National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for decorative vented gas

  1. Gas venting

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Edwin F.

    1976-01-01

    Improved gas venting from radioactive-material containers which utilizes the passageways between interbonded impervious laminae.

  2. Gas venting system

    DOEpatents

    Khan, Amjad; Dreier, Ken Wayne; Moulthrop, Lawrence Clinton; White, Erik James

    2010-06-29

    A system to vent a moist gas stream is disclosed. The system includes an enclosure and an electrochemical cell disposed within the enclosure, the electrochemical cell productive of the moist gas stream. A first vent is in fluid communication with the electrochemical cell for venting the moist gas stream to an exterior of the enclosure, and a second vent is in fluid communication with an interior of the enclosure and in thermal communication with the first vent for discharging heated air to the exterior of the enclosure. At least a portion of the discharging heated air is for preventing freezing of the moist gas stream within the first vent.

  3. Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Vented and Flared Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and ...

  4. Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Vented and Flared Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and ...

  5. Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Release Date: 03312016 Next Release Date: 04292016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Vented and Flared Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Vented and ...

  6. Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Date: 12312015 Next Release Date: 01292016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Vented and Flared Arizona Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Vented and Flared...

  7. Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

  8. Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

  9. Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  10. Tennessee Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Tennessee Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 408 180 165 376 585 339 156 117 126 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  11. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 98 96 99 75 0 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring

  12. Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 330 0 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages:

  13. Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 126,629 129,408 130,766 1970's 129,629 39,799 38,797 36,411 34,199 31,802 30,197 29,186 27,489 26,605 1980's 25,555 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next

  14. Kentucky Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6 15 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 NA 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016

  15. Illinois Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 126 102 93 1970's 122 3,997 1,806 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 NA 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  16. Unit vent airflow measurements using a tracer gas technique

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.G.; Lagus, P.L.; Fleming, K.M.

    1997-08-01

    An alternative method for assessing flowrates that does not depend on point measurements of air flow velocity is the constant tracer injection technique. In this method one injects a tracer gas at a constant rate into a duct and measures the resulting concentration downstream of the injection point. A simple equation derived from the conservation of mass allows calculation of the flowrate at the point of injection. Flowrate data obtained using both a pitot tube and a flow measuring station were compared with tracer gas flowrate measurements in the unit vent duct at the Callaway Nuclear Station during late 1995 and early 1996. These data are presented and discussed with an eye toward obtaining precise flowrate data for release rate calculations. The advantages and disadvantages of the technique are also described. In those test situations for which many flowrate combinations are required, or in large area ducts, a tracer flowrate determination requires fewer man-hours than does a conventional traverse-based technique and does not require knowledge of the duct area. 6 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Predicting Backdrafting and Spillage for Natural-Draft Gas Combustion Appliances: Validating VENT-II

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, Vi H.; Pastor-Perez, Albert; Singer, Brett C.; Wray, Craig P.

    2013-04-01

    VENT-II is a computer program designed to provide detailed analysis of natural draft and induced draft combustion appliance vent-systems (i.e., furnace or water heater). This program is capable of predicting house depressurization thresholds that lead to backdrafting and spillage of combustion appliances; however, validation reports of the program being applied for this purpose are not readily available. The purpose of this report is to assess VENT-II’s ability to predict combustion gas spillage events due to house depressurization by comparing VENT-II simulated results with experimental data for four appliance configurations. The results show that VENT-II correctly predicts depressurizations resulting in spillage for natural draft appliances operating in cold and mild outdoor conditions, but not for hot conditions. In the latter case, the predicted depressurizations depend on whether the vent section is defined as part of the vent connector or the common vent when setting up the model. Overall, the VENTII solver requires further investigation before it can be used reliably to predict spillage caused by depressurization over a full year of weather conditions, especially where hot conditions occur.

  18. Potential Flammable Gas Explosion in the TRU Vent and Purge Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, A

    2006-04-05

    The objective of the analysis was to determine the failure of the Vent and Purge (V&P) Machine due to potential explosion in the Transuranic (TRU) drum during its venting and/or subsequent explosion in the V&P machine from the flammable gases (e.g., hydrogen and Volatile Organic Compounds [VOCs]) vented into the V&P machine from the TRU drum. The analysis considers: (a) increase in the pressure in the V&P cabinet from the original deflagration in the TRU drum including lid ejection, (b) pressure wave impact from TRU drum failure, and (c) secondary burns or deflagrations resulting from excess, unburned gases in the cabinet area. A variety of cases were considered that maximized the pressure produced in the V&P cabinet. Also, cases were analyzed that maximized the shock wave pressure in the cabinet from TRU drum failure. The calculations were performed for various initial drum pressures (e.g., 1.5 and 6 psig) for 55 gallon TRU drum. The calculated peak cabinet pressures ranged from 16 psig to 50 psig for various flammable gas compositions. The blast on top of cabinet and in outlet duct ranged from 50 psig to 63 psig and 12 psig to 16 psig, respectively, for various flammable gas compositions. The failure pressures of the cabinet and the ducts calculated by structural analysis were higher than the pressure calculated from potential flammable gas deflagrations, thus, assuring that V&P cabinet would not fail during this event. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 68 calculations showed that for a failure pressure of 20 psig, the available vent area in the V&P cabinet is 1.7 to 2.6 times the required vent area depending on whether hydrogen or VOCs burn in the V&P cabinet. This analysis methodology could be used to design the process equipment needed for venting TRU waste containers at other sites across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex.

  19. Tennessee Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  20. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  1. Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  2. Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  3. Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  4. Illinois Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  5. Kentucky Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  6. Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  7. Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  8. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  9. Tennessee Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  10. Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  11. Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  12. Kentucky Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  13. New mineral occurrences and mineralization processes: Wuda coal-fire gas vents of Inner Mongolia

    SciTech Connect

    Stracher, G.B.; Prakash, A.; Schroeder, P.; McCormack, J.; Zhang, X.M.; Van Dijk, P.; Blake, D.

    2005-12-01

    Five unique mineral assemblages that include the sulfates millosevichite, alunogen, anhydrite, tschermigite, coquimbite, voltaite, and godovikovite, as well as the halide salammoniac and an unidentified phase, according to X-ray diffraction and EDS data, were found as encrustations on quartzofeldspathic sand and sandstone adjacent to coal-fire gas vents associated with underground coal fires in the Wuda coalfield of Inner Mongolia. The mineral assemblage of alunogen, coquimbite, voltaite, and the unidentified phase collected front the same gas vent, is documented for the first time. Observations suggest that the sulfates millosevichite, alunogen, coquimbite, voltaite, godovikovite, and the unidentified phase, crystallized in response to a complex sequence of processes that include condensation, hydrothermal alteration, crystallization from solution, fluctuating vent temperatures, boiling, and dehydration reactions, whereas the halide salammoniac crystallized during the sublimation of coal-fire gas. Tschermigite and anhydrite formed by the reaction of coal-fire gas with quartzofelds pathic rock or by hydrothermal alteration of this rock and crystallization from an acid-rich aqueous solution. These minerals have potentially important environmental significance and may be vectors for the transmission of toxins. Coal fires also provide insight for the recognition in the geologic record of preserved mineral assemblages that are diagnostic of ancient fires.

  14. Coil spring venting arrangement

    DOEpatents

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-10-21

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed.

  15. Palladium nanoparticle decorated silicon nanowire field-effect transistor with side-gates for hydrogen gas detection

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Jae-Hyuk; Yun, Jeonghoon; Park, Inkyu; KI for the NanoCentury, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701; Mobile Sensor and IT Convergence Center, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 ; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2014-01-06

    A silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) with local side-gates and Pd surface decoration is demonstrated for hydrogen (H{sub 2}) detection. The SiNW FETs are fabricated by top-down method and functionalized with palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) through electron beam evaporation for H{sub 2} detection. The drain current of the PdNP-decorated device reversibly responds to H{sub 2} at different concentrations. The local side-gates allow individual addressing of each sensor and enhance the sensitivity by adjusting the working region to the subthreshold regime. A control experiment using a non-functionalized device verifies that the hydrogen-sensitivity is originated from the PdNPs functionalized on the SiNW surface.

  16. Laboratory determination of gas-side mass transfer coefficients applicable to soil-venting systems for removing petroleum hydrocarbons from vadose-zone soils. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Valkenburg, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    Contamination of the subsurface environment by organic solvents has become a national problem. The EPA's Superfund list (40 CFR Part 300, 1990) continues to grow, with continual discovery of new hazardous waste sites. Various techniques are employed to remediate these sites, including excavation and removal of the contaminated soil for proper disposal, pumping and treatment of contaminated ground water and an organic phase if present, containment by slurried soil-bentonite cut-off barriers, in situ biological treatment of the organic wastes, and vadose zone soil venting for gas absorption of volatiles. Each technique, or combination, may have merit at a given site. The soil venting process, an inexpensive but relatively successful technique for removal of contaminants from the vadose (unsaturated) zone, is the focus of the research.

  17. Vented Capacitor

    DOEpatents

    Brubaker, Michael Allen; Hosking, Terry Alan

    2006-04-11

    A technique of increasing the corona inception voltage (CIV), and thereby increasing the operating voltage, of film/foil capacitors is described. Intentional venting of the capacitor encapsulation improves the corona inception voltage by allowing internal voids to equilibrate with the ambient environment.

  18. W{sub 18}O{sub 49} nanorods decorated with Ag/AgCl nanoparticles as highly-sensitive gas-sensing material and visible-light-driven photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Shibin; Chang Xueting; Dong Lihua; Zhang Yidong; Li Zhenjiang; Qiu Yanyan

    2011-08-15

    A novel gas-sensing material and photocatalyst was successfully obtained by decorating Ag/AgCl nanoparticles on the W{sub 18}O{sub 49} nanorods through a clean photochemical route. The as-prepared samples were characterized using combined techniques of X-ray diffractometry, electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Gas-sensing measurements indicate that the Ag/AgCl/W{sub 18}O{sub 49} NRs sensors exhibit superior reducing gas-sensing properties to those of bare W{sub 18}O{sub 49} NRs, and they are highly selective and sensitive to NH{sub 3}, acetone, and H{sub 2}S with short response and recovery times. The Ag/AgCl/W{sub 18}O{sub 49} NRs photocatlysts also possess higher photocatalytic performance than bare W{sub 18}O{sub 49} NRs for degradation of methyl orange under simulated sunlight irradiation. Possible mechanisms concerning the enhancement of gas-sensing and photocatalytic activities of the Ag/AgCl/W{sub 18}O{sub 49} NRs composite were proposed. - Graphical Abstract: The Ag/AgCl nanoparticles adhered well to the W{sub 18}O{sub 49} nanorod. The Ag could act as transfer center of the photoexcited carriers, prohibiting their recombinations in both W{sub 18}O{sub 49} and AgCl. Highlights: > Ag/AgCl/W{sub 18}O{sub 49} NRs were successfully obtained via a clean photochemical route. > The Ag/AgCl nanoparticles decorated on the W{sub 18}O{sub 49} NRs possessed cladding structure. > The Ag/AgCl/W{sub 18}O{sub 49} NRs exhibited excellent gas-sensing and photocatalytic properties.

  19. Battery Vent Mechanism And Method

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, Larry K. W.

    2000-02-15

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

  20. Battery venting system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Casale, Thomas J.; Ching, Larry K. W.; Baer, Jose T.; Swan, David H.

    1999-01-05

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve.

  1. Battery venting system and method

    DOEpatents

    Casale, T.J.; Ching, L.K.W.; Baer, J.T.; Swan, D.H.

    1999-01-05

    Disclosed herein is a venting mechanism for a battery. The venting mechanism includes a battery vent structure which is located on the battery cover and may be integrally formed therewith. The venting mechanism includes an opening extending through the battery cover such that the opening communicates with a plurality of battery cells located within the battery case. The venting mechanism also includes a vent manifold which attaches to the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes a first opening which communicates with the battery vent structure opening and second and third openings which allow the vent manifold to be connected to two separate conduits. In this manner, a plurality of batteries may be interconnected for venting purposes, thus eliminating the need to provide separate vent lines for each battery. The vent manifold may be attached to the battery vent structure by a spin-welding technique. To facilitate this technique, the vent manifold may be provided with a flange portion which fits into a corresponding groove portion on the battery vent structure. The vent manifold includes an internal chamber which is large enough to completely house a conventional battery flame arrester and overpressure safety valve. In this manner, the vent manifold, when installed, lessens the likelihood of tampering with the flame arrester and safety valve. 8 figs.

  2. Electrochemical cell having improved pressure vent

    DOEpatents

    Dean, Kevin; Holland, Arthur; Fillmore, Donn

    1993-01-01

    The electrochemical cell of the instant invention includes a case having a gas outlet, one or more positive electrodes positioned within the case, one or more negative electrodes positioned within the case electrode separators positioned between the positive and negative electrodes, electrolyte positioned within the case, and a pressure vent for releasing internal pressure occurring in the case to the surrounding atmosphere. The pressure vent is affixed to the case covering the gas outlet, the pressure vent includes a vent housing having a hollow interior area in gaseous communication with the surrounding atmosphere and the interior of the case via the gas outlet, a pressure release piston positioned within the hollow interior area, the pressure release piston sized to surround the gas outlet and having a seal groove configured to encapsulate all but one surface of a seal mounted within the seal groove, leaving the non-encapsulated surface of the seal exposed, and a compression spring positioned to urge the pressure release piston to compress the seal in the seal groove and block the gas outlet in the case.

  3. Natural Gas Vented and Flared

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    165,360 165,928 209,439 212,848 260,394 288,743 1936-2014 Alaska 6,481 10,173 10,966 11,769 7,219 6,554 1967-2014 Alaska Onshore 5,271 8,034 9,276 9,244 5,670 5,779 1992-2014 ...

  4. Natural Gas Vented and Flared

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Montana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2015 New Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2015 North Dakota NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2015 Ohio NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 ...

  5. Natural Gas Vented and Flared

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6-2016 Colorado NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2016 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 1997-2016 Kansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2016 Louisiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 Montana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2016 New Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2016 North Dakota NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2016 Ohio NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 Oklahoma NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2016 Pennsylvania NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 Texas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 Utah NA NA NA NA NA NA 1994-2016 West Virginia NA NA NA NA NA

  6. ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

    2012-03-27

    A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

  7. Vented target elements for use in an isotope-production reactor. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

    1982-08-19

    A method is described for producing tritium gas in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins equipped with vents, and tritium gas is recovered from the coolant.

  8. MECHANICAL SYSTEMS - MULTIFAMILY: Venting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    MECHANICAL SYSTEMS - MULTIFAMILY: Venting MECHANICAL SYSTEMS - MULTIFAMILY: Venting 5_venting.zip (2.87 MB) More Documents & Publications MECHANICAL SYSTEMS - MULTIFAMILY: Combustion MECHANICAL SYSTEMS - MULTIFAMILY: Building as a System MECHANICAL SYSTEMS - MULTIFAMILY: Steam System Piping

  9. Did the Mississippian Lodgepole buildup at Dickinson Field (North Dakota) form as a gas seep ({open_quotes}vent{close_quotes}) community?

    SciTech Connect

    Longman, M.W.

    1996-10-01

    The Lower Mississippian Lodgepole carbonate buildup reservoir at Dickinson Field in Stark County, North Dakota, has been widely reported as being a Waulsortian (or Waulsortian-like) mound. The term {open_quotes}Waulsortian mound{close_quotes} is used for a variety of Early Mississippian carbonate buildups that share a number of features including an abundance of carbonate mud, a {open_quotes}framework{close_quotes} of organisms such as fenestrate bryozoans and crinoids that tended to trap or baffle sediment, and a general absence of marine-cemented reef framework. Although the age of the Lodgepole mound at Dickinson Field qualifies it to be a Waulsortian mound, petrographic study of cores reveals that the reservoir rocks are quite unlike those in true Waulsortian mounds. Instead of being dominated by carbonate mud, the Lodgepole mound core is dominated by marine cement. Furthermore, ostracods and microbial limestones are common in the mound core where they occur with crinoid debris and small amounts of bryozoan, coral, and brachiopod debris. The abundant microbial limestones and marine cement indicate that the Dickinson mound formed as a lithified reef on the sea floor rather than as a Waulsortian mud mound. The microbial limestones, marine cement, and common ostracods in the mount core, and the fact that the mound nucleated almost directly o top of the Bakken Shale, suggest that the Dickinson Lodgepole mound formed at the site of a submarine spring and gas seep.

  10. Transport characteristics across drum filter vents and polymer bags

    SciTech Connect

    Liekhus, K.J.

    1994-08-01

    The rate at which hydrogen (H {sub 2}) or a volatile organic compound (VOC) exits a layer of confinement in a vented waste drum is proportional to the concentration difference across the layer. The proportionality constant is the gas transport characteristic. A series of transport experiments were conducted to determine H{sub 2} and VOC transport characteristics across different drum filter vents and polymer bags. This report reviews the methods and results of past investigators in defining transport characteristics across filter vents and polymer bags, describes the apparatus and procedures used in these experiments, compares the reported and estimated transport characteristics with earlier results, and discusses the impact of changing the transport characteristic values used in model calculations.

  11. Decorative Steel Composition with a Crystalline Surface - Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Decorative Steel Composition with a Crystalline ... Technology Marketing SummaryA method for producing a new decorative steel with a ...

  12. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, James K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

  13. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 1231 Reserves ...

  14. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History ...

  15. A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers | Department of Energy A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers Comment that a requirement to reduce the BTU input rate of existing decorative

  16. ARRA Economic Impact and Jobs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers | Department of Energy A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers Comment that a requirement to reduce the BTU input rate of existing decorative

  17. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, J.K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

  18. Reactor pressure vessel head vents and methods of using the same

    SciTech Connect

    Gels, John L; Keck, David J; Deaver, Gerald A

    2014-10-28

    Internal head vents are usable in nuclear reactors and include piping inside of the reactor pressure vessel with a vent in the reactor upper head. Piping extends downward from the upper head and passes outside of the reactor to permit the gas to escape or be forcibly vented outside of the reactor without external piping on the upper head. The piping may include upper and lowers section that removably mate where the upper head joins to the reactor pressure vessel. The removable mating may include a compressible bellows and corresponding funnel. The piping is fabricated of nuclear-reactor-safe materials, including carbon steel, stainless steel, and/or a Ni--Cr--Fe alloy. Methods install an internal head vent in a nuclear reactor by securing piping to an internal surface of an upper head of the nuclear reactor and/or securing piping to an internal surface of a reactor pressure vessel.

  19. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Fuel Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... 1: Natural gas flaring associated with crude oil production ......as "lease and plant fuel" and for "pipeline and distribution use." 1 * Venting: The ...

  20. Monitoring arrangement for vented nuclear fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Campana, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel reactor core, fuel elements are arranged in a closely packed hexagonal configuration, each fuel element having diametrically opposed vents permitting 180.degree. rotation of the fuel elements to counteract bowing. A grid plate engages the fuel elements and forms passages for communicating sets of three, four or six individual vents with respective monitor lines in order to communicate vented radioactive gases from the fuel elements to suitable monitor means in a manner readily permitting detection of leakage in individual fuel elements.

  1. Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste

    DOEpatents

    Brassell, Gilbert W.; Brugger, Ronald P.

    1985-02-19

    Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

  2. Passive soil venting at the Chemical Waste Landfill Site at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, J.M.; Reavis, B.; Cheng, W.C.

    1995-05-01

    Passive Soil Vapor Extraction was tested at the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) site at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNLIW). Data collected included ambient pressures, differential pressures between soil gas and ambient air, gas flow rates into and out of the soil and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in vented soil gas. From the differential pressure and flow rate data, estimates of permeability were arrived at and compared with estimates from other studies. Flow, differential pressure, and ambient pressure data were collected for nearly 30 days. VOC data were collected for two six-hour periods during this time. Total VOC emissions were calculated and found to be under the limit set by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Although a complete process evaluation is not possible with the data gathered, some of the necessary information for designing a passive venting process was determined and the important parameters for designing the process were indicated. More study is required to evaluate long-term VOC removal using passive venting and to establish total remediation costs when passive venting is used as a polishing process following active soil vapor extraction.

  3. Examination of frit vent from Sixty-Watt Heat Source simulant fueled clad vent set

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.

    1995-11-01

    The flow rate and the metallurgical condition of a frit vent from a simulant-fueled clad vent set (CVS) that had been hot isostatically pressed (HIP) for the Sixty-Watt Heat Source program were evaluated. The flow rate form the defueled vent cup subassembly was reduced approximately 25% from the original flow rate. No obstructions were found to account for the reduced flow rate. Measurements indicate that the frit vent powder thickness was reduced about 30%. Most likely, the powder was compressed during the HIP operation, which increased the density of the powder layer and thus reduced the flow rate of the assembly. All other observed manufacturing attributes appeared to be normal, but the vent hole activation technique needs further refinement before it is used in applications requiring maximum CVS integrity.

  4. Template Directed Formation of Nanoparticle Decorated Multi-Walled...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Carbon Nanotube Bundles with Uniform Diameter Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Template Directed Formation of Nanoparticle Decorated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube ...

  5. Energy-Efficient Holiday Decorating Tips | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    save you energy and money. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.competerspiro Using LED lights for your holiday decorations can save you energy and money. | Photo courtesy of ...

  6. Biodegradation of jet fuel in vented columns of water-unsaturated sandy soil. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Coho, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of soil water content on the rate of jet fuel (JP-4) biodegradation in air-vented, water-unsaturated columns of sandy soil was investigated. The contaminated soil was obtained from a spill site located on Tyndall AFB, Fla. The initial soil loading was 4590 mg of JP-4/kg of dry soil. Three laboratory columns were packed with the contaminated soil, saturated and drained for periods of 81-89 days. Two columns were continuously vented with air, and the third, intended to provide an anaerobic control, was vented with nitrogen. The venting gas flows were maintained between 1 and 2.5 soil pore volume changeouts per day. The total JP-4 removal in the air-vented columns averaged 44% of the mass originally present. Biodegradation and volatilization accounted for 93% and 7% of the total removal, respectively. A maximum biodegradation rate of 14.3 mg of JP-4/kg of moist soil per day was observed at a soil water content of approximately 72% saturation. Soil drainage characteristics indicated that this water content may have corresponded to 100% of the in situ field capacity water content. Theses.

