure, until it levels off at lower gas pressures. The wave numbers and growth rates for the harmonics are near integer multiples of those for the fundamental.

  15. Design and development of a greenhouse growing system with a cooling facility using geothermal energy; Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Shunichiro; Ishibashi, Sadato . Faculty of Agriculture); Kaieda, Masami )

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of the present work was to develop a greenhouse growing system with a night cooling facility using geothermal energy to grow fall and winter vegetables during high summer temperatures. In this paper, the authors first designed and constructed a greenhouse cooling facility using geothermal water for the driving energy, and then conducted a cooling performance test and growth experiment in the growing of vegetables. As a result of the investigation, first, the facility showed the cooling performance as designed, since the air in the greenhouse was cooled to the desired temperature of 15 C. Second, in the open division, almost all the spinach, lettuce, and Kinusaya peas died back during growing and there was therefore no yield. However, in the cooling division, all the vegetables grew normally and their yields were large. From the results mentioned above, the authors concluded that it is possible to grow vegetables during the high-temperature summer season in greenhouse cooled only at night.

  16. China's growing CO{sub 2} emissions - a race between increasing consumption and efficiency gains

    SciTech Connect

    Glen P. Peters; Christopher L. Weber; Dabo Guan; Klaus Hubacek

    2007-09-15

    China's rapidly growing economy and energy consumption are creating serious environmental problems on both local and global scales. Understanding the key drivers behind China's growing energy consumption and the associated CO{sub 2} emissions is critical for the development of global climate policies and provides insight into how other emerging economies may develop a low emissions future. Using recently released Chinese economic input-output data and structural decomposition analysis we analyze how changes in China's technology, economic structure, urbanization, and lifestyles affect CO{sub 2} emissions. We find that infrastructure construction and urban household consumption, both in turn driven by urbanization and lifestyle changes, have outpaced efficiency improvements in the growth of CO{sub 2} emissions. Net trade had a small effect on total emissions due to equal, but significant, growth in emissions from the production of exports and emissions avoided by imports. Technology and efficiency improvements have only partially offset consumption growth, but there remains considerable untapped potential to reduce emissions by improving both production and consumption systems. As China continues to rapidly develop there is an opportunity to further implement and extend policies, such as the Circular Economy, that will help China avoid the high emissions path taken by today's developed countries. 65 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. (Assessment of the potential of Yunnan Province, China to grow and convert biomass to electricity)

    SciTech Connect

    Perlack, R.D.

    1990-10-15

    The purpose of the trip was to conduct a preliminary evaluation of biomass energy development in Yunnan Province, China. The evaluation included an assessment of the potential to grow and convert biomass to electricity, and an evaluation of the institutional relationships, which would be critical to the establishment of a collaborative biomass energy development project. This site visit was undertaken to evaluate the potential of an integrated biomass energy project, including the growing and handling of biomass feedstocks and its conversion to electricity. Based on this site visit, it was concluded that biomass production risks are real and further research on species screening and experiments is necessary before proceeding to the conversion phase of this project. The location of potential sites inspected and the logistics required for handling and transporting biomass may also be a concern. The commitment of support (labor and land) and leadership to this project by the Chinese is overwhelming exceeding all pre-site visit expectations. In sum, there is a definite opportunity in Yunnan for an integrated biomass energy project and a potential market for US technology.

  18. Working with SRNL - Our Facilities- Primary Standards Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Primary Standards Laboratory Working with SRNL Our Facilities - Primary Standards Laboratory The Primary Standards Laboratory at SRNL provides calibration services compliant to the requirements of the American national standard for calibration laboratories

  19. US Army primary radiation standards complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.C.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the U.S. Army Primary Radiation Standards Complex (PRSC) to be constructed at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The missions of the organizations to be located in the PRSC are described. The health physics review of the facility design is discussed. The radiation sources to be available in the PRSC and the resulting measurement capabilities of the Army Primary Standards Laboratory Nucleonics section are specified. Influence of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accrediation Program (NVLAP) accreditation criteria on facility design and source selection is illustrated.

  20. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY ...

  1. Primary Science of Energy Student Guide (42 Activities) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Student Guide (42 Activities) Primary Science of Energy Student Guide (42 Activities) Information about Primary Science of Energy, 42 student activities on energy basics for grades...

  2. Organosilicon-Based Electrolytes for Long-Life Lithium Primary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Organosilicon-Based Electrolytes for Long-Life Lithium Primary Batteries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Organosilicon-Based Electrolytes for Long-Life Lithium Primary ...

  3. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation system

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space filtered venting of tanks AY101, AY102, AZ101, AZ102. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  4. The temperature dependence of atomic incorporation characteristics in growing GaInNAs films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jingling; Gao, Fangliang; Wen, Lei; Zhou, Shizhong; Zhang, Shuguang E-mail: msgli@scut.edu.cn; Li, Guoqiang E-mail: msgli@scut.edu.cn

    2015-02-07

    We have systematically studied the temperature dependence of incorporation characteristics of nitrogen (N) and indium (In) in growing GaInNAs films. With the implementation of Monte-Carlo simulation, the low N adsorption energy (−0.10 eV) is demonstrated. To understand the atomic incorporation mechanism, temperature dependence of interactions between Group-III and V elements are subsequently discussed. We find that the In incorporation behaviors rather than that of N are more sensitive to the T{sub g}, which can be experimentally verified by exploring the compositional modulation and structural changes of the GaInNAs films by means of high-resolution X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy.

  5. Method of synthesizing and growing copper-indium-diselenide (CuInSe.sub.2) crystals

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, Theodore F.

    1987-01-01

    A process for preparing CuInSe.sub.2 crystals includes melting a sufficient quantity of B.sub.2 O.sub.3 along with stoichiometric quantities of Cu, In, and Se in a crucible in a high pressure atmosphere of inert gas to encapsulate the CuInSe.sub.2 melt and confine the Se to the crucible. Additional Se in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 percent over the stoichiometric quantity is preferred to make up for small amounts of Se lost in the process. The crystal is grown by inserting a seed crystal through the B.sub.2 O.sub.3 encapsulate into contact with the CuInSe.sub.2 melt and withdrawing the seed upwardly to grow the crystal thereon from the melt.

  6. Method of synthesizing and growing copper-indium-diselenide (CuInSe/sub 2/) crystals

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1984-11-29

    A process for preparing CuInSe/sub 2/ crystals includes melting a sufficient quantity of B/sub 2/O/sub 2/ along with stochiometric quantities of Cu, In, and Se in a crucible in a high-pressure atmosphere of inert gas to encapsulate the CuInSe/sub 2/ melt and confine the Se to the crucible. Additional Se in the range of 1.8 to 2.2% over the stochiometric quantity is preferred to make up for small amounts of Se lost in the process. The melt can then be cooled slowly to form the crystal as direct solidification, or the crystal can be grown by inserting a seed crystal through the B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ encapsulate into contact with the CuInSe/sub 2/ melt and withdrawing the seed upwardly to grow the crystal thereon from the melt.

  7. Forest phenology and a warmer climate - Growing season extension in relation to climatic provenance

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, Carla A; Edwards, Nelson T; Walker, Ashley V; O'Hara, Keiran H; Campion, Christina M; Hanson, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Predicting forest responses to warming climates relies on assumptions about niche and temperature sensitivity that remain largely untested. Observational studies have related current and historical temperatures to phenological shifts, but experimental evidence is sparse, particularly for autumn responses. A five-year field experiment exposed four deciduous forest species from contrasting climates (Liquidambar styraciflua, Quercus rubra, Populus grandidentata, and Betula alleghaniensis) to air temperatures 2 and 4 C above ambient controls. Impacts of year-round warming on bud burst (BB), senescence and abscission were evaluated in relation to thermal provenance. Leaves emerged earlier in all species, by an average of 6-9 days at +2 and +4 C. Magnitude of advance varied with species and year, but was larger for the first 2 C increment than the second. The effect of warming increased with early BB, favoring Liquidambar, from the warmest climate, but even BB in northern species advanced, despite temperatures well beyond those of the realized niche. Treatment differences in BB were poorly explained by temperature sums, which increased with treatment. In autumn, chlorophyll was retained an average of 4 and 7 days longer in +2 and +4 C treatments, and abscission delayed by 8 and 13 days. Species differences in autumn responses were marginally significant. Growing seasons in the warmer atmospheres were 6 - 28 days longer, with the least impact in Quercus. Results are compared with a 16-year record of canopy onset and offset in a nearby upland deciduous forest, where BB showed similar responsiveness to spring temperatures (2 - 4 days C-1). Offset dates in the stand tracked August-September temperatures, except when late summer drought caused premature senescence. The common garden-like experimental approach provides evidence that warming alone extends the growing season, at both ends, even if stand-level impacts are complicated by other environmental factors.

  8. Geek-Up[10.15.2010]: Growing Nanoparticles, Developing Plastic from Bacteria and Wireless Water Heaters

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    A new, cheaper way to make plastics with wastewater, why we're watching nanoparticles grow in real time and wireless devices that are helping us integrate renewable energy sources into our grid.

  9. REPOSITORY SURFACE FACILITIES PRIMARY SYSTEM CRANE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    K. Schwartztrauber

    2005-03-14

    The purpose of this calculation is to compile crane design data for the mechanical primary structures, systems, and components (SSCs) required for the repository Waste Handling Building (WHB) and Carrier Preparation Building (CPB). The work presented in this document has been prepared in accordance with Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management approved program document AP-3.12Q, Calculations. This calculation has been developed to supplement information previously prepared using the development plan for ''WHB/WTB Space Program Analysis for Site Recommendation'' (Reference 5), which concentrates on the primary, primary support, facility support, and miscellaneous building support areas located in the WHB and Waste Treatment Building (WTB). The development plan was completed in accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning''. The work in this calculation is a continuance of the work described in the previous development plan; therefore, in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', a new Technical Work Plan is not required.

  10. Results from intercropping fast-growing trees and food crops at Morogoro, Tanzania

    SciTech Connect

    Redhead, J.F.

    1992-12-31

    In Morogoro, Tanzania, agroforestry trials were set up to investigate intercropping with primarily eucalypt species. The climate in the region is very similar to Kolar, Karnataka State, India. Three crops-sorghum, bean and maize-were grown annually under Eucalyptus tereticornis at 2.5 m x 2.5 m for three years with a range of weeding practices. Plots that were intercropped with beans showed best results. Shading by the eucalypts after three years resulted in negligible crop yields in all treatments. Three tree spacings of E. camaldulensis (3 m x 3 m, 4 m x 4 m, and 5 m x 5 m) were combined with the intercropping of beans and maize. Beans gave satisfactory yields at all spacings, but the maize showed significantly depressed yields at 3 m x 3 m at 4 m x 4 m, but was similar to pure maize crop at 5 m x 5 m spacing. Overall the extra revenue from a food crop in the first and second year of tree growth increases the return from the land. The short rotation of fast growing trees depleted the soil of nutrients and, as with other crops, the fertility would have to be maintained by applying fertilizer.

  11. Autonomous Demand Response for Primary Frequency Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Matt; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mattix, S.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2012-02-28

    The research documented within this report examines the use of autonomous demand response to provide primary frequency response in an interconnected power grid. The work builds on previous studies in several key areas: it uses a large realistic model (i.e., the interconnection of the western United States and Canada); it establishes a set of metrics that can be used to assess the effectiveness of autonomous demand response; and it independently adjusts various parameters associated with using autonomous demand response to assess effectiveness and to examine possible threats or vulnerabilities associated with the technology.

  12. Primary Succession on a Hawaiian Dryland Chronosequence

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, Kealohanuiopuna M.; Asner, Gregory P.; Cordell, Susan; Chadwick, Oliver A.; Heckman, Katherine; Hotchkiss, Sara; Jeraj, Marjeta; Kennedy-Bowdoin, Ty; Knapp, David E.; Questad, Erin J.; Thaxton, Jarrod M.; Trusdell, Frank; Kellner, James R.

    2015-06-12

    We used measurements from airborne imaging spectroscopy and LiDAR to quantify the biophysical structure and composition of vegetation on a dryland substrate age gradient in Hawaii. Both vertical stature and species composition changed during primary succession, and reveal a progressive increase in vertical stature on younger substrates followed by a collapse on Pleistocene-aged flows. Tall-stature Metrosideros polymorpha woodlands dominated on the youngest substrates (hundreds of years), and were replaced by the tall-stature endemic tree species Myoporum sandwicense and Sophora chrysophylla on intermediate-aged flows (thousands of years). The oldest substrates (tens of thousands of years) were dominated by the short-stature native shrub Dodonaea viscosa and endemic grass Eragrostis atropioides. We excavated 18 macroscopic charcoal fragments from Pleistocene-aged substrates. Mean radiocarbon age was 2,002 years and ranged from < 200 to 7,730. Genus identities from four fragments indicate that Osteomeles spp. or M. polymorpha once occupied the Pleistocene-aged substrates, but neither of these species is found there today. These findings indicate the existence of fires before humans are known to have occupied the Hawaiian archipelago, and demonstrate that a collapse in vertical stature is prevalent on the oldest substrates. In conclusion, this work contributes to our understanding of prehistoric fires in shaping the trajectory of primary succession in Hawaiian drylands.

  13. Ion source with improved primary arc collimation

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1985-01-01

    An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power, thereby preventing the exposure of the anode to the full arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

  14. Ion source with improved primary arc collimation

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1983-12-16

    An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

  15. Primary Succession on a Hawaiian Dryland Chronosequence

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Kinney, Kealohanuiopuna M.; Asner, Gregory P.; Cordell, Susan; Chadwick, Oliver A.; Heckman, Katherine; Hotchkiss, Sara; Jeraj, Marjeta; Kennedy-Bowdoin, Ty; Knapp, David E.; Questad, Erin J.; et al

    2015-06-12

    We used measurements from airborne imaging spectroscopy and LiDAR to quantify the biophysical structure and composition of vegetation on a dryland substrate age gradient in Hawaii. Both vertical stature and species composition changed during primary succession, and reveal a progressive increase in vertical stature on younger substrates followed by a collapse on Pleistocene-aged flows. Tall-stature Metrosideros polymorpha woodlands dominated on the youngest substrates (hundreds of years), and were replaced by the tall-stature endemic tree species Myoporum sandwicense and Sophora chrysophylla on intermediate-aged flows (thousands of years). The oldest substrates (tens of thousands of years) were dominated by the short-stature nativemore » shrub Dodonaea viscosa and endemic grass Eragrostis atropioides. We excavated 18 macroscopic charcoal fragments from Pleistocene-aged substrates. Mean radiocarbon age was 2,002 years and ranged from < 200 to 7,730. Genus identities from four fragments indicate that Osteomeles spp. or M. polymorpha once occupied the Pleistocene-aged substrates, but neither of these species is found there today. These findings indicate the existence of fires before humans are known to have occupied the Hawaiian archipelago, and demonstrate that a collapse in vertical stature is prevalent on the oldest substrates. In conclusion, this work contributes to our understanding of prehistoric fires in shaping the trajectory of primary succession in Hawaiian drylands.« less

  16. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS You are ...

  17. Secondary emission electron gun using external primaries

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni; Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2009-10-13

    An electron gun for generating an electron beam is provided, which includes a secondary emitter. The secondary emitter includes a non-contaminating negative-electron-affinity (NEA) material and emitting surface. The gun includes an accelerating region which accelerates the secondaries from the emitting surface. The secondaries are emitted in response to a primary beam generated external to the accelerating region. The accelerating region may include a superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavity, and the gun may be operated in a continuous wave (CW) mode. The secondary emitter includes hydrogenated diamond. A uniform electrically conductive layer is superposed on the emitter to replenish the extracted current, preventing charging of the emitter. An encapsulated secondary emission enhanced cathode device, useful in a superconducting RF cavity, includes a housing for maintaining vacuum, a cathode, e.g., a photocathode, and the non-contaminating NEA secondary emitter with the uniform electrically conductive layer superposed thereon.

  18. Secondary emission electron gun using external primaries

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Kewisch, Jorg; Chang, Xiangyun

    2007-06-05

    An electron gun for generating an electron beam is provided, which includes a secondary emitter. The secondary emitter includes a non-contaminating negative-electron-affinity (NEA) material and emitting surface. The gun includes an accelerating region which accelerates the secondaries from the emitting surface. The secondaries are emitted in response to a primary beam generated external to the accelerating region. The accelerating region may include a superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavity, and the gun may be operated in a continuous wave (CW) mode. The secondary emitter includes hydrogenated diamond. A uniform electrically conductive layer is superposed on the emitter to replenish the extracted current, preventing charging of the emitter. An encapsulated secondary emission enhanced cathode device, useful in a superconducting RF cavity, includes a housing for maintaining vacuum, a cathode, e.g., a photocathode, and the non-contaminating NEA secondary emitter with the uniform electrically conductive layer superposed thereon.

  19. Combustor with two stage primary fuel assembly

    DOEpatents

    Sharifi, Mehran; Zolyomi, Wendel; Whidden, Graydon Lane

    2000-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine having first and second passages for pre-mixing primary fuel and air supplied to a primary combustion zone. The flow of fuel to the first and second pre-mixing passages is separately regulated using a single annular fuel distribution ring having first and second row of fuel discharge ports. The interior portion of the fuel distribution ring is divided by a baffle into first and second fuel distribution manifolds and is located upstream of the inlets to the two pre-mixing passages. The annular fuel distribution ring is supplied with fuel by an annular fuel supply manifold, the interior portion of which is divided by a baffle into first and second fuel supply manifolds. A first flow of fuel is regulated by a first control valve and directed to the first fuel supply manifold, from which the fuel is distributed to first fuel supply tubes that direct it to the first fuel distribution manifold. From the first fuel distribution manifold, the first flow of fuel is distributed to the first row of fuel discharge ports, which direct it into the first pre-mixing passage. A second flow of fuel is regulated by a second control valve and directed to the second fuel supply manifold, from which the fuel is distributed to second fuel supply tubes that direct it to the second fuel distribution manifold. From the second fuel distribution manifold, the second flow of fuel is distributed to the second row of fuel discharge ports, which direct it into the second pre-mixing passage.

  20. A study of the mechanism of primary water stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect

    Gourgues, A.F.; Andrieu, E.; Scott, P.M.

    1995-12-31

    Two aspects of the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in pressurized water reactors (PWR) primary water have been studied in detail. Results are presented showing that grain boundaries of Alloy 600 are embrittled to a depth of several microns by exposure to primary water in an unstressed condition. It has been established that this embrittlement is not reversible by high temperature degassing and cannot be directly due to hydrogen. The results seem to support the hypothesis that oxygen atom penetration of grain boundaries is possible. However, no evidence of formation of grain boundary gas bubbles or oxides has been found. It is envisaged that this embrittlement process could sequentially act at the tip of a growing stress corrosion crack. The second phenomenon under study has been the plastic deformation behavior of Alloy 600 since it is known that cold work and stress have an important effect on stress corrosion cracking sensitivity. Results of plastic deformation during cyclic straining at various controlled strain rates are presented showing that Alloy 600 is not very sensitive to loading history and that cold work is of an essentially kinematic nature.

  1. Microgrid-Ready Solar PV (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Microgrids allow hospitals, data centers, or other critical facilities to operate even ... The solar energy industry is one of the fastest growing industries in the United States. In ...

  2. Estimated Rare Earth Reserves and Deposits

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Many of the fastest growing clean energy technologies, from batteries to solar panels to magnets, are made with materials that have unique chemical and physical characteristics, including magnetic,...

  3. Fact #920: April 11, 2016 Electric Charging Stations are the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    0: April 11, 2016 Electric Charging Stations are the Fastest Growing Type of Alternative Fueling Station - Dataset Fact 920: April 11, 2016 Electric Charging Stations are the ...

  4. Using RPS Policies to Grow the Solar Market in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan H; Wiser, Ryan H.

    2007-11-20

    York, New Hampshire, Delaware, and DC. Among those states with set-asides, two are restricted to PV applications, nine also allow solar-thermal electric to qualify, three allow solar heating and/or cooling to qualify, and three have broader renewable DG set-asides. The policies also differ in their targets and timeframes, whether projects must be located in-state, the application of cost caps, and the degree of oversight on how suppliers contract with solar projects. Only three of these states have more than two years of experience with solar or DG set-asides so far: Arizona, Nevada, and New Jersey. And yet, despite the embryonic stage of these policies, they have already begun to have a significant impact on the grid-connected PV market. From 2000-2006, 16% (or 48 MW) of grid-connected PV installations in the US occurred in states with such set-asides, a percentage that increases to 67% if one only considers PV additions outside of California. The importance of these programs is growing and will continue to expand. In fact, if one assumes (admittedly somewhat optimistically) that these policies will be fully achieved, then existing state solar or DG set-asides could result in 400 MW of solar capacity by 2010, 2,000 MW by 2015, and 6,500 MW by 2025. This equates to annual additions of roughly 100 MW through 2010, increasing to over 500 MW per year by 2015 and 700 MW per year by 2020. PV is not assured of all of this capacity, and will receive strong competition from solar-thermal electric facilities in the desert southwest. Nonetheless, set-asides in those states outside of the southwest will favor PV, and even some of the southwestern states have designed their RPS programs to ensure that PV fares well, relative to other forms of solar energy. Since 2000, Arizona and, more recently, New Jersey have represented the largest solar set-aside-driven PV markets. Even more-recent additions are coming from Colorado, Nevada, New York, and Pennsylvania. In the long-term, the

  5. Pitch-angle diffusion of electrons through growing and propagating along a magnetic field electromagnetic wave in Earth's radiation belts

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, C.-R. Dokgo, K.; Min, K.-W.; Woo, M.-H.; Choi, E.-J.; Hwang, J.; Park, Y.-D.; Lee, D.-Y.

    2015-06-15

    The diffusion of electrons via a linearly polarized, growing electromagnetic (EM) wave propagating along a uniform magnetic field is investigated. The diffusion of electrons that interact with the growing EM wave is investigated through the autocorrelation function of the parallel electron acceleration in several tens of electron gyration timescales, which is a relatively short time compared with the bounce time of electrons between two mirror points in Earth's radiation belts. Furthermore, the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient is derived for the resonant and non-resonant electrons, and the effect of the wave growth on the electron diffusion is discussed. The results can be applied to other problems related to local acceleration or the heating of electrons in space plasmas, such as in the radiation belts.

  6. Chromosome abnormalities in primary ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yonescu, R.; Currie, J.; Griffin, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome abnormalities that are specific and recurrent may occur in regions of the genome that are involved in the conversion of normal cells to those with tumorigenic potential. Ovarian cancer is the primary cause of death among patients with gynecological malignancies. We have performed cytogenetic analysis of 16 ovarian tumors from women age 28-82. Three tumors of low malignant potential and three granulosa cell tumors had normal karyotypes. To look for the presence of trisomy 12, which has been suggested to be a common aberration in this group of tumors, interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on direct preparations from three of these tumors using a probe for alpha satellite sequences of chromosome 12. In the 3 preparations, 92-98 percent of the cells contained two copies of chromosome 12, indicating that trisomy 12 is not a universal finding in low grade ovarian tumors. Endometrioid carcinoma of the ovary is histologically indistinguishable from endometial carcinoma of the uterus. We studied 10 endometrioid tumors to determine the degree of genetic similarity between these two carcinomas. Six out of ten endometrioid tumors showed a near-triploid modal number, and one presented with a tetraploid modal number. Eight of the ten contained structural chromosome abnormalities, of which the most frequent were 1p- (5 tumors), 19q+ (3 tumors), 6q- or ins(6) (4 tumors), 3q- or 3q+ (4 tumors). These cytogenetic results resemble those reported for papillary ovarian tumors and differ from those of endometrial carcinoma of the uterus. We conclude that despite the histologic similarities between the endometrioid and endometrial carcinomas, the genetic abnormalities in the genesis of these tumors differ significantly.

  7. Primary Characteristics of Loan Loss Reserve Funds | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Primary Characteristics of Loan Loss Reserve Funds Primary Characteristics of Loan Loss Reserve Funds Loan loss reserve (LLR) funds have four primary characteristics, detailed here. Portfolio approach to credit Leverage Financial institution partner Secondary market support Portfolio Approach to Credit LLRs take a "portfolio approach," meaning that state and local governments setting up LLRs do so on the basis of the entire portfolio of loans they support. For example, a 5% loss

  8. Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    amino acid sequence (Patent) | DOEPatents Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary amino acid sequence Title: Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary amino acid sequence The present invention provides a method utilizing primary amino acid sequence of a protein, energy minimization, molecular dynamics and protein vibrational modes to predict three-dimensional structure of a protein. The present invention also determines possible

  9. Primary Science of Energy Teacher and Student Guides (42 Activities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Teacher and Student Guides (42 Activities) Primary Science of Energy Teacher and Student Guides (42 Activities) Below is information about the student activitylesson plan from...

  10. Primary Characteristics of Loan Loss Reserve Funds | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Loan loss reserve (LLR) funds have four primary characteristics, detailed here. Portfolio ... LLRs take a "portfolio approach," meaning that state and local governments setting up LLRs ...

  11. Estimation of net primary productivity using a process-based...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Net primary productivity (NPP) modeling can help to improve the understanding of the ecosystem, and therefore, improve ecological efficiency. The boreal ecosystem productivity ...

  12. Light Absorption of Primary Organic Aerosol Paper Named ACS Editors...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Absorption of Primary Organic Aerosol Paper Named ACS Editors' Choice For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights...

  13. Feeding Arteries of Primary Tongue Cancers on Intra-arterial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on Intra-arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Feeding Arteries of Primary Tongue Cancers on Intra-arterial Infusion Chemotherapy PurposeTo ...

  14. Texas Large Construction Site Notice for Primary Operators |...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Texas Large Construction Site Notice for Primary Operators Published Texas Commission on Environmental...

  15. "Table 2. Real Average Annual Coal Transportation Costs, By Primary...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Real Average Annual Coal Transportation Costs, By Primary Transport Mode and Supply Region" "(2013 dollars per ton)" "Coal Supply Region",2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "Railroad"...

  16. Comparing the Primary Electron Transfer Process in Organic Photovoltai...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparing the Primary Electron Transfer Process in Organic Photovoltaic Heterojunctions with Photosynthetic Reaction Centers October 4, 2011 at 3pm36-428 Garry Rumbles National ...

  17. Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Planning Template for Primary Care Offices

    SciTech Connect

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    The Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Plan Template for Primary Care Provider Offices is intended to assist primary care providers and office managers with preparing their offices for quickly putting a plan in place to handle an increase in patient calls and visits, whether during the 2009-2010 influenza season or future influenza seasons.

  18. As Tesla Grows Up, It Give Up on Free Charging > EMC2 News > The Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Center at Cornell As Tesla Grows Up, It Give Up on Free Charging November 7th, 2016 › Jack Stewart: Transportation Jens Wolf/Associated Press Tesla offers a good sales pitch: Gorgeous cars, ludicrous acceleration, features like Autopilot that arrive via over the air updates. And to sweeten the deal for those who can afford the luxury electric, free charging at the young automaker's international network of Supercharger stations. Since 2012, Tesla has invited its customers to plug

  19. Cell migration or cytokinesis and proliferation? Revisiting the go or grow hypothesis in cancer cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Garay, Tams; Juhsz, va; Molnr, Eszter; Eisenbauer, Maria; Czirk, Andrs; Dekan, Barbara; Lszl, Viktria; Hoda, Mir Alireza; Dme, Balzs; Tmr, Jzsef; Klepetko, Walter; Berger, Walter; Heged?s, Balzs

    2013-12-10

    The mortality of patients with solid tumors is mostly due to metastasis that relies on the interplay between migration and proliferation. The go or grow hypothesis postulates that migration and proliferation spatiotemporally excludes each other. We evaluated this hypothesis on 35 cell lines (12 mesothelioma, 13 melanoma and 10 lung cancer) on both the individual cell and population levels. Following three-day-long videomicroscopy, migration, proliferation and cytokinesis-length were quantified. We found a significantly higher migration in mesothelioma cells compared to melanoma and lung cancer while tumor types did not differ in mean proliferation or duration of cytokinesis. Strikingly, we found in melanoma and lung cancer a significant positive correlation between mean proliferation and migration. Furthermore, non-dividing melanoma and lung cancer cells displayed slower migration. In contrast, in mesothelioma there were no such correlations. Interestingly, negative correlation was found between cytokinesis-length and migration in melanoma. FAK activation was higher in melanoma cells with high motility. We demonstrate that the cancer cells studied do not defer proliferation for migration. Of note, tumor cells from various organ systems may differently regulate migration and proliferation. Furthermore, our data is in line with the observation of pathologists that highly proliferative tumors are often highly invasive. - Highlights: We investigated the go or grow hypothesis in human cancer cells in vitro. Proliferation and migration positively correlate in melanoma and lung cancer cells. Duration of cytokinesis and migration shows inverse correlation. Increased FAK activation is present in highly motile melanoma cells.

  20. Strontium concentrations in chamisa (Chrysothamnus nauseosus) shrub plants growing in a former liquid waste disposal area in Bayo Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Foxx, T.S.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    Chamisa (Chrysothamnus nauseosus) shrub plants growing in a former liquid waste disposal site Solid Waste Management Unit [SWMU] 10-003(c) in Bayo Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) were collected and analyzed for strontium ({sup 90}Sr) and total uranium. Surface soil samples were also collected from below (understory) and between (interspace) shrub canopies. Both chamisa plants growing over SWMU 10-003(c) contained significantly higher concentrations of {sup 90}Sr than a control plant -- one plant, in particular, contained 90, 500 pCi {sup 90}Sr g{sup {minus}1} ash in top-growth material. Similarly, soil surface samples collected underneath and between plants contained {sup 90}Sr concentrations above background and LANL screening action levels; this probably occurred as a result of chamisa plant leaf fall contaminating the soil understory area followed by water and/or winds moving {sup 90}Sr to the soil interspace area. Although some soil surface migration of {sup 90}Sr from SWMU 10-003(c) has occurred, the level of {sup 90}Sr in sediments collected downstream of SWMU 10-003(c) at the Bayo Canyon/State Road 5 intersection was still within regional (background) concentrations.

  1. Green Button Initiative Growing

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Green Button initiative, which is the common-sense idea that electricity customers should be able to securely download their own energy usage information from their utility websites, is continuing to gain traction across the country.

  2. Growing the Future Bioeconomy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    the Future Bioeconomy JOEL VELASCO July 2014 2 Copyright © 2012 Amyris, Inc. All rights reserved. This presentation and oral statements accompanying this presentation contain forward-looking statements, and any statements other than statements of historical facts could be deemed to be forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements include, among other things, sizes of markets that may be addressed by Amyris's current and potential products, Amyris's expected product pipeline,

  3. Lithium Ethylene Dicarbonate Identified as the Primary Product...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lithium Ethylene Dicarbonate Identified as the Primary Product ofChemical and Electrochemical Reduction of EC in EC:EMC1.2M LiPF6Electrolyte Citation Details In-Document Search ...

  4. An Approach for Assessing the Signature Quality of Various Chemical Assays when Predicting the Culture Media Used to Grow Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Aimee E.; Sego, Landon H.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate an approach for assessing the quality of a signature system designed to predict the culture medium used to grow a microorganism. The system was comprised of four chemical assays designed to identify various ingredients that could be used to produce the culture medium. The analytical measurements resulting from any combination of these four assays can be used in a Bayesian network to predict the probabilities that the microorganism was grown using one of eleven culture media. We evaluated combinations of the signature system by removing one or more of the assays from the Bayes network. We measured and compared the quality of the various Bayes nets in terms of fidelity, cost, risk, and utility, a method we refer to as Signature Quality Metrics

  5. Growing LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces by sputter deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Dildar, I. M.; Neklyudova, M.; Xu, Q.; Zandbergen, H. W.; Harkema, S.; Boltje, D.; Aarts, J.

    2015-06-15

    Sputter deposition of oxide materials in a high-pressure oxygen atmosphere is a well-known technique to produce thin films of perovskite oxides in particular. Also interfaces can be fabricated, which we demonstrated recently by growing LaAlO{sub 3} on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates and showing that the interface showed the same high degree of epitaxy and atomic order as is made by pulsed laser deposition. However, the high pressure sputtering of oxides is not trivial and number of parameters are needed to be optimized for epitaxial growth. Here we elaborate on the earlier work to show that only a relatively small parameter window exists with respect to oxygen pressure, growth temperature, radiofrequency power supply and target to substrate distance. In particular the sensitivity to oxygen pressure makes it more difficult to vary the oxygen stoichiometry at the interface, yielding it insulating rather than conducting.

  6. Method of growing GaN films with a low density of structural defects using an interlayer

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    2003-01-01

    A dramatic reduction of the dislocation density in GaN was obtained by insertion of a single thin interlayer grown at an intermediate temperature (IT-IL) after the growth of an initial grown at high temperature. A description of the growth process is presented with characterization results aimed at understanding the mechanisms of reduction in dislocation density. A large percentage of the threading dislocations present in the first GaN epilayer are found to bend near the interlayer and do not propagate into the top layer which grows at higher temperature in a lateral growth mode. TEM studies show that the mechanisms of dislocation reduction are similar to those described for the epitaxial lateral overgrowth process, however a notable difference is the absence of coalescence boundaries.

  7. Status of fossil energy resources: A global perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Balat, M.

    2007-07-01

    This article deals with recently status of global fossil energy sources. Fossil energy sources have been split into three categories: oil,coal, and natural gas. Fossil fuels are highly efficient and cheap. Currently oil is the fastest primary energy source in the world (39% of world energy consumption). Coal will be a major source of energy for the world for the foreseeable future (24% of world energy consumption). In 2030, coal covers 45% of world energy needs. Natural gas is expected to be the fastest growing component of world energy consumption (23% of world energy consumption). Fossil fuel extraction and conversion to usable energy has several environmental impacts. They could be a major contributor to global warming and greenhouse gases and a cause of acid rain; therefore, expensive air pollution controls are required.

  8. Design study of primary ion provider for RHIC-EBIS

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Tamura, J.; Okamura, M.

    2009-09-20

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed the new pre-injector system, Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  9. Safety and performance enhancement circuit for primary explosive detonators

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Ronald W.

    2006-04-04

    A safety and performance enhancement arrangement for primary explosive detonators. This arrangement involves a circuit containing an energy storage capacitor and preset self-trigger to protect the primary explosive detonator from electrostatic discharge (ESD). The circuit does not discharge into the detonator until a sufficient level of charge is acquired on the capacitor. The circuit parameters are designed so that normal ESD environments cannot charge the protection circuit to a level to achieve discharge. When functioned, the performance of the detonator is also improved because of the close coupling of the stored energy.

  10. NIF Functional Requirements and Primary Criteria Rev. 1.8 September...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: NIF Functional Requirements and Primary Criteria Rev. 1.8 September 2006 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NIF Functional Requirements and Primary ...

  11. Table 9. Net electricity trade index and primary electricity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,,"Primary " ,,,2011,"Source" ,"Least CO2 per capita" ," New York",0.94,1,0.95,0.92,0.87,0.93,1.01,0.99,0.99,0.95,0.93,1,"Natural...

  12. Cleaning Cesium Radionuclides from BN-350 Primary Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, O.G.; Allen, K.J.; Wachs, D.M.; Planchon, H.P.; Wells, P.B.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Nazarenko, P.; Dumchev, I.; Maev, V.; Zemtzev, B.; Tikhomirov, L.; Yakovlev, V.; Synkov, A

    2005-04-15

    This paper reports the successful design and operation of a system to remove highly radioactive cesium from the sodium coolant of the BN-350 reactor in Aktau, Kazakhstan. As an international effort between the United States and the Republic of Kazakhstan, a cesium-trapping system was jointly designed, fabricated, installed, and successfully operated. The results are significant for a number of reasons, including (a) a significant reduction of radioactivity levels of the BN-350 coolant and reactor surfaces, thereby reducing exposure to workers during shutdown operations; (b) demonstration of scientific ideas; and (c) the engineering application of effective cesium trap deployment for commercial-sized liquid-metal reactors. About 255 300 GBq (6900 Ci) of cesium was trapped, and the {sup 137}Cs specific activity in BN-350 primary sodium was decreased from 296 MBq/kg (8000 {mu}Ci/kg) to 0.37 MBq/kg (10 {mu}Ci/kg) by using seven cesium traps containing reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) as the cesium adsorbent. Cesium trapping was accomplished by pumping sodium from the primary circuit, passing it through a block of RVC within each trap, and returning the cleaned sodium to the primary circuit. Both to predict and to analyze the behavior of the cesium traps in the BN-350 reactor primary circuit, a model was developed that satisfactorily describes the observed results of the cesium trapping. By using this model, thermodynamic parameters, such as the heat of adsorption of cesium atoms on RVC and on internal piping surfaces of the BN-350 reactor primary circuit, -22.7 and -5.0 kJ/mole, respectively, were extracted from the experimental data.

  13. Mechanical Design of the HER Synchrotron Light Monitor Primary Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Edward F.; Fisher, Alan S.; Kurita, Nadine R.; Langton, J.; /SLAC

    2011-09-14

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the primary mirror that images the visible portion of the synchrotron radiation (SR) extracted from the High Energy Ring (HER) of the PEP-II B-Factory. During off-axis operation, the water-cooled GlidCop mirror is subjected to a heat flux in excess of 2000 W/cm2. When on-axis imaging occurs, the heat flux due to scattered SR, resistive wall losses and Higher-Order-Mode (HOM) heating is estimated at 1 W/cm2. The imaging surface is plated with Electroless Nickel to improve its optical characteristics. The design requirements for the primary mirror are listed and discussed. Calculated mechanical distortions and stresses experienced by the mirror during on-axis and off-axis operation will be presented.

  14. Multiscalar black holes with contingent primary hair: Mechanics and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Mignemi, Salvatore; Wiltshire, David L.

    2004-12-15

    We generalize a class of magnetically charged black holes nonminimally coupled to two scalar fields previously found by one of us to the case of multiple scalar fields. The black holes possess a novel type of primary scalar hair, which we call a contingent primary hair: although the solutions possess degrees of freedom which are not completely determined by the other charges of the theory, the charges necessarily vanish in the absence of the magnetic monopole. Only one constraint relates the black hole mass to the magnetic charge and scalar charges of the theory. We obtain a Smarr-type thermodynamic relation, and the first law of black hole thermodynamics for the system. We further explicitly show in the two-scalar-field case that, contrary to the case of many other hairy black holes, the black hole solutions are stable to radial perturbations.

  15. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

    2008-05-01

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The

  16. Inservice leak testing of primary pressure isolation valves. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.A.

    1983-02-01

    This report discusses the inservice leak testing of primary pressure isolation valves in commercial power reactors which was investigated to identify problems with current test procedures and requirements. Nine utilities were surveyed to gather information which is presented in this report. An analysis of the survey information was performed, resulting in recommended changes to improve valve leak testing requirements currently invoked by Section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Plant Technical Specifications, and Regulatory Guides addressing this subject.

  17. Inservice leak testing of primary pressure isolation valves

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.A.

    1983-02-01

    This report discusses the inservice leak testing of primary pressure isolation valves in commercial power reactors which was investigated to identify problems with current test procedures and requirements. Nine utilities were surveyed to gather information which is presented in this report. An analysis of the survey information was performed, resulting in recommended changes to improve valve leak testing requirements currently invoked by Section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Plant Technical Specifications, and Regulatory Guides addressing this subject.

  18. DETECTION OF THE COMPRESSED PRIMARY STELLAR WIND IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Teodoro, M.; Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2013-08-10

    A series of three Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectroscopic mappings, spaced approximately one year apart, reveal three partial arcs in [Fe II] and [Ni II] emissions moving outward from {eta} Carinae. We identify these arcs with the shell-like structures, seen in the three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, formed by compression of the primary wind by the secondary wind during periastron passages.

  19. High temperature sodium testing of the CRBR prototype primary pump

    SciTech Connect

    Tessier, M.J.; Grimaldi, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    Qualification testing in sodium of the CRBR primary pump was conducted through 1982. This paper presents an overview of the test program, a description of the Sodium Pump Test Facility (largest of its kind in the world), a brief description of the test article and summary overview of results. Of special interest were the high temperature gas convection tests and the extensive flow/speed control (dynamic) tests. Special innovative test methods were employed to investigate these phenomena.

  20. Comparing the Primary Electron Transfer Process in Organic Photovoltaic

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Heterojunctions with Photosynthetic Reaction Centers | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Comparing the Primary Electron Transfer Process in Organic Photovoltaic Heterojunctions with Photosynthetic Reaction Centers October 4, 2011 at 3pm/36-428 Garry Rumbles National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Univeristy of Colorado, Boulder rumbles002 Abstract: This presentation will focus on some of the fundamental science associated with the rapidly emerging field of organic photovoltaics (OPV).

  1. Molecular-beam Studies of Primary Photochemical Processes

    DOE R&D Accomplishments

    Lee, Y. T.

    1982-12-01

    Application of the method of molecular-beam photofragmentation translational spectroscopy to the investigation of primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules is described. Examples will be given to illustrate how information concerning the energetics, dynamics, and mechanism of dissociation processes can be obtained from the precise measurements of angular and velocity distributions of products in an experiment in which a well-defined beam of molecules is crossed with a laser.

  2. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743 - an effective microsymbiont of an Indigofera sp. growing in Australia

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Eshraghi, Leila; De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Tiwari, Ravi; et al

    2015-10-26

    Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of an Indigofera sp. WSM1743 was isolated from a nodule recovered from the roots of an Indigofera sp. growing 20 km north of Carnarvon in Australia. It is slow growing, tolerates up to 1 % NaCl and is capable of growth at 37 °C. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1743, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. Finally, the 8,341,956 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 163 scaffolds and 167more » contigs, contains 7908 protein-coding genes and 75 RNA-only encoding genes and was sequenced as part of the Root Nodule Bacteria chapter of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.« less

  3. Hanfords Contamination Expected to Grow From Unacceptable Levels Today to Incredibly Unacceptable Levels in One Hundred Years and Over Thousands of Years

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Contamination Expected to Grow From Unacceptable Levels Today to Incredibly Unacceptable Levels in One Hundred Years and Thousands of Years... 10x Worse if USDOE uses Hanford as a National Radioactive Waste Dump Source: USDOE's Own TCWMEIS (Tank Closure Waste Management Draft EIS) Presented by Heart of America Northwest 2010 TCWMEIS - Tank Closure Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement * TCWMEIS was required due to legal and scientific errors in the 2004 Hanford Site Solid Waste EIS,

  4. Radiation effects in the stainless steel primary coolant supply adapter

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.

    1995-09-01

    The primary coolant supply adapter (PCSA) is a flanged, cylindrical collar of 316NG stainless steel that is part of the primary pressure boundary of the Advanced Neutron Source. The radiation fluxes on the PCSA are dominated by thermal neutrons. During its intended 40-year service life, the PCSA will receive a thermal neutron fluence of 1.8 {times} 10{sup 26} m{sup {minus}2} in its upper sections at a temperature of <1OO{degree}C. The PCSA will suffer radiation damage, caused primarily by the interaction of thermal neutrons with the 14% nickel in the steel, which will generate helium by the sequential reactions {sup 58}Ni (n,y){sup 59}Ni (n,{alpha}){sup 56}Fe and will concurrently produce significant atomic displacements per atom (dpa) from the {sup 59}Ni (n,{alpha}){sup 56}Fe recoils. It is estimated that the helium concentration and total atomic displacements in the upper parts of the PCSA will be about 430 atomic parts per million and 1 dpa, respectively. From newly compiled trend curves of tensile properties and fracture toughness data versus atomic displacements for 316 steel, it is deduced that the irradiated PCSA will retain at least 20% uniform tensile elongation and a fracture toughness of more than 200 Mpa{radical}m, which are judged adequate to resist brittle failure. Tberefore, employment of a neutron shield around the PCSA is unnecessary.

  5. Subclonal diversification of primary breast cancer revealed by multiregion sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, Lucy R.; Gerstung, Moritz; Knappskog, Stian; Desmedt, Christine; Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Aas, Turid; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Larsimont, Denis; Davies, Helen; Li, Yilong; Ju, Young Seok; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Haugland, Hans Kristian; Lilleng, Peer Kaare; Nik-Zainal, Serena; McLaren, Stuart; Butler, Adam; Martin, Sancha; Glodzik, Dominic; Menzies, Andrew; Raine, Keiran; Hinton, Jonathan; Jones, David; Mudie, Laura J.; Jiang, Bing; Vincent, Delphine; Greene-Colozzi, April; Adnet, Pierre -Yves; Fatima, Aquila; Maetens, Marion; Ignatiadis, Michail; Stratton, Michael R.; Sotiriou, Christos; Richardson, Andrea L.; Lønning, Per Eystein; Wedge, David C.; Campbell, Peter J.

    2015-06-22

    Sequencing cancer genomes may enable tailoring of therapeutics to the underlying biological abnormalities driving a particular patient's tumor. However, sequencing-based strategies rely heavily on representative sampling of tumors. To understand the subclonal structure of primary breast cancer, we applied whole-genome and targeted sequencing to multiple samples from each of 50 patients' tumors (303 samples in total). The extent of subclonal diversification varied among cases and followed spatial patterns. No strict temporal order was evident, with point mutations and rearrangements affecting the most common breast cancer genes, including PIK3CA, TP53, PTEN, BRCA2 and MYC, occurring early in some tumors and late in others. In 13 out of 50 cancers, potentially targetable mutations were subclonal. Landmarks of disease progression, such as resistance to chemotherapy and the acquisition of invasive or metastatic potential, arose within detectable subclones of antecedent lesions. These findings highlight the importance of including analyses of subclonal structure and tumor evolution in clinical trials of primary breast cancer.

  6. Primary side stress corrosion cracking and remedial measures

    SciTech Connect

    Theus, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    Primary side stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Alloy 600 stream generator tubing in some recirculating pressurized water reactor steam generators has usually occurred in two locations: at the roll transition and expansion locations within the tube-sheets and at the apex and tangent areas of the tight radius U bends. Occasionally, other highly stressed areas have also suffered primary side SCC: at support plate tube intersections where secondary side denting has occurred and at the steam generator tube transition areas of explosively installed mini-sleeves. Laboratory data and operating performances of Alloy 600 tubing indicate that the factors affecting the susceptibility to this type of SSC, in decreasing order of importance, are high stresses, material microstructures, and operating temperatures. Remedial measures to correct these problems in newer plants include changing design and fabrication procedures, thus avoiding highly stressed areas of tubing, and changing tube manufacturing heat treating requirements, thus improving the microstructures. Alternate tube materials, such as Alloy 800, Monel 400, or austenitic stainless steels, have not suffered this type of failure.

  7. Subclonal diversification of primary breast cancer revealed by multiregion sequencing

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yates, Lucy R.; Gerstung, Moritz; Knappskog, Stian; Desmedt, Christine; Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Aas, Turid; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Larsimont, Denis; Davies, Helen; et al

    2015-06-22

    Sequencing cancer genomes may enable tailoring of therapeutics to the underlying biological abnormalities driving a particular patient's tumor. However, sequencing-based strategies rely heavily on representative sampling of tumors. To understand the subclonal structure of primary breast cancer, we applied whole-genome and targeted sequencing to multiple samples from each of 50 patients' tumors (303 samples in total). The extent of subclonal diversification varied among cases and followed spatial patterns. No strict temporal order was evident, with point mutations and rearrangements affecting the most common breast cancer genes, including PIK3CA, TP53, PTEN, BRCA2 and MYC, occurring early in some tumors and latemore » in others. In 13 out of 50 cancers, potentially targetable mutations were subclonal. Landmarks of disease progression, such as resistance to chemotherapy and the acquisition of invasive or metastatic potential, arose within detectable subclones of antecedent lesions. These findings highlight the importance of including analyses of subclonal structure and tumor evolution in clinical trials of primary breast cancer.« less

  8. Fact #864: March 16, 2015 Imports of Primary Energy have Declined...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fact 864: March 16, 2015 Imports of Primary Energy have Declined Sharply Since the Peak Reached in 2007 Fact 864: March 16, 2015 Imports of Primary Energy have Declined Sharply ...

  9. Analysis of N-16 concentration in primary cooling system of AP1000...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Analysis of N-16 concentration in primary cooling system of AP1000 power reactor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Analysis of N-16 concentration in primary cooling system ...

  10. Sensitivity of Global Terrestrial Gross Primary Production to Hydrologic States Simulated by the Community Land Model Using Two Runoff Parameterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Huimin; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Dawen; Shi, Xiaoying; Mao, Jiafu; Hayes, Daniel J.; Schwalm, C.; Wei, Yaxing; Liu, Shishi

    2014-09-01

    The terrestrial water and carbon cycles interact strongly at various spatio-temporal scales. To elucidate how hydrologic processes may influence carbon cycle processes, differences in terrestrial carbon cycle simulations induced by structural differences in two runoff generation schemes were investigated using the Community Land Model 4 (CLM4). Simulations were performed with runoff generation using the default TOPMODEL-based and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model approaches under the same experimental protocol. The comparisons showed that differences in the simulated gross primary production (GPP) are mainly attributed to differences in the simulated leaf area index (LAI) rather than soil moisture availability. More specifically, differences in runoff simulations can influence LAI through changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and their seasonality that affect the onset of the growing season and the subsequent dynamic feedbacks between terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles. As a result of a relative difference of 36% in global mean total runoff between the two models and subsequent changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and LAI, the simulated global mean GPP differs by 20.4%. However, the relative difference in the global mean net ecosystem exchange between the two models is small (2.1%) due to competing effects on total mean ecosystem respiration and other fluxes, although large regional differences can still be found. Our study highlights the significant interactions among the water, energy, and carbon cycles and the need for reducing uncertainty in the hydrologic parameterization of land surface models to better constrain carbon cycle modeling.

  11. BRCA1 mutations in primary breast and ovarian carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Futreal, P.A.; Cochran, C.; Bennett, L.M.; Haugen-Strano, A.; Terry, L.; Barrett, J.C.; Wiseman, R.; Liu, Q.; Shattuck-Eidens, D.; Harshman, K.

    1994-10-07

    Loss of heterozygosity data from familial tumors suggested that BRCA1, a gene that confers susceptibility to ovarian and early-onset breast cancer, encodes a tumor suppressor. The BRCA1 region is also subject to allelic loss in sporadic breast and ovarian cancers, an indication that BRCA1 mutations may occur somatically in these tumors. The BRCA1 coding region was examined for mutations in primary breast and ovarian tumors that show allele loss at the BRCA1 locus. Mutations were detected in 3 of 32 breast and 1 of 12 ovarian carcinomas; all four mutations were germline alterations and occurred in early-onset cancers. These results suggest that mutation of BRCA1 may not be critical in the development of the majority of breast and ovarian cancers that arise in the absence of a mutant germline allele.

  12. Preoperational test report, primary ventilation condenser cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-10-29

    This represents the preoperational test report for the Primary Ventilation Condenser Cooling System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system uses a closed chilled water piping loop to provide offgas effluent cooling for tanks AY101, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102; the offgas is cooled from a nominal 100 F to 40 F. Resulting condensation removes tritiated vapor from the exhaust stack stream. The piping system includes a package outdoor air-cooled water chiller with parallel redundant circulating pumps; the condenser coil is located inside a shielded ventilation equipment cell. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  13. Fission Product Migration in Primary System and Containment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2015-04-01

    Version 00 ART MOD2 aims at a comprehensive analysis for the FP behaviour in primary system and in containment during severe accidents and therefore the code considers the removal of radio-nuclides of up to 60 materials including chemical compounds by natural deposition and by the engineered safety features (ESF) such as spray systems. As for the natural deposition of radio-nuclides, the code can consider the phenomena such as gravitational settling, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, Brownian diffusion, diffusionmore » under laminar or turbulent flows, resuspension, condensation, chemisorption and revaporization. The code also models the aerosol growth by agglomeration of aerosols and condensation/evaporation of volatile material at the aerosol surface. Recently, the models for iodine chemistry in containment sump water was incorporated into ART MOD2 ART MOD2 was modified in January 2015 to correct coding errors and improve the vibration of the calculation result of water (H2O) vapor.« less

  14. RELAP5 MODEL OF THE DIVERTOR PRIMARY HEAT TRANSFER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Emilian L; Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Kim, Seokho H

    2010-08-01

    This report describes the RELAP5 model that has been developed for the divertor primary heat transfer system (PHTS). The model is intended to be used to examine the transient performance of the divertor PHTS and evaluate control schemes necessary to maintain parameters within acceptable limits during transients. Some preliminary results are presented to show the maturity of the model and examine general divertor PHTS transient behavior. The model can be used as a starting point for developing transient modeling capability, including control system modeling, safety evaluations, etc., and is not intended to represent the final divertor PHTS design. Preliminary calculations using the models indicate that during normal pulsed operation, present pressurizer controls may not be sufficient to keep system pressures within their desired range. Additional divertor PHTS and control system design efforts may be required to ensure system pressure fluctuation during normal operation remains within specified limits.

  15. Primary Water Stress Corrosion Crack Morphology and Nondestructive Evaluation Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2004-12-01

    A research program on primary stress corrosion crack (PWSCC) is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In this program, the material degradation problem in Alloys 600, 182, and 82 is being investigated with objectives that include compling a knowledge base on all cracking in nickel based materials at all degradation sites in nuclear power plants, assessing NDE methods using mockups to quantify the detection, sizing, and using mockups to quantify the detection sizing and characterization of tight cracks, and determining the role of welding processes in degradation. In this paper, the resuts of the initial literature searchs are presented. The relevant data on crack properties such as shape and orientation are presented and their impace on nondestructive evaluation (NDE) reliability is discussed.

  16. Fact #864: March 16, 2015 Imports of Primary Energy have Declined Sharply

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Since the Peak Reached in 2007 | Department of Energy 4: March 16, 2015 Imports of Primary Energy have Declined Sharply Since the Peak Reached in 2007 Fact #864: March 16, 2015 Imports of Primary Energy have Declined Sharply Since the Peak Reached in 2007 Primary energy imports have declined by about 34% since the peak reached in 2007. During this same period, exports of primary energy have more than doubled. The combination of decreasing imports and rising exports of primary energy have

  17. Optimized Battery-Type Reactor Primary System Design Utilizing Lead

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yong H.; Son, Hyoung M.; Lee, Il S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-07-01

    A number of small and medium size reactors are being developed worldwide as well as large electricity generation reactors for co-generation, district heating or desalination. The Seoul National University has started to develop 23 MWth BORIS (Battery Optimized Reactor Integral System) as a multi-purpose reactor. BORIS is an integral-type optimized fast reactor with an ultra long life core. BORIS is being designed to meet the Generation IV nuclear energy system goals of sustainability, safety, reliability and economics. Major features of BORIS include 20 consecutive years of operation without refueling; elimination of an intermediate heat transport loop and main coolant pump; open core without individual subassemblies; inherent negative reactivity feedback; and inherent load following capability. Its one mission is to provide incremental electricity generation to match the needs of developing nations and especially remote communities without major electrical grid connections. BORIS consists of a reactor module, heat exchanger, coolant module, guard vessel, reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS), secondary system, containment and the seismic isolation. BORIS is designed to generate 10 MWe with the resulting thermal efficiency of 45 %. BORIS uses lead as the primary system coolant because of the inherent safety of the material. BORIS is coupled with a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle as the secondary system to gain a high cycle efficiency in the range of 45 %. The reference core consists of 757 fuel rods without assembly with an active core height of 0.8 m. The BORIS core consists of single enrichment zone composed of a Pu-MA (minor actinides)-U-N fuel and a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel clad. This study is intended to set up appropriate reactor vessel geometry by performing thermal hydraulic analysis on RVACS using computational fluid dynamics codes; to examine the liquid metal coolant behavior along the subchannels; to find out whether the

  18. Interspecies differences in metabolism of arsenic by cultured primary hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Drobna, Zuzana; Walton, Felecia S.; Harmon, Anne W.; Thomas, David J.; Styblo, Miroslav

    2010-05-15

    Biomethylation is the major pathway for the metabolism of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in many mammalian species, including the human. However, significant interspecies differences have been reported in the rate of in vivo metabolism of iAs and in yields of iAs metabolites found in urine. Liver is considered the primary site for the methylation of iAs and arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) is the key enzyme in this pathway. Thus, the As3mt-catalyzed methylation of iAs in the liver determines in part the rate and the pattern of iAs metabolism in various species. We examined kinetics and concentration-response patterns for iAs methylation by cultured primary hepatocytes derived from human, rat, mice, dog, rabbit, and rhesus monkey. Hepatocytes were exposed to [{sup 73}As]arsenite (iAs{sup III}; 0.3, 0.9, 3.0, 9.0 or 30 nmol As/mg protein) for 24 h and radiolabeled metabolites were analyzed in cells and culture media. Hepatocytes from all six species methylated iAs{sup III} to methylarsenic (MAs) and dimethylarsenic (DMAs). Notably, dog, rat and monkey hepatocytes were considerably more efficient methylators of iAs{sup III} than mouse, rabbit or human hepatocytes. The low efficiency of mouse, rabbit and human hepatocytes to methylate iAs{sup III} was associated with inhibition of DMAs production by moderate concentrations of iAs{sup III} and with retention of iAs and MAs in cells. No significant correlations were found between the rate of iAs methylation and the thioredoxin reductase activity or glutathione concentration, two factors that modulate the activity of recombinant As3mt. No associations between the rates of iAs methylation and As3mt protein structures were found for the six species examined. Immunoblot analyses indicate that the superior arsenic methylation capacities of dog, rat and monkey hepatocytes examined in this study may be associated with a higher As3mt expression. However, factors other than As3mt expression may also contribute to

  19. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 5. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. Load Combination Program Project I final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.O.; Lim, E.Y.; Dedhia, D.D.

    1981-06-01

    The primary purpose of the Load Combination Program covered in this report is to estimate the probability of a seismic induced LOCA in the primary piping of a commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR). Best estimates, rather than upper bound results are desired. This was accomplished by use of a fracture mechanics model that employs a random distribution of initial cracks in the piping welds. Estimates of the probability of cracks of various sizes initially existing in the welds are combined with fracture mechanics calculations of how these cracks would grow during service. This then leads to direct estimates of the probability of failure as a function of time and location within the piping system. The influence of varying the stress history to which the piping is subjected is easily determined. Seismic events enter into the analysis through the stresses they impose on the pipes. Hence, the influence of various seismic events on the piping failure probability can be determined, thereby providing the desired information.

  20. Batteries called primary source of lead, cadmium in municipal waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency reports that lead-acid batteries, such as those used in automobiles, and rechargeable nickel-cadmium batteries used in consumer electronics equipment, are the primary sources of lead and cadmium in municipal trash and garbage. A report prepared for EPA analyzed existing data from 1970 to 1986 and made projections to the year 2000. Lead-acid batteries continue to constitute a major source of lead in garbage even though 80 percent of them are now recycled. As a result, EPA is calling for additional recycling of batteries. This study is an important step in implementing EPA's strategy for helping states and cities achieve the national goal of recycling and reducing 25 percent of all municipal garbage by 1992. The findings on batteries are the result of a study conducted for EPA because of concern over the levels of lead and cadmium found n ash (residue) from municipal waste incinerators. Lead and cadmium are two metals of particular concern in the solid waste stream. The metals can contaminate soil and groundwater when landfilled. They also may be found in some incinerator emissions.

  1. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    SciTech Connect

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  2. Nonbreast Second Malignancies After Treatment of Primary Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Budhi S. Sharma, Suresh C.; Patel, Firuza D.; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Kapoor, Rakesh; Kumar, Rajinder

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and risk factors for nonbreast second malignancies (NBSMs) in women after treatment for primary breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1985 and December 1995, a total of 1,084 breast cancer patients were analyzed for NBSMs. Detailed analysis was carried out for age, family history, disease stage, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, other clinical/pathologic characteristics, and site of NBSMs. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to estimate the relative risk of NBSMs. Results: Median follow-up was 12 years. In total, 33 cases of NBSMs were noted in 29 patients. The overall incidence of NBSM was 3%, and the median time for NBSMs was 7 years. The most common NBSMs were gynecologic (22 patients), gastrointestinal (4 patients), head and neck (3 patients), hematologic (2 patients), lung (1 patient), and thyroid (1 patient). The NBSMs rate at 12 years was 2.4% for both mastectomy and radiation therapy groups. In the subset of patients less than 45 years of age at the time of treatment, the NBSMs rate was 0.7% as compared with 4.6% in patients more than 45 years of age (p = 0.001). Statistically significant higher incidences of endometrial and ovarian cancer were seen in patients with hormonal therapy (5.2%) as compared with patients without hormonal therapy (1.8%, p = 0.002). Women with a family history of breast cancer had a higher incidence (6%) of endometrial and ovarian malignancy compared with women without such a history (2.1%, p = 0.003). Chemotherapy did not affect the risk of second malignancy. Conclusion: The most common NBSMs in this study were gynecologic. Family history of breast cancer was a high risk factor for NBSMs. No risk of NBSMs with radiotherapy was observed.

  3. GROW HOME | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Sort by: Random | Alphabetical | Rating (High to Low) | Rating (Low to High) AGGIE SOL The University of California, Davis, has strong pedigrees in both sustainable projects...

  4. Fuel shortage: Grow your own

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, E.; Hargrave, R.H.

    1981-05-01

    Wood power offers farmers a clean burning fuel with a tremendous potential for renewable energy. The development of a wood-gas tractor is outlined and fuel consumption estimated.

  5. An LDC grows in Brooklyn

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffmann, B.

    1994-11-01

    Bob Catell is turning Brooklyn Union into the premier energy company of the Northeast. He also plans to make A.G.A. the premier trade association of the energy business, and natural gas the premier energy source of the world. And as far back as 1984, Catell and others at Brooklyn Union anticipated the need to change the way gas companies ran their core business, in order to meet the coming deregulation that they all thought was a certainty. Believing that industry restructuring would make gas companies more responsible for acquiring and transporting gas, Catell began looking around for alternative suppliers and new ways to transport gas. This resulted in two of his proudest accomplishments. The first is the construction of the Iroquois Gas Transmission System, which extends from Canada to New York and transports gas to all of the Northeast. The second is the close working relationship he and Brooklyn Union have established with Canadian suppliers, whose exports make up nearly 24 percent of the gas used in the Northeast. Catell plans to use his year as A.G.A. chairman to cultivate even closer relationships with the Canadian gas industry.

  6. GROW HOME | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Random | Alphabetical | Rating (High to Low) | Rating (Low to High) STILE The aroma of Italian cooking will waft from STILE, the West Virginia University and University of Roma Tor...

  7. GROW HOME | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    their 2015 Solar Decathlon entry, dubbed "Indigo Pine." Learn More STILE The aroma of Italian cooking will waft from STILE, the West Virginia University and University of Roma Tor...

  8. GROW HOME | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    by embracing the city's sense of expansive greenery. Learn More STILE The aroma of Italian cooking will waft from STILE, the West Virginia University and University of Roma Tor...

  9. GROW HOME | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    storms in a state that averages 27 tornadoes yearly. Learn More STILE The aroma of Italian cooking will waft from STILE, the West Virginia University and University of Roma Tor...

  10. Manufacturing Cost Analysis of 100 and 250 kW Fuel Cell Systems for Primary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Power and Combined Heat and Power Applications | Department of Energy 0 and 250 kW Fuel Cell Systems for Primary Power and Combined Heat and Power Applications Manufacturing Cost Analysis of 100 and 250 kW Fuel Cell Systems for Primary Power and Combined Heat and Power Applications Battelle Memorial Institute is conducting manufacturing cost assessments of fuel cells for stationary and non-automotive applications to identify the primary cost drivers impacting successful product

  11. Fact #863 March 9, 2015 Crude Oil Accounts for the Majority of Primary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Imports while Exports are Mostly Petroleum Products | Department of Energy 3 March 9, 2015 Crude Oil Accounts for the Majority of Primary Energy Imports while Exports are Mostly Petroleum Products Fact #863 March 9, 2015 Crude Oil Accounts for the Majority of Primary Energy Imports while Exports are Mostly Petroleum Products In 2014, seventy percent of the primary energy imports were crude oil, followed by petroleum products (16%) and natural gas (12%). The remaining sources of

  12. Fact #863 March 9, 2015 Crude Oil Accounts for the Majority of Primary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Imports while Exports are Mostly Petroleum Products - Dataset | Department of Energy 3 March 9, 2015 Crude Oil Accounts for the Majority of Primary Energy Imports while Exports are Mostly Petroleum Products - Dataset Fact #863 March 9, 2015 Crude Oil Accounts for the Majority of Primary Energy Imports while Exports are Mostly Petroleum Products - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Crude Oil Accounts for the Majority of Primary Energy Imports while Exports are Mostly Petroleum Products

  13. Infrastructure Security EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    GaN for LED Lighting Displays and High Power Electronics The LED market is one of the fastest growing worldwide, driven by demand for clean solid state lighting, LED displays, and ...

  14. Arizona Department of Transportation | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    agency serving one of the fastest-growing areas of the country. ADOT is responsible for planning, building and operating a complex highway system in addition to building and...

  15. Forsyth County Slashes Energy Bills with Upgrades

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forsyth County, Georgia has been among the nation's fastest growing counties for the past ten years. Given the growth, officials are working diligently to remain mindful of its environmental impact.

  16. Life Improvement of Pot Hardware in Continuous Hot Dipping Processes

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flat-rolled surface-coated steel, including galvanized and aluminized sheet, is one of the fastest growing, most profitable sectors of the U.S. steel industry. Coating steel sheets by continuous...

  17. Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    continues to be one of the world's largest and fastest growing wind markets. In 2012, wind energy became the number one source of new U.S. electricity generation capacity for...

  18. California

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    promote clean transportation fuels, that path could help bring the promise of algal biofuels closer to reality. As one of the fastest growing organisms on the planet, algae are...

  19. algae

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    promote clean transportation fuels, that path could help bring the promise of algal biofuels closer to reality. As one of the fastest growing organisms on the planet, algae are...

  20. Economic Environment 0 Anirban Basu, Chairman & CEO, Sage Policy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Real GDP Growth, 20 Fastest and Slowest Growing Countries Estimated Growth in Output by Select Global Areas Median Weekly Earnings, Full-Time U.S. Workers Construction Employment ...

  1. DOE Releases 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in August, the United States was the fastest-growing wind power market in the world in 2012. More than 13,100 megawatts (MW) of new wind power...

  2. EECBG Success Story: Forsyth County Slashes Energy Bills with Upgrades

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forsyth County, Georgia has been among the nation's fastest growing counties for the past ten years. Given the growth, officials are working diligently to remain mindful of its environmental impact. Learn more.

  3. Wind | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Science & Innovation Energy Sources Renewable Energy Wind Wind Wind The United States is home to one of the largest and fastest growing wind markets in the world. To stay ...

  4. Guide to Cool Roofs

    Energy Saver

    beautify your home. The immediate and long-term benefits of roofs that stay cool in the sun have made cool roofing the fastest growing sector of the building industry. Studies...

  5. Breakout Session: Business Innovation in Solar: Thriving Beyond Incentives

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The solar energy industry has been one of the fastest growing industries in the U.S. over the last five years. In 2013, a solar project was installed every four minutes in America. This...

  6. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Polycrystalline Thin-Film Materials...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    researchers, postdocs, and students. CdTe Research CdTe-based thin-film solar cell modules currently represent one of the fastest-growing segments of commercial module production. ...

  7. National Renewable Energy Laboratory | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    from 40 cents per kilowatt-hour when the lab was founded, to 6-9 cents today. These lower costs have helped wind energy become the fastest growing source of new electricity in...

  8. Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption Estimates by Source, 1949...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic, and wind. ... Notes: * See "Primary Energy Consumption" in Glossary. * See Table E1 for estimated energy consumption ...