  7. Feasibility and Safety Assessment for Advanced Reactor Concepts Using Vented Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Andrew; Matthews, Topher; Lenhof, Renae; Deason, Wesley; Harter, Jackson

    2015-01-16

    Recent interest in fast reactor technology has led to renewed analysis of past reactor concepts such as Gas Fast Reactors and Sodium Fast Reactors. In an effort to make these reactors more economic, the fuel is required to stay in the reactor for extended periods of time; the longer the fuel stays within the core, the more fertile material is converted into usable fissile material. However, as burnup of the fuel-rod increases, so does the internal pressure buildup due to gaseous fission products. In order to reach the 30 year lifetime requirements of some reactor designs, the fuel pins must have a vented-type design to allow the buildup of fission products to escape. The present work aims to progress the understanding of the feasibility and safety issues related to gas reactors that incorporate vented fuel. The work was separated into three different work-scopes: 1. Quantitatively determine fission gas release from uranium carbide in a representative helium cooled fast reactor; 2. Model the fission gas behavior, transport, and collection in a Fission Product Vent System; and, 3. Perform a safety analysis of the Fission Product Vent System. Each task relied on results from the previous task, culminating in a limited scope Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the Fission Product Vent System. Within each task, many key parameters lack the fidelity needed for comprehensive or accurate analysis. In the process of completing each task, the data or methods that were lacking were identified and compiled in a Gap Analysis included at the end of the report.

  8. Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.; Jackaway, Adam D.

    2000-05-16

    A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

  9. Florida Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 NA 0 1971-2015 Marketed Production 12,409 15,125 773 292 496 499 1967-2015 Natural Gas Processed 2,915 2014-2015 Natural Gas Processed 2,915 1967-2015 ...

  10. Provisions for containment venting in Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, J.G.

    1997-08-01

    In this short paper an overlook is given of the systems developed in Germany for filtered containment venting and their implementation in nuclear power plants. More information on the development can be found in the Proceedings of the DOE/NRC Aircleaning Conferences. In Germany, 28.8 % of the electric energy is produced by 19 nuclear power reactors. No new power reactor is expected to be built at least within the next ten years, but France and Germany cooperate in the development of a future European Power Reactor (ERP). This reactor type will be fitted with a core catcher and passive cooling in order to avoid serious consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident so that provisions for containment venting are not required. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Comparative Study of Vented vs. Unvented Crawlspaces

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Christian, Jeffrey E; Gehl, Anthony C

    2011-10-01

    There has been a significant amount of research in the area of building energy efficiency and durability. However, well-documented quantitative information on the impact of crawlspaces on the performance of residential structures is lacking. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of two crawlspace strategies on the whole-house performance of a pair of houses in a mixed humid climate. These houses were built with advanced envelope systems to provide energy savings of 50% or more compared to traditional 2010 new construction. One crawlspace contains insulated walls and is sealed and semi-conditioned. The other is a traditional vented crawlspace with insulation in the crawlspace ceiling. The vented (traditional) crawlspace contains fiberglass batts installed in the floor chase cavities above the crawl, while the sealed and insulated crawlspace contains foil-faced polyisocyanurate foam insulation on the interior side of the masonry walls. Various sensors to measure temperatures, heat flux through crawlspace walls and ceiling, and relative humidity were installed in the two crawlspaces. Data from these sensors have been analyzed to compare the performance of the two crawlspace designs. The analysis results indicated that the sealed and insulated crawlspace design is better than the traditional vented crawlspace in the mixed humid climate.

  12. Transport properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbon decorated with copper clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Berahman, M.; Sheikhi, M. H.

    2014-09-07

    Using non-equilibrium green function with density functional theory, the present study investigates the transport properties of decorated zigzag graphene nanoribbon with a copper cluster. We have represented the decoration of zigzag graphene nanoribbon with single copper atom and cluster containing two and three copper atoms. In all the cases, copper atoms tend to occupy the edge state. In addition, we have shown that copper can alter the current-voltage characteristic of zigzag graphene nanoribbon and create new fluctuations and negative differential resistance. These alternations are made due to discontinuity in the combination of orbitals along the graphene nanoribbon. Decoration alters these discontinuities and creates more visible fluctuations. However, in low bias voltages, the changes are similar in all the cases. The study demonstrates that in the decorated zigzag graphene nanoribbon, the edge states are the main states for transporting electron from one electrode to another.

  13. Printed decorative solar panels could become part of our homes...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    content Printed decorative solar panels could become part of our homes and offices Hello, I provide user supp... The top one on this page: htt... Can you send the specific...

  14. High gas flow alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, R.D.; Bounds, J.A.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.W.

    1996-05-07

    An alpha detector for application in areas of high velocity gas flows, such as smokestacks and air vents. A plurality of spaced apart signal collectors are placed inside an enclosure, which would include smokestacks and air vents, in sufficient numbers to substantially span said enclosure so that gas ions generated within the gas flow are electrostatically captured by the signal collector means. Electrometer means and a voltage source are connected to the signal collectors to generate an electrical field between adjacent signal collectors, and to indicate a current produced through collection of the gas ions by the signal collectors. 4 figs.

  15. High gas flow alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, Richard D.; Bounds, John A.; Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini W.

    1996-01-01

    An alpha detector for application in areas of high velocity gas flows, such as smokestacks and air vents. A plurality of spaced apart signal collectors are placed inside an enclosure, which would include smokestacks and air vents, in sufficient numbers to substantially span said enclosure so that gas ions generated within the gas flow are electrostatically captured by the signal collector means. Electrometer means and a voltage source are connected to the signal collectors to generate an electrical field between adjacent signal collectors, and to indicate a current produced through collection of the gas ions by the signal collectors.

  16. Development of a practical training program based on BNL`s input to new NFPA Lined Masonary Chimney Venting Tables

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, G.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes how we developed a practical training program for technicians and sales personnel from the BNL studies that evolved into the Lined Chimney Venting Tables. One of the topics discussed is our search for solutions to the reoccurring problems associated with flue gas condensation on newly installed oil fired appliances. The paper will also discuss our own experiences in applying the new venting tables and working through the questions that arise when we encounter installations beyond the scope of the present tables.

  17. Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Low-Pressure Steam | Department of Energy Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam This tip sheet on steam jet ejectors and thermocompressors provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies. STEAM TIP SHEET #29 Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam (January 2012)

  18. Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems Citation Details ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 29 ENERGY PLANNING, ...

  19. Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 129,403 124,584 111,499 1970's 100,305 70,222 59,821 36,133 34,431 31,295 30,402 27,340 25,556 27,350 1980's 28,837 32,907 33,061 28,420 32,256 30,776 26,050 29,325 31,832 29,770 1990's 28,247 30,638 19,689 34,486 42,037 46,183 45,382 47,922 25,949 35,675 2000's 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947 38,654 43,169 36,682 42,541 41,234 2010's 39,569 35,248 47,530 76,113 90,125 113,786

  20. Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 2,478 2,147 2,113 2,353 3,203 2,833 3,175 2,684 2,296 2,457 2,750 2,150 1992 1,337 1,107 1,379 1,254 1,439 1,833 2,083 1,970 2,009 1,630 1,835 1,812 1993 3,276 3,172 2,618 2,863 2,492 2,286 2,563 2,471 2,865 3,708 2,934 3,238 1994 3,225 3,330 3,515 3,403 3,959 4,686 3,429 2,766 3,188 3,543 3,122 3,871 1995 3,543 3,658 3,862 3,738 4,350 5,148 3,768 3,039 3,503 3,893 3,430 4,252 1996 3,461 3,537 3,340 3,922 3,459 4,520 4,339 3,794 3,556

  1. South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 4 5 5 5 1980's 5 52 54 85 165 194 140 0 0 0 1990's 3,648 4,844 5,476 5,732 5,805 7,122 7,636 1,639 1,526 1,555 2000's 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 2,071 1,931 2,177 2,073 2,160 2010's 2,136 2,120 0 0 NA 0

  2. South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 384 350 382 380 382 376 405 418 397 439 445 486 1992 455 445 448 468 497 447 465 459 438 450 440 465 1993 463 417 484 453 478 459 497 500 495 545 507 435 1994 385 324 383 373 409 424 506 590 595 591 601 625 1995 640 570 637 609 617 602 617 637 578 526 540 549 1996 533 516 618 620 662 658 680 685 650 689 657 669 1997 128 123 129 135 139 134 135 145 143 146 140 143 1998 145 134 148 145 129 114 122 121 118 119 114 117 1999 147 136 151 148

  3. Other States Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    654 1995 667 594 663 634 643 626 643 663 603 553 567 578 1996 549 538 625 620 693 703 709 715 676 708 682 690 1997 133 124 135 142 147 142 149 177 160 150 159 161 1998 147 134...

  4. Alabama Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 194 200 140 132 106 82 205 152 157 192 159 134 1997 134 110 90 112 98 125 119 114 118 91 227 224 1998 125 101 87 104 91 ...

  5. Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 161,849 166,439 158,852 1970's 154,089 103,564 63,667 102,091 31,572 25,459 31,467 33,251 29,807 26,061 1980's 22,851 23,042 19,781 25,651 25,008 25,013 24,173 25,290 22,835 21,898 1990's 20,660 20,415 20,538 19,580 19,689 18,729 21,705 21,928 19,543 21,509 2000's 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 5,228 6,665 6,496 4,021 4,336 2010's 4,578 6,302 0 3,912 4,606 3,748

  6. Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1,788 1,684 1,571 1,593 1,807 1,690 2,042 1,781 1,437 1,867 1,649 1,505 1992 1,707 1,639 1,564 1,775 1,752 2,153 1,623 1,737 1,907 1,568 1,595 1,518 1993 1,588 1,460 1,500 1,708 1,614 1,590 1,778 1,711 2,014 1,500 1,482 1,636 1994 1,597 1,468 1,509 1,717 1,623 1,599 1,788 1,720 2,025 1,509 1,490 1,645 1995 1,519 1,396 1,435 1,633 1,544 1,521 1,701 1,636 1,926 1,435 1,418 1,565 1996 1,545 1,443 1,514 1,471 1,528 1,939 2,042 2,033 1,985

  7. Maryland Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 0

  8. Maryland Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0

  9. Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,861 1,120 808 1970's 809 1,032 1,117 1,268 1,612 2,042 2,291 2,736 2,960 1980's 3,433 3,310 3,320 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,705 3,324 4,070 1990's 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 2000's 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 2010's 3,324 3,324 0 0 NA 0

  10. Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1997 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1998 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1999 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2000 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2001 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2002 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2003 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2004 277 277 277 277

  11. Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 7,098 5,910 8,097 1970's 7,233 5,090 3,672 10,767 10,787 11,862 13,599 13,514 36,273 38,417 1980's 16,627 12,188 10,799 8,694 9,862 4,097 4,845 4,112 5,512 4,201 1990's 3,628 2,799 3,076 2,222 1,928 2,234 2,677 2,742 2,798 2,745 2000's 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,812 3,944 4,575 5,909 7,504 7,875 2010's 8,685 9,593 0 0 NA 0

  12. Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 217 199 223 219 237 234 239 235 213 224 218 220 1997 214 202 214 209 221 223 218 242 235 258 250 256 1998 250 222 245 225 233 220 238 232 235 234 227 236 1999 230 217 247 232 239 233 234 231 226 223 214 219 2000 205 161 204 193 213 198 210 214 205 223 216 235 2001 236 216 234 241 248 236 265 266 242 260 251 267 2002 259 299 266 255 266 262 267 274 276 280 267 298 2003 293 261 282 277 284 285 244 304 306 323 305 337 2004 319 321 331 325

  13. Missouri Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 NA NA 2010's NA NA NA 0 0 0

  14. Missouri Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  15. Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 5,022 12,551 26,458 1970's 5,203 4,917 4,222 3,691 3,901 3,202 2,070 1,095 1,408 1,689 1980's 1,705 1,896 1,667 1,549 1,285 1,460 1,468 1,181 1,146 1,099 1990's 886 772 763 758 551 417 596 1,120 1,274 317 2000's 488 404 349 403 1,071 629 1,173 3,721 6,863 7,001 2010's 5,722 4,878 0 0 NA 0

  16. Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 32 38 34 40 43 27 63 59 60 71 67 62 1997 67 60 71 62 66 83 72 92 47 118 186 195 1998 189 147 159 177 107 76 155 129 136 0 0 0 1999 47 54 50 52 56 58 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 43 39 41 44 49 44 44 36 36 39 43 28 2001 36 32 40 35 36 36 35 33 34 32 28 27 2002 30 25 27 31 31 30 28 32 30 29 28 27 2003 34 28 30 33 34 36 32 32 29 30 43 43 2004 49 41 37 81 85 91 97 125 135 150 125 55 2005 42 36 52 46 57 57 60 55 52 56 51 66 2006 74 75 73 86 111 99 94 87

  17. Nebraska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 1,558 1,263 834 2,137 1,398 797 60 0 0 1980's 0 194 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 5 12 23 29 17 5 2 9 2010's 24 21 0 0 NA 0

  18. Nebraska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2003 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2004 2 1 1 2 2 1 3 2 2 2 2 2 2005 4 3 2 2 2 1 2 3 2 3 3 3 2006 5 2 2 1

  19. New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 236 220 240 230 241 229 217 221 212 215 216 223 1997 241 220 245 236 243 225 235 239 231 240 217 213 1998 231 211 235 227 233 215 226 229 221 230 209 205 1999 232 210 231 226 225 229 230 235 224 235 229 212 2000 289 245 293 242 287 251 285 246 240 278 233 242 2001 249 226 245 237 213 175 179 384 317 237 505 288 2002 304 207 214 254 269 249 266 263 247 216 202 159 2003 179 154 198 210 234 226 221 285 199 193 127 121 2004 124 128 292 275

  20. North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 25,795 22,050 22,955 1970's 19,862 2,686 20,786 22,533 17,860 2,155 2,737 1,116 6,788 26,932 1980's 7,975 698 1 996 2,018 2,984 6,853 2,771 2,771 2,050 1990's 3,642 2,603 2,197 2,337 2,492 4,300 2,957 3,534 4,371 2,693 2000's 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 2,198 3,260 7,460 10,500 25,700 26,876 2010's 24,582 49,652 79,564 102,855 129,717 106,590

  1. North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 232 193 232 176 230 258 269 324 298 334 213 199 1997 229 264 293 280 303 313 258 301 327 330 321 315 1998 308 301 334 380 418 459 435 425 310 328 345 330 1999 231 194 245 204 202 206 231 307 232 227 202 212 2000 225 218 226 237 257 271 292 327 293 333 311 300 2001 269 246 276 255 245 263 289 283 250 260 281 249 2002 231 221 210 235 250 238 258 245 257 222 210 214 2003 196 167 193 174 167 161 158 171 164 181 168 170 2004 197 157 166 150

  2. Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's - 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 0

  3. Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0

  4. Nevada Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 ...

  5. Nevada Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0

  6. Alabama Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 360 422 795 1970's 656 308 966 1,890 1,492 1,107 1,088 1,180 1,695 1,497 1980's 3,175 2,485 2,806 1,793 1,829 1,426 1,310 1,356 1,824 1,503 1990's 1,933 2,193 1,799 1,798 2,650 2,935 1,853 1,563 1,462 1,085 2000's 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 2,485 3,525 2,372 1,801 2,495 2010's 2,617 3,491 0 0 NA 0

  7. Alaska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 11,390 24,258 32,543 1970's 34,808 33,880 21,590 4,979 11,524 10,401 6,554 15,644 8,492 4,526 1980's 4,820 5,630 6,946 5,027 11,670 6,296 8,862 15,603 9,018 9,786 1990's 10,727 10,784 14,097 22,485 13,240 8,736 7,070 8,269 8,171 7,098 2000's 7,546 7,686 7,312 6,345 6,088 6,429 7,125 6,458 10,023 6,481 2010's 10,173 10,966 11,769 7,219 6,554 5,477

  8. Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 997 895 1,326 1970's 226 1,734 2,649 1,947 1,716 1,318 1,227 1,153 869 471 1980's 394 552 973 973 2,225 824 1,760 1,068 1,110 1,110 1990's 284 208 371 409 313 313 270 134 45 6,005 2000's 206 431 251 354 241 241 12 11 114 141 2010's 425 494 0 0 NA 0

  9. Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 23 13 12 7 13 28 28 30 36 9 5 5 1992 33 29 32 31 30 29 30 30 30 32 32 33 1993 36 32 35 33 34 32 33 33 33 35 35 37 1994 27 25 27 25 26 25 25 26 25 27 27 28 1995 27 24 27 25 26 25 25 26 25 27 27 28 1996 17 23 8 0 31 45 28 29 25 19 25 21 1997 5 0 6 7 7 8 13 32 16 4 19 17 1998 2 0 2 2 2 3 4 11 5 1 6 6 1999 607 269 535 439 561 494 583 216 469 689 668 472 2000 1 0 1 16 21 17 23 23 27 23 24 30 2001 2 1 2 33 45 35 48 48 57 47 50 63 2002 12 15 29

  10. California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,565 2,780 3,074 1970's 2,499 575 1,999 1,560 1,537 1,288 1,038 960 1,253 1980's 1,386 1,907 1,907 1,135 2,116 2,200 2,750 2,734 2,733 2,731 1990's 1,244 1,429 751 580 830 1,250 1,268 1,590 1,952 1,367 2000's 2,210 1,717 2,690 3,940 3,215 2,120 1,562 1,879 2,127 2,501 2010's 2,790 2,424 0 0 NA 0

  11. California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 97 103 109 107 107 104 108 107 104 108 106 108 1997 111 113 85 88 213 140 121 108 122 171 175 144 1998 235 192 246 157 166 129 173 167 152 132 127 76 1999 165 135 173 110 116 91 121 117 106 92 89 53 2000 266 218 279 178 188 146 196 189 172 149 144 86 2001 207 169 217 138 146 114 152 146 134 116 111 67 2002 324 265 340 216 228 178 238 230 209 181 175 105 2003 266 228 237 343 405 431 342 333 276 316 593 170 2004 217 186 193 280 331 352 279

  12. Alaska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    514 674 605 615 1996 682 532 552 569 588 618 691 545 634 560 528 570 1997 798 623 646 666 687 723 808 637 741 654 618 666 1998 788 615 639 658 679 715 799 630 733 647 610 658...

  13. New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0 0 0 1970's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980's 7 2,926 2,883 3,744 2,400 3,773 3,720 2,802 4,012 5,036...

  14. New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1993 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1994 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1995 0 0 0...

  15. New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 5,992 5,987 4,058 1970's 2,909 2,823 5,696 3,791 1,227 1,642 1,519 5,065 8,163 4,636 1980's...

  16. Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,000 2,906 2,802 1970's 2,852 2,926 5,506 7,664 5,259 1,806 1,048 691 469 560 1980's 2,439 2,740 3,682 1,572 1,766 1,161 1990's 1,338 1,625 1,284 2,153 3,363 35,069 27,277 16,790 19,365 13,835 2000's 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 595 585 1,005 1,285 1,398 2010's 2,080 1,755 0 0 NA 0

  17. Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 646 1995 696 4,590 4,767 4,382 4,389 4,603 4,932 5,137 1996 5,088 4,788 2,269 2,009 2,564 1,687 1,695 1,724 1,229 1,255 1,547 1,422 1997 2,411 2,381 1,594 942 490 1,391 1,344 1,185 1,114 1,130 1,058 1,750 1998 909 697 700 689 1,194 1,161 2,299 2,625 2,235 2,226 2,258 2,373 1999 1,462 1,480 993 1,254 1,131 1,316 904 776 1,291 1,249 894 1,084 2000 158 65 69 100 91 626 87 119 185 220 123 99 2001 129 98 83 55 49 47 79 274 242 254 469 68 2002

  18. West Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 NA 0

  19. West Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0

  20. Wyoming Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,498 13,038 17,632 1970's 18,419 3,860 8,376 6,618 6,102 3,223 1,916 699 559 1,830 1980's 1,117 983 2,149 5,233 3,271 1,330 2,413 25,107 45,342 47,793 1990's 63,216 82,854 89,736 126,362 126,722 148,721 145,452 140,147 8,711 9,002 2000's 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848 31,161 31,661 47,783 42,346 42,530 2010's 42,101 57,711 45,429 34,622 27,220 7,883

  1. Wyoming Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 5,712 5,109 6,529 6,408 6,948 6,430 7,035 7,792 7,475 7,837 7,649 7,930 1992 7,430 7,009 7,475 7,039 5,797 7,809 8,770 8,218 7,442 7,505 7,662 7,580 1993 10,674 10,789 10,568 10,480 11,572 12,350 10,996 8,163 9,912 10,526 9,870 10,463 1994 11,590 11,569 11,181 10,129 9,324 10,365 10,174 10,394 10,578 10,635 10,629 10,155 1995 13,046 11,867 11,628 12,102 14,419 12,911 12,917 10,472 12,302 12,592 11,896 12,569 1996 13,000 12,042 12,951

  2. Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,656 1,514 1,326 1970's 7,126 2,843 4,758 3,008 2,957 2,516 1,836 1,528 1,108 1,199 1980's 796 1,195 1,223 1,360 1,000 1,821 1,577 2,360 4,593 3,961 1990's 4,719 2,890 1,868 2,024 2,476 1,510 1,230 2,178 1,244 802 2000's 805 908 935 1,123 1,158 1,215 1,291 1,333 1,501 1,411 2010's 1,242 1,291 0 0 NA 0

  3. Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 112 77 78 91 100 89 100 106 97 121 155 102 1997 173 188 180 168 228 187 188 102 189 192 185 199 1998 92 166 98 92 98 115 222 83 82 92 95 10 1999 70 71 70 65 68 66 66 66 63 67 65 64 2000 67 64 68 65 68 66 67 68 65 69 69 70 2001 77 69 75 71 73 74 73 78 76 79 78 83 2002 83 75 84 79 79 77 79 80 72 80 72 75 2003 96 86 95 92 95 92 94 96 94 98 95 90 2004 99 89 98 94 98 95 97 99 97 101 98 93 2005 103 94 103 99 103 99 102 104 102 106 102 98 2006

  4. Indiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 0

  5. Indiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0

  6. Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,630 2,529 2,666 1970's 2,713 2,669 2,681 2,377 889 846 831 783 861 801 1980's 737 641 431 436 ...