  9. NIF Functional Requirements and Primary Criteria Rev. 1.8 September...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NIF Functional Requirements and Primary ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  10. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae strain GB30; an effective microsymbiont of Pisum sativum growing in Poland

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Mazur, Andrzej; De Meyer, Sofie E.; Tian, Rui; Wielbo, Jerzy; Zebracki, Kamil; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B.K.; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Pati, Amrita; et al

    2015-07-16

    We report that Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae GB30 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of Pisum sativum. GB30 was isolated in Poland from a nodule recovered from the roots of Pisum sativum growing at Janow. GB30 is also an effective microsymbiont of the annual forage legumes vetch and pea. Here we describe the features of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae strain GB30, together with sequence and annotation. The 7,468,464 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 78 scaffolds of 78 contigs containing 7,227 protein-coding genes and 75more » RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal.« less

  11. Uptake of strontium by chamisa (Chrysothamnus nauseosus) shrub plants growing over a former liquid waste disposal site at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Foxx, T.S.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    A major concern of managers at low-level waste burial site facilities is that plant roots may translocate contaminants up to the soil surface. This study investigates the uptake of strontium ({sup 90}Sr), a biologically mobile element, by chamisa (Chrysothamnus nauseosus), a deep-rooted shrub plant, growing in a former liquid waste disposal site (Solid Waste Management Unit [SWMU] 10-003[c]) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. Surface soil samples were also collected from below (understory) and between (interspace) shrub canopies. Both chamisa plants growing over SWMU 10-003(c) contained significantly higher concentrations of {sup 90}Sr than a control plant--one plant, in particular, contained 3.35 x 10{sup 6} Bq kg{sup {minus}1} ash (9.05 x 10{sup 4} pCi g{sup {minus}1} ash) in top-growth material. Similarly, soil surface samples collected underneath and between plants contained {sup 90}Sr concentrations above background and LANL screening action levels (> 218 Bq kg{sup {minus}1} dry [5.90 pCi g{sup {minus}1} dry]); this probably occurred as a result of chamisa plant leaf fall contaminating the soil understory area followed by water and/or winds moving {sup 90}Sr to the soil interspace areas. Although some soil surface migration of {sup 90}Sr from SWMU 10-003(c) has occurred, the level of {sup 90}Sr in sediments collected downstream of SWMU 10-003(c) at the LANL boundary was still within regional (background) concentrations.

  12. Thermally activated dislocation creep model for primary water stress corrosion cracking of NiCrFe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.M., Jr

    1995-12-31

    There is a growing awareness that awareness that environmentally assisted creep plays an important role in integranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of NiCrFe alloys in the primary coolant water environment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The expected creep mechanism is the thermally activated glide of dislocations. This mode of deformation is favored by the relatively low temperature of PWR operation combined with the large residual stresses that are most often identified as responsible for the SCC failure of plant components. Stress corrosion crack growth rate (CGR) equations that properly reflect the influence of this mechanism of crack tip deformation are required for accurate component life predictions. A phenomenological IGSCC-CGR model, which is based on an apriori assumption that the IGSCC-CGR is controlled by a low temperature dislocation creep mechanism, is developed in this report. Obstacles to dislocation creep include solute atoms such as carbon, which increase the lattice friction force, and forest dislocations, which can be introduced by cold prestrain. Dislocation creep also may be environmentally assisted due to hydrogen absorption at the crack tip. The IGSCC-CGR model developed here is based on an assumption that crack growth occurs by repeated fracture events occurring within an advancing crack-tip creep-fracture zone. Thermal activation parameters for stress corrosion cracking are obtained by fitting the CGR model to IGSCC-CGR data obtained on NiCrFe alloys, Alloy X-750 and Alloy 600. These IGSCC-CGR activation parameters are compared to activation parameters obtained from creep and stress relaxation tests. Recently reported CGR data, which exhibit an activation energy that depends on yield stress and the applied stress intensity factor, are used to benchmark the model. Finally, the effects of matrix carbon concentration, grain boundary carbides and absorbed hydrogen concentration are discussed within context of the model.

  13. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Ensifer medicae strain WSM244, a microsymbiont isolated from Medicago polymorpha growing in alkaline soil

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; O’Hara, Graham; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; et al

    2015-12-01

    We report that Ensifer medicae WSM244 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of Medicago species. WSM244 was isolated in 1979 from a nodule recovered from the roots of the annual Medicago polymorpha L. growing in alkaline soil (pH 8.0) in Tel Afer, Iraq. WSM244 is the only acid-sensitive E. medicae strain that has been sequenced to date. It is effective at fixing nitrogen with M. polymorpha L., as well as with more alkaline-adapted Medicago spp. such as M. littoralis Loisel., M. scutellata (L.) Mill., M. tornata (L.)more » Mill. and M. truncatula Gaertn. This strain is also effective with the perennial M. sativa L. Here we describe the features of E. medicae WSM244, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,650,282 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 91 scaffolds of 91 contigs containing 6,427 protein-coding genes and 68 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of the rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project proposal.« less

  14. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Ensifer medicae strain WSM244, a microsymbiont isolated from Medicago polymorpha growing in alkaline soil

    SciTech Connect

    Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; O’Hara, Graham; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Howieson, John; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-12-01

    We report that Ensifer medicae WSM244 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of Medicago species. WSM244 was isolated in 1979 from a nodule recovered from the roots of the annual Medicago polymorpha L. growing in alkaline soil (pH 8.0) in Tel Afer, Iraq. WSM244 is the only acid-sensitive E. medicae strain that has been sequenced to date. It is effective at fixing nitrogen with M. polymorpha L., as well as with more alkaline-adapted Medicago spp. such as M. littoralis Loisel., M. scutellata (L.) Mill., M. tornata (L.) Mill. and M. truncatula Gaertn. This strain is also effective with the perennial M. sativa L. Here we describe the features of E. medicae WSM244, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,650,282 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 91 scaffolds of 91 contigs containing 6,427 protein-coding genes and 68 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of the rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project proposal.

  15. Growing antiphase-domain-free GaAs thin films out of highly ordered planar nanowire arrays on exact (001) silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qiang; Ng, Kar Wei; Lau, Kei May

    2015-02-16

    We report the use of highly ordered, dense, and regular arrays of in-plane GaAs nanowires as building blocks to produce antiphase-domain-free GaAs thin films on exact (001) silicon. High quality GaAs nanowires were grown on V-grooved Si (001) substrates using the selective aspect ratio trapping concept. The 4.1% lattice mismatch has been accommodated by the initial GaAs, a few nanometer-thick with high density stacking faults. The bulk of the GaAs wires exhibited smooth facets and a low defect density. An unusual defect trapping mechanism by a tiara-like structure formed by Si undercuts was discovered. As a result, we were able to grow large-area antiphase-domain-free GaAs thin films out of the nanowires without using SiO{sub 2} sidewalls for defect termination. Analysis from XRD ?-rocking curves yielded full-width-at-half-maximum values of 238 and 154?arc sec from 900 to 2000?nm GaAs thin films, respectively, indicating high crystalline quality. The growth scheme in this work offers a promising path towards integrated III-V electronic, photonic, or photovoltaic devices on large scale silicon platform.

  16. A CAD system for nodule detection in low-dose lung CTs based on region growing and a new active contour model

    SciTech Connect

    Bellotti, R.; De Carlo, F.; Gargano, G.; Tangaro, S.; Cascio, D.; Catanzariti, E.; Cerello, P.; Cheran, S. C.; Delogu, P.; De Mitri, I.; Fulcheri, C.; Grosso, D.; Retico, A.; Squarcia, S.; Tommasi, E.; Golosio, Bruno

    2007-12-15

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the selection of lung nodules in computer tomography (CT) images is presented. The system is based on region growing (RG) algorithms and a new active contour model (ACM), implementing a local convex hull, able to draw the correct contour of the lung parenchyma and to include the pleural nodules. The CAD consists of three steps: (1) the lung parenchymal volume is segmented by means of a RG algorithm; the pleural nodules are included through the new ACM technique; (2) a RG algorithm is iteratively applied to the previously segmented volume in order to detect the candidate nodules; (3) a double-threshold cut and a neural network are applied to reduce the false positives (FPs). After having set the parameters on a clinical CT, the system works on whole scans, without the need for any manual selection. The CT database was recorded at the Pisa center of the ITALUNG-CT trial, the first Italian randomized controlled trial for the screening of the lung cancer. The detection rate of the system is 88.5% with 6.6 FPs/CT on 15 CT scans (about 4700 sectional images) with 26 nodules: 15 internal and 11 pleural. A reduction to 2.47 FPs/CT is achieved at 80% efficiency.

  17. Synthesis of free-standing carbon nanohybrid by directly growing carbon nanotubes on air-sprayed graphene oxide paper and its application in supercapacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Li; Jiang, Wenchao; Yuan, Yang; Goh, Kunli; Yu, Dingshan; Wang, Liang; Chen, Yuan

    2015-04-15

    We report the synthesis of a free-standing two dimensional carbon nanotube (CNT)-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) hybrid by directly growing CNTs on air-sprayed GO paper. As a result of the good integration between CNTs and thermally reduced GO film during chemical vapor deposition, excellent electrical conductivity (2.6×10{sup 4} S/m), mechanical flexibility (electrical resistance only increases 1.1% after bent to 90° for 500 times) and a relatively large surface area (335.3 m{sup 2}/g) are achieved. Two-electrode supercapacitor assembled using the CNT–rGO hybrids in ionic liquid electrolyte (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate) shows excellent stability upon 500 bending cycles with the gravimetric energy density measuring 23.7 Wh/kg and a power density of 2.0 kW/kg. Furthermore, it shows an impedance phase angle of −64.4° at a frequency of 120 Hz, suggesting good potentials for 120 Hz alternating current line filtering applications. - Graphical abstract: Flexible and highly conductive carbon nanotube-reduced graphene oxide nanohybrid. - Highlights: • Direct growth of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition on air-sprayed graphene oxide paper. • Two-dimensional carbon nanohybrid with excellent conductivity and mechanical flexibility. • Supercapacitor with excellent performance stability upon mechanical deformation for flexible electronics applications. • Supercapacitor with high impedance phase angle for 120 Hz alternating current line filtering applications.

  18. Electronic structure of the primary electron donor of Blastochloris viridis heterodimer mutants : high field EPR study.

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarenko, N. S.; Poluektov, O. G.; Bylina, E. J.; Norris, J. R.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-09-01

    High-field electron paramagnetic resonance (HF EPR) has been employed to investigate the primary electron donor electronic structure of Blastochloris viridis heterodimer mutant reaction centers (RCs). In these mutants the amino acid substitution His(M200)Leu or His(L173)Leu eliminates a ligand to the primary electron donor, resulting in the loss of a magnesium in one of the constituent bacteriochlorophylls (BChl). Thus, the native BChl/BChl homodimer primary donor is converted into a BChl/bacteriopheophytin (BPhe) heterodimer. The heterodimer primary donor radical in chemically oxidized RCs exhibits a broadened EPR line indicating a highly asymmetric distribution of the unpaired electron over both dimer constituents. Observed triplet state EPR signals confirm localization of the excitation on the BChl half of the heterodimer primary donor. Theoretical simulation of the triplet EPR lineshapes clearly shows that, in the case of mutants, triplet states are formed by an intersystem crossing mechanism in contrast to the radical pair mechanism in wild type RCs. Photooxidation of the mutant RCs results in formation of a BPhe anion radical within the heterodimer pair. The accumulation of an intradimer BPhe anion is caused by the substantial loss of interaction between constituents of the heterodimer primary donor along with an increase in the reduction potential of the heterodimer primary donor D/D{sup +} couple. This allows oxidation of the cytochrome even at cryogenic temperatures and reduction of each constituent of the heterodimer primary donor individually. Despite a low yield of primary donor radicals, the enhancement of the semiquinone-iron pair EPR signals in these mutants indicates the presence of kinetically viable electron donors.

  19. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H. (Bethany, CT); Brown, Stephen H. (East Haven, CT)

    1989-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  20. Fact #864: March 16, 2015 Imports of Primary Energy have Declined Sharply

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Since the Peak Reached in 2007 | Department of Energy 4: March 16, 2015 Imports of Primary Energy have Declined Sharply Since the Peak Reached in 2007 Fact #864: March 16, 2015 Imports of Primary Energy have Declined Sharply Since the Peak Reached in 2007 Excel file and dataset for Imports of Primary Energy have Declined Sharply Since the Peak Reached in 2007 fotw#864_web.xlsx (22.86 KB) More Documents & Publications Fact #915: March 7, 2016 Average Historical Annual Gasoline Pump Price,

  1. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1989-10-17

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  2. UCOR Assumes Role as Primary Cleanup Contractor for ETTP | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy UCOR Assumes Role as Primary Cleanup Contractor for ETTP UCOR Assumes Role as Primary Cleanup Contractor for ETTP August 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Following the successful completion of transition, URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) has assumed its role as the primary contractor for remediation and cleanup of the Department of Energy's (DOE) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). "We are extremely pleased to have UCOR on board," said John Eschenberg, the DOE

  3. Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change. Volume II, Part 8. Impacts of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels on agricultural growing seasons and crop water use efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, J. E.

    1982-09-01

    The researchable areas addressed relate to the possible impacts of climate change on agricultural growing seasons and crop adaptation responses on a global basis. The research activities proposed are divided into the following two main areas of investigation: anticipated climate change impacts on the physical environmental characteristics of the agricultural growing seasons and, the most probable food crop responses to the possible changes in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ levels in plant environments. The main physical environmental impacts considered are the changes in temperature, or more directly, thermal energy levels and the growing season evapotranspiration-precipitation balances. The resulting food crop, commercial forest and rangeland species response impacts addressed relate to potential geographical shifts in agricultural growing seasons as determined by the length in days of the frost free period, thermal energy changes and water balance changes. In addition, the interaction of possible changes in plant water use efficiencies during the growing season in relationship to changing atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations, is also considered under the scenario of global warming due to increases in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration. These proposed research investigations are followed by adaptive response evaluations.

  4. Qualitative assessment of the ignition of highly flammable fuels by primary explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Elischer, P.P.; De Yong, L.

    1983-06-01

    An assessment of the ignition of fuel/air mixtures and of fabrics soaked with different fuels (ethanol, n-hexane and diethyl ether) by primary explosives has been carried out.

  5. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 2a. First Use for All Purposes (Primary...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2a. Consumption of Energy (Primary 1 Energy) for All Purposes (First Use) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS...

  6. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 2b. Primary Fuel Consumption for...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Primary 1 Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS...

  7. MODERATE-LUMINOSITY GROWING BLACK HOLES FROM 1.25 < z < 2.7: VARIED ACCRETION IN DISK-DOMINATED HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, B. D.; Glikman, E.; Urry, C. M.; Schawinski, K.; Cardamone, C.

    2012-12-10

    We compute black hole masses and bolometric luminosities for 57 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the redshift range 1.25 {<=} z {<=} 2.67, selected from the GOODS-South deep multi-wavelength survey field via their X-ray emission. We determine host galaxy morphological parameters by separating the galaxies from their central point sources in deep Hubble Space Telescope images, and host stellar masses and colors by multi-wavelength spectral energy distribution fitting. Of GOODS AGNs at these redshifts, 90% have detected rest-frame optical nuclear point sources; bolometric luminosities range from 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}. The black holes are growing at a range of accretion rates, with {approx}> 50% of the sample having L/L{sub Edd} < 0.1. Of the host galaxies, 70% have stellar masses M{sub *} > 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, with a range of colors suggesting a complex star formation history. We find no evolution of AGN bolometric luminosity within the sample, and no correlation between AGN bolometric luminosity and host stellar mass, color, or morphology. Fully half the sample of host galaxies are disk-dominated, with another 25% having strong disk components. Fewer than 15% of the systems appear to be at some stage of a major merger. These moderate-luminosity AGN hosts are therefore inconsistent with a dynamical history dominated by mergers strong enough to destroy disks, indicating that minor mergers or secular processes dominate the coevolution of galaxies and their central black holes at z {approx} 2.

  8. CFD modeling and image analysis of exhaled aerosols due to a growing bronchial tumor: Towards non-invasive diagnosis and treatment of respiratory obstructive diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Jinxiang [Central Michigan Univ., Mount Pleasant, MI (United States); Kim, JongWon [Central Michigan Univ., Mount Pleasant, MI (United States); Si, Xiuhua A. [California Baptist Univ., Riverside, CA (United States); Corley, Richard A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kabilan, Senthil [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Shengyu [First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Medical Univ., Shaanxi (China); Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 ?m at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug delivery protocol.

  9. CFD Modeling and Image Analysis of Exhaled Aerosols due to a Growing Bronchial Tumor: towards Non-Invasive Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Obstructive Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-02-06

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure vari-ations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagran-gian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respira-tions of tracer aerosols of 1 m at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug de-livery protocol.

  10. CFD modeling and image analysis of exhaled aerosols due to a growing bronchial tumor: Towards non-invasive diagnosis and treatment of respiratory obstructive diseases

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treatmore » the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 μm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug delivery protocol.« less

  11. Observations and models of emissions of volatile terpenoid compounds from needles of ponderosa pine trees growing in situ: Controls by light, temperature and stomatal conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, P.; Eller, Allyson; Guenther, Alex B.; Monson, Russell K.

    2014-07-14

    Terpenoid emissions from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa subsp. scopulorum) were measured in Colorado, USA over two growing seasons to evaluate the role of incident light, needle temperature and stomatal conductance in controlling emissions of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) and several monoterpenes. MBO was the dominant daylight terpenoid emission, comprising on average 87% of the total flux, and diurnal variations were largely determined by light and temperature. During daytime, oxygenated monoterpenes (especially linalool) comprised up to 75% of the total monoterpenoid flux from needles. A significant fraction of monoterpenoid emissions was light dependent and 13CO2 labeling studies confirmed de novo production. Thus, modeling of monoterpenoid emissions required a hybrid model in which a significant fraction of emissions was dependent on both light and temperature, while the remainder was dependent on temperature alone. Experiments in which stomata were forced to close using abscisic acid demonstrated that MBO and a large fraction of the monoterpene flux, presumably linalool, could be limited at the scale of seconds to minutes by stomatal conductance. Using a previously published model of terpenoid emissions which explicitly accounts for the physico-chemical properties of emitted compounds, we are able to simulate these observed stomatal effects, whether induced through experimentation or arising under naturally fluctuation conditions of temperature and light. This study shows unequivocally that, under naturally occurring field conditions, de novo light dependent monoterpenes can comprise a large fraction of emissions. Differences between the monoterpene composition of ambient air and needle emissions imply a significant non-needle emission source enriched in ?-3-carene.

  12. CFD modeling and image analysis of exhaled aerosols due to a growing bronchial tumor: Towards non-invasive diagnosis and treatment of respiratory obstructive diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 μm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug delivery protocol.

  13. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H. (Bethany, CT); Brown, Stephen H. (East Haven, CT)

    1988-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  14. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1988-02-16

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  15. APPLICATION OF CONTROLLED-POTENTIAL COULOMETRY AS A PRIMARY METHOD FOR THE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CHARACTERIZATION OF PLUTONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS BEING USED FOR LARGE-SIZE DRY SPIKES REFERENCE MATERIALS; COLLABORATION BETWEEN JAEA AND SRNL (Conference) | SciTech Connect APPLICATION OF CONTROLLED-POTENTIAL COULOMETRY AS A PRIMARY METHOD FOR THE CHARACTERIZATION OF PLUTONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS BEING USED FOR LARGE-SIZE DRY SPIKES REFERENCE MATERIALS; COLLABORATION BETWEEN JAEA AND SRNL Citation Details In-Document Search Title: APPLICATION OF CONTROLLED-POTENTIAL COULOMETRY AS A PRIMARY

  16. Nuclear reactor having a polyhedral primary shield and removable vessel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Ekeroth, D.E.; Orr, R.

    1993-12-07

    A nuclear reactor is provided having a generally cylindrical reactor vessel disposed within an opening in a primary shield. The opening in the primary shield is defined by a plurality of generally planar side walls forming a generally polyhedral-shaped opening. The reactor vessel is supported within the opening in the primary shield by reactor vessel supports which are in communication and aligned with central portions of some of the side walls. The reactor vessel is connected to the central portions of the reactor vessel supports. A thermal insulation polyhedron formed from a plurality of slidably insertable and removable generally planar insulation panels substantially surrounds at least a portion of the reactor vessel and is disposed between the reactor vessel and the side walls of the primary shield. The shape of the insulation polyhedron generally corresponds to the shape of the opening in the primary shield. Reactor monitoring instrumentation may be mounted in the corners of the opening in the primary shield between the side walls and the reactor vessel such that insulation is not disposed between the instrumentation and the reactor vessel. 5 figures.

  17. Nuclear reactor having a polyhedral primary shield and removable vessel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Ekeroth, Douglas E. (Delmont, PA); Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is provided having a generally cylindrical reactor vessel disposed within an opening in a primary shield. The opening in the primary shield is defined by a plurality of generally planar side walls forming a generally polyhedral-shaped opening. The reactor vessel is supported within the opening in the primary shield by reactor vessel supports which are in communication and aligned with central portions of some of the side walls. The reactor vessel is connected to the central portions of the reactor vessel supports. A thermal insulation polyhedron formed from a plurality of slidably insertable and removable generally planar insulation panels substantially surrounds at least a portion of the reactor vessel and is disposed between the reactor vessel and the side walls of the primary shield. The shape of the insulation polyhedron generally corresponds to the shape of the opening in the primary shield. Reactor monitoring instrumentation may be mounted in the corners of the opening in the primary shield between the side walls and the reactor vessel such that insulation is not disposed between the instrumentation and the reactor vessel.

  18. Impact of Primary Gleason Grade on Risk Stratification for Gleason Score 7 Prostate Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, Bridget F.; Tsivian, Matvey; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Sun, Leon; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Moul, Judd; Lee, W. Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the primary Gleason grade (GG) in Gleason score (GS) 7 prostate cancers for risk of non-organ-confined disease with the goal of optimizing radiotherapy treatment option counseling. Methods: One thousand three hundred thirty-three patients with pathologic GS7 were identified in the Duke Prostate Center research database. Clinical factors including age, race, clinical stage, prostate-specific antigen at diagnosis, and pathologic stage were obtained. Data were stratified by prostate-specific antigen and clinical stage at diagnosis into adapted D'Amico risk groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed evaluating for association of primary GG with pathologic outcome. Results: Nine hundred seventy-nine patients had primary GG3 and 354 had GG4. On univariate analyses, GG4 was associated with an increased risk of non-organ-confined disease. On multivariate analysis, GG4 was independently associated with seminal vesicle invasion (SVI) but not extracapsular extension. Patients with otherwise low-risk disease and primary GG3 had a very low risk of SVI (4%). Conclusions: Primary GG4 in GS7 cancers is associated with increased risk of SVI compared with primary GG3. Otherwise low-risk patients with GS 3+4 have a very low risk of SVI and may be candidates for prostate-only radiotherapy modalities.

  19. Methanol and isoprene emissions from the fast growing tropical pioneer species Vismia guianensis (Aubl.) Pers. (Hypericaceae) in the central Amazon forest

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Jardine, Kolby J.; Jardine, Angela B.; Souza, Vinicius F.; Carneiro, Vilany; Ceron, Joao V.; Gimenez, Bruno O.; Soares, Cilene P.; Durgante, Flavia M.; Higuchi, Niro; Manzi, Antonio O.; et al

    2016-05-26

    Isoprene (Is) emissions by plants represent a loss of carbon and energy resources leading to the initial hypothesis that fast growing pioneer species in secondary tropical forests allocate carbon primarily to growth at the expense of isoprenoid defenses. In this study, we quantified leaf isoprene and methanol emissions from the abundant pantropical pioneer tree species Vismia guianensis and ambient isoprene concentrations above a diverse secondary forest in the central Amazon. As photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was varied (0 to 3000 µmol m−2 s−1) under standard leaf temperature (30 °C), isoprene emissions from V. guianensis increased without saturation up to 80 nmol m−2 s−1. A nonlinear increase inmore » isoprene emissions with respect to net photosynthesis (Pn) resulted in the fraction of Pn dedicated to isoprene emissions increasing with light intensity (up to 2 % of Pn). Emission responses to temperature under standard light conditions (PAR of 1000 µmol m−2 s−1) resulted in the classic uncoupling of isoprene emissions (Topt, iso > 40 °C) from net photosynthesis (Topt, Pn = 30.0–32.5 °C) with up to 7 % of Pn emitted as isoprene at 40 °C. Under standard environmental conditions of PAR and leaf temperature, young V. guianensis leaves showed high methanol emissions, low Pn, and low isoprene emissions. In contrast, mature leaves showed high Pn, high isoprene emissions, and low methanol emissions, highlighting the differential control of leaf phenology over methanol and isoprene emissions. High daytime ambient isoprene concentrations (11 ppbv) were observed above a secondary Amazon rainforest, suggesting that isoprene emissions are common among neotropical pioneer species. The results are not consistent with the initial hypothesis and support a functional role of methanol during leaf expansion and the establishment of photosynthetic machinery and a protective role of isoprene for

  20. Primary explosives

    DOEpatents

    Hiskey, Michael A.; Huynh, My Hang V.

    2009-03-03

    The present invention provides a compound of the formula (Cat).sup.+.sub.z[M.sup.++(5-nitro-1H-tetrazolato-N2).sup.-.sub.x(H.sub.2- O).sub.y] where x is 3 or 4, y is 2 or 3, x+y is 6, z is 1 or 2, and M.sup.++ is selected from the group consisting of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, chromium, and manganese, and (Cat).sup.+ is selected from the group consisting of ammonium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium. A method of preparing the compound of that formula is also disclosed.

  1. Primary explosives

    DOEpatents

    Hiskey, Michael A.; Huynh, My Hang V.

    2011-01-25

    The present invention provides a compound of the formula (Cat).sup.+.sub.z[M.sup.++(5-nitro-1H-tetrazolato-N2).sup.-.sub.x(H.sub.2- O).sub.y] where x is 3 or 4, y is 2 or 3, x+y is 6, z is 1 or 2, and M.sup.++ is selected from the group consisting of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, chromium, and manganese, and (Cat).sup.+ is selected from the group consisting of ammonium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium. A method of preparing the compound of that formula is also disclosed.

  2. Primary Document

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    b. 50-year and 100-year wind event c. 50-year and ... Hawaii 5. Cape Hatteras - North Carolina An initial short-list of ... Galway Bay - Deep water Offshore or other Irish ...

  3. Elevated Temperature Primary Load Design Method Using Pseudo Elastic-Perfectly Plastic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Peter; Sham, Sam; Jetter, Robert I

    2012-01-01

    A new primary load design method for elevated temperature service has been developed. Codification of the procedure in an ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III Code Case is being pursued. The proposed primary load design method is intended to provide the same margins on creep rupture, yielding and creep deformation for a component or structure that are implicit in the allowable stress data. It provides a methodology that does not require stress classification and is also applicable to a full range of temperature above and below the creep regime. Use of elastic-perfectly plastic analysis based on allowable stress with corrections for constraint, steady state stress and creep ductility is described. This approach is intended to ensure that traditional primary stresses are the basis for design, taking into account ductility limits to stress re-distribution and multiaxial rupture criteria.

  4. Combustor with two stage primary fuel tube with concentric members and flow regulating

    DOEpatents

    Parker, David Marchant; Whidden, Graydon Lane; Zolyomi, Wendel

    1999-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine having a centrally located fuel nozzle and inner, middle and outer concentric cylindrical liners, the inner liner enclosing a primary combustion zone. The combustor has an air inlet that forms two passages for pre-mixing primary fuel and air to be supplied to the primary combustion zone. Each of the pre-mixing passages has a circumferential array of swirl vanes. A plurality of primary fuel tube assemblies extend through both pre-mixing passages, with each primary fuel tube assembly located between a pair of swirl vanes. Each primary fuel tube assembly is comprised of two tubular members. The first member supplies fuel to the first pre-mixing passage, while the second member, which extends through the first member, supplies fuel to the second pre-mixing passage. An annular fuel manifold is divided into first and second chambers by a circumferentially extending baffle. The proximal end of the first member is attached to the manifold itself while the proximal end of the second member is attached to the baffle. The distal end of the first member is attached directly to the second member at around its mid-point. The inlets of the first and second members are in flow communication with the first and second manifold chambers, respectively. Control valves separately regulate the flow of fuel to the two chambers and, therefore, to the two members of the fuel tube assemblies, thereby allowing the flow of fuel to the first and second pre-mixing passages to be separately controlled.

  5. "Table B22. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Useda" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings ................",4657,4016,1128,2189,302,77 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000

  6. "Table B23. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Useda" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings ................",67338,61602,17627,32729,3719,5077 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000

  7. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS & RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-17

    This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double shell waste tanks. The analysis is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raise by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review (in April and May 2001) of work being performed on the double-shell tank farms, and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system.

  8. Survey and alignment report on the primary control network for the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedsam, H.; Penicka, M.; Zhao, S.

    1993-02-01

    During November 1992 the survey and alignment team measured the entire primary control network for the APS. This task had to be finished before the enclosure of the EAA and the RF buildings were put in place, inhibiting several lines of sight necessary for the determination of the monument locations.

  9. EVALUATION OF THE TEMPORARY TENT COVER TRUSS SYSTEM AP PRIMARY VENT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    HAQ MA

    2009-12-31

    The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate a temporary ten cover truss system. This system will be used to provide weather protection to the workers during replacement of the filter for the Primary Ventilation System in AP Tank Farm. The truss system has been fabricated utilizing tubes and couplers, which are normally used for scaffoldings.

  10. Merging photovoltaic hardware development with hybrid applications in the USA

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, W.

    1993-11-01

    The use of multi-source power systems, ``hybrids,`` is one of the fastest growing, potentially significant markets for photovoltaic (PV) system technology today. Cost-effective applications today include remote facility power, remote area power supplies, remote home and village power, and power for dedicated electrical loads such as communications systems. This market sector is anticipated to be one of the most important growth opportunities for PV over the next five years. The US Department of Energy (USDOE) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are currently engaged in an effort to accelerate the adoption of market-driven PV hybrid power systems and to effectively integrate PV with other energy sources. This paper provides details of this development and the ongoing hybrid activities in the United States. Hybrid systems are the primary focus of this paper.

  11. Sulfur dioxide emissions from primary copper smelters in the western US

    SciTech Connect

    Mangeng, C.A.; Mead, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The body of information presented is directed to environmental scientists and policy makers without chemical or metallurgical engineering backgrounds. This paper addresses the problems of reducing sulfur dioxide emissions from primary copper smelters in the western United States and projects the future impact of emissions within a framework of legal, technological, and economic considerations. Methodology used to calculate historical sulfur dioxide emissions is described. Sulfur dioxide emission regulations are outlined as they apply to primary copper smelters. A discussion of available sulfur dioxide control technology and copper smelting processes summarizes the technological and economic problems of reducing copper smelter emissions. Based upon these technological and economic considerations, projections of smelter emissions indicate that compliance with existing legislative requirements will be achieved by 1990. Three smelters are projected to close by 1985.

  12. AmeriFlux BR-Sa1 Santarem-Km67-Primary Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Saleska, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site BR-Sa1 Santarem-Km67-Primary Forest. Site Description - The LBA Tapajos KM67 Mature Forest site is located in the Tapajos National Forest, a 450,000 ha closed-canopy upland forest in Amazonian Brazil. Bounded by the Tapajos River in the west and highway BR-163 to the east, the tower is located on a flat plateau (or planalto) that extends up to 150 km to the north, south, and east. Within the confines of the National Forest, anthropogenic disturbances are limited to a few small hunting trails. The surrounding stand is classified as primary or "old-growth"" predominantly by its uneven age distribution, emergent trees, numerous epiphytes and abundant large logs. In 2007 falling trees hit the tower guy wires rendering all instrumentation in-operational. After a complete restoration tower measurements resumed in August of 2008.

  13. Primary water stress corrosion crack growth rates in Alloy 600 steam generator tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, R.G.; Jacko, R.J.; Gold, R.E.

    1992-12-31

    Direct measurements of SCC crack growth rates have been used to determine the effects of changes in PWR primary water chemistry on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. Reversing current DC potential measurement techniques have been adapted for use on thin walled tubing containing through-wall circumferential cracks. These techniques have been used to monitor crack rates in Alloy 600 tubing exposed to typical PWR primary water chemistries at 330{degrees}C. Crack growth rate studies, conducted under well defined stress intensity conditions, provide a sensitivity in the assessment of stress corrosion cracking susceptibility that is not possible using more traditional techniques. Preliminary studies have been conducted to determine the effects of B and Li concentrations on the stress corrosion crack growth rate of Alloy 600 tubing.

  14. Primary water stress corrosion cracking inspection ranking scheme for Alloy 600 components

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, P.H.; Gangadharan, A.; Ramalingam, S.C.

    1996-12-31

    Palisades Nuclear Plant has developed a comprehensive inspection program to support safe, reliable, and cost-effective operation of all Alloy 600 nozzles and safe ends in the primary coolant system (PCS). As a part of the Palisades Alloy 600 Project, an inspection prioritization scheme was developed to help the plant focus its resources on high risk components and plan appropriate inspection activities for the other components. The inspection prioritization scheme is based on the susceptibility of the components to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC), component failure consequences, component leak detectability and component radiation exposure. The scheme provides a simple, systematic and technical base for selecting Alloy 600 components for inspection. The scheme, however, could be used to develop an inspection schedule or to select the highest priority components for mitigation or replacement.

  15. INTEGRATED DRILLING SYSTEM USING MUD ACTUATED DOWN HOLE HAMMER AS PRIMARY ENGINE

    SciTech Connect

    John V. Fernandez; David S. Pixton

    2005-12-01

    A history and project summary of the development of an integrated drilling system using a mud-actuated down-hole hammer as its primary engine are given. The summary includes laboratory test results, including atmospheric tests of component parts and simulated borehole tests of the hammer system. Several remaining technical hurdles are enumerated. A brief explanation of commercialization potential is included. The primary conclusion for this work is that a mud actuated hammer can yield substantial improvements to drilling rate in overbalanced, hard rock formations. A secondary conclusion is that the down-hole mud actuated hammer can serve to provide other useful down-hole functions including generation of high pressure mud jets, generation of seismic and sonic signals, and generation of diagnostic information based on hammer velocity profiles.