  7. Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 63 63 63 61 62 57 57 55 56 58 59 61 1997 60 55 60 59 62 60 58 54 50 54 54 54 1998 55 50 54 52 52 52 45 48 48 51 49 50 1999 ...

  8. Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1997 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1998 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1999 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2000 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2001 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2002 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2003 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2004 277 277 277 277

  9. Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 217 199 223 219 237 234 239 235 213 224 218 220 1997 214 202 214 209 221 223 218 242 235 258 250 256 1998 250 222 245 225 233 220 238 232 235 234 227 236 1999 230 217 247 232 239 233 234 231 226 223 214 219 2000 205 161 204 193 213 198 210 214 205 223 216 235 2001 236 216 234 241 248 236 265 266 242 260 251 267 2002 259 299 266 255 266 262 267 274 276 280 267 298 2003 293 261 282 277 284 285 244 304 306 323 305 337 2004 319 321 331 325

  10. Missouri Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  11. Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 32 38 34 40 43 27 63 59 60 71 67 62 1997 67 60 71 62 66 83 72 92 47 118 186 195 1998 189 147 159 177 107 76 155 129 136 0 0 0 1999 47 54 50 52 56 58 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 43 39 41 44 49 44 44 36 36 39 43 28 2001 36 32 40 35 36 36 35 33 34 32 28 27 2002 30 25 27 31 31 30 28 32 30 29 28 27 2003 34 28 30 33 34 36 32 32 29 30 43 43 2004 49 41 37 81 85 91 97 125 135 150 125 55 2005 42 36 52 46 57 57 60 55 52 56 51 66 2006 74 75 73 86 111 99 94 87

  12. Nebraska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2003 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2004 2 1 1 2 2 1 3 2 2 2 2 2 2005 4 3 2 2 2 1 2 3 2 3 3 3 2006 5 2 2 1

  13. Nevada Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0

  14. New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 236 220 240 230 241 229 217 221 212 215 216 223 1997 241 220 245 236 243 225 235 239 231 240 217 213 1998 231 211 235 227 233 215 226 229 221 230 209 205 1999 232 210 231 226 225 229 230 235 224 235 229 212 2000 289 245 293 242 287 251 285 246 240 278 233 242 2001 249 226 245 237 213 175 179 384 317 237 505 288 2002 304 207 214 254 269 249 266 263 247 216 202 159 2003 179 154 198 210 234 226 221 285 199 193 127 121 2004 124 128 292 275

  15. New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1993 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1994 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0

  16. North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 232 193 232 176 230 258 269 324 298 334 213 199 1997 229 264 293 280 303 313 258 301 327 330 321 315 1998 308 301 334 380 418 459 435 425 310 328 345 330 1999 231 194 245 204 202 206 231 307 232 227 202 212 2000 225 218 226 237 257 271 292 327 293 333 311 300 2001 269 246 276 255 245 263 289 283 250 260 281 249 2002 231 221 210 235 250 238 258 245 257 222 210 214 2003 196 167 193 174 167 161 158 171 164 181 168 170 2004 197 157 166 150

  17. Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0

  18. South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 384 350 382 380 382 376 405 418 397 439 445 486 1992 455 445 448 468 497 447 465 459 438 450 440 465 1993 463 417 484 453 478 459 497 500 495 545 507 435 1994 385 324 383 373 409 424 506 590 595 591 601 625 1995 640 570 637 609 617 602 617 637 578 526 540 549 1996 533 516 618 620 662 658 680 685 650 689 657 669 1997 128 123 129 135 139 134 135 145 143 146 140 143 1998 145 134 148 145 129 114 122 121 118 119 114 117 1999 147 136 151 148

  19. Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 2,478 2,147 2,113 2,353 3,203 2,833 3,175 2,684 2,296 2,457 2,750 2,150 1992 1,337 1,107 1,379 1,254 1,439 1,833 2,083 1,970 2,009 1,630 1,835 1,812 1993 3,276 3,172 2,618 2,863 2,492 2,286 2,563 2,471 2,865 3,708 2,934 3,238 1994 3,225 3,330 3,515 3,403 3,959 4,686 3,429 2,766 3,188 3,543 3,122 3,871 1995 3,543 3,658 3,862 3,738 4,350 5,148 3,768 3,039 3,503 3,893 3,430 4,252 1996 3,461 3,537 3,340 3,922 3,459 4,520 4,339 3,794 3,556

  20. Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 646 1995 696 4,590 4,767 4,382 4,389 4,603 4,932 5,137 1996 5,088 4,788 2,269 2,009 2,564 1,687 1,695 1,724 1,229 1,255 1,547 1,422 1997 2,411 2,381 1,594 942 490 1,391 1,344 1,185 1,114 1,130 1,058 1,750 1998 909 697 700 689 1,194 1,161 2,299 2,625 2,235 2,226 2,258 2,373 1999 1,462 1,480 993 1,254 1,131 1,316 904 776 1,291 1,249 894 1,084 2000 158 65 69 100 91 626 87 119 185 220 123 99 2001 129 98 83 55 49 47 79 274 242 254 469 68 2002

  1. West Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0

  2. Wyoming Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 5,712 5,109 6,529 6,408 6,948 6,430 7,035 7,792 7,475 7,837 7,649 7,930 1992 7,430 7,009 7,475 7,039 5,797 7,809 8,770 8,218 7,442 7,505 7,662 7,580 1993 10,674 10,789 10,568 10,480 11,572 12,350 10,996 8,163 9,912 10,526 9,870 10,463 1994 11,590 11,569 11,181 10,129 9,324 10,365 10,174 10,394 10,578 10,635 10,629 10,155 1995 13,046 11,867 11,628 12,102 14,419 12,911 12,917 10,472 12,302 12,592 11,896 12,569 1996 13,000 12,042 12,951

  3. Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,630 2,529 2,666 1970's 2,713 2,669 2,681 2,377 889 846 831 783 861 801 1980's 737 641 431 436...

  4. California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 97 103 109 107 107 104 108 107 104 108 106 108 1997 111 113 85 88 213 140 121 108 122 171 175 144 1998 235 192 246 157 166 129 173 167 152 132 127 76 1999 165 135 173 110 116 91 121 117 106 92 89 53 2000 266 218 279 178 188 146 196 189 172 149 144 86 2001 207 169 217 138 146 114 152 146 134 116 111 67 2002 324 265 340 216 228 178 238 230 209 181 175 105 2003 266 228 237 343 405 431 342 333 276 316 593 170 2004 217 186 193 280 331 352 279

  5. Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 112 77 78 91 100 89 100 106 97 121 155 102 1997 173 188 180 168 228 187 188 102 189 192 185 199 1998 92 166 98 92 98 115 222 83 82 92 95 10 1999 70 71 70 65 68 66 66 66 63 67 65 64 2000 67 64 68 65 68 66 67 68 65 69 69 70 2001 77 69 75 71 73 74 73 78 76 79 78 83 2002 83 75 84 79 79 77 79 80 72 80 72 75 2003 96 86 95 92 95 92 94 96 94 98 95 90 2004 99 89 98 94 98 95 97 99 97 101 98 93 2005 103 94 103 99 103 99 102 104 102 106 102 98 2006

  6. Indiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0

  7. Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 63 63 63 61 62 57 57 55 56 58 59 61 1997 60 55 60 59 62 60 58 54 50 54 54 54 1998 55 50 54 52 52 52 45 48 48 51 49 50 1999 52 44 47 46 46 47 46 46 44 45 44 46 2000 47 43 45 50 45 44 45 45 42 42 41 41 2001 42 37 41 40 41 39 41 41 39 40 39 40 2002 40 36 40 38 40 39 39 39 36 37 36 37 2003 36 32 36 35 36 34 36 36 35 35 34 34 2004 34 32 34 33 34 33 35 34 33 33 32 32 2005 32 30 32 32 32 30 32 33 31 32 31 31 2006 30 27 30 30 30 30 31 32 31 30 31

  8. Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1,788 1,684 1,571 1,593 1,807 1,690 2,042 1,781 1,437 1,867 1,649 1,505 1992 1,707 1,639 1,564 1,775 1,752 2,153 1,623 1,737 1,907 1,568 1,595 1,518 1993 1,588 1,460 1,500 1,708 1,614 1,590 1,778 1,711 2,014 1,500 1,482 1,636 1994 1,597 1,468 1,509 1,717 1,623 1,599 1,788 1,720 2,025 1,509 1,490 1,645 1995 1,519 1,396 1,435 1,633 1,544 1,521 1,701 1,636 1,926 1,435 1,418 1,565 1996 1,545 1,443 1,514 1,471 1,528 1,939 2,042 2,033 1,985

  9. Maryland Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0

  10. Staged venting of fuel cell system during rapid shutdown

    DOEpatents

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2004-09-14

    A venting methodology and system for rapid shutdown of a fuel cell apparatus of the type used in a vehicle propulsion system. H.sub.2 and air flows to the fuel cell stack are slowly bypassed to the combustor upon receipt of a rapid shutdown command. The bypass occurs over a period of time (for example one to five seconds) using conveniently-sized bypass valves. Upon receipt of the rapid shutdown command, the anode inlet of the fuel cell stack is instantaneously vented to a remote vent to remove all H.sub.2 from the stack. Airflow to the cathode inlet of the fuel cell stack gradually diminishes over the bypass period, and when the airflow bypass is complete the cathode inlet is also instantaneously vented to a remote vent to eliminate pressure differentials across the stack.

  11. Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, V. H.; Less, B. D.; Singer, B. C.; Stratton, J. C.; Wray, C. P.

    2015-02-01

    In many residential building retrofit programs, air tightening to increase energy efficiency is often constrained by safety concerns with naturally vented combustion appliances. Tighter residential buildings more readily depressurize when exhaust equipment is operated, making combustion appliances more prone to backdraft or spill combustion exhaust into the living space. Several measures, such as installation guidelines, vent sizing codes, and combustion safety diagnostics, are in place with the intent to prevent backdrafting and combustion spillage, but the diagnostics conflict and the risk mitigation objective is inconsistent. This literature review summarizes the metrics and diagnostics used to assess combustion safety, documents their technical basis, and investigates their risk mitigations. It compiles information from the following: codes for combustion appliance venting and installation; standards and guidelines for combustion safety diagnostics; research evaluating combustion safety diagnostics; research investigating wind effects on building depressurization and venting; and software for simulating vent system performance.

  12. Staged venting of fuel cell system during rapid shutdown

    DOEpatents

    Clingerman, Bruce J.; Doan, Tien M.; Keskula, Donald H.

    2002-01-01

    A venting methodology and system for rapid shutdown of a fuel cell apparatus of the type used in a vehicle propulsion system. H.sub.2 and air flows to the fuel cell stack are slowly bypassed to the combustor upon receipt of a rapid shutdown command. The bypass occurs over a period of time (for example one to five seconds) using conveniently-sized bypass valves. Upon receipt of the rapid shutdown command, the anode inlet of the fuel cell stack is instantaneously vented to a remote vent to remove all H.sub.2 from the stack. Airflow to the cathode inlet of the fuel cell stack gradually diminishes over the bypass period, and when the airflow bypass is complete the cathode inlet is also instantaneously vented to a remote vent to eliminate pressure differentials across the stack.

  13. ARM - Campaign Instrument - cm22-pmod-vent

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    pmod-vent Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Kipp & Zonen CM22-PMOD Vent (CM22-PMOD-VENT) Instrument Categories Radiometric Campaigns Diffuse Shortwave IOP [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2001.09.24 - 2001.10.22 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered scientifically relevant. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers for the list of all available measurements,

  14. Gaseous fission product management for molten salt reactors and vented fuel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Messenger, S. J.; Forsberg, C.; Massie, M.

    2012-07-01

    Fission gas disposal is one of the unresolved difficulties for Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs) and advanced reactors with vented fuel systems. As these systems operate, they produce many radioactive isotopes of xenon and krypton (e.g. {sup 135}Xe t{sub 1/2} = 9.14 hours and {sup 85}Kr t{sub 1/2}= 10.73 years). Removing these gases proves vital to the success of such reactor designs for two reasons. First, the gases act as large neutron sinks which decrease reactivity and must be counterbalanced by increasing fuel loading. Second, for MSRs, inert fission product gases naturally separate quickly from high temperature salts, thus creating high vapor pressure which poses safety concerns. For advanced reactors with solid vented fuel, the gases are allowed to escape into an off-gas system and thus must be managed. Because of time delays in transport of fission product gases in vented fuel systems, some of the shorter-lived radionuclides will decay away thereby reducing the fission gas source term relative to an MSR. To calculate the fission gas source term of a typical molten salt reactor, we modeled a 1000 MWe graphite moderated thorium MSR similar to that detailed in Mathieu et al. [1]. The fuel salt used in these calculations was LiF (78 mole percent) - (HN)F 4 (22 mole percent) with a heavy nuclide composition of 3.86% {sup 233}U and 96.14% {sup 232}Th by mass. Before we can remove the fission product gases produced by this reactor configuration, we must first develop an appropriate storage mechanism. The gases could be stored in pressurized containers but then one must be concerned about bottle failure. Methods to trap noble gases in matrices are expensive and complex. Alternatively, there are direct storage/disposal options: direct injection into the Earth or injecting a grout-based product into the Earth. Advances in drilling technologies, hydro fracture technologies, and methods for the sequestration of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel plants are creating new options

  15. Building America Case Study - Evaluation of Passive Vents in...

    Energy Saver

    Typical apartments will need 20-45 CFM of outdoor air to meet ASHRAE 62.2-2010 whole-house ... The average airfow through the passive vents fell short of providing the ASHRAE 62.2-2010 ...

  16. Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Jump to: navigation,...

  17. Monitoring of Unvented Roofs with Diffusion Vents and Interior Vapor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Control in a Cold Climate | Department of Energy Monitoring of Unvented Roofs with Diffusion Vents and Interior Vapor Control in a Cold Climate Monitoring of Unvented Roofs with Diffusion Vents and Interior Vapor Control in a Cold Climate Lead Performer: Building Science Corporation - Westford, MA Partners: -- Dupont - Wilmington, DE -- Owens Corning - Toledo, OH -- Cosella-Dörken - Beamsville, Ontario, Canada -- K. Hovnanian Homes - Red Bank, NJ DOE Total Funding: $430,000 Cost Share:

  18. Quantum Hall effect in graphene decorated with disordered multilayer patches

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Youngwoo; Sun, Jie Lindvall, Niclas; Kireev, Dmitry; Yurgens, August; Jae Yang, Seung; Rae Park, Chong; Woo Park, Yung

    2013-12-02

    Quantum Hall effect (QHE) is observed in graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition using platinum catalyst. The QHE is even seen in samples which are irregularly decorated with disordered multilayer graphene patches and have very low mobility (<500 cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1}). The effect does not seem to depend on electronic mobility and uniformity of the resulting material, which indicates the robustness of QHE in graphene.

  19. CALiPER Benchmark Report: Performance of Incandescent A Type and Decorative Lamps and LED Replacements

    SciTech Connect

    Lingard, R. D.; Myer, M. A.; Paget, M. L.

    2008-11-01

    This benchmark report addresses common omnidirectional incandescent lamps - A-type and small decorative, candelabra-type lamps - and their commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) replacements.

  20. Generator stator core vent duct spacer posts

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, John Wesley; Tong, Wei

    2003-06-24

    Generator stator cores are constructed by stacking many layers of magnetic laminations. Ventilation ducts may be inserted between these layers by inserting spacers into the core stack. The ventilation ducts allow for the passage of cooling gas through the core during operation. The spacers or spacer posts are positioned between groups of the magnetic laminations to define the ventilation ducts. The spacer posts are secured with longitudinal axes thereof substantially parallel to the core axis. With this structure, core tightness can be assured while maximizing ventilation duct cross section for gas flow and minimizing magnetic loss in the spacers.

  1. Hydrogen gas relief valve

    DOEpatents

    Whittlesey, Curtis C.

    1985-01-01

    An improved battery stack design for an electrochemical system having at least one cell from which a gas is generated and an electrolyte in communication with the cell is described. The improved battery stack design features means for defining a substantially closed compartment for containing the battery cells and at least a portion of the electrolyte for the system, and means in association with the compartment means for selectively venting gas from the interior of the compartment means in response to the level of the electrolyte within the compartment means. The venting means includes a relief valve having a float member which is actuated in response to the level of the electrolyte within the compartment means. This float member is adapted to close the relief valve when the level of the electrolyte is above a predetermined level and open the relief valve when the level of electrolyte is below this predetermined level.

  2. Use a Vent Condenser to Recover Flash Steam Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    a Vent Condenser to Recover Flash Steam Energy Use a Vent Condenser to Recover Flash Steam Energy This tip sheet on using vent condensers to recover flash steam energy provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies. STEAM TIP SHEET #13 Use a Vent Condenser to Recover Flash Steam Energy (January 2012) (374.64 KB) More Documents & Publications Recover Heat from Boiler Blowdown Deaerators in Industrial Steam Systems Use Steam Jet

  3. Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Natural Gas System; Sankey Diagram Methodology

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    As natural gas travels through infrastructure, from well-head to customer meter, small portions are routinely used as fuel, vented, flared, or inadvertently leaked to the atmosphere. This paper describes the analytical and methodological basis for three diagrams that illustrate the natural gas losses and greenhouse gas emissions that result from these processes. The paper examines these emissions in some detail, focusing in particular on the production, processing, transmission and storage, and distribution segments of natural gas infrastructure.

  4. Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground

  5. Request for approval, vented container annual release fraction

    SciTech Connect

    HILL, J.S.

    1999-10-12

    In accordance with the approval conditions for Modification to the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC). dated August 24,1998, a new release fraction has been developed for submittal to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The proposed annual release fraction of 2.50 E-14 is proposed for use in future NOCs involving the storage and handling operations associated with vented containers on the Hanford Site. The proposed annual release fraction was the largest release fraction calculated from alpha measurements of the NucFil filters from 10 vented containers consisting of nine 55-gallon drums and one burial box with dimensions of 9.3 x 5.7 x 6.4 feet. An annual release fraction of 2.0 E-09 was used in the modification to the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC. This study confirmed that the release fraction used in the CWC radioactive air emissions NOC was conservative.

  6. Device and method for remotely venting a container

    DOEpatents

    Vodila, James M. (North Huntingdon, PA); Bergersen, Jeffrey A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01

    A device for venting a container having a bung includes a saddle assembly curable to a container and having a support extending therefrom. A first arm is rotatably secured to the support, and the first arm extends in a first direction. A second arm has a first end portion drivingly engaged with the first arm, so that rotation of the first arm causes rotation of the second arm. A second end portion of the first arm is positionable proximate the bung of the container. A socket is operably associated and rotatable with the second end portion and is drivingly engageable with the bung, so that rotation of the socket causes corresponding rotation of the bung for thereby venting the container.

  7. TRANSPORT OF WASTE SIMULANTS IN PJM VENT LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, Z

    2007-02-21

    The experimental work was conducted to determine whether there is a potential for waste simulant to transport or 'creep' up the air link line and contaminate the pulse jet vent system, and possibly cause long term restriction of the air link line. Additionally, if simulant creep occurred, establish operating parameters for washing down the line. The amount of the addition of flush fluids and mixer downtime must be quantified.

  8. NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development Challenges -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Air Key Points: * Air quality risks from shale oil and gas development are generally the result of: (1) dust and engine exhaust from increased truck traffic; (2) emissions from diesel-powered pumps used to power equipment; (3) intentional flaring or venting of gas for operational reasons; and, (4) unintentional emissions of pollutants from faulty equipment or impoundments. 1 * Natural gas is efficient and clean compared to other fossil fuels, emitting less nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide than

  9. Alabama State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    From Gas Wells 109,214 101,487 84,270 87,398 75,660 70,827 1987-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 2012-2014 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 2012-2014 Repressuring 0 NA NA NA 2011-2014 Vented ...

  10. Selective decoration of nickel and nickel oxide nanocrystals on multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Martis, P.; Venugopal, B.R.; Delhalle, J.; Mekhalif, Z.

    2011-05-15

    A simple route to selective decoration of nickel and nickel oxide nanocrystals on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using nickel acetylacetonate (NAA) was successfully achieved for the first time. The homogeneously decorated nanocrystals on MWCNTs were investigated for their structure and morphology by various techniques, such as powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that the size distributions of the nanocrystals on MWCNTs ranged from 8 to 15 nm and they were well resolved. The precursor, NAA, was effectively employed to impregnate the MWCNTs, which on calcination at suitable temperatures and in the presence of hydrogen and nitrogen atmosphere gave rise to nickel and nickel oxide nanocrystals, respectively. -- Graphical abstract: Nickel and nickel oxide nanocrystals were selectively and homogeneously decorated on multiwalled carbon nanotubes using nickel acetylacetonate, as a precursor in a simple and efficient route. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} A simple route for decoration of nickel and nickel oxide nanocrystals on MWCNTs. {yields} Nickel acetylacetonate used as nickel source for the first time to impregnate on MWCNTs. {yields} Selective decoration was achieved by calcination in hydrogen and nitrogen atmospheres. {yields} The as-decorated nickel and nickel oxide nanocrystals are in the range of 8-15 nm.

  11. Gas fluidized-bed stirred media mill

    DOEpatents

    Sadler, III, Leon Y.

    1997-01-01

    A gas fluidized-bed stirred media mill is provided for comminuting solid ticles. The mill includes a housing enclosing a porous fluidizing gas diffuser plate, a baffled rotor and stator, a hollow drive shaft with lateral vents, and baffled gas exhaust exit ports. In operation, fluidizing gas is forced through the mill, fluidizing the raw material and milling media. The rotating rotor, stator and milling media comminute the raw material to be ground. Small entrained particles may be carried from the mill by the gas through the exit ports when the particles reach a very fine size.

  12. Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Drum Venting - Operational Experience and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, Th.L.Jr.; Bhatt, R.N.; Troescher, P.D.; Lattin, W.J.

    2008-07-01

    Remote-handled transuranic (RH TRU) waste drums must be vented to meet transportation and disposal requirement before shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The capability to perform remote venting of drums was developed and implemented at the Idaho National Laboratory. Over 490 drums containing RH TRU waste were successfully vented. Later efforts developed and implemented a long-stem filter to breach inner waste bags, which reduced layers of confinement and mitigated restrictive transportation wattage limits. This paper will provide insight to the technical specifications for the drum venting system, development, and testing activities, startup, operations, and lessons learned. (authors)

  13. Technology Solutions Case Study: Evaluation of Passive Vents in New-Construction Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    S. Puttagunta, S. Maxwell, D. Berger, and M. Zuluaga

    2015-10-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) conducted research to gain more insight into passive vents. Because passive vents are meant to operate in a general environment of negative apartment pressure, the research assessed whether these negative pressures prevail through a variety of environmental conditions.

  14. Injections of Natural Gas into Storage (Annual Supply & Disposition)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground

  15. Effect of pressure vents on the fast cookoff of energetic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Marcia A.; Oliver, Michael S.; Erikson, William Wilding

    2013-10-01

    The effect of vents on the fast cookoff of energetic materials is studied through experimental modifications to the confinement vessel of the Radiant Heat Fast Cookoff Apparatus. Two venting schemes were investigated: 1) machined grooves at the EM-cover plate interface; 2) radial distribution of holes in PEEK confiner. EM materials of PBXN-109 and PBX 9502 were tested. Challenges with the experimental apparatus and EM materials were identified such that studying the effect of vents as an independent parameter was not realized. The experimental methods, data and post-test observations are presented and discussed.

  16. Hydrogen and fluorine co-decorated silicene: A first principles study of piezoelectric properties

    SciTech Connect

    Noor-A-Alam, Mohammad; Kim, Hye Jung; Shin, Young-Han

    2015-06-14

    A low-buckled silicene monolayer being centrosymmetric like graphene, in contrast to a piezoelectric hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), is not intrinsically piezoelectric. However, based on first principles calculations, we show that chemical co-decoration of hydrogen (H) and fluorine (F) on opposite sides of silicene (i.e., one side is decorated with H, while the other one is with F) breaks the centrosymmetry. Redistributing the charge density due to the electronegativity difference between the atoms, non-centrosymmetric co-decoration induces an out-of-plane dipolar polarization and concomitant piezoelectricity into non-piezoelectric silicene monolayer. Our piezoelectric coefficients are comparable with other known two-dimensional piezoelectric materials (e.g., hydrofluorinated graphene/h-BN) and some bulk semiconductors, such as wurtzite GaN and wurtzite BN. Moreover, because of silicene's lower elastic constants compared to graphene or h-BN, piezoelectric strain constants are found significantly larger than those of hydrofluorinated graphene/h-BN. We also predict that a wide range of band gaps with an average of 2.52 eV can be opened in a low-buckled gapless semi-metallic silicene monolayer by co-decoration of H and F atoms on the surface.

  17. The effect of venting on cookoff of a melt-castable explosive (Comp-B)

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Michael L.; Kaneshige, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    Occasionally, our well-controlled cookoff experiments with Comp-B give anomalous results when venting conditions are changed. For example, a vented experiment may take longer to ignite than a sealed experiment. In the current work, we show the effect of venting on thermal ignition of Comp-B. We use Sandia’s Instrumented Thermal Ignition (SITI) experiment with various headspace volumes in both vented and sealed geometries to study ignition of Comp-B. In some of these experiments, we have used a boroscope to observe Comp-B as it melts and reacts. We propose that the mechanism for ignition involves TNT melting, dissolution of RDX, and complex bubbly liquid flow. High pressure inhibits bubble formation and flow is significantly reduced. At low pressure, a vigorous dispersed bubble flow was observed.

  18. The effect of venting on cookoff of a melt-castable explosive (Comp-B)

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Hobbs, Michael L.; Kaneshige, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    Occasionally, our well-controlled cookoff experiments with Comp-B give anomalous results when venting conditions are changed. For example, a vented experiment may take longer to ignite than a sealed experiment. In the current work, we show the effect of venting on thermal ignition of Comp-B. We use Sandia’s Instrumented Thermal Ignition (SITI) experiment with various headspace volumes in both vented and sealed geometries to study ignition of Comp-B. In some of these experiments, we have used a boroscope to observe Comp-B as it melts and reacts. We propose that the mechanism for ignition involves TNT melting, dissolution of RDX, and complexmore » bubbly liquid flow. High pressure inhibits bubble formation and flow is significantly reduced. At low pressure, a vigorous dispersed bubble flow was observed.« less

  19. Improving the System Life of Basic Oxygen and Electric Arc Furnace Hoods, Roofs, and Side Vents

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet describes the benefits of a high-performance aluminum bronze alloy to basic oxygen furnace and electric arc furnace components such as hoods, roofs, and side vents.

  20. InnoVent InfraVest GmbH | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    InfraVest GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: InnoVentInfraVest GmbH Place: Varel, Germany Zip: 26316 Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind farm project developer based in Germany....

  1. System design description for the SY-101 vent header flow element enclosure upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, G.F.

    1995-11-01

    This document describes the design of the High and Low Range Vent Header Flow Element(s) Field Enclosure for the 241-SY-101 High Level Nuclear Waste Underground Storage Tank.

  2. Use a Vent Condenser to Recover Flash Steam Energy - Steam Tip Sheet #13

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-31

    This revised AMO tip sheet on vent condenser to recover flash steam energy provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  3. Google Earth locations of USA and seafloor hydrothermal vents with associated rare earth element data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Andrew Fowler

    2016-02-10

    Google Earth .kmz files that contain the locations of geothermal wells and thermal springs in the USA, and seafloor hydrothermal vents that have associated rare earth element data. The file does not contain the actual data, the actual data is available through the GDR website in two tier 3 data sets entitled "Compilation of Rare Earth Element Analyses from US Geothermal Fields and Mid Ocean Ridge (MOR) Hydrothermal Vents" and "Rare earth element content of thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California"

  4. Validation testing of radioactive waste drum filter vents

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, L.D.; Rahimi, R.S.; Edling, D.

    1997-08-01

    The minimum requirements for Drum Filter Vents (DFVs) can be met by demonstrating conformance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Trupact II Safety Assessment Report (SAR), and conformance with U.S. Federal shipping regulations 49 CFR 178.350, DOT Spec 7A, for Type A packages. These together address a number of safety related performance parameters such as hydrogen diffusivity, flow related pressure drop, filtration efficiency and, separately, mechanical stability and the ability to prevent liquid water in-leakage. In order to make all metal DFV technology (including metallic filter medium) available to DOE sites, Pall launched a product development program to validate an all metal design to meet these requirements. Numerous problems experienced by DOE sites in the past came to light during this development program. They led us to explore enhancements to DFV design and performance testing addressing these difficulties and concerns. The result is a patented all metal DFV certified to all applicable regulatory requirements, which for the first time solves operational and health safety problems reported by DOE site personnel but not addressed by previous DFV`s. The new technology facilitates operations (such as manual, automated and semi-automated drum handling/redrumming), sampling, on-site storage, and shipping. At the same time, it upgrades filtration efficiency in configurations documented to maintain filter efficiency following mechanical stress. 2 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Hydrogen venting characteristics of commercial carbon-composite filters and applications to TRU waste

    SciTech Connect

    Callis, E.L.; Marshall, R.S.; Cappis, J.H.

    1997-04-01

    The generation of hydrogen (by radiolysis) and of other potentially flammable gases in radioactive wastes which are in contact with hydrogenous materials is a source of concern, both from transportation and on-site storage considerations. Because very little experimental data on the generation and accumulation of hydrogen was available in actual waste materials, work was initiated to experimentally determine factors affecting the concentration of hydrogen in the waste containers, such as the hydrogen generation rate, (G-values) and the rate of loss of hydrogen through packaging and commercial filter-vents, including a new design suitable for plastic bags. This report deals only with the venting aspect of the problem. Hydrogen venting characteristics of two types of commercial carbon-composite filter-vents, and two types of PVC bag closures (heat-sealed and twist-and-tape) were measured. Techniques and equipment were developed to permit measurement of the hydrogen concentration in various layers of actual transuranic (TRU) waste packages, both with and without filter-vents. A test barrel was assembled containing known configuration and amounts of TRU wastes. Measurements of the hydrogen in the headspace verified a hydrogen release model developed by Benchmark Environmental Corporation. These data were used to calculate revised wattage Emits for TRU waste packages incorporating the new bag filter-vent.

  6. U.S. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    526,159 649,106 677,311 1940's 655,967 630,212 626,782 684,115 1,010,285 896,208 1,102,033 ... 119,097 129,469 143,457 166,909 165,360 2010's 165,928 209,439 212,848 260,394 288,743

  7. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0 0 0 2000's 0 21,616 20,092 20,107 17,406 13,800 12,162 12,509 14,507 14,754 2010's 13,971 15,502 16,296 14,619 16,575 16,290

  8. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 1,994 1,804 1,837 1,504 1,798 1,541 1,890 1,954 1,742 2,018 1,823 1,711 2002 1,661 1,512 1,693 1,728 1,794 1,738 1,809 1,820 1,523 1,433 1,667 1,714 2003 1,728 1,590 1,801 1,753 1,774 1,675 1,639 1,702 1,612 1,661 1,555 1,617 2004 1,554 1,465 1,600 1,544 1,566 1,463 1,536 1,508 1,194 1,301 1,336 1,339 2005

  9. U.S. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1974 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1975 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1976 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1977 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1978 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1979 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1980 12,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 11,000 9,000 9,000 10,000 12,000 10,000 10,000 11,000 1981 10,000 10,000 9,000 8,000 7,000 8,000 9,000 10,000 7,000 7,000 6,000

  10. Illuminating system and method for specialized and decorative lighting using liquid light guides

    DOEpatents

    Zorn, Carl J.; Kross, Brian J.; Majewski, Stanislaw; Wojcik, Randolph F.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention comprises an illumination system for specialized decorative lighting including a light source, a flexible plastic tube sheath for distributing the light to a remote location, a transparent liquid core filling the tube that has an index of refraction greater than that of the plastic tube and an arrangement where light coupled from the light source is caused to leak from the liquid light guide at desired locations for the purposes of specialized lighting, such as underwater illumination in swimming pools.

  11. Containment venting as a mitigation technique for BWR Mark I plant ATWS

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Containment venting is studied as a mitigation strategy for preventing or delaying severe fuel damage following hypothetical BWR Anticipated Transient Without SCRAM (ATWS) accidents initiated by MSIV-closure, and compounded by failure of the Standby Liquid Control (SLC) system injection of sodium pentaborate solution and by the failure of manually initiated control rod insertion. The venting of primary containment after reaching 75 psia (0.52 MPa) is found to result in the release of the vented steam inside the reactor building, and to result in inadequate Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH) for any system pumping from the pressure suppression pool. CONTAIN code calculations show that personnel access to large portions of the reactor building would be lost soon after the initiation of venting and that the temperatures reached would be likely to result in independent equipment failures. It is concluded that containment venting would be more likely to cause or to hasten the onset of severe fuel damage than to prevent or to delay it.

  12. Decorating multi-walled carbon nanotubes with nickel nanoparticles for selective hydrogenation of citral

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Yuechao; Yang Dong; Qin Feng; Hu Jianhua; Wang Changchun; Xu Hualong

    2009-08-15

    The nanocomposites of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) decorated with nickel nanoparticles were conveniently prepared by a chemical reduction of nickel salt in the present of poly(acrylic acid) grafted MWNTs (PAA-g-MWNTs). Due to the strong interaction between Ni{sup 2+} and -COOH, PAA-g-MWNTs became an excellent supporting material for Ni nanoparticles. The morphology and distribution of Ni nanoparticles on the surface of MWNTs were greatly influenced by the reduction temperatures, the experimental results also showed that the distribution of Ni nanoparticles was greatly improved while the MWNTs were modified by poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). The hydrogenation activity and selectivity of MWNTs decorated with Ni nanoparticles (Ni-MWNTs) for alpha, beta-unsaturated aldehyde (citral) were also studied, and the experimental results showed that the citronellal, an important raw material for flavoring and perfumery industries, is the favorable product with a percentage as high as 86.9%, which is 7 times higher than that of catalyst by Ni-supported active carbon (Ni-AC). - Abstract: Nickel nanoparticles decorated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Ni-MWNTs) nanocomposites were conveniently prepared by a chemical reduction of nickel salt in the present of poly(acrylic acid) grafted MWNTs (PAA-g-MWNTs). These nanocomposites possessed excellent catalytic activity and selectivity for hydrogenation of citral.

  13. Oil heat venting technology and NFPA standard 31 revision year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Krajewski, R.F.

    1997-09-01

    The revision of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard 31 for the year 2000 offers an opportunity to update the Appendix which currently offers recommendations for basic metal relining of masonry chimneys up to and including 25 feet. The paper discusses the proposed update of the existing recommendations to include flexible (rough) metal liners. In addition, the discussion addresses the inclusion of additional information for unlined (non-conforming), lined (conforming to NFPA 211) masonary chimneys, insulated metal chimneys, chimney heights beyond what are now published, as well as power venting both forced and induced draft. Included in the paper is a discussion of the existing Oil Heat Vent Analysis Program (OHVAP Version 3.0) and issues that need resolution to make it a better vent system model.

  14. Regulatory Reduction RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123, February 3, 2011 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy This is in reply to comments filed by the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) urging the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to repeal its energy conservation standards for direct heating equipment as applied to decorative vented gas fireplaces. I support HPBA's comments because I do not believe that decorative vented gas fireplaces were ever meant to be included under the term "direct heating equipment" as that term appears in the Energy Policy and Conservation

  15. Development of a model for predicting transient hydrogen venting in 55-gallon drums

    SciTech Connect

    Apperson, Jason W; Clemmons, James S; Garcia, Michael D; Sur, John C; Zhang, Duan Z; Romero, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Remote drum venting was performed on a population of unvented high activity drums (HAD) in the range of 63 to 435 plutonium equivalent Curies (PEC). These 55-gallon Transuranic (TRU) drums will eventually be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). As a part of this process, the development of a calculational model was required to predict the transient hydrogen concentration response of the head space and polyethylene liner (if present) within the 55-gallon drum. The drum and liner were vented using a Remote Drum Venting System (RDVS) that provided a vent sampling path for measuring flammable hydrogen vapor concentrations and allow hydrogen to diffuse below lower flammability limit (LFL) concentrations. One key application of the model was to determine the transient behavior of hydrogen in the head space, within the liner, and the sensitivity to the number of holes made in the liner or number of filters. First-order differential mass transport equations were solved using Laplace transformations and numerically to verify the results. the Mathematica 6.0 computing tool was also used as a validation tool and for examining larger than two chamber systems. Results will be shown for a variety of configurations, including 85-gallon and 110-gallon overpack drums. The model was also validated against hydrogen vapor concentration assay measurements.

  16. Compilation of Rare Earth Element Analyses from US Geothermal Fields and Mid Ocean Ridge Hydrothermal Vents

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-10-01

    Compilation of rare earth element and associated major and minor dissolved constituent analytical data for USA geothermal fields and global seafloor hydrothermal vents. Data is in original units. Reference to and use of this data should be attributed to the original authors and publications according to the provisions outlined therein.

  17. Income Tax Deduction for Solar-Powered Roof Vents or Fans

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The taxpayer must provide proof of the taxpayer’s costs for installation of a solar powered roof vent or fan and a list of the persons or corporations that supplied labor or materials for the solar...

  18. Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael

    1998-01-01

    A novel design for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment.

  19. Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, M.

    1998-02-10

    A novel design is described for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment. 9 figs.

  20. Thermal conductivity studies of novel nanofluids based on metallic silver decorated mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tadjarodi, Azadeh; Zabihi, Fatemeh

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Metallic silver was decorated in mSiO{sub 2} with grafted hemiaminal functional groups. Synthesized nanoparticles were used for preparation of glycerol based nanofluids. The effect of temperature, weight fraction of mSiO{sub 2} and concentration of silver nanoparticles on thermal conductivity of nanofluids was investigated. - Abstract: In the present study, the mesoporous structure of silica (mSiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles as well as hemiaminal grafted mSiO{sub 2} decorated by metallic silver (Ag/mSiO{sub 2}) has been used for the preparation of glycerol based nanofluids. Structural and morphological characterization of the synthesized products have been carried out using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UVvis spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and N{sub 2} adsorptiondesorption isotherms. The thermal conductivity and viscosity of the nanofluids have been measured as a function of temperature for various weight fractions and silver concentrations of mSiO{sub 2} and Ag/mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, respectively. The results show that the thermal conductivity of the nanofluids increase up to 9.24% as the weight fraction of mSiO{sub 2} increases up to 4 wt%. Also, increasing the percent of the silver decorated mSiO{sub 2} (Ag/mSiO{sub 2}) up to 2.98% caused an enhancement in the thermal conductivity of the base fluid up to 10.95%. Furthermore, the results show that the nanofluids have Newtonian behavior in the tested temperature range for various concentrations of nanoparticles.

  1. Illuminating system and method for specialized and decorative lighting using liquid light guides

    DOEpatents

    Zorn, C.J.; Kross, B.J.; Majewski, S.; Wojcik, R.F.

    1998-08-25

    The present invention comprises an illumination system for specialized decorative lighting including a light source, a flexible plastic tube sheath for distributing the light to a remote location, a transparent liquid core filling the tube that has an index of refraction greater than that of the plastic tube and an arrangement where light coupled from the light source is caused to leak from the liquid light guide at desired locations for the purposes of specialized lighting, such as underwater illumination in swimming pools. 5 figs.

  2. Optical and morphological properties of graphene sheets decorated with ZnO nanowires via polyol enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Vinay, E-mail: winn201@gmail.com; Rajaura, Rajveer Singh, E-mail: winn201@gmail.com [Centre for Converging Technologies, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur - 302004 (India); Sharma, Preetam K.; Srivastava, Subodh; Vijay, Y. K. [Department of Physics, Thin Film and Membrane Science Lab., University of Rajasthan, Jaipur - 302004 (India); Sharma, S. S. [Department of Physics, Govt. Women Engineering College, Ajmer- 305002 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Graphene-ZnO nanocomposites have proven to be very useful materials for photovoltaic and sensor applications. Here, we report a facile, one-step in situ polymerization method for synthesis of graphene sheets randomly decorated with zinc oxide nanowires using ethylene glycol as solvent. We have used hydrothermal treatment for growth of ZnO nanowires. UV-visible spectra peak shifting around 288nm and 307 nm shows the presence of ZnO on graphene structure. Photoluminiscence spectra (PL) in 400nm-500nm region exhibits the luminescence quenching effect. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image confirms the growth of ZnO nanowires on graphene sheets.

  3. Quantum valley Hall states and topological transitions in Pt(Ni, Pd)-decorated silicene: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bao; Zhang, Jiayong; Wang, Yicheng; Yang, Zhongqin

    2014-12-28

    The electronic states and topological behaviors of Pt(Ni, Pd)-decorated silicene are investigated by using an ab-initio method. All the three kinds of the adatoms prefer hollow sites of the silicene, guaranteeing the Dirac cones unbroken. The Pt(Ni, Pd)-decorated silicene systems all present quantum valley Hall (QVH) states with the gap opened exactly at the Fermi level. The gaps of the QVH states can be increased substantially by applying a positive electric field. Very fascinating phase transitions from QVH to quantum spin Hall (QSH) and then to QVH again are achieved in the Pt/Ni-decorated silicene when a negative electric field is applied. The QSH state in the Pd case with a negative electric field is, however, quenched because of relatively larger Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) than the intrinsic SOC in the system. Our findings may be useful for the applications of silicene-based devices in valleytronics and spintronics.

  4. Estimating U.S. Methane Emissions from the Natural Gas Supply Chain. Approaches, Uncertainties, Current Estimates, and Future Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Garvin; Warner, Ethan; Steinberg, Daniel; Brandt, Adam

    2015-08-01

    A growing number of studies have raised questions regarding uncertainties in our understanding of methane (CH4) emissions from fugitives and venting along the natural gas (NG) supply chain. In particular, a number of measurement studies have suggested that actual levels of CH4 emissions may be higher than estimated by EPA" tm s U.S. GHG Emission Inventory. We reviewed the literature to identify the growing number of studies that have raised questions regarding uncertainties in our understanding of methane (CH4) emissions from fugitives and venting along the natural gas (NG) supply chain.

  5. GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    John K. Godwin

    2005-12-01

    Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

  6. No loss fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslukowski, R.E.

    1992-06-16

    This patent describes a no loss fueling station for delivery of liquid natural gas (LNG) to a use device such as a motor vehicle. It comprises: a pressure building tank holding a quantity of LNG and gas head; means for delivering LNG to the pressure building tank; means for selectively building the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for selectively reducing the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for controlling the pressure building and pressure reducing means to maintain a desired pressure in the pressure building tank without venting natural gas to the atmosphere; and means for delivering the LNG from the pressure building tank to the use device.

  7. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Carol T.; Bender, Donald A.; Bowman, Barry R.; Burnham, Alan K.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Comfort, III, William J.; Guymon, Lloyd G.; Henning, Carl D.; Pedersen, Knud B.; Sefcik, Joseph A.; Smith, Joseph A.; Strauch, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  8. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

    1993-03-09

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  9. Process for off-gas particulate removal and apparatus therefor

    DOEpatents

    Carl, D.E.