  16. Test report of evaluation of primary exhaust ventilation flowmeters for double shell hydrogen watch list tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, W.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-03

    This document reports the results of testing four different flowmeters for use in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of Double Shell Tanks on the hydrogen watch list that do not already have this capability. This currently includes tanks 241-AW-101,241-AN- 103, 241-AN-104, 241-AN-105 and 241-SY-103. The anticipated airflow velocity in these tanks range from 0.25 m/s(50 ft/min) to 1/78 m/s (350 ft/min). Past experiences at Hanford have forced the evaluation and selection of instruments to be used at the low flow and relatively high humidity conditions found in these tanks. Based on the results of this test, a flow meter has been chosen for installation in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of the above mentioned waste tanks.

  17. Table A17. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," "," Employment Size(b)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",1000,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and

  18. Table A20. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke",,"Shipments" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","of Energy

  19. Table A22. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Ener

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1994 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," "," " " ","Total","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)","

  20. Organosilicon-Based Electrolytes for Long-Life Lithium Primary Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Fenton, Kyle R.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Staiger, Chad L.; Pratt, III, Harry D.; Rempe, Susan B.; Leung, Kevin; Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Anderson, Travis Mark

    2015-09-01

    This report describes advances in electrolytes for lithium primary battery systems. Electrolytes were synthesized that utilize organosilane materials that include anion binding agent functionality. Numerous materials were synthesized and tested in lithium carbon monofluoride battery systems for conductivity, impedance, and capacity. Resulting electrolytes were shown to be completely non-flammable and showed promise as co-solvents for electrolyte systems, due to low dielectric strength.

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibitors epigenetically promote reparative events in primary dental pulp cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Henry F.; Smith, Anthony J.; Fleming, Garry J.P.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2013-06-10

    Application of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) to cells epigenetically alters their chromatin structure and induces transcriptional and cellular reparative events. This study investigated the application of two HDACi, valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA) on the induction of repair-associated responses in primary dental pulp cell (DPC) cultures. Flow cytometry demonstrated that TSA (100 nM, 400 nM) significantly increased cell viability. Neither HDACi was cytotoxic, although cell growth analysis revealed significant anti-proliferative effects at higher concentrations for VPA (>0.5 mM) and TSA (>50 nM). While high-content-analysis demonstrated that HDACi did not significantly induce caspase-3 or p21 activity, p53-expression was increased by VPA (3 mM, 5 mM) at 48 h. HDACi-exposure induced mineralization per cell dose-dependently to a plateau level (VPA-0.125 mM and TSA-25 nM) with accompanying increases in mineralization/dentinogenic-associated gene expression at 5 days (DMP-1, BMP-2/-4, Nestin) and 10 days (DSPP, BMP-2/-4). Both HDACis, at a range of concentrations, significantly stimulated osteopontin and BMP-2 protein expression at 10 and 14 days further supporting the ability of HDACi to promote differentiation. HDACi exert different effects on primary compared with transformed DPCs and promote mineralization and differentiation events without cytotoxic effects. These novel data now highlight the potential in restorative dentistry for applying low concentrations of HDACi in vital pulp treatment. -- Highlights: • Valproic acid and trichostatin A promoted mineralization in primary pulp cells. • Cell viability, apoptosis, caspase-3, p21 unaltered; p53 increased by valproic acid. • Trichostatin A increased cell viability at 24 h at selected concentrations. • Altered cell toxicity and differentiation between primary and transformed cells. • HDACi-induced the differentiation marker proteins osteopontin and BMP-2.

  2. Additional requirements for leak-before-break application to primary coolant piping in Belgium

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel, G.

    1997-04-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) technology has not been applied in the first design of the seven Pressurized Water Reactors the Belgian utility is currently operating. The design basis of these plants required to consider the dynamic effects associated with the ruptures to be postulated in the high energy piping. The application of the LBB technology to the existing plants has been recently approved by the Belgian Safety Authorities but with a limitation to the primary coolant loop. LBB analysis has been initiated for the Doel 3 and Tihange 2 plants to allow the withdrawal of some of the reactor coolant pump snubbers at both plants and not reinstall some of the restraints after steam generator replacement at Doel 3. LBB analysis was also found beneficial to demonstrate the acceptability of the primary components and piping to the new conditions resulting from power uprating and stretch-out operation. LBB analysis has been subsequently performed on the primary coolant loop of the Tihange I plant and is currently being performed for the Doel 4 plant. Application of the LBB to the primary coolant loop is based in Belgium on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. However the Belgian Safety Authorities required some additional analyses and put some restrictions on the benefits of the LBB analysis to maintain the global safety of the plant at a sufficient level. This paper develops the main steps of the safety evaluation performed by the Belgian Safety Authorities for accepting the application of the LBB technology to existing plants and summarizes the requirements asked for in addition to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission rules.

  3. Chemosensitivity of primary human fibroblasts with defective unhooking of DNA interstrand cross-links

    SciTech Connect

    Clingen, Peter H. . E-mail: p.clingen@ucl.ac.uk; Arlett, Colin F.; Hartley, John A.; Parris, Christopher N.

    2007-02-15

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterised by defects in nucleotide excision repair, ultraviolet (UV) radiation sensitivity and increased skin carcinoma. Compared to other complementation groups, XP-F patients show relatively mild cutaneous symptoms. DNA interstrand cross-linking agents are a highly cytotoxic class of DNA damage induced by common cancer chemotherapeutics such as cisplatin and nitrogen mustards. Although the XPF-ERCC1 structure-specific endonuclease is required for the repair of ICLs cellular sensitivity of primary human XP-F cells has not been established. In clonogenic survival assays, primary fibroblasts from XP-F patients were moderately sensitive to both UVC and HN2 compared to normal cells (2- to 3-fold and 3- to 5-fold, respectively). XP-A fibroblasts were considerably more sensitive to UVC (10- to 12-fold) but not sensitive to HN2. The sensitivity of XP-F fibroblasts to HN2 correlated with the defective incision or 'unhooking' step of ICL repair. Using the comet assay, XP-F cells exhibited only 20% residual unhooking activity over 24 h. Over the same time, normal and XP-A cells unhooked greater than 95% and 62% of ICLs, respectively. After HN2 treatment, ICL-associated DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are detected by pulse field gel electrophoresis in dividing cells. Induction and repair of DNA DSBs was normal in XP-F fibroblasts. These findings demonstrate that in primary human fibroblasts, XPF is required for the unhooking of ICLs and not for the induction or repair of ICL-associated DNA DSBs induced by HN2. In terms of cancer chemotherapy, people with mild DNA repair defects affecting ICL repair may be more prevalent in the general population than expected. Since cellular sensitivity of primary human fibroblasts usually reflects clinical sensitivity such patients with cancer would be at risk of increased toxicity.

  4. HQ State HQ City Name of Primary Selectee Project Type Project Title and Brief Project Description

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Name of Primary Selectee Project Type Project Title and Brief Project Description Project Locations Recovery Act Funding* Participant Share Total Project Value Including Cost Share AZ Fort Defiance Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Company Smart Grid Workforce Training (Topic B) Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Smart Grid Workforce Training Program - Develop a workforce that is well-trained and committed to the mission of modernizing NTUA's distribution services, including an expeditious and

  5. HQ State HQ City Primary Awardee Brief Project Description Project Locations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Primary Awardee Brief Project Description Project Locations Recovery Act Funding* Participant Share Total Project Value Including Cost Share Los Angeles Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Implement a smart grid demonstration at university campus properties and technology transfer laboratories to establish a fully-integrated Smart Grid system and suite of technologies as applied to demand response, conduct a comprehensive portfolio of behavioral studies, demonstrate next- generation cyber

  6. Analysis of N-16 concentration in primary cooling system of AP1000 power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rohanda, Anis; Waris, Abdul

    2015-04-16

    Nitrogen-16 (N-16) is one of the radiation safety parameter on the primary reactor system. The activation product, N-16, is the predominant contributor to the activity in the reactor coolant system during reactor operation. N-16 is activation product derived from activation of O-16 with fast neutron based on {sup 16}O(n,p){sup 16}N reaction. Thus study is needed and it performs to determine N-16 concentration in reactor coolant (primary coolant) in supporting radiation safety. One of the way is using analytical methode based on activation and redecay princip to obtain N-16 concentration. The analysis was performed on the configuration basis and operational of Westinghouse AP1000 power reactor in several monitoring points at coolant reactor system. The results of the calculation of N-16 concentration at the core outlet, reactor vessel outlet, pressurizer line, inlet and outlet of steam generators, primary pumps, reactor vessels inlet and core inlet are: 281, 257, 255, 250, 145, 142, 129 and 112 µCi/gram respectively. The results of analysis compared with AP1000 design control document as standard values. The verification showed very high accuracy comparation between analytical results and standard values.

  7. Effect of lithium hydroxide on primary water stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Jacko, R. )

    1991-09-01

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) studies were performed on Alloy 600 in simulated PWR high lithium primary water. Tests were conducted at 330{degree}C with Li concentrations ranging from 0.7 to 3.5 ppM in solutions containing boric acid and dissolved hydrogen. Highly stressed, Alloy 600 reverse U-bend specimens (RUBs) were predominantly used for tests. Both mill-annealed (MA) and thermally treated (TT) Alloy 600 were tested. The large number of specimens tested allowed the use of rigorous statistical techniques to interpret the variability of PWSCC performance. Results of tests of MA 600 RUBs at 2 stress levels show no effect of chemistry on the time to initiate PWSCC cracks over the range from 0.7 to 3.5 ppM Li. However, results for TT 600 RUBs and in MA 600 RUBs at a third stress level show the tendency for a shorter time to initiate PWSCC cracks at a Li concentration of 3.5 ppM. Analysis suggests that certain Alloy 600 components may experience an increase in PWSCC by using the higher LI content primary water due to a subtle influence of chemistry on PWSCC. 5 refs. 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Primary Vaginal Cancer Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation Using Cis-Platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Samant, Rajiv Lau, Bedy; E, Choan; Le, Tien; Tam, Tiffany

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of concurrent weekly Cis-platinum chemoradiation (CRT) in the curative treatment of primary vaginal cancer. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all primary vaginal cancer patients treated with curative intent at the Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre between 1999 and 2004 using concurrent Cis-platinum CRT. Results: Twelve patients were treated with concurrent weekly CRT. The median age at diagnosis was 56 years (range, 34-69 years), and the median follow-up was 50 months (range, 11-75 months). Ten patients (83%) were diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma and 2 patients (17%) with adenocarcinoma. The distribution according to stage was as follows: 6 (50%) Stage II, 4 (33%) Stage III, and 2 (17%) Stage IVA. All patients received pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) concurrently with weekly intravenous Cis-platinum chemotherapy (40 mg/m{sup 2}) followed by brachytherapy (BT). The median dose of EBRT was 4500 cGy given in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Ten patients received interstitial BT, and 2 patients received intracavitary BT, with the median dose being 3000 cGy. The 5-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and locoregional progression-free survival rates were 66%, 75%, and 92%, respectively. Late toxicity requiring surgery occurred in 2 patients (17%). Conclusions: For the treatment of primary vaginal cancer, it is feasible to deliver concurrent weekly Cis-platinum chemotherapy with high-dose radiation, leading to excellent local control and an acceptable toxicity profile.

  9. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS & RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY TC; JOHNSON KI; DEIBLER JE; PILLI SP; RINKER MW; KARRI NK

    2007-02-14

    This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double-shell waste tanks (DSTs), which is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raised by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review of work performed on the double-shell tank farms and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system. The current buckling review focuses on the following tasks: (1) Evaluate the potential for progressive I-bolt failure and the appropriateness of the safety factors that were used for evaluating local and global buckling. The analysis will specifically answer the following questions: (a) Can the EH-22 scenario develop if the vacuum is limited to -6.6-inch water gage (w.g.) by a relief valve? (b) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario can develop? (c) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario cannot develop? (2) Develop influence functions to estimate the axial stresses in the primary tanks for all reasonable combinations of tank loads, based on detailed finite element analysis. The analysis must account for the variation in design details and operating conditions between the different DSTs. The analysis must also address the imperfection sensitivity of the primary tank to buckling. (3) Perform a detailed buckling analysis to determine the maximum allowable differential pressure for each of the DST primary tanks at the current specified limits on waste temperature, height, and specific gravity. Based on the I-bolt loads analysis and the small deformations that are predicted at the unfactored limits on vacuum and axial loads, it is very unlikely that the EH-22 scenario (i.e., progressive I-bolt failure leading to global

  10. Primary and secondary organics in tropical Amazonian rainforest aerosols: Chiral analysis of 2-methyltetrols

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Nelida; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Artaxo, Paulo; Guenther, Alex B.; Krejci, R.; Noziere, Barbara; Noone, Kevin

    2014-06-01

    This work presents the application of a newly developed method to facilitate the distinction between primary and secondary organic compounds in ambient aerosols based on their chiral analysis. The organic constituents chosen for chiral analysis are the four stereomers of the 2-methyltetrols, (2R,3S)- and (2S,3R)- methylerythritol and (2S,3S)- and (2R,3R)- methylthreitol. Ambient PM10 aerosol samples were collected between June 2008 and June 2009 near Manaus, Brazil, in a remote tropical rainforest environment of central Amazonia. The samples were analyzed for the presence of these four stereomers because qualitatively, in a previous study, they have been demonstrated to have partly primary origins. Thus the origin of these compounds may be primary and secondary from the biosynthesis and oxidation processes of isoprene within plants and also in the atmosphere. Using authentic standards, the quantified concentrations were in average 78.2 and 72.8 ng m-3 for (2R,3S)- and (2S,3R)- methylerythritol and 3.1 and 3.3 ng m-3 for (2S,3S)- and (2R,3R)- methylthreitol during the dry season and 7.1, 6.5, 2.0, and 2.2 ng m-3 during the wet season, respectively. Furthermore, these compounds were found to be outside the confidence interval for racemic mixtures (enantiomeric fraction, Ef = 0.5 -0.01) in nearly all the samples, with deviations of up to 32 % (Ef = 0.61) for (2R,3S)-methylerythritol and 47 % (Ef = 0.65) for (2S,3S)-methylthreitol indicating (99% confidence level) biologically-produced 2-methyltetrols. The minimum primary origin contribution ranged between 0.19 and 29.67 ng m-3 for the 2-methylerythritols and between 0.15 and 1.2 ng m-3 for the 2-methylthreitols. The strong correlation of the diatereomers (racemic 2-methylerythritol and 2-methylthreitol) in the wet season implied a secondary origin. Assuming the maximum secondary contribution in the dry season, the secondary fraction in the wet season was 81-99 % and in the dry season, 10 - 95 %. Nevertheless, from the

  11. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; et al

    2015-07-27

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9more » RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ~40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ~20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.« less

  12. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Marson, Alexander

    2015-07-27

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ~40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ~20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.

  13. Table A14. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row"," ","

  14. Table A30. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of" "Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," ","(million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," ","

  15. Table A33. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" " Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991 (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," ",,500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and

  16. Table A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel

  17. Effects of primary breakup modeling on spray and combustion characteristics of compression ignition engines

    SciTech Connect

    Som, S.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2010-06-15

    Injector flow dynamics and primary breakup processes are known to play a pivotal role in determining combustion and emissions in diesel engines. In the present study, we examine the effects of primary breakup modeling on the spray and combustion characteristics under diesel engine conditions. The commonly used KH model, which considers the aerodynamically induced breakup based on the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, is modified to include the effects of cavitation and turbulence generated inside the injector. The KH model and the new (KH-ACT) model are extensively evaluated by performing 3-D time-dependent simulations with detailed chemistry under diesel engine conditions. Results indicate that the inclusion of cavitation and turbulence enhances primary breakup, leading to smaller droplet sizes, decrease in liquid penetration, and increase in the radial dispersion of spray. Predictions are compared with measurements for non-evaporating and evaporating sprays, as well as with flame measurements. While both the models are able to reproduce the experimentally observed global spray and combustion characteristics, predictions using the KH-ACT model exhibit closer agreement with measurements in terms of liquid penetration, cone angle, spray axial velocity, and liquid mass distribution for non-evaporating sprays. Similarly, the KH-ACT model leads to better agreement with respect to the liquid length and vapor penetration distance for evaporating sprays, and with respect to the flame lift-off location for combusting sprays. The improved agreement is attributed to the ability of the new model to account for the effects of turbulence and cavitation generated inside the injector, which enhance the primary breakup. Results further indicate that the combustion under diesel engine conditions is characterized by a double-flame structure with a rich premixed reaction zone near the flame stabilization region and a non-premixed reaction zone further downstream. This flame structure is

  18. Primary beam steering due to field leakage from superconducting SHMS magnets

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Moore, Michael H.; Waidyawansa, Buddhini P.; Covrig, Silviu; Carlini, Roger; Benesch, Jay

    2014-11-05

    In this study, simulations of the magnetic fields from the Super High Momentum Spectrometer in Hall C at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility show significant field leakage into the region of the primary beam line between the target and the beam dump. Without mitigation, these remnant fields will steer the unscattered beam enough to limit beam operations at small scattering angles. Presented here are magnetic field simulations of the spectrometer magnets and a solution using optimal placement of a minimal amount of shielding iron around the beam line.

  19. Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary amino acid sequence

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pratul Kumar

    2011-07-19

    The present invention provides a method utilizing primary amino acid sequence of a protein, energy minimization, molecular dynamics and protein vibrational modes to predict three-dimensional structure of a protein. The present invention also determines possible intermediates in the protein folding pathway. The present invention has important applications to the design of novel drugs as well as protein engineering. The present invention predicts the three-dimensional structure of a protein independent of size of the protein, overcoming a significant limitation in the prior art.

  20. Proceedings: Primary water stress corrosion cracking: 1989 EPRI remedial measures workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, J.A. )

    1990-04-01

    A meeting on PWSCC Remedial Measures'' was organized to give those working in this area an opportunity to share their results, ideas and plans with regard to development and application of remedial measures directed against the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) phenomenon affecting alloy 600 steam generator tubes. Topics discussed included: utility experience and strategies; nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for PWSCC; technical topics ranging from predictive methods for occurrence of PWSCC to results of corrosion tests; and services provided by vendors that can help prevent the occurrence of PWSCC or can help address problems caused by PWSCC once it occurs.

  1. Photoelectrochemical protection of stainless alloys from the stress-corrosion cracking in BWR primary coolant environment

    SciTech Connect

    Akashi, Masatsune; Iso-o, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Nobuhiko; Fukuda, Takanori; Ayabe, Muneo; Hirano, Kenji

    1995-12-31

    The feasibility of counteracting or preventing the stress-corrosion cracking in the BWR core internals by the photoelectrochemical method has been examined. For the purpose TiO{sub 2} semiconductor is noted for its capability of photo electrochemically inducing the water-oxidizing anodic reaction in low enough potential domain if supplied with a light of a wavelength shorter than 410 nm. This paper offers an empirical proof by showing that Type 304 stainless steel and Alloy 600 stainless alloy that have been plasma-spray coated with TiO{sub 2} film will do quite well in environments of BWR primary coolant.

  2. 1987 EPRI workshop on mechanisms of primary water intergranular stress corrosion cracking: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, J.A.; Partridge, M.J.

    1988-09-01

    A meeting on ''Mechanisms of Primary Water IGSCC'' (PWSCC) was organized to give those working in this area an opportunity to share their results, ideas, and plans in regard to investigations of fundamental aspects of the PWSCC phenomenon affecting alloy 600 steam generator tubes. Topics discussed included: (1) General reviews of hydrogen embrittlement and film rupture - anodic dissolution mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking, (2) environmental factors involved in PWSCC, (3) the influence of microstructure on PWSCC, and (4) the influence of stress and plastic strain on PWSCC. A significant portion of the discussions of all of these topics was devoted to the subject of modelling of crack initiation and crack growth.

  3. Worldwide estimates and bibliography of net primary productivity derived from pre-1982 publications

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, G.; Lieth, H.F.H.; Scurlock, J.M.O.; Olson, R.J.

    1997-10-01

    An extensive compilation of more than 700 field estimates of net primary productivity of natural and agricultural ecosystems worldwide was synthesized in Germany in the 1970s and early 1980s. Although the Osnabrueck data set has not been updated since the 1980s, it represents a wealth of information for use in model development and validation. This report documents the development of this data set, its contents, and its recent availability on the Internet from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center for Biogeochemical Dynamics. Caution is advised in using these data, which necessarily include assumptions and conversions that may not be universally applicable to all sites.

  4. Primary arm spacing in chill block melt spun Ni-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, S.N.; Glasgow, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    Chill block melt spun ribbons of Ni-Mo binary alloys containing 8.0 to 41.8 wt % Mo have been prepared under carefully controlled processing conditions. The growth velocity has been determined as a function of distance from the quench surface from the observed ribbon thickness dependence on the melt puddle residence time. Primary arm spacings measured at the midribbon thickness locations show a dependence on growth velocity and alloy composition which is expected from dendritic growth models for binary alloys directionally solidified in a positive temperature gradient.

  5. FFTF primary heat transport system heating, ventilating and air conditioning system experience

    SciTech Connect

    Umek, A.M.; Hicks, D.F.; Schweiger, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    FFTF cools its primary/in-containment sodium equipment cells by means of a forced nitrogen cooling system which exchanges heat with a water-glycol system. The nitrogen cooling system is also used to maintain an inert gas atmosphere in the cells containing sodium equipment. Sodium Piping and Components have installed electrical resistance heaters to maintain a minimum sodium temperature and stainless steel jacketed mineral insulation to reduce heat loss. Design features and test results of a comprehensive redesign of the HVAC and insulation system required to support long-term nuclear operations are discussed.

  6. Thermal Analysis of the Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System Piping During the Gas Baking Process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Harvey, Karen; Ferrada, Juan J

    2011-02-01

    A preliminary analysis has been performed examining the temperature distribution in the Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System (PHTS) piping and the divertor itself during the gas baking process. During gas baking, it is required that the divertor reach a temperature of 350 C. Thermal losses in the piping and from the divertor itself require that the gas supply temperature be maintained above that temperature in order to ensure that all of the divertor components reach the required temperature. The analysis described in this report was conducted in order to estimate the required supply temperature from the gas heater.

  7. Photosynthesis: The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis and the Primary Quantum Conversion Act of Photosynthesis

    DOE R&D Accomplishments

    Calvin, Melvin

    1952-11-22

    This constitutes a review of the path of carbon in photosynthesis as it has been elaborated through the summer of 1952, with particular attention focused on those aspects of carbon metabolism and its variation which have led to some direct information regarding the primary quantum conversion act. An introduction to the arguments which have been adduced in support of the idea that chlorophyll is a physical sensitizer handing its excitation on to thioctic acid, a compound containing a strained 1, 2 -dithiolcyclopentane ring, is given.

  8. Description and performance of track and primary-vertex reconstruction with the CMS tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-10-16

    A description is provided of the software algorithms developed for the CMS tracker both for reconstructing charged-particle trajectories in proton-proton interactions and for using the resulting tracks to estimate the positions of the LHC luminous region and individual primary-interaction vertices. Despite the very hostile environment at the LHC, the performance obtained with these algorithms is found to be excellent. For tbar t events under typical 2011 pileup conditions, the average track-reconstruction efficiency for promptly-produced charged particles with transverse momenta of pT > 0.9GeV is 94% for pseudorapidities of |?| < 0.9 and 85% for 0.9 < |?| < 2.5. The inefficiency is caused mainly by hadrons that undergo nuclear interactions in the tracker material. For isolated muons, the corresponding efficiencies are essentially 100%. For isolated muons of pT = 100GeV emitted at |?| < 1.4, the resolutions are approximately 2.8% in pT, and respectively, 10?m and 30?m in the transverse and longitudinal impact parameters. The position resolution achieved for reconstructed primary vertices that correspond to interesting pp collisions is 1012?m in each of the three spatial dimensions. The tracking and vertexing software is fast and flexible, and easily adaptable to other functions, such as fast tracking for the trigger, or dedicated tracking for electrons that takes into account bremsstrahlung.

  9. ADAM15 expression is downregulated in melanoma metastasis compared to primary melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ungerer, Christopher; Doberstein, Kai; Boehm, Beate; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Mihic-Probst, Daniela; Gutwein, Paul

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Strong ADAM15 expression is found in normal melanocytes. {yields} ADAM15 expression is significantly downregulated in patients with melanoma metastasis. {yields} TGF-{beta} can downregulate ADAM15 expression in melanoma cells. {yields} Overexpression of ADAM15 in melanoma cells inhibits migration, proliferation and invasion of melanoma cells. {yields} Conclusion: ADAM15 represents an tumor suppressor protein in melanoma. -- Abstract: In a mouse melanoma metastasis model it has been recently shown that ADAM15 overexpression in melanoma cells significantly reduced the number of metastatic nodules on the lung. Unfortunately, the expression of ADAM15 in human melanoma tissue has not been determined so far. In our study, we characterized the expression of ADAM15 in tissue micro-arrays of patients with primary melanoma with melanoma metastasis. ADAM15 was expressed in melanocytes and endothelial cells of benign nevi and melanoma tissue. Importantly, ADAM15 was significantly downregulated in melanoma metastasis compared to primary melanoma. We further demonstrate that IFN-{gamma} and TGF-{beta} downregulate ADAM15 protein levels in melanoma cells. To investigate the role of ADAM15 in melanoma progression, we overexpressed ADAM15 in melanoma cells. Importantly, overexpression of ADAM15 in melanoma cells reduced the migration, invasion and the anchorage dependent and independent cell growth of melanoma cells. In summary, the downregulation of ADAM15 plays an important role in melanoma progression and ADAM15 act as a tumorsuppressor in melanoma.

  10. High-temperature electromagnetic filtration on the primary circuit of the Winfrith 100-MW nuclear plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bridle, D.A.; Bird, E.J.; Mitchell, C.R.

    1984-05-01

    This report details results of a program carried out by the UKAEA on the Winfrith SGHWR on the removal of particulate corrosion species from the primary coolant by high temperature magnetic filtration. The program has utilized a small fixed grid research filter (5 te h/sup -1/ flow) operating, on a once-through basis, directly on the primary coolant blowdown line. Activated corrosion products, containing in particular /sup 60/Co, are the dominant source which gives rise to occupational radiation exposure incurred in operating and maintaining most LWRs. The circulating crud in SGHWR is primarily hematite (..cap alpha..-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/) plus lesser amounts of magnetite (Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/) and carries with it about 50% of the total /sup 60/Co activity in circulation as particulates. Studies carried out as part of this program have optimized the filter operating variables in terms of flow rate, operating cycle, and backwash parameters for maximum filter efficiency. Data are presented on the filter performance for the major particulate corrosion products and associated nuclides together with particle size performance data at different flow rates. Additional studies have focussed on deposition rates before and after the magnetic filter on a range of LWR circuit materials. Deposited films have been characterized chemically and radiochemically and assessments made of the effect of magnetic separation on the physical structure and activity of such films.

  11. Autoignition response of n-butanol and its blend with primary reference fuel constituents of gasoline.

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Kumar, Kamal; Zhang, Yu; Sung, Chi -Jen; Pitz, William J.

    2015-04-13

    We study the influence of blending n-butanol on the ignition delay times of n-heptane and iso-octane, the primary reference fuels for gasoline. The ignition delay times are measured using a rapid compression machine, with an emphasis on the low-to-intermediate temperature conditions. The experiments are conducted at equivalence ratios of 0.4 and 1.0, for a compressed pressure of 20 bar, with the temperatures at the end of compression ranging from 613 K to 979 K. The effect of n-butanol addition on the development of the two-stage ignition characteristics for the two primary reference fuels is also examined. The experimental results aremore » compared to predictions obtained using a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism, which has been obtained by a systematic merger of previously reported base models for the combustion of the individual fuel constituents. In conclusion, a sensitivity analysis on the base, and the merged models, is also performed to understand the dependence of autoignition delay times on the model parameters.« less

  12. Large-eddy simulation of cavitating nozzle flow and primary jet break-up

    SciTech Connect

    Örley, F. Trummler, T.; Mihatsch, M. S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.; Hickel, S.

    2015-08-15

    We employ a barotropic two-phase/two-fluid model to study the primary break-up of cavitating liquid jets emanating from a rectangular nozzle, which resembles a high aspect-ratio slot flow. All components (i.e., gas, liquid, and vapor) are represented by a homogeneous mixture approach. The cavitating fluid model is based on a thermodynamic-equilibrium assumption. Compressibility of all phases enables full resolution of collapse-induced pressure wave dynamics. The thermodynamic model is embedded into an implicit large-eddy simulation (LES) environment. The considered configuration follows the general setup of a reference experiment and is a generic reproduction of a scaled-up fuel injector or control valve as found in an automotive engine. Due to the experimental conditions, it operates, however, at significantly lower pressures. LES results are compared to the experimental reference for validation. Three different operating points are studied, which differ in terms of the development of cavitation regions and the jet break-up characteristics. Observed differences between experimental and numerical data in some of the investigated cases can be caused by uncertainties in meeting nominal parameters by the experiment. The investigation reveals that three main mechanisms promote primary jet break-up: collapse-induced turbulent fluctuations near the outlet, entrainment of free gas into the nozzle, and collapse events inside the jet near the liquid-gas interface.

  13. Modeling and Simulation of the ITER First Wall/Blanket Primary Heat Transfer System

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, Alice; Popov, Emilian L

    2011-01-01

    ITER inductive power operation is modeled and simulated using a thermal-hydraulics system code (RELAP5) integrated with a 3-D CFD (SC-Tetra) code. The Primary Heat Transfer System (PHTS) functions are predicted together with the main parameters operational ranges. The control algorithm strategy and derivation are summarized as well. The First Wall and Blanket modules are the primary components of PHTS, used to remove the major part of the thermal heat from the plasma. The modules represent a set of flow channels in solid metal structure that serve to absorb the radiation heat and nuclear heating from the fusion reactions and to provide shield for the vacuum vessel. The blanket modules are water cooled. The cooling is forced convective with constant blanket inlet temperature and mass flow rate. Three independent water loops supply coolant to the three blanket sectors. The main equipment of each loop consists of a pump, a steam pressurizer and a heat exchanger. A major feature of ITER is the pulsed operation. The plasma does not burn continuously, but on intervals with large periods of no power between them. This specific feature causes design challenges to accommodate the thermal expansion of the coolant during the pulse period and requires active temperature control to maintain a constant blanket inlet temperature.

  14. Primary experimental results of wire-array Z-pinches on PTS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X. B. Zhou, S. T. Ren, X. D. Dan, J. K. Wang, K. L. Zhang, S. Q. Li, J. Xu, Q. Cai, H. C. Duan, S. C. Ouyang, K. Chen, G. H. Ji, C. Wang, M. Feng, S. P. Yang, L. B. Xie, W. P. Deng, J. J.

    2014-12-15

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a multiterawatt pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%-90%) current to a short circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. In this paper, primary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 14.4-26.4 mm, and consisting of 132∼276 tungsten wires with 5∼10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to determine the characteristics of x-ray radiations and to obtain self-emitting images of imploding plasmas. X-ray power up to 80 TW with ∼3 ns FWMH is achieved by using nested wire arrays. The total x-ray energy exceeds 500 kJ and the peak radiation temperature is about 150 eV. Typical velocity of imploding plasmas goes around 3∼5×10{sup 7} cm/s and the radial convergence ratio is between 10 and 20.

  15. Description and performance of track and primary-vertex reconstruction with the CMS tracker

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-10-16

    A description is provided of the software algorithms developed for the CMS tracker both for reconstructing charged-particle trajectories in proton-proton interactions and for using the resulting tracks to estimate the positions of the LHC luminous region and individual primary-interaction vertices. Despite the very hostile environment at the LHC, the performance obtained with these algorithms is found to be excellent. For tbar t events under typical 2011 pileup conditions, the average track-reconstruction efficiency for promptly-produced charged particles with transverse momenta of pT > 0.9GeV is 94% for pseudorapidities of |η| < 0.9 and 85% for 0.9 < |η| < 2.5. Themore » inefficiency is caused mainly by hadrons that undergo nuclear interactions in the tracker material. For isolated muons, the corresponding efficiencies are essentially 100%. For isolated muons of pT = 100GeV emitted at |η| < 1.4, the resolutions are approximately 2.8% in pT, and respectively, 10μm and 30μm in the transverse and longitudinal impact parameters. The position resolution achieved for reconstructed primary vertices that correspond to interesting pp collisions is 10–12μm in each of the three spatial dimensions. The tracking and vertexing software is fast and flexible, and easily adaptable to other functions, such as fast tracking for the trigger, or dedicated tracking for electrons that takes into account bremsstrahlung.« less

  16. Features of primary damage by high energy displacement cascades in concentrated Ni-based alloys

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Lu, Chenyang; Osetskiy, Yuri N.; Samolyuk, German D.; Caro, Alfredo; Wang, Lumin; Stoller, Roger E.

    2016-02-25

    Alloying of Ni with Fe or Co reduces primary damage production under ion irradiation. Similar results have been obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations of 1, 10, 20, and 40 keV collision cascades in Ni, NiFe, and NiCo. In all cases, a mix of imperfect stacking fault tetrahedra, faulted loops with a 1/3 {111} Burgers vector, and glissile interstitial loops with a 1/2 {110} Burgers vector were formed, along with small sessile point defect complexes and clusters. Primary damage reduction occurs by three mechanisms. First, Ni-Co, Ni-Fe, Co-Co, and Fe-Fe short-distance repulsive interactions are stiffer than Ni-Ni interactions, which leadmore » to a decrease in damage formation during the transition from the supersonic ballistic regime to the sonic regime. This largely controls final defect production. Second, alloying decreases thermal conductivity, leading to a longer thermal spike lifetime. The associated annealing reduces final damage production. These two mechanisms are especially important at cascades energies less than 40 keV. Third, at the higher energies, the production of large defect clusters by subcascades is inhibited in the alloys. A number of challenges and limitations pertaining to predictive atomistic modeling of alloys under high-energy particle irradiation are discussed.« less

  17. Displacement per Atom, Primary Knocked-on Atoms Produced in an Atomic Solid Target

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2015-07-01

    Version 00 DART calculates the total number of displacements, primary knocked-on atoms, recoil spectra, displacement cross sections and displacement per atoms rates in a poly atomic solid target, composed of many different isotopes, using ENDF/B-VI derived cross sections. To calculate these values, different incident particles were considered: neutrons, ions and electrons. The user needs only to specify an incident particle energy spectrum and the composition of the target. The number of displaced atoms is calculatedmore » within the Binary Collision Approximation framework. To calculate the number of displacements the DART code does not use the classical NRT dpa analytical formula, which is only appropriate for projectile and target of the same mass. It numerically solves the linearized Boltzmann equation for a polyatomic target. It can be a useful tool to select the nature and energy of ions or electrons in particle accelerators or electron microscopes to mimic the primary damage induced by neutron irradiation in nuclear plants or fission facilities. Nuclear data: • Typically any ENDFB format evaluation may be used. This package includes the ENDFB-VI nuclear data library. Energy ranges: • Neutron or ion : 10E-11 to 20 MeV Data library distributed with DART v1.0: • ENDFB-VI nuclear data library« less

  18. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS -TBACT- DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEMS SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    HAAS CC; KOVACH JL; KELLY SE; TURNER DA

    2010-06-24

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilizaiton Plant (WTP).