    1997-10-21

    In the event of a breach in the off-gas line of a melter operation requiring closure of the line, a secondary vessel vent line is provided with a particulate collector utilizing atomization for removal of large particulates from the off-gas. The collector receives the gas containing particulates and directs a portion of the gas through outer and inner annular channels. The collector further receives a fluid, such as water, which is directed through the outer channel together with a second portion of the particulate-laden gas. The outer and inner channels have respective ring-like termination apertures concentrically disposed adjacent one another on the outer edge of the downstream side of the particulate collector. Each of the outer and inner channels curves outwardly away from the collector`s centerline in proceeding toward the downstream side of the collector. Gas flow in the outer channel maintains the fluid on the channel`s wall in the form of a ``wavy film,`` while the gas stream from the inner channel shears the fluid film as it exits the outer channel in reducing the fluid to small droplets. Droplets formed by the collector capture particulates in the gas stream by one of three mechanisms: impaction, interception or Brownian diffusion in removing the particulates. The particulate-laden droplets are removed from the fluid stream by a vessel vent condenser or mist eliminator. 4 figs.

  10. Lithium-decorated oxidized graphyne for hydrogen storage by first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Zeyu; Wang, Lang; Cheng, Julong; Huang, Libei; Zhu, Chao; Chen, Chi; Miao, Ling Jiang, Jianjun

    2014-11-07

    The geometric stability and hydrogen storage capacity of Li decorated oxidized ?-graphyne are studied based on the first-principles calculations. It is found that oxygen atoms trend to bond with acetylenic carbons and form C=O double bonds on both sides of graphyne. The binding energy of single Li atom on oxidized graphyne is 3.29?eV, owning to the strong interaction between Li atom and O atom. Meanwhile, the dispersion of Li is stable even under a relatively high density. One attached Li atom can at least adsorb six hydrogen molecules around. Benefitting from the porous structure of graphyne and the high attached Li density, a maximum hydrogen storage density 12.03?wt. % is achieved with four Li atoms in graphyne cell. The corresponding average binding energy is 0.24?eV/H{sub 2}, which is suitable for reversible storage. These results indicate that Li decorated graphyne can serve as a promising hydrogen storage material.

  11. A NOVEL APPROACH TO DRUM VENTING AND DRUM MONITORINGe/pj

    SciTech Connect

    Ohl, P.C.; Farwick, C.C.; Douglas, D.G.; Cruz, E.J.

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes the details and specifications associated with drum venting and drum monitoring technologies, and discusses the maturity of in-place systems and current applications. Each year, unventilated drums pressurize and develop bulges and/or breaches that can result in potentially hazardous explosions, posing undesirable hazards to workers and the environment. Drum venting is accomplished by the safe and simple installation of ventilated lids at the time of packaging, or by the inherently risky in-situ ventilation (depressurization) of ''bulged'' drums. Drum monitoring employs either a Magnetically Coupled Pressure Gauge (MCPG) Patent Pending and/or a Magnetically Coupled Corrosion Gauge (MCCG) Patent Pending. Through patented magnetic sensor coupling, these devices enable the noninvasive and remote monitoring of the potentially hazardous materials and/or spent nuclear fuel that is contained in 55-gal drums and associated steel overpack containers.

  12. Theoretical study of hydrogen adsorption on Ca-decorated C{sub 48}B{sub 12} clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Pengtang; Chen, Hongshan

    2015-09-15

    The hydrogen adsorption on Ca-decorated C{sub 48}B{sub 12} clusters is studied using density functional theory. The favorable binding site for Ca atom is the hexagonal C{sub 4}B{sub 2} rings. The strong interaction between Ca atoms and C{sub 48}B{sub 12} cluster hinders the aggregation of Ca atoms on the cluster surface. C{sub 48}B{sub 12} is an electron deficient system with a large electron affinity of 2.952 eV. The decorated Ca atoms transfer their electrons to the cluster easily. The net charges on the Ca atoms are in the range of 1.101 to 1.563 e. When H{sub 2} molecules approach the Ca atoms, they are moderately polarized and adsorbed around the Ca atoms in molecular form. The adsorption strength can reach up to 0.133 eV/H{sub 2}. Each Ca atom in the Ca-decorated C{sub 48}B{sub 12} complexes can adsorb three H{sub 2} molecules. The fully decorated C{sub 48}B{sub 12}Ca{sub 6} can hold up to 18 H{sub 2} molecules.

  13. Highly Active TiO2-Based Visible-Light Photocatalyst with Nonmetal Doping and Plasmonic Metal Decoration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qiao; Lima, Diana Q.; Chi, Miaofang; Yin, Yadong

    2011-01-01

    A sandwich-structured photocatalyst shows an excellent performance in degradation reactions of a number of organic compounds under UV, visible light, and direct sunlight (see picture). The catalyst was synthesized by a combination of nonmetal doping and plasmonic metal decoration of TiO2 nanocrystals, which improves visible-light activity and enhances light harvesting and charge separation, respectively.

  14. Process for off-gas particulate removal and apparatus therefor

    DOEpatents

    Carl, Daniel E.

    1997-01-01

    In the event of a breach in the off-gas line of a melter operation requiring closure of the line, a secondary vessel vent line is provided with a particulate collector utilizing atomization for removal of large particulates from the off-gas. The collector receives the gas containing particulates and directs a portion of the gas through outer and inner annular channels. The collector further receives a fluid, such as water, which is directed through the outer channel together with a second portion of the particulate-laden gas. The outer and inner channels have respective ring-like termination apertures concentrically disposed adjacent one another on the outer edge of the downstream side of the particulate collector. Each of the outer and inner channels curves outwardly away from the collector's centerline in proceeding toward the downstream side of the collector. Gasflow in the outer channel maintains the fluid on the channel's wall in the form of a "wavy film," while the gas stream from the inner channel shears the fluid film as it exits the outer channel in reducing the fluid to small droplets. Droplets formed by the collector capture particulates in the gas stream by one of three mechanisms: impaction, interception or Brownian diffusion in removing the particulates. The particulate-laden droplets are removed from the fluid stream by a vessel vent condenser or mist eliminator.

  15. Flammable Gas Detection for the D-Zero Gas System

    SciTech Connect

    Spires, L.D.; Foglesong, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-02-11

    The use of flammable gas and high voltage in detector systems is common in many experiments at Fermilab. To mitigate the hazards associated with these systems, Fermilab Engineering Standard SD-45B (Ref. 1) was adopted. Since this note is meant to be a guide and not a mandatory standard, each experiment is reviewed for compliance with SD-45B by the flammable gas safety subcommittee. Currently, there are only two types of flammable gas in use, ethane (Appendix A) and methane (Appendix B). The worst flammable-gas case is C2H6 (ethane), which has an estimated flow rate that is 73% of the CH4 (methane) flow but a heat of combustion (in kcal/g-mole) that is 173% of that of methane. In the worst case, if ethane were to spew through its restricting orifice into its gas line at 0 psig and then through a catastrophic leak into Room 215 (TRD) or Room 511 (CDC/FDCNTX), the time that would be required to build up a greater than Class 1 inventory (0.4kg H2 equivalent) would be 5.2 hours (Ref. 2). Therefore a worst-case flammable gas leak would have to go undetected for over 5 hours in order to transform a either mixing room to an environment with a Risk Class greater than Class 1. The mixing systems, gas lines, and detectors themselves will be thoroughly leak checked prior to active service. All vessels that are part of the mixing systems will be protected from overpressure by safety valves vented outside the building. Both the input and output of all detector volumes are protected from overpressure in the same way. The volume immediately outside the central tracking detectors is continuously purged by nitrogen from boiloff from the main nitrogen dewar at the site. However, if flammable gas were to build up in the mixing rooms or particular detector areas, no matter how unlikely, flammable gas detectors that are part of the interlock chain of each gas mixing system will shut down the appropriate system. This includes shutting off the output of flammable gas manifolds within the

  16. SUBMERGED GRAVEL SCRUBBER DEMONSTRATION AS A PASSIVE AIR CLEANER FOR CONTAINMENT VENTING AND PURGING WITH SODIUM AEROSOLS -- CSTF TESTS AC7 - AC10

    SciTech Connect

    HILLIARD, R K.; MCCORMACK, J D.; POSTMA, A K.

    1981-11-01

    Four large-scale air cleaning tests (AC7 - AC10) were performed in the Containment Systems Test Facility (CS'lF) to demonstrate the performance of a Submerged Gravel Scrubber for cleaning the effluent gas from a vented and purged breeder reactor containment vessel. The test article, comprised of a Submerged Gravel Scrubber (SGS) followed by a high efficiency fiber demister, had a design gas flow rate of 0.47 m{sup 3}/s (1000 ft{sup 3}/min) at a pressure drop of 9.0 kPa (36 in. H{sub 2}O). The test aerosol was sodium oxide, sodium hydroxide, or sodium carbonate generated in the 850-m{sup 3} CSTF vessel by continuously spraying sodium into the air-filled vessel while adding steam or carbon dioxide. Approximately 4500 kg (10,000 lb) of sodium was sprayed over a total period of 100 h during the tests. The SGS/Demister system was shown to be highly efficient (removing ~99.98% of the entering sodium aerosol mass), had a high mass loading capacity, and operated in a passive manner, with no electrical requirement. Models for predicting aerosol capture, gas cooling, and pressure drop are developed and compared with experimental results.

  17. Modeling Lithium Ion Battery Safety: Venting of Pouch Cells; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram.; Yang, Chuanbo.; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2013-07-01

    This report documents the successful completion of the NREL July milestone entitled “Modeling Lithium-Ion Battery Safety - Complete Case-Studies on Pouch Cell Venting,” as part of the 2013 Vehicle Technologies Annual Operating Plan with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This work aims to bridge the gap between materials modeling, usually carried out at the sub-continuum scale, and the

  18. Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A Simulation-based Assessment for Southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Klepeis, Neil E.; Lobscheid, Agnes B.; Singer, Brett C.

    2014-01-01

    Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants, and they are typically used without venting range hoods. In this study, LBNL researchers quantified pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes.The simulation model estimated that—in homes using NGCBs without coincident use of venting range hoods -- 62%, 9%, and 53% of occupants are routinely exposed to NO2, CO, and HCHO levels that exceed acute health-based standards and guidelines. NGCB use increased the sample median of the highest simulated 1-hr indoor concentrations by 100, 3,000, and 20 ppb for NO2, CO, and HCHO, respectively. The study recommends that reducing pollutant exposures from NGCBs should be a public health priority. Simulation results suggest that regular use of even moderately effective venting range hoods would dramatically reduce the percentage of homes in which concentrations exceed health-based standards.

  19. A hydrogen peroxide electrochemical sensor based on silver nanoparticles decorated three-dimensional graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Beibei; Liu, Changbing; Shi, Huaxia; Li, Chen; Wang, Lianhui [Key Laboratory for Organic Electronics and Information Displays (KLOEID), Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Huang, Wei, E-mail: iamxcdong@njtech.edu.cn, E-mail: iamwhuang@njtech.edu.cn; Dong, Xiaochen, E-mail: iamxcdong@njtech.edu.cn, E-mail: iamwhuang@njtech.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Organic Electronics and Information Displays (KLOEID), Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu-Singapore Joint Research Center for Organic/Bio-Electronics and Information Displays and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Nanjing Tech University, 30 South Puzhu Road, Nanjing 211816 (China)

    2014-06-16

    A facile strategy has been developed to synthesize sliver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) decorated three-dimensional graphene (3DG) through hydrothermal process. The AgNPs-3DG composites are directly fabricated into a free standing sensing electrode for electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in phosphate buffered solutions. Various techniques equipments including scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the morphology and structure of the as-prepared composite. The electrochemical experiments reveal the AgNPs-3DG based biosensor exhibits fast amperometric sensing, low detection limitation, wide linear responding range, and perfect selectivity for non-enzyme H{sub 2}O{sub 2} detection, indicating the well synergistic effect of Ag NPs high electrocatalytic activity and 3DG high conductivity and large surface area.

  20. Synthesis of ZnO decorated graphene nanocomposite for enhanced photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gayathri, S.; Jayabal, P.; Kottaisamy, M.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2014-05-07

    Zinc oxide/Graphene (GZ) composites with different concentrations of ZnO were successfully synthesized through simple chemical precipitation method. The X-ray diffraction pattern and the micro-Raman spectroscopic technique revealed the formation of GZ composite, and the energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry analysis showed the purity of the prepared samples. The ZnO nanoparticles decorated graphene sheets were clearly visible in the field emission scanning electron micrograph. Raman mapping was employed to analyze the homogeneity of the prepared samples. The diffuse-reflectance spectra clearly indicated that the formation of GZ composites promoted the absorption in the visible region also. The photocatalytic activity of ZnO and GZ composites was studied by the photodegradation of Methylene blue dye. The results revealed that the GZ composites exhibited a higher photocatalytic activity than pristine ZnO. Hence, we proposed a simple wet chemical method to synthesize GZ composite and its application on photocatalysis was demonstrated.

  1. Synthesis and Lanthanide Coordination Chemistry of Phosphine Oxide Decorated Dibenzothiophene and Dibenzothiophene Sulfone Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario-Amorin, Daniel; Ouizem, Sabrina; Dickie, D. A.; Paine, Robert T.; Cramer, Roger E.; Hay, Benjamin; Podair, Julien; Delmau, Laetitia Helene

    2014-01-01

    Syntheses for new ligands based upon dibenzothiophene and dibenzothiophene sulfone platforms, decorated with phosphine oxide and methylphosphine oxide donor groups, are described. Coordination chem. of 4, 6- bis(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl) dibenzothiophene (8) , 4, 6- bis(diphenylphosphinoylmethyl) dibenzothiophene- 5, 5- dioxide (9) and 4, 6- bis(diphenylphosphinoyl) dibenzothiophene- 5, 5- dioxide (10) with lanthanide nitrates, Ln(NO3) 3 (H2O) n is outlined, and crystal structure detns. reveal a range of chelation interactions on Ln(III) ions. The HNO3 dependence of the solvent extn. performance of 9 and 10 in 1, 2- dichloroethane for Eu(III) and Am(III) is described and compared against the extn. behavior of related dibenzofuran ligands (2, 3; R = Ph) and n- octyl(phenyl) - N, N- diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (4) measured under identical conditions.

  2. Characterizing Microbial Community and Geochemical Dynamics at Hydrothermal Vents Using Osmotically Driven Continuous Fluid Samplers

    SciTech Connect

    Robidart, Julie C.; Callister, Stephen J.; Song, Peng F.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wheat, Charles G.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-05-07

    Microbes play a key role in mediating all aquatic biogeochemical cycles, and ongoing efforts are aimed at better understanding the relationships between microbial phylogenetic and physiological diversity, and habitat physical and chemical characteristics. Establishing such relationships is facilitated by sampling and studying microbiology and geochemistry at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales, to access information on the past and current environmental state that contributes to observed microbial abundances and activities. A modest number of sampling systems exist to date, few of which can be used in remote, harsh environments such as hydrothermal vents, where the ephemeral nature of venting underscores the necessity for higher resolution sampling. We have developed a robust, continuous fluid sampling system for co-registered microbial and biogeochemical analyses. The osmosis-powered bio-osmosampling system (BOSS) use no electricity, collects fluids with daily resolution or better, can be deployed in harsh, inaccessible environments and can sample fluids continuously for up to five years. Here we present a series of tests to examine DNA, RNA and protein stability over time, as well as material compatability, via lab experiments. We also conducted two field deployments at deep-sea hydrothermal vents to assess changes in microbial diversity and protein expression as a function of the physico-chemical environment. Our data reveal significant changes in microbial community composition co-occurring with relatively modest changes in the geochemistry. These data additionally provide new insights into the distribution of an enigmatic sulfur oxidizing symbiont in its free-living state. Data from the second deployment reveal differences in the representation of peptides over time, underscoring the utility of the BOSS in meta-proteomic studies. In concert, these data demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, and illustrate the value of using this method to study

  3. An Evaluation of Frangible Materials as Veneers on Vented Structural Member Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, Kevin Jay

    2015-10-01

    Literature shows there has been extensive research and testing done in the area of wall panels and frangible materials. There is evidence from past research that shows it is possible to vent a structure that has had an accidental internal explosion [1]. The reviewed literature shows that most designs vent the entire wall panel versus a frangible material attached to the wall panel. The frangible material attachment points are important to determine the overall loading of the wall panel structure [2]. The materials used in the reviewed literature were securely attached as well as strong enough to remain intact during the pressure loading to move the entire wall panel. Since the vented wall panel was the weakest part of the overall structure, the other walls of the structure were substantially larger. The structure was usually built from concrete and large amounts of steel with dirt and sand over the top of the structure.The study will be conducted at Sandia National Laboratories located in Albuquerque New Mexico. The skeletal structural design for evaluation is a rectangular frame with a square grid pattern constructed from steel. The skeletal structure has been given to the researcher as a design requirement. The grid pattern will be evaluated strictly on plastic deformation and the loading that is applied from the frangible material. The frangible material tested will either fit into the grid or will be a veneer lightly attached to the structure frame. The frangible material may be required on both sides of the structure to adequately represent the application.

  4. Influence of solvent on the morphology and photocatalytic properties of ZnS decorated CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Raubach, Cristiane W. Polastro, Lisnias; Ferrer, Mateus M.; Perrin, Andre; Perrin, Christiane; Albuquerque, Anderson R.; Buzolin, Prescila G. C.; Sambrano, Julio R.; Santana, Yuri B. V. de; Varela, Jos A.; Longo, Elson

    2014-06-07

    Herein, we report a theoretical and experimental study on the photocatalytic activity of CeO{sub 2} ZnS, and ZnS decorated CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared by a microwave-assisted solvothermal method. Theoretical models were established to analyze electron transitions primarily at the interface between CeO{sub 2} and ZnS. As observed, the particle morphology strongly influenced the photocatalytic degradation of organic dye Rhodamine B. A model was proposed to rationalize the photocatalytic behavior of the prepared decorated systems taking into account different extrinsic and intrinsic defect distributions, including order-disorder effects at interfacial and intra-facial regions, and vacancy concentration.

  5. First principles DFT investigation of yttrium-decorated boron-nitride nanotube: Electronic structure and hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Richa Naja; Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2015-06-24

    The electronic structure and hydrogen storage capability of Yttrium-doped BNNTs has been theoretically investigated using first principles density functional theory (DFT). Yttrium atom prefers the hollow site in the center of the hexagonal ring with a binding energy of 0.8048eV. Decorating by Y makes the system half-metallic and magnetic with a magnetic moment of 1.0µ{sub B}. Y decorated Boron-Nitride (8,0) nanotube can adsorb up to five hydrogen molecules whose average binding energy is computed as 0.5044eV. All the hydrogen molecules are adsorbed with an average desorption temperature of 644.708 K. Taking that the Y atoms can be placed only in alternate hexagons, the implied wt% comes out to be 5.31%, a relatively acceptable value for hydrogen storage materials. Thus, this system can serve as potential hydrogen storage medium.

  6. A vent sizing program with particular reference to hybrid runaway reaction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, J.C.; Noronha, J.A.; Torres, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    VSSPH (Vent Sizing Software Program for Hybrid System) is a software program designed to yield rapid evaluation of emergency requirements requirements for a general class of hybrid system runaway reaction - a system which generate both condensable vapor and noncondensable gases. The calculational method is based on transient numerical solutions as well as analytical solutions. This program only requires a few key input parameters as well as physical properties. The program also incorporates the latest two-phase pipe flow model based on the {omega} methodology. This paper describes the model construction and summarizes the results of sample runs. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Method of and apparatus for preheating pressurized fluidized bed combustor and clean-up subsystem of a gas turbine power plant

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Rossa W.; Zoll, August H.

    1982-01-01

    In a gas turbine power plant having a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, gas turbine-air compressor subsystem and a gas clean-up subsystem interconnected for fluid flow therethrough, a pipe communicating the outlet of the compressor of the gas turbine-air compressor subsystem with the interior of the pressurized fluidized bed combustor and the gas clean-up subsystem to provide for flow of compressed air, heated by the heat of compression, therethrough. The pressurized fluidized bed combustor and gas clean-up subsystem are vented to atmosphere so that the heated compressed air flows therethrough and loses heat to the interior of those components before passing to the atmosphere.

  8. Biogenicity of silica precipitation around geysers and hot-spring vents, North Island, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Renaut, R.W.; Rosen, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    Before anthropogenic modifications, Ohaaki Pool (Broadlands-Ohaaki) and Dragon`s Mouth Geyser (Wairakei) emitted waters at temperatures of 93--98 C. The siliceous sinter that precipitated around their vents has the characteristics of geyserite, a dense laminated deposit of presumed abiogenic origin, that was precipitated from waters too hot (>73C) to support microbes other than thermophilic bacteria. Petrographic and SEM examinations of the sinters show that they incorporate columnar stromatolites and silicified, laminated stromatolitic mats that contain well-preserved filamentous microbes. At both localities the microbes lack evidence of desiccation or shrinkage, which implies that they were silicified rapidly at or shortly after their death. Although boiling and very hot (>90 C) waters were discharged, temperatures at many sites surrounding the vents remained sufficiently low and moist to support a microbial community that included thermophilic bacteria and cyanobacteria. In these cooler niches, the microbes and their biofilms served as highly favorable templates for the nucleation and growth of amorphous silica, and collectively provided a microbial framework for the laminated accretionary sinter. Some columnar, spicular, and stratiform geyserites are probably not abiotic precipitates, but are true silica stromatolites.

  9. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospiracrunogena XCL-2

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Kathleen M.; Sievert, Stefan M.; Abril, Fereniki N.; Ball,Lois A.; Barrett, Chantell J.; Blake, Rodrigo A.; Boller, Amanda J.; Chain, Patrick S.G.; Clark, Justine A.; Davis, Carisa R.; Detter, Chris; Do, Kimberly F.; Dobrinski, Kimberly P.; Faza, BrandonI.; Fitzpatrick,Kelly A.; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; Harmer, Tara L.; Hauser, Loren J.; Hugler, Michael; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Klotz, Martin G.; Kong, William W.; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Larimer, Frank W.; Longo, Dana L.; Lucas,Susan; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Massey, Steven E.; Martin, Darlene D.; McCuddin, Zoe; Meyer, Folker; Moore, Jessica L.; Ocampo, Luis H.; Paul,John H.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Reep, Douglas K.; Ren, Qinghu; Ross, Rachel L.; Sato, Priscila Y.; Thomas, Phaedra; Tinkham, Lance E.; Zeruth, Gary T.

    2006-08-23

    Presented here is the complete genome sequence ofThiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2, representative of ubiquitouschemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from deep-seahydrothermal vents. This gammaproteobacterium has a single chromosome(2,427,734 bp), and its genome illustrates many of the adaptations thathave enabled it to thrive at vents globally. It has 14 methyl-acceptingchemotaxis protein genes, including four that may assist in positioningit in the redoxcline. A relative abundance of CDSs encoding regulatoryproteins likely control the expression of genes encoding carboxysomes,multiple dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphate transporters, as wellas a phosphonate operon, which provide this species with a variety ofoptions for acquiring these substrates from the environment. T. crunogenaXCL-2 is unusual among obligate sulfur oxidizing bacteria in relying onthe Sox system for the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds. A 38 kbprophage is present, and a high level of prophage induction was observed,which may play a role in keeping competing populations of close relativesin check. The genome has characteristics consistent with an obligatelychemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, including few transporters predicted tohave organic allocrits, and Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle CDSs scatteredthroughout the genome.

  10. Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5,144 4,851 5,825 5,400 5,294 4,276 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 5,144 4,851 5,825 5,400 5,294 4,276 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2015 Marketed Production 5,144 4,851 5,825 5,400 5,294 4,276 1967-2015 Dry Production 4,638 4,335 5,324 4,912 4,912 3,937

  11. Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    136,782 143,826 129,333 123,622 115,065 107,634 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 7,345 18,470 17,041 17,502 14,139 12,329 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 9,453 11,620 4,470 4,912 5,560 4,796 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 119,984 113,736 107,822 101,208 95,366 90,509 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2015 Repressuring 2,340 2,340 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 3,324 3,324 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2015 Marketed Production 131,118 138,162 129,333 123,622

  12. Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    93,266 79,506 66,954 63,242 59,160 57,421 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 51,117 37,937 27,518 19,831 17,015 13,571 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 19,292 21,777 20,085 23,152 22,757 23,065 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 12,937 13,101 15,619 18,636 18,910 20,428 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 9,920 6,691 3,731 1,623 478 357 2002-2015 Repressuring 5 4 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 5,722 4,878 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed NA NA 0 0 NA 0 1996-2015 Marketed Production 87,539 74,624 66,954

  13. Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2,255 1,980 1,328 1,032 417 477 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 2,092 1,854 1,317 1,027 353 399 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 163 126 11 5 63 78 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 24 21 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 NA 0 2006-2015 Marketed Production 2,231 1,959 1,328 1,032 417 477 1967-2015 Dry Production 2,231 1,959 1,328 1,032 417 477

  14. Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    78,122 78,858 84,482 166,017 512,371 1,014,848 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 73,459 30,655 65,025 55,583 51,541 46,237 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 4,651 45,663 6,684 10,317 13,022 32,674 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 11 2,540 12,773 100,117 447,809 935,937 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Marketed Production 78,122 78,858 84,482 166,017 512,371 1,014,848

  15. Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    147,255 151,094 146,405 139,382 133,661 127,584 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 23,086 20,375 21,802 26,815 10,143 10,679 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 0 0 9 9 12 8 2006-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 16,433 18,501 17,212 13,016 12,309 11,059 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 107,736 112,219 107,383 99,542 111,197 105,838 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003-2015 Vented and Flared NA NA 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2015 Marketed Production 147,255 151,094 146,405 139,382 133,661

  16. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    135,330 124,243 106,122 94,665 93,091 85,775 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 133,521 122,578 106,122 94,665 93,091 85,775 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 1,809 1,665 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 NA 0 2006-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 NA 0 2006-2015 Marketed Production 135,330 124,243 106,122 94,665 93,091 85,775 1967-2015 Dry Production 130,754 119,559 99,551

  17. Structural analysis of palladium-decorated gold nanoparticles as colloidal bimetallic catalysts.

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Y. L.; Miller, J. T.; Guo, N.; Heck, K. N.; Alvarez, P. J. J.; Wong, M. S. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Rice Univ.)

    2011-02-02

    Bimetallic palladium-decorated gold nanoparticle (Pd/Au NP) catalysts are significantly more active than palladium-only catalysts, but the mechanism for enhancement is not completely clear for most reactions, like the aqueous-phase hydrodechlorination of trichloroethene. In this study, we conducted X-ray absorption spectroscopy on carbon-supported Pd/Au NPs to obtain information about the local atomic environment (i.e., oxidation states, coordination numbers, and bond distances) of the two metals under different treatment conditions. The as-synthesized NPs were confirmed to have a Pd-shell/Au-core nanostructure, in which the Pd was found as surface ensembles. Upon exposure to room temperature in air, a portion of the Pd, but not the Au, was oxidized. In comparison, nearly the entire surface of monometallic Pd NPs was oxidized, suggesting that Au in Pd/Au NPs imparts oxidation resistance to Pd atoms. The surface Pd was found randomly distributed, presumably as a PdAu surface alloy, after reduction at 300 C. X-ray absorption spectroscopy provides direct evidence for the Pd-shell/Au-core structure of Pd/Au NPs, and suggests that metallic Pd in the Pd/Au NPs is a source for higher catalytic activity for aqueous-phase trichloroethene hydrodechlorination.

  18. Portable tester for determining gas content within a core sample

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Jr., Fred; Schatzel, Steven J.

    1998-01-01

    A portable tester is provided for reading and displaying the pressure of a gas released from a rock core sample stored within a sealed container and for taking a sample of the released pressurized gas for chemical analysis thereof for subsequent use in a modified direct method test which determines the volume of gas and specific type of gas contained within the core sample. The portable tester includes a pair of low and high range electrical pressure transducers for detecting a gas pressure; a pair of low and high range display units for displaying the pressure of the detected gas- a selector valve connected to the low and high range pressure transducers, a selector knob for selecting gas flow to one of the flow paths; control valve having an inlet connection to the sealed container, and outlets connected to: a sample gas canister, a second outlet port connected to the selector valve means for reading the pressure of the gas from the sealed container to either the low range or high range pressure transducers, and a connection for venting gas contained within the sealed container to the atmosphere. A battery is electrically connected to and supplies the power for operating the unit. The pressure transducers, display units, selector and control valve means and the battery is mounted to and housed within a protective casing for portable transport and use.

  19. Portable tester for determining gas content within a core sample

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, F. Jr.; Schatzel, S.J.

    1998-04-21

    A portable tester is provided for reading and displaying the pressure of a gas released from a rock core sample stored within a sealed container and for taking a sample of the released pressurized gas for chemical analysis thereof for subsequent use in a modified direct method test which determines the volume of gas and specific type of gas contained within the core sample. The portable tester includes a pair of low and high range electrical pressure transducers for detecting a gas pressure; a pair of low and high range display units for displaying the pressure of the detected gas; a selector valve connected to the low and high range pressure transducers and a selector knob for selecting gas flow to one of the flow paths; control valve having an inlet connection to the sealed container; and outlets connected to: a sample gas canister, a second outlet port connected to the selector valve means for reading the pressure of the gas from the sealed container to either the low range or high range pressure transducers, and a connection for venting gas contained within the sealed container to the atmosphere. A battery is electrically connected to and supplies the power for operating the unit. The pressure transducers, display units, selector and control valve means and the battery is mounted to and housed within a protective casing for portable transport and use. 5 figs.

  20. PERCOLATION ON GRAIN BOUNDARY NETWORKS: APPLICATION TO FISSION GAS RELEASE IN NUCLEAR FUELS

    SciTech Connect

    Paul C. Millett

    2012-02-01

    The percolation behavior of grain boundary networks is characterized in two- and three-dimensional lattices with circular macroscale cross-sections that correspond to nuclear fuel elements. The percolation of gas bubbles on grain boundaries, and the subsequent percolation of grain boundary networks is the primary mechanism of fission gas release from nuclear fuels. Both radial cracks and radial gradients in grain boundary property distributions are correlated with the fraction of grain boundaries vented to the free surfaces. Our results show that cracks surprisingly do not significantly increase the percolation of uniform grain boundary networks. However, for networks with radial gradients in boundary properties, the cracks can considerably raise the vented grain boundary content.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS QUENCHER SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, J.

    2011-11-14

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently received a deposit sample from the Melter Primary Off Gas System (POG) of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This sample was composed of material that had been collected while the quencher was in operation January 27, 2011 through March 31, 2011. DWPF requested, through a technical assistance request, characterization of the melter off-gas deposits by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. The purpose of the Melter Off-Gas System is to reduce the amount of radioactive particles and mercury in the gases vented to the atmosphere. Gases emitted from the melter pass through the primary film cooler, quencher, Off-Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT), Steam Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), a condenser, a high efficiency mist eliminator, and a high efficiency particulate air filter, before being vented to the Process Vessel Vent System. The film coolers cool the gases leaving the melter vapor space from {approx}750 C to {approx}375 C, by introducing air and steam to the flow. In the next step, the quencher cools the gas to about 60 C by bringing the condensate from the OGCT in contact with the effluent (Figure 1). Most of the steam in the effluent is then condensed and the melter vapor space pressure is reduced. The purpose of the OGCT is to collect and store the condensate formed during the melter operation. Condensate from the OGCT is circulated to the SAS and atomized with steam. This atomized condensate is mixed with the off-gas to wet and join the particulate which is then removed in the cyclone. The next stage incorporates a chilled water condenser which separates the vapors and elemental mercury from the off-gas steam. Primary off-gas deposit samples from the DWPF melter have previously been analyzed. In 2003, samples from just past the film cooler, from the inlet of the quencher and inside the quencher were analyzed at SRNL. It was determined that the samples were a

  2. Silver decorated titanate/titania nanostructures for efficient solar driven photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Dangguo; Ho, Weng Chye Jeffrey; Tang Yuxin; Tay Qiuling; Lai Yuekun; Highfield, James George; Chen Zhong

    2012-05-15

    Photocatalysis has attracted significant interest to solve both the energy crisis and effectively combat environmental contamination. However, as the most widely used photocatalyst, titania (TiO{sub 2}) suffers from inefficient utilization of solar energy due to its wide band gap. In the present paper, we describe a method to extend the absorption edge of photocatalyst to visible region by the surface plasmon effect of silver. Silver ions are photo-reduced onto the surface of titanate nanotubes, which are synthesized by a conventional hydrothermal method. The as-synthesized Ag/titanate composite is transformed into Ag/titania nanoparticles by annealing at different temperatures. It is found that the interaction of Ag nanoparticles with the supports (titanate/titania) plays a key role for the visible light activity. The samples annealed at low temperature (<350 Degree-Sign C) do not show significant activity under our conditions, while the one annealed at 450 Degree-Sign C shows fast-degradation of methyl orange (MO) under visible light irradiation. The detailed mechanisms are also discussed. - Graphical abstract: Silver nanoparticles decorated titanate/titania as visible light active photocatalysts: silver nanoparticles could be excited by visible light due to its surface plasmon effect and excited electrons could be transferred to the conduction band of the semiconductor, where the reduction process occurs. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uniform Ag nanoparticles are photo-reduced onto titanate and titania nanostructures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titania crystal is formed by annealing hydrogen titanate at different temperatures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Best visible-light activity is achieved by Ag-loaded titania annealed at 450 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The visible light activity is attributed to the surface plasmonic resonance effect.

  3. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye

    1988-01-01

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  4. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, Arye Z. [Newton, MA

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing.

  5. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  6. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 ...

  7. COMPARISON OF VENTED AND ABSOLUTE PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS FOR WATER-LEVEL MONITORING IN HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD JP

    2011-09-08

    Automated water-level data collected using vented pressure transducers deployed in Hanford Site Central Plateau wells commonly display more variability than manual tape measurements in response to barometric pressure fluctuations. To explain this difference, it was hypothesized that vented pressure transducers installed in some wells are subject to barometric pressure effects that reduce water-level measurement accuracy. Vented pressure transducers use a vent tube, which is open to the atmosphere at land surface, to supply air pressure to the transducer housing for barometric compensation so the transducer measurements will represent only the water pressure. When using vented transducers, the assumption is made that the air pressure between land surface and the well bore is in equilibrium. By comparison, absolute pressure transducers directly measure the air pressure within the wellbore. Barometric compensation is achieved by subtracting the well bore air pressure measurement from the total pressure measured by a second transducer submerged in the water. Thus, no assumption of air pressure equilibrium is needed. In this study, water-level measurements were collected from the same Central Plateau wells using both vented and absolute pressure transducers to evaluate the different methods of barometric compensation. Manual tape measurements were also collected to evaluate the transducers. Measurements collected during this study demonstrated that the vented pressure transducers over-responded to barometric pressure fluctuations due to a pressure disequilibrium between the air within the wellbores and the atmosphere at land surface. The disequilibrium is thought to be caused by the relatively long time required for barometric pressure changes to equilibrate between land surface and the deep vadose zone and may be exacerbated by the restriction of air flow between the well bore and the atmosphere due to the presence of sample pump landing plates and well caps. The

  8. Use a Vent Condenser to Recover Flash Steam Energy, Energy Tips: STEAM, Steam Tip Sheet #13 (Fact Sheet), Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    3 Use a Vent Condenser to Recover Flash Steam Energy When the pressure of saturated condensate is reduced, a portion of the liquid "fashes" to low-pressure steam. Depending on the pressures involved, the fash steam contains approximately 10% to 40% of the energy content of the original condensate. In most cases, including condensate receivers and deaerators, the fashing steam is vented and its energy content lost. However, a heat exchanger can be placed in the vent to recover this

  9. A first-principles study of lithium-decorated hybrid boron nitride and graphene domains for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zi-Yu; Shao, Xiaohong E-mail: limin.liu@csrc.ac.cn; Wang, Da; Liu, Li-Min E-mail: limin.liu@csrc.ac.cn; Johnson, J. Karl

    2014-08-28

    First-principles calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption of hydrogen onto Li-decorated hybrid boron nitride and graphene domains of (BN){sub x}C{sub 1−x} complexes with x = 1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 0, and B{sub 0.125}C{sub 0.875}. The most stable adsorption sites for the nth hydrogen molecule in the lithium-decorated (BN){sub x}C{sub 1−x} complexes are systematically discussed. The most stable adsorption sites were affected by the charge localization, and the hydrogen molecules were favorably located above the C-C bonds beside the Li atom. The results show that the nitrogen atoms in the substrate planes could increase the hybridization between the 2p orbitals of Li and the orbitals of H{sub 2}. The results revealed that the (BN){sub x}C{sub 1−x} complexes not only have good thermal stability but they also exhibit a high hydrogen storage of 8.7% because of their dehydrogenation ability.

  10. Texas Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8-2015 From Gas Wells 27,421 23,791 15,953 13,650 10,902 9,055 1978-2015 From Oil Wells 1,153 0 552 386 298 266 1978-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 2012-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 2012-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 NA NA 2003-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 NA NA 2003-2015 Marketed Production 28,574 23,791 16,506 14,036 11,200 9,321 1992-2015 Dry Production 16,506 11,222 8,887 2012

    Propane-Air 1981-2005 Refinery Gas 1981-2005 Other

  11. Plentiful natural gas headed for big growth in Mideast

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, S.H.; Aitani, A.M. )

    1995-01-23

    Natural gas is increasingly becoming a major contributor in the industrial development of most Middle Eastern countries. Demand there will rise steeply in coming years. This is because of the abundant and growing natural gas resources in the region, the economic benefits of using local resources, as well as increased emphasis on a cleaner environment. Today, proved reserves of natural gas in the Middle East are 45 trillion cu meters (tcm), or 1,488 trillion cu ft (tcf). This is over 30% of the world's natural gas reserves. A table presents data on reserves and production of natural gas in the region. About 20% of this gross production is rein-injecting for oil field pressure maintenance, 13% is flared or vented, and 7% is accounted as losses. The remaining 60% represents consumption in power generation, water desalination, petrochemicals and fertilizers production, aluminum and copper smelting, and fuel for refineries and other industries. The use of natural gas in these various industries is discussed. Thirteen tables present data on gas consumption by country and sector, power generation capacity, major chemicals derived from natural gas, and petrochemical plant capacities.

  12. Field-scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as an oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition. Appendices. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    This document contains appendices regarding a reprint on a field scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as a oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition.

  13. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, A.Z.

    1990-12-25

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  14. Natural Gas

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage ...

  15. Gas magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2016-05-03

    Measurement of a precessional rate of a gas, such as an alkali gas, in a magnetic field is made by promoting a non-uniform precession of the gas in which substantially no net magnetic field affects the gas during a majority of the precession cycle. This allows sensitive gases that would be subject to spin-exchange collision de-phasing to be effectively used for extremely sensitive measurements in the presence of an environmental magnetic field such as the Earth's magnetic field.

  16. Gas separating

    DOEpatents

    Gollan, A.

    1988-03-29

    Feed gas is directed tangentially along the non-skin surface of gas separation membrane modules comprising a cylindrical bundle of parallel contiguous hollow fibers supported to allow feed gas to flow from an inlet at one end of a cylindrical housing through the bores of the bundled fibers to an outlet at the other end while a component of the feed gas permeates through the fibers, each having the skin side on the outside, through a permeate outlet in the cylindrical casing. 3 figs.

  17. Determination of landfill gas composition and pollutant emission rates at fresh kills landfill. Volume 1. Project report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-07

    Air emissions of landfill gas pollutants at Fresh Kills Landfill, located in Staten Island, NY, were estimated based on three weeks of sampling of flow, concentration, and flux at passive vents, gas extraction wells, gas collection plant headers, and the landfill surface conducted by Radian Corporation in 1995. Emission rates were estimated for 202 pollutants, including hydrogen sulfide, mercury vapor, speciated volatile organic compounds, methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane recovery plant. Emission factors based on the results are presented.

  18. The Effects of Infrared-Blocking Pigments and Deck Venting on Stone-Coated Metal Residential Roofs

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William A

    2006-01-01

    Field data show that stone-coated metal shakes and S-mission tile, which exploit the use of infraredblocking color pigments (IrBCPs), along with underside venting reduce the heat flow penetrating the conditioned space of a residence by 70% compared with the amount of heat flow penetrating roofs with conventional asphalt shingles. Stone-coated metal roof products are typically placed on battens and counter-battens and nailed through the battens to the roof deck. The design provides venting on the underside of the metal roof that reduces the heat flow penetrating a home. The Metal Construction Association (MCA) and its affiliate members installed stone-coated metal roofs with shake and S-mission tile profiles and a painted metal shake roof on a fully instrumented attic test assembly at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Measurements of roof, deck, attic, and ceiling temperatures; heat flows; solar reflectance; thermal emittance; and ambient weather were recorded for each of the test roofs and also for an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and direct nailed asphalt shingle roof. All attic assemblies had ridge and soffit venting; the ridge was open to the underside of the stone-coated metal roofs. A control assembly with a conventional asphalt shingle roof was used for comparing deck and ceiling heat transfer rates.

  19. Greenhouse gas reduction strategy: A team approach to resource management

    SciTech Connect

    Ngai, C.C.; Borchert, G.; Ho, K.T.; Lee, S.

    1996-12-31

    In spite of the conflicting evidence of global warming due to greenhouse gas emission, PanCanadian accepts the reduction of greenhouse gas as both a political and environmental reality. While PanCanadian is committed to participate in the government and industry sponsored voluntary climate change challenge, we are also acutely aware of its potential impact on our competitiveness considering our status as a hydrocarbon producer and exporter. This paper describes a multi-discipline team approach to the challenge of reducing greenhouse gas. This includes identification of all greenhouse gas emission sources, listing the opportunities and relative impact of each remedial solution, and estimated cost associated with the reduction. Both immediate solutions and long term strategies are explored. This includes energy conservation, improving process efficiency and promoting environmental training and awareness programs. A number of important issues become evident in greenhouse gas reduction related to the exploration and production of hydrocarbons: depleting pressure and water encroachment in reservoirs; energy required for producing oil as opposed to producing gas; and public perception of flaring as compared with venting. A cost and benefit study of greenhouse gas reduction opportunities in terms of net present values is discussed. This paper describes a process that can be adapted by other producers in managing air emissions.

  20. Unconventional Natural Gas

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 21 Exhibit 1-9 U.S. oil- and gas-producing ... for natural gas extraction (NETL, 2014) ... shale gas, tight gas sands, and coalbed methane resources. ...

  1. Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, W.H.

    1997-06-30

    This report encompasses the second year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on fundamental research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (1) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (2) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. The results of this work are expected to enhance utilization of LNG as a transportation fuel. The paper discusses the following topics: (A) Fueling Delivery to the Engine, Engine Considerations, and Emissions: (1) Atomization and/or vaporization of LNG for direct injection diesel-type natural gas engines; (2) Fundamentals of direct replacement of diesel fuel by LNG in simulated combustion; (3) Distribution of nitric oxide and emissions formation from natural gas injection; and (B) Short and long term storage: (1) Modification by partial direct conversion of natural gas composition for improved storage characteristics; (2) LNG vent gas adsorption and recovery using activate carbon and modified adsorbents; (3) LNG storage at moderate conditions.

  2. Temperature dependent dual hydrogen sensor response of Pd nanoparticle decorated Al doped ZnO surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, D.; Barman, P. B.; Hazra, S. K.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, M.; Som, T.