  19. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS (TBACT) DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEM SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY SE; HAASS CC; KOVACH JL; TURNER DA

    2010-06-03

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste throught the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  20. Y-12's second era grows

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    with the comments made in your letter, and you will be glad to know that Dr. Clarence Larson has been placed in charge of the overall stable isotopes program at Y-12. Both he and...

  1. One Direction: Researchers grow nanocircuitry with semiconducting...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Matthieu Fortin-Deschenes, Pierre L. Levesque, Kyle M. McElhinny, Gerald J. Brady, Richard Rojas Delgado, Susmit Singha Roy, Andrew Mannix, Max G. Lagally, Paul G....

  2. The Growing Web of Open Data

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Looking for energy data APIs? NREL has created a handy browser to help you find just what you're looking for.

  3. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Keith; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2015-01-01

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industrys projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantial investments.

  4. Bioproducts and biofuels … growing together!

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Muhtar Kent, Oct 2012 (KO earnings call) "The rest of our North America water business grew 4% in the quarter, led by Dasani which maintained its premium price position and saw ...

  5. Growing America's Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    on foreign oil and ensuring American prosperity while protecting the environment. ... Webinar Office of the Biomass Program Educational Opportunities in Bioenergy Intro ...

  6. Reliable Video Analysis Helps Security Company Grow

    SciTech Connect

    Meurer, Dave; Furgal, Dave; Hobson, Rick

    2014-10-24

    Armed Response Team (ART) has grown to become the largest locally owned security company in New Mexico. With technical assistance from Sandia National Laboratories through the New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) Program, ART got help so they could quickly bring workable video security solutions to market. By offering a reliable video analytic camera system, they’ve been able to reduce theft, add hundreds of clients, and increase their number of employees.

  7. The growing world LP-gas supply

    SciTech Connect

    Hoare, M.C.

    1988-11-01

    The possible range of future (LPG) export availabilities is huge, but actual production levels depend on factors, many of which are beyond our direct control - world demand for crude oil and gas, developments in technology, and the price of both energy in general and LPG specifically. Although these factors limit some of the potential developments, a substantial increase in LPG supply is certain, and this is likely to depress its price relative to other products. Over the last few years, a dramatic expansion has taken place in the industry. From 1980 to 1987, non-Communist world production of LPG increased by close to 35%, to a total of 115 million tonnes. If this is set against the general energy scene, LPG represented 3.7% of crude oil production by weight in 1980, rising to 5.4% in 1987. This growth reflects rise in consciousness around the world of the value of the product. LPG is no longer regarded as a byproduct, which is flared or disposed of at low value, but increasingly as a co-product, and much of the growth in production has been due to the installation of tailored recovery systems. LPG markets historically developed around sources of supply, constrained by the costs of transportation. The major exceptions, of course, were the Middle East, the large exporter, and Japan, the large importer.

  8. Growing from the Middle | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Companies here span a tremendous range of industries - from fitness clubs and real estate developers, to semiconductor device manufacturers and energy service providers....

  9. Engaging and Growing Small Contractor Businesses | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications Quality Control, Standardization of Upgrades, and Workforce Expectations Working with Condominium Owners and Associations Transitioning to a Utility ...

  10. Oil privatization growing: Peru poised for comeback

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-18

    Economic reform in Peru is transforming the oil and gas sector. Free market rationale is replacing the state monopoly mind-set. Foreign investment in oil, once discouraged by former administrations, is the response to new terms established by current government in its search for capital inflows to boost economic growth.

  11. Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Register for Biomass 2014 today and don’t miss your chance to take part in this important event that will help move the nation to a more secure, sustainable, and economically sound future.

  12. What Makes Clouds Form, Grow and Die?

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Based on these results, Hagos and his collaborators will next focus on cold pools and ... problems in combustion, climate modeling, fusion energy, materials science, physics, ...

  13. Northern Virginia Grows Local Energy Business

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    It didn’t take long for Kristan Castro to be convinced of the benefits of performing energy audits on homes and weatherizing them to improve their energy efficiency. He’s been in the remodeling business for about 13 years, but it wasn’t until this year that he decided to join a team that is saving Americans money and ultimately helping the environment in the D.C.-metro area.

  14. Final Report- Grow Solar Wisconsin Team

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Awardee: Midwest Renewable Energy AssociationLocation: Custer, WISubprogram: Soft CostsFunding Program: Rooftop Solar Challenge 1

  15. Bioproducts: Enabling Fielfuels and Growing the Bioeconomy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    may submit questions for the panel to Ashley Rose via notecards - We would like everyone to have the chance for their questions to be asked- this method allows us to ensure that we ...

  16. McElroy grows longwall production safely

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2009-05-15

    One of America's leading underground coal mines has successfully transitions to a two-panel mine. A second longwall face way installed by CONSOL Energy at the McElroy mine south of Moundsville, W.Va. as part of a $200 m upgrade some five years ago. The article describes this installation and the current operations. 3 photos.

  17. Plant Products a Growing Research Area

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    For every barrel of crude oil used in the United States, 16% goes toward making products ranging from everyday plastics to specialty chemicals in addition to making liquid fuels. From deli...

  18. With growing numbers of solar energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Pending SOLAR GLARE HAZARD ANALYSIS TOOL (SGHAT) TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY Figure 1. Glare from solar panels viewed from an air traffic control tower. Figure 2. Screen image of glare...

  19. Growing attraction of refuse-derived fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.

    1981-09-08

    A review of Dr. Andrew Porteous' book, Refuse Derived Fuels is presented. The escalating price of fossil fuel, particularily oil, together with the high cost of handling and transporting refuse makes the idea of refuse-derived fuel production an attractive and economic proposition. Refuse-derived fuel production is discussed and the various manufacturing processes in the UK and the USA are described. The pyrolysis of refuse for the production of gas, oil or heat and the production of methane and ethyl alcohol or other possibilities for refuse conversion.

  20. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Keith; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2014-10-18

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industry’s projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantial investments.

  1. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Otisco`

    DOEpatents

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-09-11

    A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.S. miyabeana named `Otisco`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 42% more woody biomass than one of its parents (`SX64`) and 33% more biomass than a current production cultivar (`SV1`). `Otisco` produced greater than 2.5-fold more stem biomass than two other current production cultivars, `SX67` and `SX61`. `Otisco` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Otisco` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.

  2. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Millbrook`

    DOEpatents

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P [Marcellus, NY; Kopp, Richard F [Marietta, NY; Smart, Lawrence B [Geneva, NY; Volk, Timothy A [Syracuse, NY

    2007-04-24

    A distinct female cultivar of Salix purpurea.times.Salix miyabeana named `Millbrook`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing 9% more woody biomass than one of its parents (`SX64`) and 2% more biomass than a current production cultivar (`SV1`). `Millbrook` produced greater than 2-fold more stem biomass than two other current production cultivars, `SX67` and `SX61`. `Millbrook` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Millbrook` displays a low incidence of rust disease.

  3. Fast-growing shrub willow named `Owasco`

    DOEpatents

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-07-03

    A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.Salix miyabeana named `Owasco`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 49% more woody biomass than one of its parents (`SX64`) and 39% more biomass than a current production cultivar (`SV1`). `Otisco` produced greater than 2.7-fold more stem biomass than two other current production cultivars, `SX67` and `SX61`. `Owasco` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Owasco` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.

  4. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Oneida`

    DOEpatents

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-05-01

    A distinct male cultivar of Salix purpurea.times.S. miyabeana named `Oneida`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing 2.7-times greater woody biomass than one of its parents (`SX67`) and greater than 36% more biomass than current production cultivars (`SV1` and `SX64`). `Oneida` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Oneida` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by beetles or sawflies.

  5. Natural Gas Pipeline Network: Changing and Growing

    Reports and Publications

    1996-01-01

    This chapter focuses upon the capabilities of the national natural gas pipeline network, examining how it has expanded during this decade and how it may expand further over the coming years. It also looks at some of the costs of this expansion, including the environmental costs which may be extensive. Changes in the network as a result of recent regional market shifts are also discussed.

  6. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Burrows, Keith; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2014-10-18

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industry’s projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantialmore » investments.« less

  7. Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    FB definition) 5 Thermo-chemical (F-T and similar processes) Woody Biomass, Municipal solid waste Green diesel, Green gasoline, Aviation Fuel, F-T waxes 6 Biochemical (Enzymatic ...

  8. Growing Significance of Renewable Energy (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Arvizu, D. E.

    2007-02-05

    Presentation on renewable energy innovations and policies by Dr. Dan Arvizu of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  9. Complex growing networks with intrinsic vertex fitness

    SciTech Connect

    Bedogne, C.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2006-10-15

    One of the major questions in complex network research is to identify the range of mechanisms by which a complex network can self organize into a scale-free state. In this paper we investigate the interplay between a fitness linking mechanism and both random and preferential attachment. In our models, each vertex is assigned a fitness x, drawn from a probability distribution {rho}(x). In Model A, at each time step a vertex is added and joined to an existing vertex, selected at random, with probability p and an edge is introduced between vertices with fitnesses x and y, with a rate f(x,y), with probability 1-p. Model B differs from Model A in that, with probability p, edges are added with preferential attachment rather than randomly. The analysis of Model A shows that, for every fixed fitness x, the network's degree distribution decays exponentially. In Model B we recover instead a power-law degree distribution whose exponent depends only on p, and we show how this result can be generalized. The properties of a number of particular networks are examined.

  10. Apparatus for growing a dendritic web

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Charles S.; Piotrowski, Paul A.; Skutch, Maria E.; McHugh, James P.

    1983-06-21

    A melt system including a susceptor-crucible assembly having improved gradient control when melt replenishment is used during dendritic web growth. The improvement lies in the formation of a thermal barrier in the base of the receptor which is in the form of a vertical slot in the region of the susceptor underlying the crucible at the location of a compartmental separator dividing the crucible into a growth compartment and a melt replenishment compartment. The result achieved is a step change in temperature gradient in the melt thereby providing a more uniform temperature in the growth compartment from which the dendritic web is drawn.

  11. Benefit of Consolidative Radiation Therapy for Primary Bone Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Randa; Allen, Pamela K.; Rodriguez, Alma; Shihadeh, Ferial; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Arzu, Isadora; Reed, Valerie K.; Oki, Yasuhiro; Westin, Jason R.; Fayad, Luis E.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Dabaja, Bouthaina

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Outcomes for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) differ according to the site of presentation. With effective chemotherapy, the need for consolidative radiation therapy (RT) is controversial. We investigated the influence of primary bone presentation and receipt of consolidative RT on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with DLBCL. Methods and Materials: We identified 102 patients with primary bone DLBCL treated consecutively from 1988 through 2013 and extracted clinical, pathologic, and treatment characteristics from the medical records. Survival outcomes were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, with factors affecting survival determined by log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done with a Cox regression model. Results: The median age was 55 years (range, 16-87 years). The most common site of presentation was in the long bones. Sixty-five patients (63%) received R-CHOP–based chemotherapy, and 74 (72%) received rituximab. RT was given to 67 patients (66%), 47 with stage I to II and 20 with stage III to IV disease. The median RT dose was 44 Gy (range, 24.5-50 Gy). At a median follow-up time of 82 months, the 5-year PFS and OS rates were 80% and 82%, respectively. Receipt of RT was associated with improved 5-year PFS (88% RT vs 63% no RT, P=.0069) and OS (91% vs 68%, P=.0064). On multivariate analysis, the addition of RT significantly improved PFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.14, P=.014) with a trend toward an OS benefit (HR=0.30, P=.053). No significant difference in PFS or OS was found between patients treated with 30 to 35 Gy versus ≥36 Gy (P=.71 PFS and P=.31 OS). Conclusion: Patients with primary bone lymphoma treated with standard chemotherapy followed by RT can have excellent outcomes. The use of consolidative RT was associated with significant benefits in both PFS and OS.

  12. Genetics and Common Disorders: Implications for Primary Care and Public Health Providers

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, Joseph D.; Greendale, Karen; Peay, Holly L.

    2005-06-01

    We developed this program for primary care providers (PCPs) and public health professionals (PHPs) who are interested in increasing their understanding of the genetics of common chronic diseases and of the implications of genetics and genomics for their fields. The program differs from virtually all previous educational efforts in genetics for health professionals in that it focuses on the genetics of common chronic disease and on the broad principles that emerge when one views disease from the perspectives of variation and individuality, which are at the heart of thinking genetically. The CD-ROM introduces users to content that will improve their understanding of topics such as: • A framework for genetics and common disease; • Basic information on genetics, genomics, genetic medicine, and public health genetics, all in the context of common chronic disease; • The status of research on genetic contributions to specific common diseases, including a review of research methods; • Genetic/environmental interaction as the new “central dogma” of public health genetics; • The importance of taking and analyzing a family history; • The likely impact of potential gene discovery and genetic testing on genetic counseling and risk assessment and on the practices of PCPs and PHPs; • Stratification of populations into low-, moderate-, and high-risk categories; • The potential role of PCPs and PHPs in identifying high-risk individuals and families, in providing limited genetics services, and in referring to clinical genetics specialists; the potential for standard referral algorithms; • Implications of genetic insights for diagnosis and treatment; • Ethical, legal, and social issues that arise from genetic testing for common chronic diseases; and • Specific prevention strategies based on understanding of genetics and genetic/ environmental interactions. The interactive content – developed by experts in genetics, primary care, and public health – is

  13. U.S. primary energy consumption by source and sector, 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    33 35 24 9 53 100 14 9 <1 91 28 72 23 4 1 92 3 5 44 39 7 11 76 1 9 1 26 37 13 22 petroleum 1 35.4 (36%) sector natural gas 2 28.3 (29%) coal 3 15.7 (16%) renewable energy 4 9.7 (10%) nuclear electric power 8.3 (9%) source percent of sources percent of sectors industrial 5 21.2 (22%) residential and commercial 6 10.6 (11%) electric power 7 38.2 (39%) 15 transportation 27.6 (28%) U.S. primary energy consumption by source and sector, 2015 Total = 97.7 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) 1

  14. Primary Side Power Flow Control of Wireless Power Transfer for Electric Vehicle Charging

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, John M; Onar, Omer C; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan

    2015-01-01

    Various noncontacting methods of plug-in electric vehicle charging are either under development or now deployed as aftermarket options in the light-duty automotive market. Wireless power transfer (WPT) is now the accepted term for wireless charging and is used synonymously for inductive power transfer and magnetic resonance coupling. WPT technology is in its infancy; standardization is lacking, especially on interoperability, center frequency selection, magnetic fringe field suppression, and the methods employed for power flow regulation. This paper proposes a new analysis concept for power flow in WPT in which the primary provides frequency selection and the tuned secondary, with its resemblance to a power transmission network having a reactive power voltage control, is analyzed as a transmission network. Analysis is supported with experimental data taken from Oak Ridge National Laboratory s WPT apparatus. This paper also provides an experimental evidence for frequency selection, fringe field assessment, and the need for low-latency communications in the feedback path.

  15. Energy conservation in the primary aluminum and chlor-alkali industries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    The primary aluminum and chlor-alkali industries together use nearly 13% of the electrical energy consumed by US industry. As part of its mission to promote energy conservation in basic US industries, the DOE surveys the present technological status of the major electrochemical industries and evaluates promising technological innovations that may lead to reduced energy requirements. This study provides technical and economic analyses in support of a government program of research and development in advanced electrolytic technology. This program is intended to supplement the development efforts directed toward energy savings by private industry. Sections II and III of this report cover aluminum and chlorine production processes only, since these two industries represent over 90% of the electrical energy requirements of all electrolytic industries in the United States. Section IV examines barriers to accelerated research and development by the electrolytic industries, and makes suggestions for government actions to overcome these barriers.

  16. Primary oil-shale resources of the Green River Formation in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Trudell, L.G.; Smith, J.W.; Beard, T.N.; Mason, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    Resources of potential oil in place in the Green River Formation are measured and estimated for the primary oil-shale resource area east of the Green River in Utah's Uinta Basin. The area evaluated (Ts 7-14 S, Rs 19-25 E) includes most of, and certainly the best of Utah's oil-shale resource. For resource evaluation the principal oil-shale section is divided into ten stratigraphic units which are equivalent to units previously evaluated in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado. Detailed evaluation of individual oil-shale units sampled by cores, plus estimates by extrapolation into uncored areas indicate a total resource of 214 billion barrels of shale oil in place in the eastern Uinta Basin.

  17. Distributed Hierarchical Control of Multi-Area Power Systems with Improved Primary Frequency Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Jianming; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Du, Pengwei; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

    2012-12-12

    The conventional distributed hierarchical control architecture for multi-area power systems is revisited. In this paper, a new distributed hierarchical control architecture is proposed. In the proposed architecture, pilot generators are selected in each area to be equipped with decentralized robust control as a supplementary to the conventional droop speed control. With the improved primary frequency control, the system frequency can be restored to the nominal value without the help of secondary frequency control, which reduces the burden of the automatic generation control for frequency restoration. Moreover, the low frequency inter-area electromechanical oscillations can also be effectively damped. The effectiveness of the proposed distributed hierarchical control architecture is validated through detailed simulations.

  18. Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Coolant Leak Events Caused by Thermal Fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Atwood; V. N. Shah; W. J. Galyean

    1999-09-01

    We present statistical analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary coolant leak events caused by thermal fatigue, and discuss their safety significance. Our worldwide data contain 13 leak events (through-wall cracking) in 3509 reactor-years, all in stainless steel piping with diameter less than 25 cm. Several types of data analysis show that the frequency of leak events (events per reactor-year) is increasing with plant age, and the increase is statistically significant. When an exponential trend model is assumed, the leak frequency is estimated to double every 8 years of reactor age, although this result should not be extrapolated to plants much older than 25 years. Difficulties in arresting this increase include lack of quantitative understanding of the phenomena causing thermal fatigue, lack of understanding of crack growth, and difficulty in detecting existing cracks.

  19. Primary Energy Efficiency Analysis of Different Separate Sensible and Latent Cooling Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Separate Sensible and Latent cooling (SSLC) has been discussed in open literature as means to improve air conditioning system efficiency. The main benefit of SSLC is that it enables heat source optimization for the different forms of loads, sensible vs. latent, and as such maximizes the cycle efficiency. In this paper I use a thermodynamic analysis tool in order to analyse the performance of various SSLC technologies including: multi-evaporators two stage compression system, vapour compression system with heat activated desiccant dehumidification, and integrated vapour compression with desiccant dehumidification. A primary coefficient of performance is defined and used to judge the performance of the different SSLC technologies at the design conditions. Results showed the trade-off in performance for different sensible heat factor and regeneration temperatures.

  20. RELAP5 Model of the Vacuum Vessel Primary Heat Transfer System

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan J; Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Kim, Seokho H

    2010-07-01

    This report describes the RELAP5 models that have been developed for the Vacuum Vessel (VV) Primary Heat Transfer System (PHTS). The models are intended to be used to examine the transient performance of the VV PHTS, and evaluate control schemes necessary to maintain parameters within acceptable limits during transients. Some preliminary results are presented to show the maturity of the models and to examine general VV PHTS transient behavior. The models can be used as a starting point to develop transient modeling capability in several directions including control system modeling, safety evaluations, etc, and are not intended to represent the final VV PHTS design. Preliminary calculations using the models indicate that during normal pulsed operation, heat exchanger control may not be necessary, and that temperatures within the vacuum vessel during decay heat operation remain low.

  1. Critical analysis of alloy 600 stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in primary water

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, R. |; Noel, D.; Bouvier, O. de; Magnin, T.

    1995-04-01

    In order to study the mechanisms involved in the stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of Alloy 600 in primary water, the influence of the relevance of physicochemical and metallurgical parameters was assessed: hydrogen and oxygen overpressures, microstructure, and local chemical composition. The obtained results show that, even if the dissolution/oxidation seems to be the first and necessary step responsible for crack initiation and if hydrogen effects can also be involved in cracking, neither a dissolution/oxidation model nor a hydrogen model appears sufficient to account for cracking. Moreover, fractographic examinations performed on specimens` fracture surfaces lead to the fact that attention should be paid to a cleavage like microcracking mechanism involving interactions between corrosion and plasticity at the vicinity of grain boundaries. A corrosion-enhanced plasticity model is proposed to describe the intergranular and transgranular cracking in Alloy 600.

  2. A simple primary amide for the selective recovery of gold from secondary resources

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Doidge, Euan D.; Carson, Innis; Tasker, Peter A.; Ellis, Ross J.; Morrison, Carole A.; Love, Jason B.

    2016-08-24

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) such as mobile phones contains a plethora of metals of which gold is by far the most valuable. Herein a simple primary amide is described that achieves the selective separation of gold from a mixture of metals typically found in mobile phones by extraction into toluene from an aqueous HCl solution; unlike current processes, reverse phase transfer is achieved simply using water. Phase transfer occurs by dynamic assembly of protonated and neutral amides with [AuCl4]– ions through hydrogen bonding in the organic phase, as shown by EXAFS, mass spectrometry measurements, and computational calculations, andmore » supported by distribution coefficient analysis. In conclusion, the fundamental chemical understanding gained herein should be integral to the development of metal-recovery processes, in particular through the use of dynamic assembly processes to build complexity from simplicity.« less

  3. Cooperative Research and Development of Primary Surface Recuperator for Advanced Microturbine Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Escola, George

    2007-01-17

    Recuperators have been identified as key components of advanced gas turbines systems that achieve a measure of improvement in operating efficiency and lead the field in achieving very low emissions. Every gas turbine manufacturer that is studying, developing, or commercializing advanced recuperated gas turbine cycles requests that recuperators operate at higher temperature without a reduction in design life and must cost less. The Solar Cooperative Research and Development of Primary Surface Recuperator for Advanced Microturbine Systems Program is directed towards meeting the future requirements of advanced gas turbine systems by the following: (1) The development of advanced alloys that will allow recuperator inlet exhaust gas temperatures to increase without significant cost increase. (2) Further characterization of the creep and oxidation (dry and humid air) properties of nickel alloy foils (less than 0.13 mm thick) to allow the economical use of these materials. (3) Increasing the use of advanced robotic systems and advanced in-process statistical measurement systems.

  4. Primary-Side Power Flow Control of Wireless Power Transfer for Electric Vehicle Charging

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, John M.; Onar, Omer C.; Chinthavali, Madhu

    2014-12-22

    Various noncontacting methods of plug-in electric vehicle charging are either under development or now deployed as aftermarket options in the light-duty automotive market. Wireless power transfer (WPT) is now the accepted term for wireless charging and is used synonymously for inductive power transfer and magnetic resonance coupling. WPT technology is in its infancy; standardization is lacking, especially on interoperability, center frequency selection, magnetic fringe field suppression, and the methods employed for power flow regulation. This paper proposes a new analysis concept for power flow in WPT in which the primary provides frequency selection and the tuned secondary, with its resemblance to a power transmission network having a reactive power voltage control, is analyzed as a transmission network. Analysis is supported with experimental data taken from Oak Ridge National Laboratory s WPT apparatus. Lastly, this paper also provides an experimental evidence for frequency selection, fringe field assessment, and the need for low-latency communications in the feedback path.

  5. CPEB1 modulates lipopolysaccharide-mediated iNOS induction in rat primary astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki Chan; Hyun Joo, So; Shin, Chan Young

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} Expression and phosphorylation of CPEB1 is increased by LPS stimulation in rat primary astrocytes. {yields} JNK regulates expression and phosphorylation of CPEB1 in reactive astrocytes. {yields} Down-regulation of CPEB1 using siRNA inhibits oxidative stress and iNOS induction by LPS stimulation. {yields} CPEB1 may play an important role in regulating inflammatory responses in reactive astrocytes induced by LPS. -- Abstract: Upon CNS damage, astrocytes undergo a series of biological changes including increased proliferation, production of inflammatory mediators and morphological changes, in a response collectively called reactive gliosis. This process is an essential part of the brains response to injury, yet much is unknown about the molecular mechanism(s) that induce these changes. In this study, we investigated the role of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 1 (CPEB1) in the regulation of inflammatory responses in a model of reactive gliosis, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated astrocytes. CPEB1 is an mRNA-binding protein recently shown to be expressed in astrocytes that may play a role in astrocytes migration. After LPS stimulation, the expression and phosphorylation of CPEB1 was increased in rat primary astrocytes in a JNK-dependent process. siRNA-induced knockdown of CPEB1 expression inhibited the LPS-induced up-regulation of iNOS as well as NO and ROS production, a hallmark of immunological activation of astrocytes. The results from the study suggest that CPEB1 is actively involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses in astrocytes, which might provide new insights into the regulatory mechanism after brain injury.

  6. Oatp-associated uptake and toxicity of microcystins in primary murine whole brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Feurstein, D.; Holst, K.; Fischer, A.; Dietrich, D.R.

    2009-01-15

    Microcystins (MCs) are naturally occurring cyclic heptapeptides that exhibit hepato-, nephro- and possibly neurotoxic effects in mammals. Organic anion transporting polypeptides (rodent Oatp/human OATP) appear to be specifically required for active uptake of MCs into hepatocytes and kidney epithelial cells. Based on symptoms of neurotoxicity in MC-intoxicated patients and the presence of Oatp/OATP at the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal-fluid-barrier (BCFB) it is hypothesized that MCs can be transported across the BBB/BCFB in an Oatp/OATP-dependent manner and can induce toxicity in brain cells via inhibition of protein phosphatase (PP). To test these hypotheses, the presence of murine Oatp (mOatp) in primary murine whole brain cells (mWBC) was investigated at the mRNA and protein level. MC transport was tested by exposing mWBCs to three different MC-congeners (MC-LR, -LW, -LF) with/without co-incubation with the OATP/Oatp-substrates taurocholate (TC) and bromosulfophthalein (BSP). Uptake of MCs and cytotoxicity was demonstrated via MC-Western blot analysis, immunocytochemistry, cell viability and PP inhibition assays. All MC congeners bound covalently and inhibited mWBC PP. MC-LF was the most cytotoxic congener followed by -LW and -LR. The lowest toxin concentration significantly reducing mWBC viability after 48 h exposure was 400 nM (MC-LF). Uptake of MCs into mWBCs was inhibited via co-incubation with excess TC (50 and 500 {mu}M) and BSP (50 {mu}M). MC-Western blot analysis demonstrated a concentration-dependent accumulation of MCs. In conclusion, the in vitro data support the assumed MC-congener-dependent uptake in a mOatp-associated manner and cytotoxicity of MCs in primary murine whole brain cells.

  7. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Primary Reference Fuels for Diesel Cetane Number and Spark-Ignition Octane Number

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

    2010-03-03

    For the first time, a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed for primary reference fuel mixtures of n-hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane for diesel cetane ratings. The mechanisms are constructed using existing rules for reaction pathways and rate expressions developed previously for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, n-heptane and iso-octane. These reaction mechanisms are validated by comparisons between computed and experimental results for shock tube ignition and for oxidation under jet-stirred reactor conditions. The combined kinetic reaction mechanism contains the submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for diesel cetane ratings and submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, all in one integrated large kinetic reaction mechanism. Representative applications of this mechanism to two test problems are presented, one describing fuel/air autoignition variations with changes in fuel cetane numbers, and the other describing fuel combustion in a jet-stirred reactor environment with the fuel varying from pure 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane (Cetane number of 15) to pure n-hexadecane (Cetane number of 100). The final reaction mechanism for the primary reference fuels for diesel fuel and gasoline is available on the web.

  8. Modern Radiation Therapy for Primary Cutaneous Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, Lena; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Illidge, Tim; Wilson, Lynn D.; Hoppe, Richard T.

    2015-05-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases. They often remain localized, and they generally have a more indolent course and a better prognosis than lymphomas in other locations. They are highly radiosensitive, and radiation therapy is an important part of the treatment, either as the sole treatment or as part of a multimodality approach. Radiation therapy of primary cutaneous lymphomas requires the use of special techniques that form the focus of these guidelines. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group steering committee on the use of radiation therapy in primary cutaneous lymphomas in the modern era.

  9. The influence of dissolved hydrogen on primary water stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 at PWR steam generator operating temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Jacko, R.J.; Economy, G.; Pement, F.W.

    1992-12-31

    PWR primary coolant chemistry uses an intentional dissolved hydrogen concentration of 20 to 50 ml (STP)/kg of water to effect a net suppression of oxygen-producing radiolysis, to minimize corrosion in primary loop materials and to maintain a low redox potential. Speculation has attended a possible influence of dissolved hydrogen on the kinetics of initiation of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) behavior of Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. Three series of experiments are presented for conditions in which the level of dissolved hydrogen was intentionally varied over the hydrogen and temperature ranges of interest for steam generator operation. No significant effect of dissolved hydrogen was found on PWSCC of Alloy 600.

  10. Structural, electronic and optical properties of well-known primary explosive: Mercury fulminate

    SciTech Connect

    Yedukondalu, N.; Vaitheeswaran, G.

    2015-11-28

    Mercury Fulminate (MF) is one of the well-known primary explosives since 17th century and it has rendered invaluable service over many years. However, the correct molecular and crystal structures are determined recently after 300 years of its discovery. In the present study, we report pressure dependent structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of MF. Non-local correction methods have been employed to capture the weak van der Waals interactions in layered and molecular energetic MF. Among the non-local correction methods tested, optB88-vdW method works well for the investigated compound. The obtained equilibrium bulk modulus reveals that MF is softer than the well known primary explosives Silver Fulminate (SF), silver azide and lead azide. MF exhibits anisotropic compressibility (b > a > c) under pressure, consequently the corresponding elastic moduli decrease in the following order: C{sub 22} > C{sub 11} > C{sub 33}. The structural and mechanical properties suggest that MF is more sensitive to detonate along c-axis (similar to RDX) due to high compressibility of Hg⋯O non-bonded interactions along that axis. Electronic structure and optical properties were calculated including spin-orbit (SO) interactions using full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within recently developed Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential. The calculated TB-mBJ electronic structures of SF and MF show that these compounds are indirect bandgap insulators. Also, SO coupling is found to be more pronounced for 4d and 5d-states of Ag and Hg atoms of SF and MF, respectively. Partial density of states and electron charge density maps were used to describe the nature of chemical bonding. Ag—C bond is more directional than Hg—C bond which makes SF to be more unstable than MF. The effect of SO coupling on optical properties has also been studied and found to be significant for both (SF and MF) of the compounds.

  11. Belgian experience in applying the {open_quotes}leak-before-break{close_quotes} concept to the primary loop piping

    SciTech Connect

    Gerard, R.; Malekian, C.; Meessen, O.

    1997-04-01

    The Leak Before Break (LBB) concept allows to eliminate from the design basis the double-ended guillotine break of the primary loop piping, provided it can be demonstrated by a fracture mechanics analysis that a through-wall flaw, of a size giving rise to a leakage still well detectable by the plant leak detection systems, remains stable even under accident conditions (including the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE)). This concept was successfully applied to the primary loop piping of several Belgian Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) units, operated by the Utility Electrabel. One of the main benefits is to permit justification of supports in the primary loop and justification of the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel and internals in case of a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in stretch-out conditions. For two of the Belgian PWR units, the LBB approach also made it possible to reduce the number of large hydraulic snubbers installed on the primary coolant pumps. Last but not least, the LBB concept also facilitates the steam generator replacement operations, by eliminating the need for some pipe whip restraints located close to the steam generator. In addition to the U.S. regulatory requirements, the Belgian safety authorities impose additional requirements which are described in details in a separate paper. An novel aspect of the studies performed in Belgium is the way in which residual loads in the primary loop are taken into account. Such loads may result from displacements imposed to close the primary loop in a steam generator replacement operation, especially when it is performed using the {open_quote}two cuts{close_quotes} technique. The influence of such residual loads on the LBB margins is discussed in details and typical results are presented.

  12. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Extent Of The Primary Groundwater Contaminants At The Y-12 National Security Complex

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-01

    This report presents data summary tables and maps used to define and illustrate the approximate lateral extent of groundwater contamination at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The data tables and maps address the primary (i.e., most widespread and mobile) organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in the groundwater. The sampling locations, calculated contaminant concentrations, plume boundary values, and paired map format used to define, quantify, delineate, and illustrate the approximate extent of the primary organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in groundwater at Y-12 are described.

  13. Oil Production by a Consortium of Oleaginous Microorganisms grown on primary effluent wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Jacqueline; Hetrick, Mary; French, Todd; Hernandez, Rafael; Donaldson, Janet; Mondala, Andro; Holmes, William

    2011-01-01

    Municipal wastewater could be a potential growth medium that has not been considered for cultivating oleaginous microorganisms. This study is designed to determine if a consortium of oleaginous microorganism can successfully compete for carbon and other nutrients with the indigenous microorganisms contained in primary effluent wastewater. RESULTS: The oleaginous consortium inoculated with indigenous microorganisms reached stationary phase within 24 h, reaching a maximum cell concentration of 0.58 g L -1. Water quality post-oleaginous consortium growth reached a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of approximately 81%, supporting the consumption of the glucose within 8 h. The oleaginous consortium increased the amount of oil produced per gram by 13% compared with indigenous microorganisms in raw wastewater. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) results show a substantial population increase in bacteria within the first 24 h when the consortium is inoculated into raw wastewater. This result, along with the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) results, suggests that conditions tested were not sufficient for the oleaginous consortium to compete with the indigenous microorganisms.