    2015-10-28

    Sputter deposited Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin films exhibit a dual hydrogen sensing response in the temperature range 40 °C–150 °C after surface modifications with palladium nanoparticles. The unmodified AZO films showed no response in hydrogen in the temperature range 40 °C–150 °C. The operational temperature windows on the low and high temperature sides have been estimated by isolating the semiconductor-to-metal transition temperature zone of the sensor device. The gas response pattern was modeled by considering various adsorption isotherms, which revealed the dominance of heterogeneous adsorption characteristics. The Arrhenius adsorption barrier showed dual variation with change in hydrogen gas concentration on either side of the semiconductor-to-metal transition. A detailed analysis of the hydrogen gas response pattern by considering the changes in nano palladium due to hydrogen adsorption, and semiconductor-to-metal transition of nanocrystalline Al doped ZnO layer due to temperature, along with material characterization studies by glancing incidence X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, are presented.

  3. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and ...

  4. New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas ... Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells New Mexico Natural Gas Gross ...

  5. South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    12,540 12,449 15,085 16,205 15,305 14,531 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 1,300 933 14,396 15,693 15,006 14,196 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 11,240 11,516 689 512 299 335 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 2,136 2,120 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 8,543 8,480 0 0 NA 0 1997-2015 Marketed Production 1,862 1,848 15,085 16,205 15,305 14,531 1970-2015 Dry Production 1,862 1,848

  6. New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    35,813 31,124 26,424 23,458 20,201 17,829 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 35,163 30,495 25,985 23,111 19,808 17,609 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 650 629 439 348 393 220 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Marketed Production 35,813 31,124 26,424 23,458 20,201 17,829 1967-2015 Dry Production 35,813 31,124 26,424 23,458 20,201

  7. Louisiana Onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2,148,447 2,969,297 2,882,193 2,289,193 1,907,296 1,731,680 1992-2015 From Gas Wells 848,745 819,264 707,705 710,608 666,337 571,633 1992-2015 From Oil Wells 57,024 61,727 43,936 44,213 43,479 39,240 1992-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 2,130,551 1,199,807 1,120,806 2012-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 Repressuring 3,490 4,895 NA 2,829 3,199 4,248 1992-2015 Vented and Flared 4,432 6,153 NA 3,912 4,606 3,748 1992-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed NA NA NA NA NA NA 2003-2015 Marketed

  8. Alabama Onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    39,215 134,305 128,312 120,666 110,232 104,065 1992-2015 From Gas Wells 29,961 32,602 27,009 27,182 24,945 23,925 1992-2015 From Oil Wells 6,195 5,975 10,978 8,794 7,939 8,406 1992-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 2012-2015 From Coalbed Wells 103,060 95,727 90,325 84,690 77,347 71,735 2007-2015 Repressuring 736 531 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Vented and Flared 2,085 3,012 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 8,200 13,830 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Marketed Production 128,194 116,932 128,312

  9. California Onshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    273,136 237,388 214,509 219,386 218,668 217,517 1992-2015 From Gas Wells 71,189 62,083 76,704 73,493 53,520 53,473 1992-2015 From Oil Wells 106,442 80,957 49,951 51,625 57,572 56,081 1992-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 55,344 107,513 107,964 2012-2015 Repressuring 15,767 13,702 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Vented and Flared 2,790 2,424 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 3,019 2,624 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Marketed Production 251,559 218,638 214,509 219,386 218,668 217,517 1992-2015 Dry

  10. Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    NA NA NA 9 3 1 1967-2015 From Gas Wells NA NA NA 8 3 1 1967-2015 From Oil Wells NA NA NA 1 * 0 2007-2015 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA 0 0 0 2007-2015 Repressuring NA NA NA 0 0 0 2007-2015 Vented and Flared NA NA NA 0 0 0 2007-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed NA NA NA 0 0 0 2007-2015 Marketed Production NA NA NA 9 3 1 1967-2015 Dry Production NA NA NA 9 3 Feet)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  11. Montana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    93,266 79,506 66,954 63,242 59,160 57,421 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 51,117 37,937 27,518 19,831 17,015 13,571 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 19,292 21,777 20,085 23,152 22,757 23,065 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 12,937 13,101 15,619 18,636 18,910 20,428 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 9,920 6,691 3,731 1,623 478 357 2002-2015 Repressuring 5 4 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 5,722 4,878 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed NA NA 0 0 NA 0 1996-2015 Marketed Production 87,539 74,624 66,954

  12. Nebraska Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2,255 1,980 1,328 1,032 417 477 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 2,092 1,854 1,317 1,027 353 399 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 163 126 11 5 63 78 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 24 21 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 NA 0 2006-2015 Marketed Production 2,231 1,959 1,328 1,032 417 477 1967-2015 Dry Production 2,231 1,959 1,328 1,032 417 477 Feet)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr

  13. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4 3 4 3 3 3 1991-2015 From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 * 1 2006-2015 From Oil Wells 4 3 4 3 3 3 1991-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 0 0 1991-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Marketed Production 4 3 4 3 3 3 1991-2015 Dry Production 4 3 4 3 3 3 1991 Feet)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  14. Oklahoma Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    827,328 1,888,870 2,023,461 1,993,754 2,331,086 2,499,599 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 1,210,315 1,402,378 1,573,880 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 210,492 104,703 53,720 71,515 136,270 130,482 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 406,143 449,167 503,329 663,507 746,686 759,519 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 70,581 53,206 71,553 48,417 45,751 35,719 2002-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2015

  15. Oregon Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    407 1,344 770 770 1,142 848 1979-2015 From Gas Wells 1,407 1,344 770 770 1,142 848 1979-2015 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994-2015 Marketed Production 1,407 1,344 770 770 1,142 848 1979-2015 Dry Production 1,407 1,344 770 770 1,142 848 Feet)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep

  16. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    572,902 1,310,592 2,256,696 3,259,042 4,257,693 4,812,983 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 173,450 242,305 210,609 207,872 217,702 293,325 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 0 0 3,456 2,987 3,527 2,629 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 399,452 1,068,288 2,042,632 3,048,182 4,036,463 4,517,028 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2015 Marketed Production 572,902 1,310,592 2,256,696

  17. South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    12,540 12,449 15,085 16,205 15,305 14,531 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 1,300 933 14,396 15,693 15,006 14,196 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 11,240 11,516 689 512 299 335 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 2,136 2,120 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 8,543 8,480 0 0 NA 0 1997-2015 Marketed Production 1,862 1,848 15,085 16,205 15,305 14,531 1970-2015 Dry Production 1,862 1,848

  18. Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    147,255 151,094 146,405 139,382 133,661 127,584 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 23,086 20,375 21,802 26,815 10,143 10,679 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 0 0 9 9 12 8 2006-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 16,433 18,501 17,212 13,016 12,309 11,059 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 107,736 112,219 107,383 99,542 111,197 105,838 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003-2015 Vented and Flared NA NA 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2015 Marketed Production 147,255 151,094 146,405 139,382 133,661

  19. West Virginia Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    265,174 394,125 539,860 741,853 1,067,114 1,318,822 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 151,401 167,113 193,537 167,118 185,005 174,090 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 0 0 1,477 2,660 1,687 2,018 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 113,773 227,012 344,847 572,076 880,422 1,142,714 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 NA 0 2006-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 NA 0 2006-2015 Marketed Production 265,174 394,125 539,860 741,853 1,067,114

  20. Alabama Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Alabama

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    39,215 134,305 128,312 120,666 110,232 104,065 1992-2015 From Gas Wells 29,961 32,602 27,009 27,182 24,945 23,925 1992-2015 From Oil Wells 6,195 5,975 10,978 8,794 7,939 8,406 1992-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 2012-2015 From Coalbed Wells 103,060 95,727 90,325 84,690 77,347 71,735 2007-2015 Repressuring 736 531 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Vented and Flared 2,085 3,012 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 8,200 13,830 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Marketed Production 128,194 116,932 128,312

  1. California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    319,891 279,130 246,822 252,310 238,988 231,060 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 73,017 63,902 91,904 88,203 60,936 57,031 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 151,369 120,880 67,065 69,839 70,475 66,065 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 95,505 94,349 87,854 94,268 107,577 107,964 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2015 Repressuring 27,240 23,905 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 2,790 2,424 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 3,019 2,624 0 0 NA 0 1980-2015 Marketed Production 286,841 250,177

  2. California Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    273,136 237,388 214,509 219,386 218,668 217,517 1992-2015 From Gas Wells 71,189 62,083 76,704 73,493 53,520 53,473 1992-2015 From Oil Wells 106,442 80,957 49,951 51,625 57,572 56,081 1992-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 55,344 107,513 107,964 2012-2015 Repressuring 15,767 13,702 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Vented and Flared 2,790 2,424 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 3,019 2,624 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Marketed Production 251,559 218,638 214,509 219,386 218,668 217,517 1992-2015 Dry

  3. Colorado Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ,589,664 1,649,306 1,709,376 1,604,860 1,643,487 1,704,836 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 801,749 728,978 761,886 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 338,565 359,537 67,466 106,784 178,657 236,009 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 195,131 211,488 228,796 247,046 315,469 308,642 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 529,891 514,531 376,543 449,281 420,383 398,298 2002-2015 Repressuring 10,043 10,439 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 1,242 1,291 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0

  4. Florida Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3,938 17,129 18,681 18,011 3,178 5,790 1971-2015 From Gas Wells 0 0 17,182 16,459 43 69 1996-2015 From Oil Wells 13,938 17,129 1,500 1,551 3,135 5,720 1971-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2015 Repressuring 0 0 17,909 17,718 2,682 5,291 1976-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 NA 0 1971-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 1,529 2,004 0 0 NA 0 1980-2015 Marketed Production 12,409 15,125 773 292 496 499 1967-2015 Dry Production 12,409 15,125 773 292 263

  5. Kansas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    325,591 309,952 296,299 292,467 286,480 285,236 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 247,651 236,834 264,610 264,223 261,093 261,877 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 39,071 37,194 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 38,869 35,924 31,689 28,244 25,387 23,359 2002-2015 Repressuring 548 521 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 323 307 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2015 Marketed Production 324,720 309,124 296,299 292,467 286,480 285,236

  6. Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    135,330 124,243 106,122 94,665 93,091 85,775 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 133,521 122,578 106,122 94,665 93,091 85,775 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 1,809 1,665 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 NA 0 2006-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 NA 0 2006-2015 Marketed Production 135,330 124,243 106,122 94,665 93,091 85,775 1967-2015 Dry Production 130,754 119,559 99,551

  7. Louisiana Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2,148,447 2,969,297 2,882,193 2,289,193 1,907,296 1,731,680 1992-2015 From Gas Wells 848,745 819,264 707,705 710,608 666,337 571,633 1992-2015 From Oil Wells 57,024 61,727 43,936 44,213 43,479 39,240 1992-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 2,130,551 1,199,807 1,120,806 2012-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 Repressuring 3,490 4,895 NA 2,829 3,199 4,248 1992-2015 Vented and Flared 4,432 6,153 NA 3,912 4,606 3,748 1992-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed NA NA NA NA NA NA 2003-2015 Marketed

  8. Maryland Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    43 34 44 32 20 27 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 43 34 44 32 20 27 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Marketed Production 43 34 44 32 20 27 1967-2015 Dry Production 43 34 44 32 20 27 Feet)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0

  9. Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    136,782 143,826 129,333 123,622 115,065 107,634 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 7,345 18,470 17,041 17,502 14,139 12,329 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 9,453 11,620 4,470 4,912 5,560 4,796 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 119,984 113,736 107,822 101,208 95,366 90,509 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2015 Repressuring 2,340 2,340 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 3,324 3,324 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2015 Marketed Production 131,118 138,162 129,333 123,622

  10. U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2,823,398 2,682,021 2,778,526 2,634,991 2,705,744 2,739,059 1973-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2016 From Coalbed Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2002-2016 Repressuring NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2016 Vented and Flared NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2016 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2016 Marketed Production 2,430,818 2,339,556 2,410,513 2,304,300 2,368,566 2,390,961 1973-2016 Dry Production

  11. Gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    There is a definite need for the US government to provide leadership for research in gas hydrates and to coordinate its activities with academia, industry, private groups, federal agencies, and their foreign counterparts. In response to this need, the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center implemented a gas hydrates R and D program. Understanding the resource will be achieved through: assessment of current technology; characterization of gas hydrate geology and reservoir engineering; and development of diagnostic tools and methods. Research to date has focused on geology. As work progressed, areas where gas hydrates are likely to occur were identified, and specific high potential areas were targeted for future detailed investigation. Initial research activities involved the development of the Geologic Analysis System (GAS); which will provide, through approximately 30 software packages, the capability to manipulate and correlate several types of geologic and petroleum data into maps, graphics, and reports. Preliminary mapping of hydrate prospects for the Alaskan North Slope is underway. Geological research includes physical system characterization which focuses on creating synthetic methane hydrates and developing synthetic hydrate cores using tetrahydrofuran, consolidated rock cores, frost base mixtures, water/ice base mixtures, and water base mixtures. Laboratory work produced measurements of the sonic velocity and electrical resistivity of these synthetic hydrates. During 1983, a sample from a natural hydrate core recovered from the Pacific coast of Guatemala was tested for these properties by METC. More recently, a natural hydrate sample from the Gulf of Mexico was also acquired and testing of this sample is currently underway. In addition to the development of GAS, modeling and systems analysis work focused on the development of conceptual gas hydrate production models. 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. NATURAL CO2 FLOW FROM THE LOIHI VENT: IMPACT ON MICROBIAL PRODUCTION AND FATE OF THE CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Richard B. Coffin; Thomas J. Boyd; David L. Knies; Kenneth S. Grabowski; John W. Pohlman; Clark S. Mitchell

    2004-02-27

    The program for International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration was initiated December 1997. Preliminary steps involved surveying a suite of biogeochemical parameters off the coast of Kona on the Big Island of Hawaii. The preliminary survey was conducted twice, in 1999 and 2000, to obtain a thorough data set including measurements of pH, current profiles, CO{sub 2} concentrations, microbial activities, and water and sediment chemistries. These data were collected in order to interpret a planned CO{sub 2} injection experiment. After these preliminary surveys were completed, local environment regulation forced moving the project to the coast north east of Bergen, Norway. The preliminary survey along the Norwegian Coast was conducted during 2002. However, Norwegian government revoked a permit, approved by the Norwegian State Pollution Control Authority, for policy reasons regarding the CO{sub 2} injection experiment. As a result the research team decided to monitor the natural CO{sub 2} flow off the southern coast of the Big Island. From December 3rd-13th 2002 scientists from four countries representing the Technical Committee of the International Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Experiment examined the hydrothermal venting at Loihi Seamount (Hawaiian Islands, USA). Work focused on tracing the venting gases, the impacts of the vent fluids on marine organisms, and CO{sub 2} influence on biogeochemical cycles. The cruise on the R/V Ka'imikai-O-Kanaloa (KOK) included 8 dives by the PISCES V submarine, 6 at Loihi and 2 at a nearby site in the lee of the Big Island. Data for this final report is from the last 2 dives on Loihi.

  13. Florida Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Florida Natural Gas Number of Gas and ...2016 Referring Pages: Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary) Florida Natural Gas Summary

  14. Determination of landfill gas composition and pollutant emission rates at fresh kills landfill. Volume 2. Appendices to project report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-07

    Air emissions of landfill gas pollutants at Fresh Kills Landfill, located in Staten Island, NY, were estimated based on three weeks of sampling of flow, concentration, and flux at passive vents, gas extraction wells, gas collection plant headers, and the landfill surface conducted by Radian Corporation in 1995. Emission rates were estimated for 202 pollutants, including hydrogen sulfide, mercury vapor, speciated volatile organic compounds, methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane, and carbon dioxide. Results indicate that large amounts of mercury enter the methane recovery plant. Emission factors based on the results are presented.

  15. Gas sensor

    DOEpatents

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  16. Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7,593,697 7,934,689 8,143,510 8,299,472 8,659,188 8,801,282 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 3,115,409 2,672,326 2,316,239 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 849,560 1,073,301 860,675 1,166,810 1,558,002 1,801,212 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 2,302,950 3,066,435 3,662,933 4,017,253 4,428,859 4,683,831 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2015 Repressuring 558,854 502,020 437,367 423,413 440,153 533,047 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 39,569 35,248 47,530 76,113 90,125 113,786

  17. Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2,218,283 3,040,523 2,955,437 2,366,943 1,968,618 1,784,797 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 911,967 883,712 775,506 780,623 720,416 619,242 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 63,638 68,505 49,380 51,948 50,722 44,748 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 1,242,678 2,088,306 2,130,551 1,534,372 1,197,480 1,120,806 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2015 Repressuring 3,606 5,015 0 2,829 3,199 4,248 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 4,578 6,302 0 3,912 4,606 3,748 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0

  18. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    401,660 443,351 452,915 59,272 54,446 58,207 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 387,026 429,829 404,457 47,385 43,020 44,868 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 8,714 8,159 43,421 7,256 7,136 9,220 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 5,921 5,363 5,036 4,630 4,289 4,119 2002-2015 Repressuring 3,480 3,788 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 8,685 9,593 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 315,775 348,482 389,072 0 NA 0 1980-2015 Marketed Production 73,721 81,487 63,843

  19. Inert gas rejection device for zinc-halogen battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Michael J.; Arendell, Mark W.

    1981-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for separating chlorine gas from other (foreign) gases, having an anode, a cathode assembly, an aqueous electrolyte, a housing, and a constant voltage power supply. The cathode assembly is generally comprised of a dense graphite electrode having a winding channel formed in the face opposing the anode, a gas impermeable (but liquid permeable) membrane sealed into the side of the cathode electrode over the channel, and a packing of graphite particles contained in the channel of the cathode electrode. The housing separates and parallelly aligns the anode and cathode assembly, and provides a hermetic seal for the cell. In operation, a stream of chlorine and foreign gases enters the cell at the beginning of the cathode electrode channel. The chlorine gas is dissolved into the electrolyte and electrochemically reduced into chloride ions. The chloride ions disfuse through the gas impermeable membrane, and are electrochemically oxidized at the anode into purified chlorine gas. The foreign gases do not participate in the above electrochemical reactions, and are vented from the cell at the end of the cathode electrode channel.

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    natural gas demand, thereby contributing to larger net injections of natural gas into storage. Other Market Trends: EIA Releases The Natural Gas Annual 2006: The Energy...

  1. Natural Gas Applications

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Gas Applications. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Applications...

  2. New Mexico Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) ... Underground Base Natural Gas in Storage - All Operators New Mexico Underground Natural Gas ...

  3. New York Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) ... Underground Base Natural Gas in Storage - All Operators New York Underground Natural Gas ...

  4. Pollutant Exposures from Natural Gas Cooking Burners: A Simulation-Based Assessment for Southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Klepeis, Neil E.; Lobscheid, Agnes B.; Singer, Brett C.

    2014-06-01

    Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting. The objective of this study is to quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. A mass balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the "exposure concentrations" experienced by individual occupants. The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs, NO{sub 2} and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of CO and NO{sub 2} were obtained from available databases. Ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use were inferred from household characteristics. Proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods were also explored. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying less than 10%. The simulation model estimates that in homes using NGCBs without coincident use of venting range hoods, 62%, 9%, and 53% of occupants are routinely exposed to NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO levels that exceed acute health-based standards and guidelines. NGCB use increased the sample median of the highest simulated 1-hr indoor concentrations by 100, 3000, and 20 ppb for NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO, respectively. Reducing pollutant exposures from NGCBs should be a public health priority. Simulation results suggest that regular use of even moderately effective venting range hoods would dramatically reduce the percentage of homes in which concentrations exceed health

  5. Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of ...

  6. GAS SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Monson, H.; Hutter, E.

    1961-07-11

    A seal is described for a cover closing an opening in the top of a pressure vessel that may house a nuclear reactor. The seal comprises a U-shaped trough formed on the pressure vessel around the opening therein, a mass of metal in the trough, and an edge flange on the cover extending loosely into the trough and dipping into the metal mass. The lower portion of the metal mass is kept melted, and the upper portion, solid. The solid pontion of the metal mass prevents pressure surges in the vessel from expelling the liquid portion of the metal mass from the trough; the liquld portion, thus held in place by the solid portion, does not allow gas to go through, and so gas cannot escape through shrinkage holes in the solid portion.

  7. Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES Project)

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel Henderson; Robert Fickes

    2007-12-31

    strength of natural gas. The cost of producing oil is to a large extent the cost of electric power used to extract and deliver the oil. Researchers have identified stranded and flared gas in California that could generate 400 megawatts of power, and believe that there is at least an additional 2,000 megawatts that have not been identified. Since California accounts for about 14.5% of the total domestic oil production, it is reasonable to assume that about 16,500 megawatts could be generated throughout the United States. This power could restore the cost-effectiveness of thousands of oil wells, increasing oil production by millions of barrels a year, while reducing emissions and greenhouse gas emissions by burning the gas in clean distributed generators rather than flaring or venting the stranded gases. Most turbines and engines are designed for standardized, high-quality gas. However, emerging technologies such as microturbines have increased the options for a broader range of fuels. By demonstrating practical means to consume the four gas streams, the project showed that any gases whose properties are between the extreme conditions also could be utilized. The economics of doing so depends on factors such as the value of additional oil recovered, the price of electricity produced, and the alternate costs to dispose of stranded gas.

  8. ,"Natural Gas Consumption",,,"Natural Gas Expenditures"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Census Division, 1999" ,"Natural Gas Consumption",,,"Natural Gas Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand cubic feet)","per Square Foot (cubic feet)","per Worker (thousand cubic...

  9. Dry Natural Gas

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimated natural gas plant liquids and dry natural gas content of total natural gas proved reserves, 2014 million barrels and billion cubic feet 2014 Dry Natural Gas billion cubic ...

  10. Natural Gas Basics

    SciTech Connect

    NREL Clean Cities

    2010-04-01

    Fact sheet answers questions about natural gas production and use in transportation. Natural gas vehicles are also described.

  11. Method of characterizing VOC concentration in vented waste drums with multiple layers of confinement using limited sampling data

    SciTech Connect

    Liekhus, K.J.; Vaughn, M.E.; Jensen, B.A.; Connolly, M.J.