  14. Periostin differentially induces proliferation, contraction and apoptosis of primary Dupuytren's disease and adjacent palmar fascia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vi, Linda; Feng, Lucy; Zhu, Rebecca D.; Wu, Yan; Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario ; Satish, Latha; Gan, Bing Siang; Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario; Department of Surgery, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario; Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario ; O'Gorman, David B.

    2009-12-10

    Dupuytren's disease, (DD), is a fibroproliferative condition of the palmar fascia in the hand, typically resulting in permanent contracture of one or more fingers. This fibromatosis is similar to scarring and other fibroses in displaying excess collagen secretion and contractile myofibroblast differentiation. In this report we expand on previous data demonstrating that POSTN mRNA, which encodes the extra-cellular matrix protein periostin, is up-regulated in Dupuytren's disease cord tissue relative to phenotypically normal palmar fascia. We demonstrate that the protein product of POSTN, periostin, is abundant in Dupuytren's disease cord tissue while little or no periostin immunoreactivity is evident in patient-matched control tissues. The relevance of periostin up-regulation in DD was assessed in primary cultures of cells derived from diseased and phenotypically unaffected palmar fascia from the same patients. These cells were grown in type-1 collagen-enriched culture conditions with or without periostin addition to more closely replicate the in vivo environment. Periostin was found to differentially regulate the apoptosis, proliferation, {alpha} smooth muscle actin expression and stressed Fibroblast Populated Collagen Lattice contraction of these cell types. We hypothesize that periostin, secreted by disease cord myofibroblasts into the extra-cellular matrix, promotes the transition of resident fibroblasts in the palmar fascia toward a myofibroblast phenotype, thereby promoting disease progression.

  15. Preozonation of primary-treated municipal wastewater for reuse in biofuel feedstock generation

    SciTech Connect

    Mondala, Andro H.; Hernandez, Rafael; French, W. Todd; Estévez, L. Antonio; Meckes, Mark; Trillo, Marlene; Hall, Jacqueline

    2010-11-09

    The results of a laboratory scale investigation on ozone pretreatment of primary-treated municipal wastewater for potential reuse in fermentation processes for the production of biofuels and bio-based feedstock chemicals were presented. Semi-batch preozonation with 3.0% (w/w) ozone at 1 L min -1 resulted into a considerable inactivation of the indigenous heterotrophic bacteria in the wastewater with less than 0.0002% comprising the ozone-resistant fraction of the microbial population. The disinfection process was modeled using first-order inactivation kinetics with a rate constant of 4.39 10 -3 s -1. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) levels were reduced by 30% in 1-h experiments. COD depletion was also modeled using a pseudo-first-order kinetics at a rate constant of 9.50 10 -5 s -1. Biological oxygen demand (BOD 5) values were reduced by 60% up to 20 min of ozonation followed by a plateau and some slight increases attributed to partial oxidation of recalcitrant materials. Ozone also had no substantial effect on the concentration of ammonium and phosphate ions, which are essential for microbial growth and metabolism. Preliminary tests indicated that oleaginous microorganisms could be cultivated in the ozonated wastewater, resulting in relatively higher cell densities than in raw wastewater and comparable results with autoclave-sterilized wastewater. This process could potentially produce significant quantities of oil for biofuel production from municipal wastewater streams.

  16. Health risks associated with residence near a primary copper smelter: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Mattson, M.E.; Guidotti, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    Mortality for three groups of ICD codes covering acute, chronic, and malignant respiratory diseases were studied for adult white women in communities near or adjacent to primary copper smelting facilities in the United States between 1968 and 1975, a period when women had not as yet entered the industrial work force. A previous comprehensive survey, sponsored by the EPA, of all U.S. counties used multiple regression analysis as a method of statistical surveillance to assess the association of mortality with industrial activity. This preliminary study suggested an excess mortality from nonmalignant respiratory diseases in copper mining and smelting counties. We directly examined town mortality rates for white female residents, aged 35 to 74, in eight U.S. copper smelting communities and compared them to demographically and geographically matched communities without industries likely to produce significant air pollution, using death certificates obtained from state sources. Site-specific air quality data were also obtained for these communities. Our direct examination of community death rates for copper smelting towns confirmed the preliminary observation at the county level of an excess risk from acute respiratory diseases but did not detect evidence of an elevated mortality from chronic respiratory diseases or cancer of the respiratory tract.

  17. Criteria for optimization of recycling processes of primary and secondary copper

    SciTech Connect

    Dusts, S.; Piret, N.L.

    1995-12-31

    Primary and secondary copper smelting dusts are being generated in varying quantities with very dissimilar characteristics due to the different compositions of feed materials and the type of process utilized. After categorizing the multitude of dust types, the criteria for on-site and off-site recycling of smelter dust in terms of type and concentrations of the accompanying elements are established. Thereby, consideration is given to the important aspects of: optimization of copper recovery; quality of copper product; valorization of accompanying elements; elimination and disposal of deleterious impurities; minimization of impact on operation; effects on operating costs; and environmental impacts of dust treatment on overall process. Existing commercial, emerging and proposed copper smelting dusts, pyrometallurgical as well as hydrometallurgical, treatment schemes are reviewed and evaluated technically, economically and environmentally in an attempt to streamline the vast number of proposed options. Thereby, the high selectivity achievable in hydrometallurgical dust processing due to it being complementary to the smelting process, is expected to be given increased consideration. 81 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. Assessment of Field Experience Related to Pressurized Water Reactor Primary System Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    A. G. Ware; C. Hsu; C. L. Atwood; M. B. Sattison; R. S. Hartley; V. N. Shah

    1999-02-01

    This paper presents our assessment of field experience related to pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary system leaks in terms of their number and rates, how aging affects frequency of leak events, the safety significance of such leaks, industry efforts to reduce leaks, and effectiveness of current leak detection systems. We have reviewed the licensee event reports to identify the events that took place during 1985 to the third quarter of 1996, and reviewed related technical literature and visited PWR plants to analyze these events. Our assessment shows that USNRC licensees have taken effective actions to reduce the number of leak events. One main reason for this decreasing trend was the elimination or reportable leakages from valve stem packing after 1991. Our review of leak events related to vibratory fatigue reveals a statistically significant decreasing trend with age (years of operation), but not in calendar time. Our assessment of worldwide data on leakage caused by thermal fatigue cracking is that the fatigue of aging piping is a safety significant issue. Our review of leak events has identified several susceptible sites in piping having high safety significance; but the inspection of some of these sites is not required by the ASME Code. These sites may be included in the risk-informed inspection programs.

  19. Assessment of Field Experience Related to Pressurized Water Reactor Primary System Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Vikram Naginbhai; Ware, Arthur Gates; Atwood, Corwin Lee; Sattison, Martin Blaine; Hartley, Robert Scott; Hsu, C.

    1999-08-01

    This paper presents our assessment of field experience related to pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary system leaks in terms of their number of rates, how aging affects frequency of leak events, the safety significance of such leaks, industry efforts to reduce leaks, and effectiveness of current leak detection systems. We have reviewed the licensee event reports to identify the events that took place during 1985 to the third quarter of 1996, and reviewed related technical literature and visited PWR plants to analyze these events. Our assessment shows that USNRC licensees have taken effective actions to reduce the number of leak events. One main reason for this decreasing trend was the elimination or reportable leakages from valve stem packing after 1991. Our review of leak events related to vibratory fatigue reveals a statistically significant decreasing trend with age (years of operation), but not in calendar time. Our assessment of worldwide data on leakage caused by thermal fatigue cracking is that the fatigue of aging piping is a safety significant issue. Our review of leak events has identified several susceptible sites in piping having high safety significance; but the inspection of some of these sites is not required by the ASME Code. These sites may be included in the risk-informed inspection programs.

  20. 43-kilodalton protein of Torpedo nicotinic postsynaptic membranes: purification and determination of primary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C.; McCourt, D.; Cohen, J.B.

    1987-11-03

    The primary structure of the 43-kilodalton peripheral membrane protein (43-kDa protein) of Torpedo nicotinic postsynaptic membrane has been determined. The /sup 14/C-labelled 43-kDa protein, which was isolated by preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, has an amino terminus resistant to Edman degradation, while the sequence at the carboxyl terminus is Tyr-Val. An amino acid sequence of 405 residues was obtained by NH/sub 2/-terminal sequence analysis of complementary peptides generated by digestion with trypsin, chymotrypsin, Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, and endoproteinase Lys-C, as well as by chemical cleavage at methionine. This sequence of molecular mass 45,618 daltons lacks the amino terminus but extends to the carboxyl terminus of the 43-kDa protein. Unusual structural features of the 43-kDa protein include two regions of approx. 80 residues, each containing 10% cysteine, as well as stretches predicted to exist as amphipathic ..cap alpha..-helices. Other than the group blocking the amino terminus, no evidence was found for posttranslational modification of amino acids. The 43-kDa protein may represent a novel protein family because a computer search of this sequence with the National Biomedical Research Foundation data base (Release 12.0) did not reveal any significant homology to known protein sequences.

  1. Atomic Scale Modelling of the Primary Damage State of Irradiated UO{sub 2} Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Van Brutzel, Laurent

    2008-07-01

    Large scale classical molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to study the primary damage state due to a-decay self irradiation in UO{sub 2} matrix. Simulations of energetic displacement cascades up to the realistic energy of the recoil nucleus at 80 keV provide new informations on defect production, their spatial distribution and their clustering. The discrepancy with the classical linear theory NRT (Norton-Robinson-Torrens) law on the creation of the number of point defects is discussed. Study of cascade overlap sequence shows a saturation of the number of point defects created as the dose increases. Toward the end of the overlap sequence, large stable clusters of vacancies are observed. The values of athermal diffusion coefficients coming from the ballistic collisions and the additional point defects created during the cascades are estimated from these simulations to be, in all the cases, less than 10-26 m{sup 2}/s. Finally, the influence of a grain boundary of type Sigma 5 is analysed. It has been found that the energy of the cascades are dissipated along the interface and that most of the point defects are created at the grain boundary. (authors)

  2. Review of Failure Probability Calculations for HFIR Primary Coolant System Piping

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, Fredric A.

    2001-10-31

    During July 2001, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was requested by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Facilities Management, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology, Germantown, Maryland, to review calculations of piping failure probabilities for the High Flux Test Reactor (HFIR) located at and operated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of the failure probability calculations was to estimate the probabilities of large leaks (>1500 gpm) that are of sufficient size to disable the primary coolant system of HFIR to the extent that there is a potential for core damage. PNNL reviewed the computational methods and the inputs to the calculations along with an evaluation of potential failure mechanisms not explicitly addressed by the ORNL calculations. The review concluded that the calculated failure probabilities even with consideration of uncertainties in the calculations and of other potential failure mechanisms provide a high level of confidence that failure frequencies are less than the stated goal of 10-6 piping failures per year.

  3. Primary-Side Power Flow Control of Wireless Power Transfer for Electric Vehicle Charging

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Miller, John M.; Onar, Omer C.; Chinthavali, Madhu

    2014-12-22

    Various noncontacting methods of plug-in electric vehicle charging are either under development or now deployed as aftermarket options in the light-duty automotive market. Wireless power transfer (WPT) is now the accepted term for wireless charging and is used synonymously for inductive power transfer and magnetic resonance coupling. WPT technology is in its infancy; standardization is lacking, especially on interoperability, center frequency selection, magnetic fringe field suppression, and the methods employed for power flow regulation. This paper proposes a new analysis concept for power flow in WPT in which the primary provides frequency selection and the tuned secondary, with its resemblancemore » to a power transmission network having a reactive power voltage control, is analyzed as a transmission network. Analysis is supported with experimental data taken from Oak Ridge National Laboratory s WPT apparatus. Lastly, this paper also provides an experimental evidence for frequency selection, fringe field assessment, and the need for low-latency communications in the feedback path.« less

  4. Effects of molybdenum and silver on iodine transport in primary circuit on severe nuclear accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Kalilainen, J.; Rantanen, P.; Karkela, T.; Lipponen, M.; Auvinen, A.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2012-07-01

    This experimental study was a continuation of the study conducted at VTT to investigate the effects of reactions on primary circuit surfaces to transport of gaseous and aerosol phase iodine during the hypothetical severe nuclear accident. Cesium iodide was used as a precursor in every experiment. In the experiments it was observed that the hydrogen in the atmosphere decreased the fraction of released gaseous iodine. As the temperature was lowered, less iodine was released, but the fraction of gaseous iodine from the overall released iodine was increased. As molybdenum trioxide was introduced to the precursor, the fraction of gaseous iodine from the overall released iodine was increased significantly. Also, Mo decreased the transport of Cs and caused significant depositions to the reaction furnace. Addition of silver to the CsI precursor at 650 deg. C decreased the release of iodine as well as the fraction of gaseous iodine. At 400 deg. C, Ag + CsI as well as Ag + MoO{sub 3} + CsI precursor significantly increased the release of gaseous iodine, where almost no aerosol particles were released. With B{sub 2}O{sub 3} + CsI precursor it was observed that in the atmosphere without H{sub 2}O, the released iodine was mostly in gaseous form. (authors)

  5. Endovascular Therapy as a Primary Revascularization Modality in Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kärkkäinen, Jussi M.; Lehtimäki, Tiina T. Saari, Petri; Hartikainen, Juha; Rantanen, Tuomo Paajanen, Hannu; Manninen, Hannu

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate endovascular therapy (EVT) as the primary revascularization method for acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI).MethodsA retrospective review was performed on all consecutive patients treated for AMI during a 5-year period (January 2009 to December 2013). EVT was attempted in all patients referred for emergent revascularization. Surgical revascularization was performed selectively after failure of EVT. Patient characteristics, clinical presentation, and outcomes were studied. Failures and complications of EVT were recorded.ResultsFifty patients, aged 79 ± 9 years (mean ± SD), out of 66 consecutive patients with AMI secondary to embolic or thrombotic obstruction of the superior mesenteric artery were referred for revascularization. The etiology of AMI was embolism in 18 (36 %) and thrombosis in 32 (64 %) patients. EVT was technically successful in 44 (88 %) patients. Mortality after successful or failed EVT was 32 %. The rates of emergency laparotomy, bowel resection, and EVT-related complication were 40, 34, and 10 %, respectively. Three out of six patients with failure of EVT were treated with surgical bypass. EVT failure did not significantly affect survival.ConclusionsEVT is feasible in most cases of AMI, with favorable patient outcome and acceptable complication rate.

  6. Modeling and Analysis of Alternative Concept of ITER Vacuum Vessel Primary Heat Transfer System

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan J; Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Dell'Orco, Giovanni; Curd, Warren; Kim, Seokho H

    2010-01-01

    A RELAP5-3D model of the ITER (Latin for the way ) vacuum vessel (VV) primary heat transfer system has been developed to evaluate a proposed design change that relocates the heat exchangers (HXs) from the exterior of the tokamak building to the interior. This alternative design protects the HXs from external hazards such as wind, tornado, and aircraft crash. The proposed design integrates the VV HXs into a VV pressure suppression system (VVPSS) tank that contains water to condense vapour in case of a leak into the plasma chamber. The proposal is to also use this water as the ultimate sink when removing decay heat from the VV system. The RELAP5-3D model has been run under normal operating and abnormal (decay heat) conditions. Results indicate that this alternative design is feasible, with no effects on the VVPSS tank under normal operation and with tank temperature and pressure increasing under decay heat conditions resulting in a requirement to remove steam generated if the VVPSS tank low pressure must be maintained.

  7. Characterization of the resistance to PWSCC of hydraulic tube- tubesheet expansions. [Primary water stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.E.; Economy, G.; Jacko, R.J.; Harrod, D.L.

    1992-07-01

    The resistance to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of hydraulically expanded Alloy 600 steam generator tubing, manufactured by the Westinghouse Specialty Metals Division, was evaluated under highly accelerated conditions in a 400{degrees}C steam test environment. These evaluations included microstructural characterizations of all test materials, screening tests with highly stressed reverse U-bends (RUBs), and the testing of internally pressurized hydraulic expansion tube-in-collar mockups. Eighteen heats of archived tubing from an operating nuclear power plant were evaluated; included were heats of Alloy 600 in both the mill annealed (A600 MA) and thermally treated (A600 TT) conditions. Other heats of archived A600 TT tubing, and reference laboratory heats with known corrosion resistance, were also included in various portions of this investigation. Hydraulically expanded mockups of A600 T-F tubing exhibit high resistance to PWSCC in the aggressive steam test environment. Some of the archived A600 MA heats, however, possess low resistance to PWSCC. Shot peening of the ID surfaces of tubes of these latter heats prior to testing was effective in precluding the occurrence of PWSCC. Archived heats of Model F (or F-type replacement) A600 TT steam generator tubing typically exhibit carbide morphologies and distributions consistent with high resistance to PWSCC. These data are in agreement with the performance to date of operating Model F steam generators.

  8. Role of Wind Power in Primary Frequency Response of an Interconnection: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. C.; Gevorgian, V.; Ela, E.; Singhvi, V.; Pourbeik, P.

    2013-09-01

    The electrical frequency of an interconnection must be maintained very close to its nominal level at all times. Large frequency deviations can lead to unintended consequences such as load shedding, instability, and machine damage, among others. Turbine governors of conventional generating units provide primary frequency response (PFR) to ensure that frequency deviations are not significant duringlarge transient events. Increasing penetrations of variable renewable generation, such as wind and solar power, and planned retirements of conventional thermal plants - and thus a reduction in the amount of suppliers with PFR capabilities - causes concerns about a decline of PFR and system inertia in North America. The capability of inverter-coupled wind generation technologies to contribute toPFR and inertia, if appropriately equipped with the necessary control features, can help alleviate concerns. However, these responses differ from those supplied by conventional generation and inertia, and it is not entirely understood how variable renewable generation will affect the system response at different penetration levels. This paper evaluates the impact of wind generation providing PFRand synthetic inertial response on a large interconnection.

  9. Defect occurrence, detection, location and characterization; essential variables of the LBB concept application to primary piping

    SciTech Connect

    Crutzen, S.; Koble, T.D.; Lemaitre, P.

    1997-04-01

    Applications of the Leak Before Break (LBB) concept involve the knowledge of flaw presence and characteristics. In Service Inspection is given the responsibility of detecting flaws of a determined importance to locate them precisely and to classify them in broad families. Often LBB concepts application imply the knowledge of flaw characteristics such as through wall depth; length at the inner diameter (ID) or outer diameter (OD) surface; orientation or tilt and skew angles; branching; surface roughness; opening or width; crack tip aspect. Besides detection and characterization, LBB evaluations consider important the fact that a crack could be in the weld material or in the base material or in the heat affected zone. Cracks in tee junctions, in homogenous simple welds and in elbows are not considered in the same way. Essential variables of a flaw or defect are illustrated, and examples of flaws found in primary piping as reported by plant operators or service vendors are given. If such flaw variables are important in the applications of LBB concepts, essential is then the knowledge of the performance achievable by NDE techniques, during an ISI, in detecting such flaws, in locating them and in correctly evaluating their characteristics.

  10. LBB evaluation for a typical Japanese PWR primary loop by using the US NRC approved methods

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, S.A.; Bhowmick, D.C.; Prager, D.E.

    1997-04-01

    The regulatory requirements for postulated pipe ruptures have changed significantly since the first nuclear plants were designed. The Leak-Before-Break (LBB) methodology is now accepted as a technically justifiable approach for eliminating postulation of double-ended guillotine breaks (DEGB) in high energy piping systems. The previous pipe rupture design requirements for nuclear power plant applications are responsible for all the numerous and massive pipe whip restraints and jet shields installed for each plant. This results in significant plant congestion, increased labor costs and radiation dosage for normal maintenance and inspection. Also the restraints increase the probability of interference between the piping and supporting structures during plant heatup, thereby potentially impacting overall plant reliability. The LBB approach to eliminate postulating ruptures in high energy piping systems is a significant improvement to former regulatory methodologies, and therefore, the LBB approach to design is gaining worldwide acceptance. However, the methods and criteria for LBB evaluation depend upon the policy of individual country and significant effort continues towards accomplishing uniformity on a global basis. In this paper the historical development of the U.S. LBB criteria will be traced and the results of an LBB evaluation for a typical Japanese PWR primary loop applying U.S. NRC approved methods will be presented. In addition, another approach using the Japanese LBB criteria will be shown and compared with the U.S. criteria. The comparison will be highlighted in this paper with detailed discussion.

  11. Performance data for a lithium-silicon/iron disulfide, long-life, primary thermal battery

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, R.K.; Baldwin, A.R.; Armijo, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently been involved in the development of a 60-minute, 28 volt, primary thermal battery with a volume of 400 cm/sup 3/. The feasibility of Li(Si)/LiCl.KCl/FeS/sub 2/ battery was previously demonstrated at a current of 0.5 A. In this paper, the effects of various environmental tests on battery performance are reported. In order to simulate possible nuclear ordnance environments, batteries have been subjected to shock, rhythmic and random vibration, and longitudinal and lateral acceleration in the unactivated and activated state. The level and duration of these tests varied, but the performance remained good. The effects of variation in current density from open circuit to 1 A/cm/sup 2/, as well as various pulse loads, have been examined. Also presented are results of stabilizing the batteries at temperatures in the range of -54/sup 0/C to +70/sup 0/C as reflected in various performance parameters. The Li(Si)/LiCl.KCl/FeS/sub 2/ electrochemical system has also been applied to two new Sandia-designed batteries requiring rugged, medium-life performance, i.e., activated lives of 2.5 and 4 minutes. Encouraging initial results of this application are included here.

  12. Enhanced Control of PWR Primary Coolant Water Chemistry Using Selective Separation Systems for Recovery and Recycle of Enriched Boric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Czerwinski; Charels Yeamans; Don Olander; Kenneth Raymond; Norman Schroeder; Thomas Robison; Bryan Carlson; Barbara Smit; Pat Robinson

    2006-02-28

    The objective of this project is to develop systems that will allow for increased nuclear energy production through the use of enriched fuels. The developed systems will allow for the efficient and selective recover of selected isotopes that are additives to power water reactors' primary coolant chemistry for suppression of corrosion attack on reactor materials.

  13. Development of a model for predicting intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 tubes in PWR primary water. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garud, Y.S.

    1985-01-01

    A preliminary mathematical model developed in this study may make it possible to predict stress corrosion cracking on the primary side of PWR steam generator tubing. The study outlines a comprehensive testing program that will provide the operational and experimental data to further develop and verify the model.

  14. Accounting for a feature of the configuration of the loops in the primary circuit of VVER-440 reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Khazanov, A. L.

    2013-09-15

    A feature of the configuration of the loops of the primary circuit of VVER-440 reactors and its influence on the characteristics of the main circulation pumps are analyzed. It is proposed that differences in the characteristics of the main reactor circulation pumps be taken account during the design and operation of nuclear power plants.

  15. Highly purified hexachlorobenzene induces cytochrome P4501A in primary cultures of chicken embryo hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mundy, Lukas J.; Jones, Stephanie P.; Crump, Doug; Herve, Jessica C.; Konstantinov, Alex; Utley, Fiona; Potter, David; Kennedy, Sean W.

    2010-11-01

    Some uncertainty exists regarding the purity of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) used in past toxicity studies. It has been suggested that reported toxic and biochemical effects initially attributed to HCB exposure may have actually been elicited by contamination of HCB by polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). Herein, primary cultures of chicken embryo hepatocytes (CEH) were used to compare the potencies of two lots of reagent-grade hexachlorobenzene (HCB-old [HCB-O] and HCB-new [HCB-N]), highly purified HCB (HCB-P) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) as inducers of ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity, cytochrome P4501A4 (CYP1A4) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and CYP1A5 mRNA. The study also compared the EROD- and CYP1A4/5 mRNA-inducing potencies of HCB to the potencies of two mono-ortho substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 2,3,3',4,4'-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 105) and 2,3'4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 118). HCB-O, HCB-N and HCB-P all induced EROD activity and up-regulated CYP1A4 and CYP1A5 mRNAs. Induction was not caused by contamination of HCB with PCDDs or PCDFs. Based upon a comparison of the EC{sub 50} and EC{sub threshold} values for EROD and CYP1A4/5 mRNA concentration-response curves, the potency of HCB relative to the potency of TCDD was 0.0001, and was similar to that of PCB 105 and PCB 118. The maximal EROD activity and CYP1A4/5 mRNA expression differed greatly between HCB and TCDD, and may contribute to an overestimation of the ReP value calculated for highly purified HCB.

  16. Role of Definitive Radiation Therapy in Carcinoma of Unknown Primary in the Abdomen and Pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick; Das, Prajnan; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Fontanilla, Hiral P.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Jhingran, Anuja; Eifel, Patricia J.; Crane, Christopher H.

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) in the abdomen and pelvis is a heterogeneous group of cancers with no standard treatment. Considered by many to be incurable, these patients are often treated with chemotherapy alone. In this study, we determined the effectiveness of radiation therapy in combination with chemotherapy in patients with CUP in the abdomen and pelvis. Patients and Methods: Medical records were reviewed for 37 patients with CUP treated with radiation therapy for disease located in the soft tissues and/or nodal basins of the abdomen and pelvis at University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer between 2002 and 2009. All patients underwent chemotherapy, either before or concurrent with radiation therapy. Patients were selected for radiation therapy on the basis of histologic type, disease extent, and prior therapy response. Twenty patients underwent definitive radiation therapy (defined as radiation therapy targeting all known disease sites with at least 45 Gy) and 17 patients underwent palliative radiation therapy. Only 6 patients had surgical resection of their disease. Patient and treatment characteristics were extracted and the endpoints of local disease control, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and treatment-related toxicity incidence were analyzed. Results: The 2-year PFS and OS rates for the entire cohort were 32% and 57%, respectively. However, in patients treated with definitive radiation therapy, the rates were 48% and 76%, and 7 patients lived more than 3 years after treatment with no evidence of disease progression. Nevertheless, radiation-associated toxicity was significant in this cohort, as 40% experienced Grade 2 or higher late toxicities. Conclusions: The use of definitive radiation therapy should be considered in selected patients with CUP in the soft tissues or nodal basins of the abdomen and pelvis.

  17. Estimation of net primary productivity using a process-based model in Gansu Province, Northwest China

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peijuan; Xie, Donghui; Zhou, Yuyu; E, Youhao; Zhu, Qijiang

    2014-01-16

    The ecological structure in the arid and semi-arid region of Northwest China with forest, grassland, agriculture, Gobi, and desert, is complex, vulnerable, and unstable. It is a challenging and sustaining job to keep the ecological structure and improve its ecological function. Net primary productivity (NPP) modeling can help to improve the understanding of the ecosystem, and therefore, improve ecological efficiency. The boreal ecosystem productivity simulator (BEPS) model provides the possibility of NPP modeling in terrestrial ecosystem, but it has some limitations for application in arid and semi-arid regions. In this paper we improve the BEPS model, in terms of its water cycle by adding the processes of infiltration and surface runoff, to be applicable in arid and semi-arid regions. We model the NPP of forest, grass, and crop in Gansu Province as an experimental area in Northwest China in 2003 using the improved BEPS model, parameterized with moderate resolution remote sensing imageries and meteorological data. The modeled NPP using improved BEPS agrees better with the ground measurements in Qilian Mountain than that with original BEPS, with a higher R2 of 0.746 and lower root mean square error (RMSE) of 46.53 gC/m2 compared to R2 of 0.662 and RMSE of 60.19 gC/m2 from original BEPS. The modeled NPP of three vegetation types using improved BEPS show evident differences compared to that using original BEPS, with the highest difference ratio of 9.21% in forest and the lowest value of 4.29% in crop. The difference ratios between different vegetation types lie on the dependence on natural water sources. The modeled NPP in five geographic zones using improved BEPS are higher than those with original BEPS, with higher difference ratio in dry zones and lower value in wet zones.

  18. Final Technical Report Microwave Assisted Electrolyte Cell for Primary Aluminum Production

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaodi Huang; J.Y. Hwang

    2007-04-18

    This research addresses the high priority research need for developing inert anode and wetted cathode technology, as defined in the Aluminum Industry Technology Roadmap and Inert Anode Roadmap, with the performance targets: a) significantly reducing the energy intensity of aluminum production, b) ultimately eliminating anode-related CO2 emissions, and c) reducing aluminum production costs. This research intended to develop a new electrometallurgical extraction technology by introducing microwave irradiation into the current electrolytic cells for primary aluminum production. This technology aimed at accelerating the alumina electrolysis reduction rate and lowering the aluminum production temperature, coupled with the uses of nickel based superalloy inert anode, nickel based superalloy wetted cathode, and modified salt electrolyte. Michigan Technological University, collaborating with Cober Electronic and Century Aluminum, conducted bench-scale research for evaluation of this technology. This research included three sub-topics: a) fluoride microwave absorption; b) microwave assisted electrolytic cell design and fabrication; and c) aluminum electrowinning tests using the microwave assisted electrolytic cell. This research concludes that the typically used fluoride compound for aluminum electrowinning is not a good microwave absorbing material at room temperature. However, it becomes an excellent microwave absorbing material above 550C. The electrowinning tests did not show benefit to introduce microwave irradiation into the electrolytic cell. The experiments revealed that the nickel-based superalloy is not suitable for use as a cathode material; although it wets with molten aluminum, it causes severe reaction with molten aluminum. In the anode experiments, the chosen superalloy did not meet corrosion resistance requirements. A nicked based alloy without iron content could be further investigated.

  19. RELAP5 Model of the First Wall/Blanket Primary Heat Transfer System

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Emilian L; Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Kim, Seokho H

    2010-06-01

    ITER inductive power operation is modeled and simulated using a system level computer code to evaluate the behavior of the Primary Heat Transfer System (PHTS) and predict parameter operational ranges. The control algorithm strategy and derivation are summarized in this report as well. A major feature of ITER is pulsed operation. The plasma does not burn continuously, but the power is pulsed with large periods of zero power between pulses. This feature requires active temperature control to maintain a constant blanket inlet temperature and requires accommodation of coolant thermal expansion during the pulse. In view of the transient nature of the power (plasma) operation state a transient system thermal-hydraulics code was selected: RELAP5. The code has a well-documented history for nuclear reactor transient analyses, it has been benchmarked against numerous experiments, and a large user database of commonly accepted modeling practices exists. The process of heat deposition and transfer in the blanket modules is multi-dimensional and cannot be accurately captured by a one-dimensional code such as RELAP5. To resolve this, a separate CFD calculation of blanket thermal power evolution was performed using the 3-D SC/Tetra thermofluid code. A 1D-3D co-simulation more realistically models FW/blanket internal time-dependent thermal inertia while eliminating uncertainties in the time constant assumed in a 1-D system code. Blanket water outlet temperature and heat release histories for any given ITER pulse operation scenario are calculated. These results provide the basis for developing time dependent power forcing functions which are used as input in the RELAP5 calculations.

  20. Diazinon and diazoxon impair the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzurro, Daniella M.; Dao, Khoi; Costa, Lucio G.

    2014-02-01

    Evidence from in vivo and epidemiological studies suggests that organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are developmental neurotoxicants, but possible underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized for their active role in normal neuronal development. This study sought to investigate whether the widely-used OP diazinon (DZ), and its oxygen metabolite diazoxon (DZO), would affect glialneuronal interactions as a potential mechanism of developmental neurotoxicity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of DZ and DZO on the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons. The results show that both DZ and DZO adversely affect astrocyte function, resulting in inhibited neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect appears to be mediated by oxidative stress, as indicated by OP-induced increased reactive oxygen species production in astrocytes and prevention of neurite outgrowth inhibition by antioxidants. The concentrations of OPs were devoid of cytotoxicity, and cause limited acetylcholinesterase inhibition in astrocytes (18 and 25% for DZ and DZO, respectively). Among astrocytic neuritogenic factors, the most important one is the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. DZ and DZO decreased levels of fibronectin in astrocytes, and this effect was also attenuated by antioxidants. Underscoring the importance of fibronectin in this context, adding exogenous fibronectin to the co-culture system successfully prevented inhibition of neurite outgrowth caused by DZ and DZO. These results indicate that DZ and DZO increase oxidative stress in astrocytes, and this in turn modulates astrocytic fibronectin, leading to impaired neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. - Highlights: DZ and DZO inhibit astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth in rat hippocampal neurons. Oxidative stress is involved in inhibition of neuritogenesis by DZ and DZO. DZ and DZO decrease expression of the neuritogenic factor

  1. A planning study investigating dual-gated volumetric arc stereotactic treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Devereux, Thomas; Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Supple, Jeremy; Siva, Shankar

    2015-04-01

    This is a planning study investigating the dosimetric advantages of gated volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the end-exhale and end-inhale breathing phases for patients undergoing stereotactic treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma. VMAT plans were developed from the end-inhale (VMATinh) and the end-exhale (VMATexh) phases of the breathing cycle as well as a VMAT plan and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy plan based on an internal target volume (ITV) (VMATitv). An additional VMAT plan was created by giving the respective gated VMAT plan a 50% weighting and summing the inhale and exhale plans together to create a summed gated plan. Dose to organs at risk (OARs) as well as comparison of intermediate and low-dose conformity was evaluated. There was no difference in the volume of healthy tissue receiving the prescribed dose for the planned target volume (PTV) (CI100%) for all the VMAT plans; however, the mean volume of healthy tissue receiving 50% of the prescribed dose for the PTV (CI50%) values were 4.7 (± 0.2), 4.6 (± 0.2), and 4.7 (± 0.6) for the VMATitv, VMATinh, and VMATexh plans, respectively. The VMAT plans based on the exhale and inhale breathing phases showed a 4.8% and 2.4% reduction in dose to 30 cm{sup 3} of the small bowel, respectively, compared with that of the ITV-based VMAT plan. The summed gated VMAT plans showed a 6.2% reduction in dose to 30 cm{sup 3} of the small bowel compared with that of the VMAT plans based on the ITV. Additionally, when compared with the inhale and the exhale VMAT plans, a 4% and 1.5%, respectively, reduction was observed. Gating VMAT was able to reduce the amount of prescribed, intermediate, and integral dose to healthy tissue when compared with VMAT plans based on an ITV. When summing the inhale and exhale plans together, dose to healthy tissue and OARs was optimized. However, gating VMAT plans would take longer to treat and is a factor that needs to be considered.

  2. Assessment of medical waste management at a primary health-care center in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, A.M.M.; Guenther, W.M.R.

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of medical waste management at health-care center before/after intervention. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Qualitative and quantitative results of medical waste management plan are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjustments to comply with regulation were adopted and reduction of waste was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method applied could be useful for similar establishments. - Abstract: According to the Brazilian law, implementation of a Medical Waste Management Plan (MWMP) in health-care units is mandatory, but as far as we know evaluation of such implementation has not taken place yet. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the improvements deriving from the implementation of a MWMP in a Primary Health-care Center (PHC) located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The method proposed for evaluation compares the first situation prevailing at this PHC with the situation 1 year after implementation of the MWMP, thus allowing verification of the evolution of the PHC performance. For prior and post-diagnosis, the method was based on: (1) application of a tool (check list) which considered all legal requirements in force; (2) quantification of solid waste subdivided into three categories: infectious waste and sharp devices, recyclable materials and non-recyclable waste; and (3) identification of non-conformity practices. Lack of knowledge on the pertinent legislation by health workers has contributed to non-conformity instances. The legal requirements in force in Brazil today gave origin to a tool (check list) which was utilized in the management of medical waste at the health-care unit studied. This tool resulted into an adequate and simple instrument, required a low investment, allowed collecting data to feed indicators and also conquered the participation of the unit whole staff. Several non-conformities identified in the first diagnosis could be corrected by the instrument utilized

  3. Differential Motion Between Mediastinal Lymph Nodes and Primary Tumor in Radically Irradiated Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schaake, Eva E.; Rossi, Maddalena M.G.; Buikhuisen, Wieneke A.; Burgers, Jacobus A.; Smit, Adrianus A.J.; Belderbos, José S.A.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2014-11-15

    Purpose/Objective: In patients with locally advanced lung cancer, planning target volume margins for mediastinal lymph nodes and tumor after a correction protocol based on bony anatomy registration typically range from 1 to 1.5 cm. Detailed information about lymph node motion variability and differential motion with the primary tumor, however, is lacking from large series. In this study, lymph node and tumor position variability were analyzed in detail and correlated to the main carina to evaluate possible margin reduction. Methods and Materials: Small gold fiducial markers (0.35 × 5 mm) were placed in the mediastinal lymph nodes of 51 patients with non-small cell lung cancer during routine diagnostic esophageal or bronchial endoscopic ultrasonography. Four-dimensional (4D) planning computed tomographic (CT) and daily 4D cone beam (CB) CT scans were acquired before and during radical radiation therapy (66 Gy in 24 fractions). Each CBCT was registered in 3-dimensions (bony anatomy) and 4D (tumor, marker, and carina) to the planning CT scan. Subsequently, systematic and random residual misalignments of the time-averaged lymph node and tumor position relative to the bony anatomy and carina were determined. Additionally, tumor and lymph node respiratory amplitude variability was quantified. Finally, required margins were quantified by use of a recipe for dual targets. Results: Relative to the bony anatomy, systematic and random errors ranged from 0.16 to 0.32 cm for the markers and from 0.15 to 0.33 cm for the tumor, but despite similar ranges there was limited correlation (0.17-0.71) owing to differential motion. A large variability in lymph node amplitude between patients was observed, with an average motion of 0.56 cm in the cranial-caudal direction. Margins could be reduced by 10% (left-right), 27% (cranial-caudal), and 10% (anteroposterior) for the lymph nodes and −2%, 15%, and 7% for the tumor if an online carina registration protocol replaced a

  4. A lead-before-break strategy for primary heat transport piping of 500 MWe Indian PHWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, J.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    1997-04-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) is being used to design the primary heat transport piping system of 500 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (IPHWR). The work is categorized in three directions to demonstrate three levels of safety against sudden catastrophic break. Level 1 is inherent in the design procedure of piping system as per ASME Sec.III with a well defined factor of safety. Level 2 consists of fatigue crack growth study of a postulated part-through flaw at the inside surface of pipes. Level 3 is stability analysis of a postulated leakage size flaw under the maximum credible loading condition. Developmental work related to demonstration of level 2 and level 3 confidence is described in this paper. In a case study on fatigue crack growth on PHT straight pipes for level 2, negligible crack growth is predicted for the life of the reactor. For level 3 analysis, the R6 method has been adopted. A database to evaluate SIF of elbows with throughwall flaws under combined internal pressure and bending moment has been generated to provide one of the inputs for R6 method. The methodology of safety assessment of elbow using R6 method has been demonstrated for a typical pump discharge elbow. In this analysis, limit load of the cracked elbow has been determined by carrying out elasto-plastic finite element analysis. The limit load results compared well with those given by Miller. However, it requires further study to give a general form of limit load solution. On the experimental front, a set of small diameter pipe fracture experiments have been carried out at room temperature and 300{degrees}C. Two important observations of the experiments are - appreciable drop in maximum load at 300{degrees}C in case of SS pipes and out-of-plane crack growth in case of CS pipes. Experimental load deflection curves are finally compared with five J-estimation schemes predictions. A material database of PHT piping materials is also being generated for use in LBB analysis.

  5. Building America Case Study: Photovoltaic Systems with Module-Level Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    Direct current (DC) power optimizers and microinverters (together known as module-level power electronics, or MLPE) are one of the fastest growing market segments in the solar industry. According to GTM Research in The Global PV Inverter Landscape 2015, over 55% of all residential photovoltaic (PV) installations in the United States used some form of MLPE in 2014.

  6. Evaluation and Repair of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking in Alloy 600/182 Control Rod Drive Mechanism Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Charles R.; Arey, Melvin L. Jr.; Robinson, Michael R.; Whitaker, David E.

    2002-07-01

    In February 2001, a routine visual inspection of the reactor vessel head of Oconee Nuclear Station Unit 3 identified boric acid crystals at nine of sixty-nine locations where control rod drive mechanism housings (CRDM nozzles) penetrate the head. The boric acid deposits resulted from primary coolant leaking from cracks in the nozzle attachment weld and from through-thickness cracks in the nozzle wall. A general overview of the inspection and repair process is presented and results of the metallurgical analysis are discussed in more detail. The analysis confirmed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is the mechanism of failure of both the Alloy 182 weld filler material and the alloy 600 wrought base material. (authors)

  7. PSTAR: Primary and secondary terms analysis and renormalization: A unified approach to building energy simulations and short-term monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Subbarao, K.

    1988-09-01

    This report presents a unified method of hourly simulation of a building and analysis of performance data. The method is called Primary and Secondary Terms Analysis and Renormalization (PSTAR). In the PSTAR method, renormalized parameters are introduced for the primary terms such that the renormalized energy balance equation is best satisfied in the least squares sense, hence, the name PSTAR. PSTAR allows extraction of building characteristics from short-term tests on a small number of data channels. These can be used for long-term performance prediction (''ratings''), diagnostics, and control of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems (HVAC), comparison of design versus actual performance, etc. By combining realistic building models, simple test procedures, and analysis involving linear equations, PSTAR provides a powerful tool for analyzing building energy as well as testing and monitoring. It forms the basis for the Short-Term Energy Monitoring (STEM) project at SERI.

  8. Evaluation of Manual Ultrasonic Examinations Applied to Detect Flaws in Primary System Dissimilar Metal Welds at North Anna Power Station

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2012-06-01

    During a recent inservice inspection (ISI) of a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) in an inlet (hot leg) steam generator nozzle at North Anna Power Station Unit 1, several axially oriented flaws went undetected by the licensee's manual ultrasonic testing (UT) technique. The flaws were subsequently detected as a result of outside diameter (OD) surface machining in preparation for a full structural weld overlay. The machining operation uncovered the existence of two through-wall flaws, based on the observance of primary water leaking from the DMW. Further ultrasonic tests were then performed, and a total of five axially oriented flaws, classified as primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), were detected in varied locations around the weld circumference.

  9. Assessment of primary production and optical variability in shelf and slope waters near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Redalje, Donald G.; Lohrenz, Stevern E.

    2001-02-12

    In this project we determined primary production and optical variability in the shelf and slope waters off of Cape Hatteras, N.C. These processes were addressed in conjunction with other Ocean Margins Program investigators, during the Spring Transition period and during Summer. We found that there were significant differences in measured parameters between Spring and Summer, enabling us to develop seasonally specific carbon production and ecosystem models as well as seasonal and regional algorithm improvements for use in remote sensing applications.

  10. Predicting primary crystalline phase and liquidus temperature above or below 1050{degrees}C as functions of glass composition

    SciTech Connect

    Redgate, P.E.; Piepel, G.F.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the results of applying statistical empirical modeling techniques to primary crystalline phase at the liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) and (ii) whether liquidus temperature is above or below 1050{degree}C (1OO{degree}C below a melting temperature of 1150{degree}C). Data used in modeling primary crystalline phase and liquidus temperate are from the Composition Variability Study (CVS) of Hanford waste glass compositions and properties. The majority of the 123 CVS glasses are categorized into one of 13 primary crystalline phases (at the liquidus temperature). They are also classified as to having T{sub L} Above or Below 1050{degree}C. Two common statistical methods used to model such categorical data are the multinomial logit and classification tree models. The classification tree models provided an overall better modeling approach than did the multinomial logit models. The performance of models in this report should be compared to the performance of the revised ``Development of Models and Software for Liquidus Temperature of Glasses of HWVP Products`` models from Ecole Polytechnique. If the Ecole Polytechnique models perform better than the models discussed in this report, no additional effort on these models would be needed. However, if the converse is true, it may be worthwhile to invest additional effort on statistical empirical modeling methods.

  11. MD simulations of phase stability of PuGa alloys: Effects of primary radiation defects and helium bubbles

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Dremov, V. V.; Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Ionov, G. V.; Karavaev, A. V.; Vorobyova, M. A.; Chung, B. W.

    2013-05-14

    We present classical molecular dynamics (MD) with Modified Embedded Atom Model (MEAM) simulations to investigate the role of primary radiation defects and radiogenic helium as factors affecting the phase stability of PuGa alloys in cooling–heating cycles at ambient pressure. The models of PuGa alloys equilibrated at ambient conditions were subjected to cooling–heating cycles in which they were initially cooled down to 100 K and then heated up to 500 K at ambient pressure. The rate of temperature change in the cycles was 10 K/ns. The simulations showed that the initial FCC phase of PuGa alloys undergo polymorphous transition in coolingmore » to a lower symmetry α'-phase. All the alloys undergo direct and reverse polymorphous transitions in the cooling–heating cycles. The alloys containing vacancies shift in both transitions to lower temperatures relative to the defect-free alloys. The radiogenic helium has much less effect on the phase stability compared to that of primary radiation defects (in spite of the fact that helium concentration is twice of that for the primary radiation defects). Lastly, this computational result agrees with experimental data on unconventional stabilization mechanism of PuGa alloys.« less

  12. Multivalent dendrimeric compounds containing carbohydrates expressed on immune cells inhibit infection by primary isolates of HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa Borges, Andrew; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Johnson, Benitra; Benesi, Alan J.; Brown, Bruce K.; Kensinger, Richard D.; Krebs, Fred C.; Wigdahl, Brian; Blumenthal, Robert; Puri, Anu; McCutchan, Francine E.; Birx, Deborah L.; Polonis, Victoria R.; Schengrund, Cara-Lynne

    2010-12-05

    Specific glycosphingolipids (GSL), found on the surface of target immune cells, are recognized as alternate cell surface receptors by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) external envelope glycoprotein. In this study, the globotriose and 3'-sialyllactose carbohydrate head groups found on two GSL were covalently attached to a dendrimer core to produce two types of unique multivalent carbohydrates (MVC). These MVC inhibited HIV-1 infection of T cell lines and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by T cell line-adapted viruses or primary isolates, with IC{sub 50}s ranging from 0.1 to 7.4 {mu}g/ml. Inhibition of Env-mediated membrane fusion by MVC was also observed using a dye-transfer assay. These carbohydrate compounds warrant further investigation as a potential new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. The data presented also shed light on the role of carbohydrate moieties in HIV-1 virus-host cell interactions. -- Research Highlights: {yields}Multivalent carbohydrates (MVCs) inhibited infection of PBMCs by HIV-1. {yields}MVCs inhibited infection by T cell line-adapted viruses. {yields}MVCs inhibited infection by primary isolates of HIV-1. {yields}MVCs inhibited Env-mediated membrane fusion.

  13. FDG-PET/CT Imaging Predicts Histopathologic Treatment Responses after Neoadjuvant Therapy in Adult Primary Bone Sarcomas

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Benz, Matthias R.; Czernin, Johannes; Tap, William D.; Eckardt, Jeffrey J.; Seeger, Leanne L.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S.; Dry, Sarah M.; Phelps, Michael E.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Eilber, Fritz C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose . Tmore » he aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate whether FDG-PET allows an accurate assessment of histopathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment in adult patients with primary bone sarcomas. Methods . Twelve consecutive patients with resectable, primary high grade bone sarcomas were enrolled prospectively. FDG-PET/CT imaging was performed prior to the initiation and after completion of neoadjuvant treatment. Imaging findings were correlated with histopathologic response. Results . Histopathologic responders showed significantly more pronounced decreases in tumor FDG-SUVmax from baseline to late follow up than non-responders ( 64 ± 19 % versus 29 ± 30 %, resp.; P = .03 ). Using a 60% decrease in tumor FDG-uptake as a threshold for metabolic response correctly classified 3 of 4 histopathologic responders and 7 of 8 histopathologic non-responders as metabolic responders and non-responders, respectively (sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 88%). Conclusion . These results suggest that changes in FDG-SUVmax at the end of neoadjuvant treatment can identify histopathologic responders and non-responders in adult primary bone sarcoma patients.« less

  14. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Replacement of ATR Primary Coolant Pumps and Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-05-01

    The continued safe and reliable operation of the ATR is critical to the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) mission. While ATR is safely fulfilling current mission requirements, a variety of aging and obsolescence issues challenge ATR engineering and maintenance personnel’s capability to sustain ATR over the long term. First documented in a series of independent assessments, beginning with an OA Environmental Safety and Health Assessment conducted in 2003, the issues were validated in a detailed Material Condition Assessment (MCA) conducted as a part of the ATR Life Extension Program in 2007.Accordingly, near term replacement of aging and obsolescent original ATR equipment has become important to ensure ATR capability in support of NE’s long term national missions. To that end, a mission needs statement has been prepared for a non-major system acquisition which is comprised of three interdependent subprojects. The first project will replace the existent diesel-electrical bus (E-3), switchgear, and the 50-year-old obsolescent marine diesels with commercial power that is backed with safety related emergency diesel generators, switchgear, and uninterruptible power supply (UPS). The second project, the subject of this major modification determination, will replace the four, obsolete, original primary coolant pumps (PCPs) and motors. Completion of this and the two other age-related projects (replacement of the ATR diesel bus [E-3] and switchgear and replacement of the existent emergency firewater injection system) will resolve major age-related operational issues plus make a significant contribution in sustaining the ATR safety and reliability profile. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues that lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification: 1. Evaluation Criteria #3 (Change of existing process). The proposed strategy for equipping the replacement PCPs with VFDs

  15. Primary and secondary battery consumption trends in Sweden 1996–2013: Method development and detailed accounting by battery type

    SciTech Connect

    Patrício, João; Kalmykova, Yuliya; Berg, Per E.O.; Rosado, Leonardo; Åberg, Helena

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Developed MFA method was validated by the national statistics. • Exponential increase of EEE sales leads to increase in integrated battery consumption. • Digital convergence is likely to be a cause for primary batteries consumption decline. • Factors for estimation of integrated batteries in EE are provided. • Sweden reached the collection rates defined by European Union. - Abstract: In this article, a new method based on Material Flow Accounting is proposed to study detailed material flows in battery consumption that can be replicated for other countries. The method uses regularly available statistics on import, industrial production and export of batteries and battery-containing electric and electronic equipment (EEE). To promote method use by other scholars with no access to such data, several empirically results and their trends over time, for different types of batteries occurrence among the EEE types are provided. The information provided by the method can be used to: identify drivers of battery consumption; study the dynamic behavior of battery flows – due to technology development, policies, consumers behavior and infrastructures. The method is exemplified by the study of battery flows in Sweden for years 1996–2013. The batteries were accounted, both in units and weight, as primary and secondary batteries; loose and integrated; by electrochemical composition and share of battery use between different types of EEE. Results show that, despite a fivefold increase in the consumption of rechargeable batteries, they account for only about 14% of total use of portable batteries. Recent increase in digital convergence has resulted in a sharp decline in the consumption of primary batteries, which has now stabilized at a fairly low level. Conversely, the consumption of integrated batteries has increased sharply. In 2013, 61% of the total weight of batteries sold in Sweden was collected, and for the particular case of alkaline manganese

  16. Double-Shell Tank Visual Inspection Changes Resulting from the Tank 241-AY-102 Primary Tank Leak

    SciTech Connect

    Girardot, Crystal L.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.; Engeman, Jason K.

    2013-11-14

    As part of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Program, remote visual inspections are utilized to perform qualitative in-service inspections of the DSTs in order to provide a general overview of the condition of the tanks. During routine visual inspections of tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102) in August 2012, anomalies were identified on the annulus floor which resulted in further evaluations. In October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC determined that the primary tank of AY-102 was leaking. Following identification of the tank AY-102 probable leak cause, evaluations considered the adequacy of the existing annulus inspection frequency with respect to the circumstances of the tank AY-102 1eak and the advancing age of the DST structures. The evaluations concluded that the interval between annulus inspections should be shortened for all DSTs, and each annulus inspection should cover > 95 percent of annulus floor area, and the portion of the primary tank (i.e., dome, sidewall, lower knuckle, and insulating refractory) that is visible from the annulus inspection risers. In March 2013, enhanced visual inspections were performed for the six oldest tanks: 241-AY-101, 241-AZ-101,241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103, and no evidence of leakage from the primary tank were observed. Prior to October 2012, the approach for conducting visual examinations of DSTs was to perform a video examination of each tank's interior and annulus regions approximately every five years (not to exceed seven years between inspections). Also, the annulus inspection only covered about 42 percent of the annulus floor.

  17. Improved Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Li Baoqing; Farwell, D. Gregory; Marsano, Joseph; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To compare differences in dosimetric, clinical, and quality-of-life endpoints among a cohort of patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 51 patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Twenty-four patients (47%) were treated using CRT, and 27 (53%) were treated using IMRT. The proportions of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy were 54% and 63%, respectively. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and disease-specific survival for the entire patient population were 86%, 89%, and84%, respectively. There were no significant differences in any of these endpoints with respect to radiation therapy technique (p > 0.05 for all). Dosimetric analysis revealed that the use of IMRT resulted in significant improvements with respect to mean dose and V30 to the contralateral (spared) parotid gland. In addition, mean doses to the ipsilateral inner and middle ear structures were significantly reduced with IMRT (p < 0.05 for all). The incidence of severe xerostomia in the late setting was 58% and 11% among patients treated by CRT and IMRT, respectively (p < 0.001). The percentages of patients who were G-tube dependent at 6 months after treatment were 42% and 11%, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT results in significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio among patients treated by radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin.

  18. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 5: probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.O.; Lim, E.Y.; Dedhia, D.D.

    1981-08-01

    The purpose of the portion of the Load Combination Program covered in this volume was to estimate the probability of a seismic induced loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in the primary piping of a commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR). Such results are useful in rationally assessing the need to design reactor primary piping systems for the simultaneous occurrence of these two potentially high stress events. The primary piping system at Zion I was selected for analysis. Attention was focussed on the girth butt welds in the hot leg, cold leg and cross-over leg, which are centrifugally cast austenitic stainless steel lines with nominal outside diameters of 32 - 37 inches.

  19. Highly selective fusion and accumulation of hybrid liposomes into primary effusion lymphoma cells along with induction of apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Towata, Tomomi; Division of Hematopoiesis, Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-0811 ; Komizu, Yuji; Suzu, Shinya; Ueoka, Ryuichi; Okada, Seiji

    2010-03-12

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an aggressive neoplasm caused by human herpes virus-8 infection, and is generally resistant to chemotherapy. Hybrid liposomes, composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and polyoxyethylene (21) dodecyl ether (C{sub 12}(EO){sub 21}) (HL-21), were rapidly accumulated in the membrane of PEL cells. HL-21 also increased membrane fluidity of PEL cells, and induced caspase-3 activation along with cell death. These results suggest that HL-21 should be an effective and attractive regent for PEL treatment.

  20. Application of the leak-before-break concept to the primary circuit piping of the Leningrad NPP

    SciTech Connect

    Eperin, A.P.; Zakharzhevsky, Yu.O.; Arzhaev, A.I.

    1997-04-01

    A two-year Finnish-Russian cooperation program has been initiated in 1995 to demonstrate the applicability of the leak-before-break concept (LBB) to the primary circuit piping of the Leningrad NPP. The program includes J-R curve testing of authentic pipe materials at full operating temperature, screening and computational LBB analyses complying with the USNRC Standard Review Plan 3.6.3, and exchange of LBB-related information with emphasis on NDE. Domestic computer codes are mainly used, and all tests and analyses are independently carried out by each party. The results are believed to apply generally to RBMK type plants of the first generation.

  1. Assessment of the Mechanical Stress Improvement Process for Mitigating Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking in Nickel Alloy Butt Welds in Piping Systems Approved for Leak-Before-Break

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of the use of Mechanical Stress Improvement Process to reduce, or decrease, stress-driven degradation, i.e., primary water stress corrosion cracking.

  2. Intelligent emissions controller for substance injection in the post-primary combustion zone of fossil-fired boilers

    DOEpatents

    Reifman, Jaques; Feldman, Earl E.; Wei, Thomas Y. C.; Glickert, Roger W.

    2003-01-01

    The control of emissions from fossil-fired boilers wherein an injection of substances above the primary combustion zone employs multi-layer feedforward artificial neural networks for modeling static nonlinear relationships between the distribution of injected substances into the upper region of the furnace and the emissions exiting the furnace. Multivariable nonlinear constrained optimization algorithms use the mathematical expressions from the artificial neural networks to provide the optimal substance distribution that minimizes emission levels for a given total substance injection rate. Based upon the optimal operating conditions from the optimization algorithms, the incremental substance cost per unit of emissions reduction, and the open-market price per unit of emissions reduction, the intelligent emissions controller allows for the determination of whether it is more cost-effective to achieve additional increments in emission reduction through the injection of additional substance or through the purchase of emission credits on the open market. This is of particular interest to fossil-fired electrical power plant operators. The intelligent emission controller is particularly adapted for determining the economical control of such pollutants as oxides of nitrogen (NO.sub.x) and carbon monoxide (CO) emitted by fossil-fired boilers by the selective introduction of multiple inputs of substances (such as natural gas, ammonia, oil, water-oil emulsion, coal-water slurry and/or urea, and combinations of these substances) above the primary combustion zone of fossil-fired boilers.

  3. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 3: nonseismic stress analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, A.L.; Curtis, D.J.; Rybicki, E.F.; Lu, S.C.

    1981-08-01

    This volume describes the analyses used to evaluate stresses due to loads other than seismic excitations in the primary coolant loop piping of a selected four-loop pressurized water reactor nuclear power station. The results of the analyses are used as input to a simulation procedure for predicting the probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant system. Sources of stresses considered in the analyses are pressure, dead weight, thermal expansion, thermal gradients through the pipe wall, residual welding, and mechanical vibrations. Pressure and thermal transients arising from plant operations are best estimates and are based on actual plant operation records supplemented by specified plant design conditions. Stresses due to dead weight and thermal expansion are computed from a three-dimensional finite element model that uses a combination of pipe, truss, and beam elements to represent the reactor coolant loop piping, reactor pressure vessel, reactor coolant pumps, steam generators, and the pressurizer. Stresses due to pressure and thermal gradients are obtained by closed-form solutions. Calculations of residual stresses account for the actual heat impact, welding speed, weld preparation geometry, and pre- and post-heat treatments. Vibrational stresses due to pump operation are estimated by a dynamic analysis using existing measurements of pump vibrations.

  4. Investigation of the relative abundance of heavy versus light nuclei in primary cosmic rays using underground muon bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaralingam, N.

    1993-06-08

    We study multiple muon events (muon bundles) recorded underground at a depth of 2090 mwe. To penetrate to this depth, the muons must have energies above 0.8 TeV at the Earth`s surface; the primary cosmic ray nuclei which give rise to the observed muon bundles have energies at incidence upon the upper atmosphere of 10 to 10{sup 5}TeV. The events are detected using the Soudan 2 experiment`s fine grained tracking calorimeter which is surrounded by a 14 m {times}10 m {times} 31 m proportional tube array (the ``active shield``). Muon bundles which have at least one muon traversing the calorimeter, are reconstructed using tracks in the calorimeter together with hit patterns in the proportional tube shield. All ionization pulses are required to be coincident within 3 microseconds. A goal of this study is to investigate the relative nuclear abundances in the primary cosmic radiation around the ``knee`` region (10{sup 3} {minus} 10{sup 4} TeV) of the incident energy spectrum. Four models for the nuclear composition of cosmic rays are considered: The Linsley model, the Constant Mass Composition model (CMC), the Maryland model and the Proton-poor model. A Monte Carlo which incorporates one model at a time is used to simulate events which are then reconstructed using the same computer algorithms that are used for the data. Identical cuts and selections are applied to the data and to the simulated events.

  5. Elastic-plastic analysis of the PVRC burst disk tests with comparison to the ASME code -- Primary stress limits

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.P.; Holliday, J.E.

    1999-02-01

    This paper provides a comparison between finite element analysis results and test data from the Pressure Vessel Research Council (PVRC) burst disk program. Testing sponsored by the PVRC over 20 years ago was done by pressurizing circular flat disks made from three different materials until failure by bursting. The purpose of this re-analysis is to investigate the use of finite element analysis (FEA) to assess the primary stress limits of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (1998) and to qualify the use of elastic-plastic (EP-FEA) for limit load calculations. The three materials tested represent the range of strength and ductility found in modern pressure vessel construction and include a low strength high ductility material, a medium strength medium ductility material, and a high strength low ductility low alloy material. Results of elastic and EP-FEA are compared to test data. Stresses from the elastic analyses are linearized for comparison of Code primary stress limits to test results. Elastic-plastic analyses are done using both best-estimate and elastic-perfectly plastic (EPP) stress-strain curves. Both large strain-large displacement (LSLD) and small strain-small displacement (SSSD) assumptions are used with the EP-FEA. Analysis results are compared to test results to evaluate the various analysis methods, models, and assumptions as applied to the bursting of thin disks.

  6. Final Report For The Erosion And Corrosion Analysis Of Waste Transfer Primary Pipeline Sections From 241-SY Tank Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Page, J. S.; Wyrwas, R. B.; Cooke, G. A.

    2012-10-04

    Three sections of primary transfer pipeline removed from the 241-SY Tank Farm in Hanford's 200 West area, labeled as SN-285, SN-286, and SN-278, were analyzed for the presence and amount of corrosion and erosion on the inside surface of the transfer pipe. All three sections of pipe, ranging in length between 6 and 8 in., were received at the 222-S Laboratory still in the pipe-in-pipe assembly. The annular spaces were filled with urethane foam injected into the pipes for as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) purposes. The 3-in. primary transfer pipes were first separated from the outer encasement, 6-in. pipes. The pipes were cut into small sections, or coupons, based upon the results of a non-destructive pipe wall thickness measurement which used an ultrasonic transducer. Following removal of the foam, the coupons were subjected to a series of analytical methods utilizing both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to obtain erosion and corrosion information. The ultrasonic transducer analysis of the SN-285 primary pipe did not show any thinned locations in the pipe wall which were outside the expected range for the 3-in. schedule 40 pipe of 216 mils. A coupon was cut from the thinnest area on the pipe, and analysis of the inside surface, which was in contact with the tank waste, revealed a continuous layer of corrosion ~ 100 11m (4 mils) thick under a semi-continuous layer of tank waste residue ~ 20 11m (1 mil) thick. This residue layer was composed of an amorphous phase rich in chromium, magnesium, calcium, and chlorine. Small pits were detected throughout the inside pipe surface with depths up to ~ 50 11m (2 mils). Similarly, the SN-286 primary pipe did not show, by the ultrasonic transducer measurements, any thinned locations in the pipe wall which were outside the expected range for this pipe. Analysis of the coupon cut from the pipe section showed the presence of a tank waste layer containing sodium aluminate and phases rich in iron, calcium

  7. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS AND RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY TC; JOHNSON KI; DEIBLER JE; PILLI SP; RINKER MW; KARRI NK

    2009-01-14

    This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double-shell waste tanks (DSTs), which is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raised by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review of work performed on the double-shell tank farms and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system. The current buckling review focuses on the following tasks: (1) Evaluate the potential for progressive anchor bolt failure and the appropriateness of the safety factors that were used for evaluating local and global buckling. The analysis will specifically answer the following questions: (a) Can the EH-22 scenario develop if the vacuum is limited to -6.6-inch water gage (w.g.) by a relief valve? (b) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario can develop? (c) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario cannot develop? (2) Develop influence functions to estimate the axial stresses in the primary tanks for all reasonable combinations of tank loads based on detailed finite element analysis. The analysis must account for the variation in design details and operating conditions between the different DSTs. The analysis must also address the imperfection sensitivity of the primary tank to buckling. (3) Perform a detailed buckling analysis to determine the maximum allowable differential pressure for each of the DST primary tanks at the current specified limits on waste temperature, height, and specific gravity. Based on the concrete anchor bolt loads analysis and the small deformations that are predicted at the unfactored limits on vacuum and axial loads, it is very unlikely that the EH-22 scenario (i.e., progressive anchor bolt

  8. The effect of adjuvant immunotherapy on tumor recurrence after segmental resection of carcinogen-induced Wistar/Furth primary bowel adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, G. Jr.; Harte, P.J.; Rayner, A.A.; Corson, J.M.; Madara, J.; Munroe, A.E.; King, V.P.; Wilson, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Primary bowel tumors were induced in Wistar/Furth (W/Fu) rats by 16 weekly subcutaneous injections of 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine (DMH). After ''curative'' resection of primary adenocarcinomas of the colon, 75% of control rats who received no further treatment developed local or regional recurrence within 22 wk. In 4 separate experiments, rats immunized after primary tumor resection by 3 weekly subcutaneous inoculations of 1 x 10/sup 6/ irradiated (10,000 rad) DMH-W15 sarcoma cells (no tumor-associated antigens cross-reacting with bowel adenocarcinomas) developed recurrent tumor at a rate similar to the controls. By contrast, after primary bowel tumor resection, rats immunized with DMH-W-163 colon adenocarcinoma (possessing tumor-associated antigens cross-reactive with W/Fu bowel adenocarcinomas) showed a consistently reduced rate of local or regional recurrence compared to either of the controls (x/sup 2/ = 4.62, p < 0.05) or the rats immunized with sarcomas (X/sup 2/ = 5.42, p < 0.05)= 4.62, p < 0.05). By 22 wk after primary tumor resection, only 35% of the DMH-W-163-immunized animals in each of the 4 experiments showed recurrence. No deaths from recurrences were note in any of the experimental groups after this time, and selected animals sacrificed in the immunized groups up to 30 wk after primary tumor resection were documented to be disease-free. Protection against tumor recurrence was, therefore, a reflection of increased disease-free survival. No change in the effectiveness of immunoprotection in this model could be demonstrated after resection of less invasive primary tumors. These data reflect the utility of a new model in which modification of the natural history of individual primary bowel adenocarcinomas can be examined. The similarities and differences between this system and humans with colon cancer are discussed.

  9. The primary circuit materials properties results analysis performed on archive material used in NPP V-1 and Kola NPP Units 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kupca, L.; Beno, P.

    1997-04-01

    A very brief summary is provided of a primary circuit piping material properties analysis. The analysis was performed for the Bohunice V-1 reactor and the Kola-1 and -2 reactors. Assessment was performed on Bohunice V-1 archive materials and primary piping material cut from the Kola units after 100,000 hours of operation. Main research program tasks included analysis of mechanical properties, corrosion stability, and microstructural properties. Analysis results are not provided.

  10. An unusual xylan in Arabidopsis primary cell walls is synthesised by GUX3, IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Mortimer, Jenny C.; Faria-Blanc, Nuno; Yu, Xiaolan; Tryfona, Theodora; Sorieul, Mathias; Ng, Yao Z.; Zhang, Zhinong; Stott, Katherine; Anders, Nadine; Dupree, Paul

    2015-06-04

    Xylan is a crucial component of many plant primary and secondary cell walls. However, the structure and function of xylan in the dicotyledon primary cell wall is not well understood. Here, we characterized a xylan that is specific to tissues enriched in Arabidopsis primary cell walls. Unlike previously described xylans, this xylan carries a pentose linked 1–2 to the α-1,2-d-glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains on the β-1,4-Xyl backbone. The frequent and precisely regular spacing of GlcA substitutions every six xylosyl residues along the backbone is also unlike that previously observed in secondary cell wall xylan. Molecular genetics, in vitro assays,more » and expression data suggest that IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14 are required for xylan backbone synthesis in primary cell wall synthesising tissues. IRX9 and IRX10 are not involved in the primary cell wall xylan synthesis but are functionally exchangeable with IRX9L and IRX10L. GUX3 is the only glucuronyltransferase required for the addition of the GlcA decorations on the xylan. The differences in xylan structure in primary versus secondary cell walls might reflect the different roles in cross-linking and interaction with other cell wall components.« less

  11. An unusual xylan in Arabidopsis primary cell walls is synthesised by GUX3, IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14

    SciTech Connect

    Mortimer, Jenny C.; Faria-Blanc, Nuno; Yu, Xiaolan; Tryfona, Theodora; Sorieul, Mathias; Ng, Yao Z.; Zhang, Zhinong; Stott, Katherine; Anders, Nadine; Dupree, Paul

    2015-06-04

    Xylan is a crucial component of many plant primary and secondary cell walls. However, the structure and function of xylan in the dicotyledon primary cell wall is not well understood. Here, we characterized a xylan that is specific to tissues enriched in Arabidopsis primary cell walls. Unlike previously described xylans, this xylan carries a pentose linked 1–2 to the α-1,2-d-glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains on the β-1,4-Xyl backbone. The frequent and precisely regular spacing of GlcA substitutions every six xylosyl residues along the backbone is also unlike that previously observed in secondary cell wall xylan. Molecular genetics, in vitro assays, and expression data suggest that IRX9L, IRX10L and IRX14 are required for xylan backbone synthesis in primary cell wall synthesising tissues. IRX9 and IRX10 are not involved in the primary cell wall xylan synthesis but are functionally exchangeable with IRX9L and IRX10L. GUX3 is the only glucuronyltransferase required for the addition of the GlcA decorations on the xylan. The differences in xylan structure in primary versus secondary cell walls might reflect the different roles in cross-linking and interaction with other cell wall components.

  12. Can Locoregional Treatment of the Primary Tumor Improve Outcomes for Women With Stage IV Breast Cancer at Diagnosis?

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, David H.A.; Truong, Pauline T.; Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, BC; University of British Columbia, BC ; Alexander, Cheryl; Walter, Caroline V.; Hayashi, Emily; Christie, Jennifer; Lesperance, Mary

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of locoregional treatment (LRT) of the primary tumor on survival in patients with Stage IV breast cancer at diagnosis. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 733 women referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency between 1996 and 2005 with newly diagnosed clinical or pathologic M1 breast cancer. Tumor and treatment characteristics, overall survival (OS), and locoregional progression-free survival were compared between patients treated with (n = 378) and without (n = 355) LRT of the primary disease. Multivariable analysis was performed with Cox regression modeling. Results: The median follow-up time was 1.9 years. LRT consisted of surgery alone in 67% of patients, radiotherapy alone in 22%, and both in 11%. LRT was used more commonly in women with age <50 years, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 0-1, Stage T1-2 tumors, N0-1 disease, limited M1 burden, and asymptomatic M1 disease (all p < 0.05). Systemic therapy was used in 92% of patients who underwent LRT and 85% of patients who did not. In patients treated with LRT compared with those without LRT, the 5-year OS rates were 21% vs. 14% (p < 0.001), and the rates of locoregional progression-free survival were 72% vs. 46% (p < 0.001). Among 378 patients treated with LRT, the rates of 5-year OS were higher in patients with age <50, ECOG performance status 0-1, estrogen receptor-positive disease, clear surgical margins, single subsite, bone-only metastasis, and one to four metastatic lesions (all p < 0.003). On multivariable analysis, LRT was associated with improved OS (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.94, p = 0.009). Conclusion: Locoregional treatment of the primary disease is associated with improved survival in some women with Stage IV breast cancer at diagnosis. Among those treated with LRT, the most favorable rates of survival were observed in subsets with young age, good performance status, estrogen receptor-positive disease

  13. Primary transitions between the yrast superdeformed band and low-lying normal deformed states in {sup 194}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Hauschild, K.; Bernstein, L.A.; Becker, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    The observation of one-step `primary` gamma-ray transitions directly linking the superdeformed (SD) states to the normal deformed (ND) low-lying states of known excitation energies (E{sub x}), spins and parities (J{sup {pi}}) is crucial to determining the E{sub x} and J{sup {pi}} of the SD states. With this knowledge one can begin to address some of the outstanding problems associated with SD nuclei, such as the identical band issue, and one can also place more stringent restrictions on theoretical calculations which predict SD states and their properties. Brinkman, et al., used the early implementation of the GAMMASPHERE spectrometer array (32 detectors) and proposed a single, candidate {gamma} ray linking the {sup 194}Pb yrast SD band to the low-lying ND states in {sup 194}Pb. Using 55 detectors in the GAMMASPHERE array Khoo, et al., observed multiple links between the yrast SD band in {sup 194}Hg and the low-lying level scheme and conclusively determined E{sub x} and J of the yrast SD states. Here the authors report on an experiment in which Gammasphere with 88 detectors was used and the E{sub x} and J{sup {pi}} values of the yrast SD states in {sup 194}Pb were uniquely determined. Twelve one-step linking transitions between the yrast SD band and low-lying states in {sup 194}Pb have been identified, including the transition proposed by Brinkman. These transitions have been placed in the level scheme of {sup 194}Pb using coincidence relationships and agreements between the energies of the primary transitions and the energy differences in level spacings. Furthermore, measurements of angular asymmetries have yielded the multipolarities of the primaries which have allowed J{sup {pi}} assignments of the {sup 194}Pb SD states to be unambiguously determined for the first time without a priori assumptions about the character of SD bands. A study performed in parallel to this work using the EUROGAM-II array reports similar, but somewhat less extensive, results.

  14. Electrochemical and metallurgical aspects of stress corrosion cracking of sensitized Alloy 600 in simulated primary water containing sulfur contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, R.; Kelly, K.

    1985-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of sensitized Alloy 600 was investigated in aerated solutions of sodium thiosulfate containing 1.3% boric acid. Results indicate that in the borated thiosulfate solution containing 7 ppM sulfur, 5 ppM lithium as lithium hydroxide is sufficient to inhibit SCC in U-bends. The occurrence of inhibition seems to correlate to the rapid increase of pH and conductivity of the solution as a result of the lithium hydroxide addition. In the slow strain rate tests in the borated solution containing 0.7 ppM lithium as lithium hydroxide, significant SCC is observed at a sulfur level of 30 ppB, i.e., a lithium to sulfur ratio of 23. In a parallel test in 30 ppB sulfur level but without any lithium hydroxide, the SCC is more severe than that in the lithiated environment. In the constant load test on a specimen held initially at a nominal stress near the yield strength of the material, cracks continue to grow until fracture during controlled, progressive dilution of the bulk solution, leading to final lithium concentration of 1.5 ppM and sulfur concentration (as thiosulfate) of 9.6 ppB i.e., a lithium to sulfur ratio of about 156, although lithium hydroxide retards the rate of crack propagation to some extent. The crack growth rate is strongly influenced by the electrochemical potential which is primarily governed by the local crack tip chemistry.

  15. Examinations of Oxidation and Sulfidation of Grain Boundaries in Alloy 600 Exposed to Simulated Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Water

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Saxey, David W.; Kruska, Karen; Moore, K. L.; Lozano-Perez, Sergio; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-06-01

    High-resolution characterizations of intergranular attack in alloy 600 (Ni-17Cr-9Fe) exposed to 325 C simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water have been conducted using a combination of scanning electron microscopy, NanoSIMS, analytical transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The intergranular attack exhibited a two-stage microstructure that consisted of continuous corrosion/oxidation to a depth of ~200 nm from the surface followed by discrete Cr-rich sulfides to a further depth of ~500 nm. The continuous oxidation region contained primarily nanocrystalline MO-structure oxide particles and ended at Ni-rich, Cr-depleted grain boundaries with spaced CrS precipitates. Three-dimensional characterization of the sulfidized region using site-specific atom probe tomography revealed extraordinary grain boundary composition changes, including total depletion of Cr across a several nm wide dealloyed zone as a result of grain boundary migration.

  16. Investigation of particulate corrosion product transients in the primary coolant of the Winfrith steam generating heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Means, F.A.; Rodliffe, R.S.; Harding, K.

    1980-03-01

    Equipment for on-line counting and sizing of particles has been used to sample coolant from the primary circuit of a water reactor (the Winfrith steam generating heavy water reactor). The particle size distribution is compared with a determination by electron microscopic examination of a filter sample and is shown to be in good agreement. The technique allows transients in coolant-borne particle concentrations to be sufficiently resolved for analysis in terms of postulated particle deposition and resuspension behavior. The deposition behavior is found to be describable by a first-order rate process with rate constants smaller than those that would be predicted from mass transfer considerations. It is concluded that deposition cannot be limited by mass transfer alone.

  17. Effect of Hydrophobic Primary Organic Aerosols on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Ozonolysis of α-Pinene

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chen; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Thornton, Joel A.; Madronich, Sasha; Ortega, John V.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Laskin, Alexander; Maughan, A. D.

    2007-10-16

    Semi-empirical secondary organic aerosol (SOA) models typically assume a well-mixed organic aerosol phase even in the presence of hydrophobic primary organic aerosols (POA). This assumption significantly enhances the modeled SOA yields as additional organic mass is made available to absorb greater amounts of oxidized secondary organic gases than otherwise. We investigate the applicability of this critical assumption by measuring SOA yields from ozonolysis of α-pinene (a major biogenic SOA precursor) in a smog chamber in the absence and in the presence of dioctyl phthalate (DOP) and lubricating oil seed aerosol. These particles serve as surrogates for urban hydrophobic POA. The results show that these POA did not enhance the SOA yields. If these results are found to apply to other biogenic SOA precursors, then the semi-empirical models used in many global models would predict significantly less biogenic SOA mass and display reduced sensitivity to anthropogenic POA emissions than previously thought.

  18. Design and test of a trumpet secondary concentrator for a faceted stretched membrane primary in a dish-Stirling application

    SciTech Connect

    O`Gallagher, J.J.; Winston, R.; Diver, R.B.; Mahoney, A.R.

    1995-11-01

    A ``trumpet`` type nonimaging secondary concentrator has been designed and a prototype fabricated for test with the Cummins Power Generation (CPG) 7.5 kW{sub e} dish-Stirling system. Trumpets are families of hyperbolae of revolution which can be characterized by three parameters, the exit aperture radius, the asymptotic angle, and the truncation height. The test prototype unit was designed using a detailed ray trace code to simulate the radiation distribution from the primary and modeling the performance across a range of these trumpet design parameters. The unit is 26.7 cm (10.5 in.) deep by about 69 cm (27 in.) wide, and has a geometric concentration of 1.7X. The test units were fabricated from polished copper spinnings, overcoated with vapor deposited aluminum and aluminum oxide layers and are water cooled. The objectives and test procedures for the experiments are reviewed.

  19. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 4: seismic response analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.C.; Ma, S.M.; Larder, R.A.

    1981-09-01

    This volume of the report gives a detailed account of the seismic response analysis of the primary coolant loop piping of Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Station. Because the purpose of this work was to perform a realistic simulation, best estimate loads and material properties were used for the calculation whenever possible. When such data were unavailable, conservative values were used. The calculation procedure included the generation of seismic input, the determination of dynamic soil properties, a three-part soil-structure-piping interaction analysis, and the post-response data procession. A large number of variables considered in the analysis can affect the seismic response stresses. This volume therefore describes a sensitivity study, as well as the method of analysis. The sensitivity study is included to establish confidence in the computed response stresses.

  20. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 6: failure mode analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.D.

    1981-09-01

    Material properties and failure criteria were evaluated to assess the requirements for double-ended guillotine break in the primary coolant loop of the Zion Unit 1 pressurized water reactor. The properties of the 316 stainless steel piping materials were obtained from the literature. Statistical distributions of both the tensile and fracture properties at room and operating temperatures were developed. Yield and ultimate strength tensile properties were combined to estimate the material flow strength. The flow strength and fracture properties were used in the various failure models analyzed. Linear-elastic, elastic-plastic, and fully plastic fracture models were compared, and the governing fracture criterion was determined. For the particular case studied, the fully plastic flow requirement was found to be the controlling fracture criterion leading to a double-ended guillotine pipe break.

  1. Biotechnological reduction of sulfide in an industrial primary wastewater treatment system: A sustainable and successful case study

    SciTech Connect

    Rajamani, S.

    1996-12-31

    The leather industry is an important export-oriented industry in India, with more than 3,000 tanneries located in different clusters. Sodium sulfide, a toxic chemical, is used in large quantities to remove hair and excess flesh from hides and skins. Most of the sodium sulfide used in the process is discharged as waste in the effluent, which causes serious environmental problems. Reduction of sulfide in the effluent is generally achieved by means of chemicals in the pretreatment system, which involves aerobic mixing using large amounts of chemicals and high energy, and generating large volumes of sludge. A simple biotechnological system that uses the residual biosludge from the secondary settling tank was developed, and the commercial-scale application established that more than 90% of the sulfide could be reduced in the primary treatment system. In addition to the reduction of sulfide, foul smells, BOD and COD are reduced to a considerable level. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Microstructural effects on microdeformation and primary-side stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 tubing: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Charlot, L.A.; Henager, C.H. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    Microdeformation characteristics in Alloy 600 tubing have been examined after various tensile deformations. Microstructure developed during processing was found to control subsequent microdeformation behavior. Grain boundary carbides were the most effective source of dislocations, activating at lower macro-strains and continuing to operate at higher macro-strains than other sources. Ledges within grain boundaries, twin boundaries and matrix carbides also acted as dislocation sources. Most dislocation activity at low strains was confined to planar arrays. A conceptual model is presented to account for the effects of interfacial and matrix microstructure on microdeformation and primary-side SCC of Alloy 600 tubing. Microstructure is linked to IGSCC resistance through its influence on microdeformation behavior and the resultant crack-tip stress state. Dislocation source activity at grain interfaces is proposed to be a critical aspect controlling IGSCC susceptibility. Effective sources such as grain boundary carbides promote crack blunting, decrease the crack-tip stress state and increase resistance to cracking.

  3. Determination of the threshold values for corrosion fatigue crack growth rate of pressure vessel steels in PWR primary water

    SciTech Connect

    Haenninen, H.E.; Arilahti, E.; Ehrnsten, U.

    1992-12-31

    Corrosion fatigue crack growth rates over a range of frequencies from 10 Hz to 0.00001 Hz in two materials that have exhibited low-rate (A508 Class 3) and high-rate (A533B) crack growth behaviour at 288{degrees}C were studied at 200{degrees}C in PWR primary water. The frequency values above which marked environmental enhancement was observed were determined. Also the threshold values in terms of {Delta}K{sub th}, above which the marked environmental enhancement was observed in the crack growth rate, were determined both for A533B steel and Soviet pressure vessel steels with certain test parameters. Based on the extensive fractography the crack growth rate results are discussed mechanistically.

  4. Coupling reactions of phenylacetylene with water, hydrogen sulfide and primary amines mediated by a Ru(II) phenylvinylidene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchini, C.; Peruzzini, M.; Zanobini, F. [Istituto per lo Studio della Stereochimica ed Energetica dei Composti di Coordinazione, Florence (Italy)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The Ru(II) fragment [(PNP)RuCl{sub 2}] assists the reaction of phenylacetylene with water, hydrogen sulfide and primary amines to give carbonyl, {eta}{sup 1}-benzylthioaldehyde, and isonitrile complexes, respectively [PNP = CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PPh{sub 2}){sub 2}]. In all of these processes, the reaction is initiated by the 1-alkyne to vinylidene tautomerization at the Ru(II) center, followed by attack of the H{sub 2}Z molecule (Z = O, S, NR) on the vinylidene ligand. The mechanisms which account for these transformations have been completely elucidated and several of the intermediates in these reactions have been isolated and fully characterized. The scope of these reactions in view of their potential applications in organic syntheses involving thioaldehydes and optically pure isonitriles will be briefly presented.

  5. Helical Tomotherapy Versus Conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Primary Chemoradiation in Cervical Cancer Patients: An Intraindividual Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Marnitz, Simone; Lukarski, Dusko; Koehler, Christhardt; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Ebert, Andreas; Budach, Volker; Schneider, Achim; Stromberger, Carmen

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivered by helical tomotherapy (HT) with conventional IMRT for primary chemoradiation in cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty cervical cancer patients undergoing primary chemoradiation received radiation with HT; 10 patients underwent pelvic irradiation (PEL) and 10 extended-field irradiation (EXT). For treatment planning, the simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) concept was applied. Tumor, pelvic, with or without para-aortic lymph nodes were defined as planning target volume A (PTV-A) with a prescribed dose of 1.8/50.4 Gy (28 fractions). The SIB dose for the parametrium (PTV-B), was 2.12/59.36 Gy. The lower target constraints were 95% of the prescribed dose in 95% of the target volume, and the upper dose constraint was 107%. The irradiated small-bowel volumes were kept as low as possible. For every HT plan, a conventional IMRT plan was calculated and compared with regard to dose-volume histogram, conformity index and conformity number, and homogeneity index. Results: Both techniques allowed excellent target volume coverage and sufficient SB sparing. Conformity index and conformity number results for both PTV-A and PTV-B, homogeneity index for PTV-B, and SB sparing for V45, V50, Dmax, and D1% were significantly better with HT. SB sparing was significantly better for conventional IMRT at low doses (V10). Conclusions: Both HT and conventional IMRT provide optimal treatment of cervical cancer patients. The HT technique was significantly favored with regard to target conformity, homogeneity, and SB sparing. Randomized trials are needed to assess the oncological outcome, toxicity, and clinical relevance of these differences.

  6. Pretreatment Evaluation of Microcirculation by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Survival in Primary Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, Alexander Friedrich; Piringer, Gudrun; Kremser, Christian; Judmaier, Werner; Saely, Christoph Hubert; Lukas, Peter; Öfner, Dietmar

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of the perfusion index (PI), a microcirculatory parameter estimated from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability, to predict overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with primary rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 83 patients with stage cT3 rectal cancer requiring neoadjuvant chemoradiation were investigated with DCE-MRI before start of therapy. Contrast-enhanced dynamic T{sub 1} mapping was obtained, and a simple data analysis strategy based on the calculation of the maximum slope of the tissue concentration–time curve divided by the maximum of the arterial input function was used as a measure of tumor microcirculation (PI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability. Results: In 39 patients (47.0%), T downstaging (ypT0-2) was observed. During a mean (±SD) follow-up period of 71 ± 29 months, 58 patients (69.9%) survived, and disease-free survival was achieved in 45 patients (54.2%). The mean PI (PImean) averaged over the group of nonresponders was significantly higher than for responders. Additionally, higher PImean in age- and gender-adjusted analyses was strongly predictive of therapy nonresponse. Most importantly, PImean strongly and significantly predicted disease-free survival (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.85 [ 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.54; P<.001)]; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.81 [1.30-2.51]; P<.001) as well as overall survival (unadjusted HR 1.42 [1.02-1.99], P=.040; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.43 [1.03-1.98]; P=.034). Conclusions: This analysis identifies PImean as a novel biomarker that is predictive for therapy response, disease-free survival, and overall survival in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer.

  7. Efficacy and Toxicity of Chemoradiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Unknown Primary of Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Balboni, Tracy A.; Haddad, Robert I.; Norris, Charles M.; Posner, Marshall R.; Wirth, Lori J.; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: No single standard treatment paradigm is available for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma of an unknown primary (HNCUP). Bilateral neck radiotherapy with mucosal axis irradiation is widely used, with or without chemotherapy and/or surgical resection. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a highly conformal method for delivering radiation that is becoming the standard of care and might reduce the long-term treatment-related sequelae. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for HNCUP. Patients and Materials: A retrospective study of all patients treated at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for HNCUP with IMRT between August 2004 and January 2009. The primary endpoint was overall survival; the secondary endpoints were locoregional and distant control, and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: A total of 24 patients with HNCUP were included. Of these patients, 22 had Stage N2 disease or greater. All patients underwent neck computed tomography, positron emission tomography-computed tomography, and examination under anesthesia with directed biopsies. Of the 24 patients, 22 received concurrent chemotherapy, and 7 (29%) also underwent induction chemotherapy. The median involved nodal dose was 70 Gy, and the median mucosal dose was 60 Gy. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years, the 2-year actuarial overall survival and locoregional control rate was 92% and 100%, respectively. Only 25% of the patients had Grade 2 xerostomia, although 11 patients (46%) required esophageal dilation for stricture. Conclusion: In a single-institution series, IMRT-based chemoradiotherapy for HNCUP was associated with superb overall survival and locoregional control. The xerostomia rates were promising, but the aggressive therapy was associated with significant rates of esophageal stenosis.

  8. Reproductive Status at First Diagnosis Influences Risk of Radiation-Induced Second Primary Contralateral Breast Cancer in the WECARE Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Jennifer D.; Boice, John D.; Stovall, Marilyn; Reiner, Anne S.; Bernstein, Leslie; John, Esther M.; Lynch, Charles F.; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Knight, Julia A.; Thomas, Duncan C.; Haile, Robert W.; Smith, Susan A.; Capanu, Marinela; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Shore, Roy E.; Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Our study examined whether reproductive and hormonal factors before, at the time of, or after radiation treatment for a first primary breast cancer modify the risk of radiation-induced second primary breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The Women's Environmental, Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology (WECARE) Study is a multicenter, population-based study of 708 women (cases) with asynchronous contralateral breast cancer (CBC) and 1399 women (controls) with unilateral breast cancer. Radiotherapy (RT) records, coupled with anthropomorphic phantom simulations, were used to estimate quadrant-specific radiation dose to the contralateral breast for each patient. Rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed to assess the relationship between reproductive factors and risk of CBC. Results: Women who were nulliparous at diagnosis and exposed to {>=}1 Gy to the contralateral breast had a greater risk for CBC than did matched unexposed nulliparous women (RR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-4.0). No increased risk was seen in RT-exposed parous women (RR = 1.1; 95% CI, 0.8-1.4). Women treated with RT who later became pregnant (8 cases and 9 controls) had a greater risk for CBC (RR = 6.0; 95% CI, 1.3-28.4) than unexposed women (4 cases and 7 controls) who also became pregnant. The association of radiation with risk of CBC did not vary by number of pregnancies, history of breastfeeding, or menopausal status at the time of first breast cancer diagnosis. Conclusion: Nulliparous women treated with RT were at an increased risk for CBC. Although based on small numbers, women who become pregnant after first diagnosis also seem to be at an increased risk for radiation-induced CBC.

  9. Primary and Site Energy

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    electricity reflect the amount of energy actually consumed within the building. Site energy data are most useful to building engineers, energy managers, building owners and others...

  10. Primary zone air proportioner

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, Edward N. G.

    1982-10-12

    An air proportioner is provided for a liquid hydrocarbon fueled gas turbine of the type which is convertible to oil gas fuel and to coal gas fuel. The turbine includes a shell for enclosing the turbine, an air duct for venting air in said shell to a gasifier, and a fuel injector for injecting gasified fuel into the turbine. The air proportioner comprises a second air duct for venting air from the air duct for mixing with fuel from the gasifier. The air can be directly injected into the gas combustion basket along with the fuel from the injector or premixed with fuel from the gasifier prior to injection by the fuel injector.

  11. Treatment and Outcomes in Patients With Primary Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma: The BC Cancer Agency Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Sarah N.; Wai, Elaine S.; Tan, King; Alexander, Cheryl; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To review the treatment and outcomes of patients with primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL). Methods and Materials: Clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were analyzed for all patients referred to our institution from 1981 through 2011 with primary CBCL without extracutaneous or distant nodal spread at diagnosis (n=136). Hematopathologists classified 99% of cases using the World Health Organization-European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (WHO-EORTC) guidelines. Results: Median age at diagnosis was 62 years. Classification was 18% diffuse large B-cell leg-type (DLBCL-leg), 32% follicle center (FCCL), 45% marginal zone (MZL), and 6% nonclassifiable (OTHER). Of the 111 subjects with indolent lymphoma (FCCL, MZL, OTHER), 79% received radiation alone (RT), 11% surgery alone, 3% chemotherapy alone, 4% chemotherapy followed by RT, and 3% observation. Following treatment, 29% of subjects relapsed. In-field recurrence occurred in 2% treated with RT and in 33% treated with surgery alone. Of the 25 subjects with DLBCL-leg, 52% received chemotherapy followed by RT, 24% chemotherapy, 20% RT, and 4% surgery alone. Seventy-nine percent received CHOP-type chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin or epirubicin, vincristine, prednisone), 47% with rituximab added. Overall and disease-specific survival and time to progression at 5 years were 81%, 92%, and 69% for indolent and 26%, 61%, and 54% for DLBCL-leg, respectively. On Cox regression analysis of indolent subjects, RT was associated with better time to progression (P=.05). RT dose, chemo, age >60 y, and >1 lesion were not significantly associated with time to progression. For DLBCL-leg, disease-specific survival at 5 years was 100% for those receiving rituximab versus 67% for no rituximab (P=.13). Conclusions: This review demonstrates better outcomes for indolent histology compared with DLBCL-leg, validating the prognostic utility of the WHO-EORTC classification. In the indolent group

  12. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part B; Limnology, Primary Production, and Zooplankton in Lake Roosevelt, Washington, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, John; Spotts, Jim; Underwood, Keith

    2002-11-01

    The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program is the result of a merger between two projects, the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 to continue work historically completed under the separate projects, and is now referred to as the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. The 1998 Annual Report, Part B. Limnology, Primary Production, and Zooplankton in Lake Roosevelt, Washington examined the limnology, primary production, and zooplankton at eleven locations throughout the reservoir. The 1998 research protocol required a continuation of the more complete examination of limnological parameters in Lake Roosevelt that began in 1997. Phytoplankton and periphyton speciation, phytoplankton and periphyton chlorophyll a analysis, complete zooplankton biomass analysis by taxonomic group, and an increased number of limnologic parameters (TDG, TDS, etc.) were examined and compared with 1997 results. Total dissolved gas levels were greatly reduced in 1998, compared with 1997, likely resulting from the relatively normal water year experienced in 1998. Mean water temperatures were similar to what was observed in past years, with a maximum of 22.7 C and a minimum of 2.6 C. Oxygen concentrations were also relatively normal, with a maximum of 16.6 mg/L, and a minimum of 0.9 mg/L. Phytoplankton in Lake Roosevelt was primarily composed of microplankton (29.6%), Cryptophyceae (21.7%), and Bacillriophyceae (17.0 %). Mean total phytoplankton chlorophyll a maximum concentration occurred in May (3.53 mg/m{sup 3}), and the minimum in January (0.39 mg/m{sup 3}). Phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations appear to be influenced by hydro-operations and temperature. Trophic status as indicated by phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations place Lake Roosevelt in the oligomesotrophic range. Periphyton colonization rates and biovolume were significantly greater at a depth

  13. Primary system fission product release and transport: A state-of-the-art report to the committee on the safety of nuclear installations

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.L.

    1994-06-01

    This report presents a summary of the status of research activities associated with fission product behavior (release and transport) under severe accident conditions within the primary systems of water-moderated and water-cooled nuclear reactors. For each of the areas of fission product release and fission product transport, the report summarizes relevant information on important phenomena, major experiments performed, relevant computer models and codes, comparisons of computer code calculations with experimental results, and general conclusions on the overall state of the art. Finally, the report provides an assessment of the overall importance and knowledge of primary system release and transport phenomena and presents major conclusions on the state of the art.

  14. Identification of full-length transmitted/founder viruses and their progeny in primary HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette; Hraber, Peter; Giorgi, Elena; Bhattacharya, T

    2009-01-01

    Identification of transmitted/founder virus genomes and their progeny by is a novel strategy for probing the molecular basis of HIV-1 transmission and for evaluating the genetic imprint of viral and host factors that act to constrain or facilitate virus replication. Here, we show in a cohort of twelve acutely infected subjects (9 clade B; 3 clade C), that complete genomic sequences of transmitted/founder viruses could be inferred using single genome amplification of plasma viral RNA, direct amplicon sequencing, and a model of random virus evolution. This allowed for the precise identification, chemical synthesis, molecular cloning, and biological analysis of those viruses actually responsible for productive clinical infection and for a comprehensive mapping of sequential viral genomes and proteomes for mutations that are necessary or incidental to the establishment of HIV-1 persistence. Transmitted/founder viruses were CD4 and CCR5 tropic, replicated preferentially in activated primary T-Iymphocytes but not monocyte-derived macrophages, and were effectively shielded from most heterologous or broadly neutralizing antibodies. By 3 months of infection, the evolving viral quasispecies in three subjects showed mutational fixation at only 2-5 discreet genomic loci. By 6-12 months, mutational fixation was evident at 18-27 genomic loci. Some, but not all, of these mutations were attributable to virus escape from cytotoxic Tlymphocytes or neutralizing antibodies, suggesting that other viral or host factors may influence early HIV -1 fitness.

  15. Impact of atmospheric refraction: how deeply can we probe exo-earth's atmospheres during primary eclipse observations?

    SciTech Connect

    Btrmieux, Yan; Kaltenegger, Lisa

    2014-08-10

    Most models used to predict or fit exoplanet transmission spectra do not include all the effects of atmospheric refraction. Namely, the angular size of the star with respect to the planet can limit the lowest altitude, or highest density and pressure, probed during primary eclipses as no rays passing below this critical altitude can reach the observer. We discuss this geometrical effect of refraction for all exoplanets and tabulate the critical altitude, density, and pressure for an exoplanet identical to Earth with a 1 bar N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere as a function of both the incident stellar flux (Venus, Earth, and Mars-like) at the top of the atmosphere and the spectral type (O5-M9) of the host star. We show that such a habitable exo-Earth can be probed to a surface pressure of 1 bar only around the coolest stars. We present 0.4-5.0 ?m model transmission spectra of Earth's atmosphere viewed as a transiting exoplanet, and show how atmospheric refraction modifies the transmission spectrum depending on the spectral type of the host star. We demonstrate that refraction is another phenomenon that can potentially explain flat transmission spectra over some spectral regions.

  16. STRESS CORROSION CRACK GROWTH RESPONSE FOR ALLOY 152/52 DISSIMILAR METAL WELDS IN PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-08-15

    As part of ongoing research into primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of alloy 690 and its welds, SCC tests have been conducted on alloy 152/52 dissimilar metal (DM) welds with cracks positioned with the goal to assess weld dilution and fusion line effects on SCC susceptibility. No increased crack growth rate was found when evaluating a 20% Cr dilution zone in alloy 152M joined to carbon steel (CS) that had not undergone a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). However, high SCC crack growth rates were observed when the crack reached the fusion line of that material where it propagated both on the fusion line and in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the carbon steel. Crack surface and crack profile examinations of the specimen revealed that cracking in the weld region was transgranular (TG) with weld grain boundaries not aligned with the geometric crack growth plane of the specimen. The application of a typical pressure vessel PWHT on a second set of alloy 152/52 – carbon steel DM weld specimens was found to eliminate the high SCC susceptibility in the fusion line and carbon steel HAZ regions. PWSCC tests were also performed on alloy 152-304SS DM weld specimens. Constant K crack growth rates did not exceed 5x10-9 mm/s in this material with post-test examinations revealing cracking primarily on the fusion line and slightly into the 304SS HAZ.

  17. Primary explants of human uroepithelium show an unusual response to low-dose irradiation with cobalt-60 gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Mothersill, C.; Seymour, C.B.; Harney, J.; Parsons, K.; Lyng, F.; Cottell, D.; Murphy, D.M.

    1995-05-01

    Recent results using very low doses of radiation have suggested that there is a hypersensitive region where cultures show an enhanced level of cell killing leading to a non-monotonic survival curve. This effect has been observed at doses below 2 Gy in mammalian systems and at much higher doses in insect cells. In this paper we report observation of the effect in primary human uroepithelial cell cultures. The effect was measured using a postirradiation proliferation assay where irradiated explants of standard size were allowed to proliferate for 14 days after exposure to {sup 60}Co{gamma} irradiation. By 14 days the majority of cultures derived from explants irradiated with 2-5 Gy showed little evidence of growth inhibition and cell numbers approached or even exceeded those obtained in the controls. There was, however, a significant reduction in cell number and growth rate in all cultures exposed to doses lower than 1 Gy. Oncoprotein and EGFR expression were also measured in these cultures and were significantly increased. Morphological evidence of apoptosis was present in all irradiated cultures at 4 h after exposure, but this persisted for longer periods in cultures exposed to low doses. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, James Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-15

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  19. Hydrodynamic instability growth and mix experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Barrios, M.; Caggiano, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W. W.; Hurricane, O.; Kroll, J.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Ma, T.; McNaney, J. M.; Mintz, M.; Parham, T.; Peterson, J. L.; and others

    2014-05-15

    Hydrodynamic instability growth and its effects on implosion performance were studied at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 443, 2841 (2004)]. Implosion performance and mix have been measured at peak compression using plastic shells filled with tritium gas and containing embedded localized carbon-deuterium diagnostic layers in various locations in the ablator. Neutron yield and ion temperature of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions were used as a measure of shell-gas mix, while neutron yield of the tritium-tritium fusion reaction was used as a measure of implosion performance. The results have indicated that the low-mode hydrodynamic instabilities due to surface roughness were the primary culprits for yield degradation, with atomic ablator-gas mix playing a secondary role. In addition, spherical shells with pre-imposed 2D modulations were used to measure instability growth in the acceleration phase of the implosions. The capsules were imploded using ignition-relevant laser pulses, and ablation-front modulation growth was measured using x-ray radiography for a shell convergence ratio of ∼2. The measured growth was in good agreement with that predicted, thus validating simulations for the fastest growing modulations with mode numbers up to 90 in the acceleration phase. Future experiments will be focused on measurements at higher convergence, higher-mode number modulations, and growth occurring during the deceleration phase.

  20. Prognostic Impact of Radiation Therapy to the Primary Tumor in Patients With Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Oligometastasis at Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Instituto Madrileno de Oncologia/Grupo IMO, Madrid (Spain); Gomez, Daniel, E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang, Yan; Hong, David S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Heymach, John V. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lin, Steven H.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: We investigated prognostic factors associated with survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and oligometastatic disease at diagnosis, particularly the influence of local treatment to the primary site on prognosis. Methods and Materials: From January 2000 through June 2011, 78 consecutive patients with oligometastatic NSCLC (<5 metastases) at diagnosis underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy ({>=}45 Gy) to the primary site. Forty-four of these patients also received definitive local treatment for the oligometastases. Survival outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Univariate Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed better overall survival (OS) for those patients who received at least 63 Gy of radiation to the primary site (P=.002), received definitive local treatment for oligometastasis (P=.041), had a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score >80 (P=.007), had a gross tumor volume {<=}124 cm{sup 3} (P=.002), had adenocarcinoma histology (P=.002), or had no history of respiratory disease (P=.016). On multivariate analysis, radiation dose, performance status, and tumor volume retained significance (P=.004, P=.006, and P<.001, respectively). The radiation dose also maintained significance when patients with and without brain metastases were analyzed separately. Conclusions: Tumor volume, KPS, and receipt of at least 63 Gy to the primary tumor are associated with improved OS in patients with oligometastatic NSCLC at diagnosis. Our results suggest that a subset of such patients may benefit from definitive local therapy.