    1994-11-01

    Characterization of transuranic waste destined for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant currently requires detailed characterization of the volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration in the void volume headspaces (drum headspace, the large polymer bag headspace, and the innermost layers of confinement headspace) of the waste drums. A test program is underway at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to determine if the drum headspace VOC concentration is representative of the concentration in the entire drum void space and demonstrate that the VOC concentration in the innermost layer of confinement can be estimated using a model incorporating diffusion and permeation transport principles and limited waste drum sampling data. A comparison of model predictions of VOC concentration in the innermost layer of confinement with actual measurement from transuranic waste drums demonstrate that this method may be useful in characterizing VOC concentration in a vented waste drum.

  12. New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and ... Number of Producing Gas Wells Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary) New York Natural Gas ...

  13. Louisiana State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8-2015 From Gas Wells 63,222 64,448 67,801 70,015 54,080 47,609 1978-2015 From Oil Wells 6,614 6,778 5,443 7,735 7,243 5,508 1978-2015 Repressuring 116 120 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Vented and Flared 146 149 NA NA NA NA 1999-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed NA NA NA NA NA NA 2003-2015 Marketed Production 69,574 70,957 73,244 77,750 61,322 53,117 1992-2015 Dry Production 68,145 58,077 48,945 2012

  14. California State Offshore Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5,554 5,163 5,051 5,470 5,805 5,146 1978-2015 From Gas Wells 71 259 640 413 410 454 1978-2015 From Oil Wells 5,483 4,904 4,411 5,057 5,395 4,692 1978-2015 Repressuring 435 403 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 NA NA NA NA 2003-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 NA NA NA NA 2003-2015 Marketed Production 5,120 4,760 5,051 5,470 5,805 5,146 1992-2015 Dry Production 5,051 5,952 5,139

  15. Federal Offshore California Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    41,200 36,579 27,262 27,454 14,515 8,397 1977-2015 From Gas Wells 1,757 1,560 14,559 14,296 7,007 3,105 1977-2015 From Oil Wells 39,444 35,020 12,703 13,158 7,508 5,292 1977-2015 Repressuring 11,038 9,800 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Vented and Flared NA NA NA 2003-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed NA NA NA 2003-2015 Marketed Production 30,162 26,779 27,262 27,454 14,515 8,397 1992-2015

  16. California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    5,554 5,163 5,051 5,470 5,805 5,146 1978-2015 From Gas Wells 71 259 640 413 410 454 1978-2015 From Oil Wells 5,483 4,904 4,411 5,057 5,395 4,692 1978-2015 Repressuring 435 403 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 NA NA NA NA 2003-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 NA NA NA NA 2003-2015 Marketed Production 5,120 4,760 5,051 5,470 5,805 5,146 1992-2015 Dry Production 5,051 5,952 5,139

    22,503 2,171 0 23 0 0 2007-2015 Import Price 4.76 3.57 -- 3.59 -- -- 2007-2015 Export Volume 43,278

  17. Louisiana Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8-2015 From Gas Wells 63,222 64,448 67,801 70,015 54,080 47,609 1978-2015 From Oil Wells 6,614 6,778 5,443 7,735 7,243 5,508 1978-2015 Repressuring 116 120 NA NA NA NA 1992-2015 Vented and Flared 146 149 NA NA NA NA 1999-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed NA NA NA NA NA NA 2003-2015 Marketed Production 69,574 70,957 73,244 77,750 61,322 53,117 1992-2015 Dry Production 68,145 58,077 48,945 2012

    249 435 553 560 517 478 2007-2015 Biomass 249 435 553 560 517 478 201

    90,867 60,554 20,132

  18. Fuel gas conditioning process

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2000-01-01

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  19. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline Segment About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Intrastate Natural Gas ...

  20. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Major Natural Gas Transportation...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Major Natural Gas Transportation Corridors About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Major Natural Gas ...

  1. Natural Gas Regulation - Other Gas-Related Information Sources...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Natural Gas Regulation - Other Gas-Related Information Sources Natural Gas Regulation - Other Gas-Related Information Sources The single largest source of energy information...

  2. Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Release Date: 05312016 Next Release Date: 06302016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas ...

  3. Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and ...

  4. Electron spin resonance study of the La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dowan; Lee, Kyu Won; Choi, E.H.; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2014-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Inverse spin susceptibilities obtained by integration of the distinct ESR line components of the LSMO-CNTs system as a function of temperature. - Highlights: • Spin/charge dynamics in La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3}-decorated CNTs studied by EPR. • One spin species revealed only paramagnetic–superparamagnetic phase transition. • Another spin species manifested reflected weak localization of spin/charge carriers. • Spins participating in the magnetic phase transition and the itinerant spins well separated by EPR. - Abstract: We have studied La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO) nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by means of the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy in view of our previous work on the magnetic and electrical properties of the system. One of the line components of the ESR spectrum reflected a paramagnetic–superparamagnetic phase transition at T{sub SP}∼200 K, which is accompanied by a concomitant metal–insulator transition (MIT) associated with charge transport taking place through the CNTs network triggered by the LSMO nanoparticles. On the other hand, another ESR line component revealed anomalies at T{sub WL}∼170 K as well, attributable to a 2D weak localization effect of the spin/charge carriers. Thus, magnetic interactions and dynamics of the distinct spin species were sensitively reflected in the LSMO-CNTs system.

  5. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability of Pd3V/C nanoparticles with a trace amount of Pt decoration for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Liu, Sufen; Han, Lili; Zhu, Jing; Xiao, Weiping; Wang, Jie; Liu, Hongfang; Xin, Huolin; Wang, Deli

    2015-09-14

    In this study, carbon supported Pd3V bimetallic alloy nanoparticles (Pd3V/C) have been successfully synthesized via a simple impregnation–reduction method, followed by high temperature treatment under a H2 atmosphere. Electrochemical tests reveal that the half-wave potential of Pd3V/C-500 shifts positively 40 mV compared with Pd/C. However, the catalytic activity of Pd3V/C-500 suffers from serious degradation after 1k cycles. By a spontaneous displacement reaction or co-reduction method, a trace amount of Pt was decorated on the surface or inside of the Pd3V/C nanoparticles. The catalytic activity and stability of the Pd3V@Pt/C and Pt-Pd3V/C catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are enhancedmore » significantly, and are comparable to commercial Pt/C. In addition, the Pt mass activity of Pd3V@Pt/C and Pt-Pd3V/C improves by factors of 10.9 and 6.5 at 0.80 V relative to Pt/C. Moreover, Pt-decorated Pd3V/C nanoparticles show almost no obvious morphology change after durability tests, because the Pt-rich shell plays an important role in preventing degradation.« less

  6. Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse provides information about the implications of natural gas infrastructure modernization, including strategies and technologies that increase public safety, improve environmental performance and enhance natural gas deliverability.

  7. Future of Natural Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Natural Gas Bill Eisele, CEM SC Electric & Gas Co Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral. Florida Agenda * Gas Facts * ...

  8. Industrial Gas Turbines

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature,...

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    of the Alaska gas pipeline. The opening of ANWR might reduce the gas resource risk of building an Alaska gas pipeline, as the area has an estimated 3.6 trillion cubic...

  10. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and ... Number of Producing Gas Wells Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary) New Mexico Natural ...

  11. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas ... Number of Producing Gas Wells Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary) North Dakota Natural ...

  12. Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Huston, Gregg C.

    1992-01-01

    A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatrography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by UV photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the UV photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector.

  13. Calculational technique to predict combustible gas generation in sealed radioactive waste containers

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, J.E.; Fujita, A.; Deltete, C.P.; Quinn, G.J.

    1986-05-01

    Certain forms of nuclear waste, when subjected to ionizing radiation, produce combustible mixtures of gases. The production of these gases in sealed radioactive waste containers represents a significant safety concern for the handling, shipment and storage of waste. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) acted on this safety concern in September 1984 by publishing an information notice requiring waste generators to demonstrate, by tests or measurements, that combustible mixtures of gases are not present in radioactive waste shipments; otherwise the waste must be vented within 10 days of shipping. A task force, formed by the Edison Electric Institute to evaluate these NRC requirements, developed a calculational method to quantify hydrogen gas generation in sealed containers. This report presents the calculational method along with comparisons to actual measured hydrogen concentrations from EPICOR II liners, vented during their preparation for shipment. As a result of this, the NRC recently altered certain waste shipment Certificates-Of-Compliance to allow calculations, as well as tests and measurements, as acceptable means of determining combustible gas concentration. This modification was due in part to work described herein.

  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    more from the system than they nominate. Other pipeline companies, such as CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company and Southern Star Central Gas Pipeline Corporation, both...

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    that had been in place since February 1. Other pipeline companies, such as CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company and Southern Star Central Gas Pipeline Corporation, both...

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    June 12, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Spot gas at most market locations (outside the Rocky Mountain Region) traded...

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    strong price contango during the report week, mitigated withdrawals of natural gas from storage. Other Market Trends: EIA Releases New Report on U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions:...

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    of natural gas vehicles. The Department of Energys Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy reports that there were 841 compressed natural gas (CNG) fuel stations and 41...

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Market Trends: MMS Announces New Incentives for Gulf Gas Production: The Minerals Management Service (MMS) unveiled proposed new incentives to increase deep gas production...

  20. Gas scrubbing liquids

    DOEpatents

    Lackey, Walter J.; Lowrie, Robert S.; Sease, John D.

    1981-01-01

    Fully chlorinated and/or fluorinated hydrocarbons are used as gas scrubbing liquids for preventing noxious gas emissions to the atmosphere.

  1. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2008 Next Release: November 6, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 29) Natural gas...

  2. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    9, 2008 Next Release: June 26, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, June 11, natural gas spot prices...

  3. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    prices using spot prices from producing areas, plus an allowance for interstate natural gas pipeline and local distribution company charges to transport the gas to market. Such a...

  4. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Report. The sample change occurred over a transition period that began with the release of the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR)...

  5. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Annual Energy Outlook

    6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  6. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  7. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  8. Imported resources - gas

    SciTech Connect

    Marxt, J.

    1995-12-01

    This paper examines aspects of the supply and demand of natural gas and natural gas products such as LNG in the Czech Republic.

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    5, 2009 Next Release: July 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 24, 2009) Natural gas...

  10. Natural Gas Industrial Price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    , 2008 Next Release: July 10, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, June 25, natural gas spot prices...

  12. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ability to process gas. The company's Main Pass 260 line to Pascagoula Gas Plant in Jackson, Mississippi, will not be available for transportation services. While the plant is...

  13. CONTINUOUS GAS ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Katz, S.; Weber, C.W.

    1960-02-16

    A reagent gas and a sample gas are chemically combined on a continuous basis in a reaction zone maintained at a selected temperature. The reagent gas and the sample gas are introduced to the reaction zone at preselected. constant molar rates of flow. The reagent gas and the selected gas in the sample mixture combine in the reaction zone to form a product gas having a different number of moles from the sum of the moles of the reactants. The difference in the total molar rates of flow into and out of the reaction zone is measured and indicated to determine the concentration of the selected gas.

  14. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  15. Natural gas dehydration apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Ng, Alvin; Mairal, Anurag P

    2006-11-07

    A process and corresponding apparatus for dehydrating gas, especially natural gas. The process includes an absorption step and a membrane pervaporation step to regenerate the liquid sorbent.

  16. Oil and Gas

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil and Gas Oil and Gas R&D focus on the use of conventional and unconventional fossil fuels, including associated environmental challenges Contact thumbnail of Business ...

  17. NETL: Oil & Gas

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil & Gas Efficient recovery of our nation's fossil fuel resources in an environmentally ... and challenging locations of many of our remaining oil and natural gas accumulations. ...

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas...

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    cooling demand for natural gas. Meanwhile, it became increasingly clear that Hurricane Frances likely would not pose a significant threat to natural gas production in the Gulf of...

  20. Low-quality natural gas sulfur removal/recovery: Task 2. Topical report, September 30, 1992--August 29, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, W.J.; Neyman, M.; Brown, W.; Klint, B.W.; Kuehn, L.; O`Connell, J.; Paskall, H.; Dale, P.

    1993-08-01

    The primary purpose of this Task 2 Report is to present conceptual designs developed to treat a large portion of proven domestic natural gas reserves which are low quality. The conceptual designs separate hydrogen sulfide and large amounts of carbon dioxide (>20%) from methane, convert hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur, produce a substantial portion of the carbon dioxide as EOR or food grade CO{sub 2}, and vent residual CO{sub 2} virtually free of contaminating sulfur containing compounds. A secondary purpose of this Task 2 Report is to review existing gas treatment technology and identify existing commercial technologies currently used to treat large volumes of low quality natural gas with high acid content. Section II of this report defines low quality gas and describes the motivation for seeking technology to develop low quality gas reserves. The target low quality gas to be treated with the proposed technology is identified, and barriers to the production of this gas are reviewed. Section III provides a description of the Controlled Freeze Zone (CFG)-CNG technologies, their features, and perceived advantages. The three conceptual process designs prepared under Task 2 are presented in Section IV along with the design basis and process economics. Section V presents an overview of existing gas treatment technologies, organized into acid gas removal technology and sulfur recovery technology.

  1. Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam, Energy Tips: STEAM, Steam Tip Sheet #29 (Fact Sheet), Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    9 Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam Large industrial plants often vent signifcant quantities of low-pressure steam to the atmosphere, wasting energy, water, and water-treatment chemicals. Recovery of the latent heat content of low-pressure steam reduces the boiler load, resulting in energy and fuel cost savings. Low-pressure steam's potential uses include driving evaporation and distillation processes, producing hot water, space heating,

  2. Nonradioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC) Application for the Central Waste Complex (CSC) for Storage of Vented Waste Containers

    SciTech Connect

    KAMBERG, L.D.

    2000-04-01

    This Notice of Construction (NOC) application is submitted for the storage and management of waste containers at the Central Waste Complex (CWC) stationary source. The CWC stationary source consists of multiple sources of diffuse and fugitive emissions, as described herein. This NOC is submitted in accordance with the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-400-110 (criteria pollutants) and 173-460-040 (toxic air pollutants), and pursuant to guidance provided by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). Transuranic (TRU) mixed waste containers at CWC are vented to preclude the build up of hydrogen produced as a result of radionuclide decay, not as safety pressure releases. The following activities are conducted within the CWC stationary source: Storage and inspection; Transfer and staging; Packaging; Treatment; and Sampling. This NOC application is intended to cover all existing storage structures within the current CWC treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) boundary, as well as any storage structures, including waste storage pads and staging areas, that might be constructed in the future within the existing CWC boundary.

  3. Aluminum Bronze Alloys to Improve the System Life of Basic Oxygen and Electric Arc Furnace Hoods, Roofs and Side Vents.

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence C. Boyd Jr.; Dr. Vinod K. Sikka

    2006-12-29

    Energy Industries of Ohio was the lead organization for a consortium that examined the current situation involving the service life of electric arc and basic oxygen furnace hoods, roofs and side vents. Republic Engineered Products (REP), one of the project partners, installed a full-scale Al-Bronze “skirt” in their BOF at their Lorain OH facility, believed to be the first such installation of this alloy in this service. In 24 months of operation, the Al-Bronze skirt has processed a total of 4,563 heats, requiring only 2 shutdowns for maintenance, both related to physical damage to the skirt from operational mishaps. Yearly energy savings related to the REP facility are projected to be ~ 10 billion Btu's with significant additional environmental and productivity benefits. In recognition of the excellent results, this project was selected as the winner of the Ohio’s 2006 Governor’s Award for Excellence in Energy, the state’s award for outstanding achievements in energy efficiency.

  4. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J. Chien-Chih [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of failing molten lithium or Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (Flibe) jets encircles the reactors central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel.

  5. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    SciTech Connect

    Chien-Chih Liu, J.

    1993-12-31

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of falling molten lithium or Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (Flibe) jets encircles the reactor`s central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel. X-rays from the fusion microexplosion will ablate a thin layer of blanket material from the surfaces which face toward the fusion site. This generates a highly energetic vapor, which mostly coalesces in the central cavity. The blast expansion from the central cavity generates a shock which propagates through the segmented blanket - a complex geometry, gas-continuous two-phase medium. The impulse that the blast gives to the liquid as it vents past, the gas shock on the chamber wall, and ultimately the liquid impact on the wall are all important quantities to the HYLIFE structural designers.

  6. New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    35,813 31,124 26,424 23,458 20,201 17,829 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 35,163 30,495 25,985 23,111 19,808 17,609 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 650 629 439 348 393 220 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Marketed Production 35,813 31,124 26,424 23,458 20,201 17,829 1967-2015 Dry Production 35,813 31,124 26,424 23,458 20,201

  7. Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    78,122 78,858 84,482 166,017 512,371 1,014,848 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 73,459 30,655 65,025 55,583 51,541 46,237 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 4,651 45,663 6,684 10,317 13,022 32,674 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 11 2,540 12,773 100,117 447,809 935,937 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Marketed Production 78,122 78,858 84,482 166,017 512,371 1,014,848

  8. Utah Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    436,885 461,507 490,393 470,863 454,545 423,300 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 328,135 351,168 402,899 383,216 361,474 333,232 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 42,526 49,947 31,440 36,737 45,513 45,781 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 1,333 992 877 676 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 66,223 60,392 54,722 49,918 46,680 43,612 2002-2015 Repressuring 1,187 1,449 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 2,080 1,755 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 1,573 778 0 0 NA 0 1996-2015 Marketed Production 432,045

  9. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  10. Compressed gas manifold

    DOEpatents

    Hildebrand, Richard J.; Wozniak, John J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  11. Asian natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Klass, D.L. ); Ohashi, T. )

    1989-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the present status and future development in Asia of domestic and export markets for natural gas and to describes gas utilization technologies that will help these markets grow. A perspective of natural gas transmission, transport, distribution, and utilization is presented. The papers in this book are organized under several topics. The topics are : Asian natural gas markets, Technology of natural gas export projects, Technology of domestic natural gas projects, and Natural gas utilization in power generation, air conditioning, and other applications.

  12. TiO{sub 2}/Bi{sub 2}(BDC){sub 3}/BiOCl nanoparticles decorated ultrathin nanosheets with excellent photocatalytic reaction activity and selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Shu-Mei; Ma, De-Kun Cai, Ping; Chen, Wei; Huang, Shao-Ming

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: TiO{sub 2}/Bi{sub 2}(BDC){sub 3}/BiOCl nanoparticles decorated ultrathin nanosheets showed excellent photocatalytic reaction activity and selectivity. - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2}/Bi{sub 2}(BDC){sub 3}/BiOCl nanoparticles decorated ultrathin nanosheets were synthesized through a facile hydrothermal process. • The products showed excellent photocatalytic activities for the degradation of various dyes. • The photocatalytic activities of the composite materials could be easily adjusted through tuning the content of TiO{sub 2}. • TiO{sub 2}/Bi{sub 2}(BDC){sub 3}/BiOCl displayed obvious photocatalytic selectivity in mixed dyes systems of rhodamine B and eosin Y. - Abstract: Photocatalysts with excellent photocatalytic reaction activity and ideal selectivity are highly desirable for pollutants clearance and purification of targeted organics from a mixture. Continued efforts toward the goal, we here present a facile hydrothermal route to synthesize TiO{sub 2}/Bi-benzenedicarboxylate/BiOCl nanoparticles decorated ultrathin nanosheets with a thickness less than 5 nm on a large scale. The as-synthesized products showed excellent photocatalytic activities for the degradation of various dyes such as rhodamine B, eosin Y and methylene blue in aqueous solution under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic activities of TiO{sub 2}/Bi-benzenedicarboxylate/BiOCl nanocomposites for the degradation of rhodamine B and eosin Y could be adjusted through tuning the content of TiO{sub 2}. With increasing the amount of TiO{sub 2}, the composites showed declining photocatalytic activities in decomposing of rhodamine B while on the contrary they displayed enhanced photocatalytic activities in decomposing of eosin Y. Interestingly, TiO{sub 2}/Bi-benzenedicarboxylate/BiOCl composite nanosheets showed obvious photocatalytic selectivity in a mixed dyes system. The photocatalytic reaction and selectivity mechanisms of the nanocomposites for the degradation of the

  13. Position for determining gas phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  14. Position for determining gas-phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R.

    1998-06-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  15. NETL: Natural Gas Resources

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Natural Gas Resources Useful for heating, manufacturing, and as chemical feedstock, natural gas has the added benefit of producing fewer greenhouse gas emissions than other fossil fuels used in power production.The United States is endowed with an abundance of natural gas resources, so increasing use of natural gas power can help strengthen domestic energy security. NETL research efforts enhance technologies that reduce the cost, increase the efficiency, and reduce the environmental risk of

  16. Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 ...

  17. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 ...

  18. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 ...

  19. Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction for the 105-KW Basin integrated water treatment system filter vessel sparging vent

    SciTech Connect

    Kamberg, L.D.

    1998-02-23

    This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC), pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct, pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07, for the Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) Filter Vessel Sparging Vent at 105-KW Basin. Additionally, the following description, and references are provided as the notices of startup, pursuant to 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1) and (2) in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. The 105-K West Reactor and its associated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage basin were constructed in the early 1950s and are located on the Hanford Site in the 100-K Area about 1,400 feet from the Columbia River. The 105-KW Basin contains 964 Metric Tons of SNF stored under water in approximately 3,800 closed canisters. This SNF has been stored for varying periods of time ranging from 8 to 17 years. The 105-KW Basin is constructed of concrete with an epoxy coating and contains approximately 1.3 million gallons of water with an asphaltic membrane beneath the pool. The IWTS, which has been described in the Radioactive Air Emissions NOC for Fuel Removal for 105-KW Basin (DOE/RL-97-28 and page changes per US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office letter 97-EAP-814) will be used to remove radionuclides from the basin water during fuel removal operations. The purpose of the modification described herein is to provide operational flexibility for the IWTS at the 105-KW basin. The proposed modification is scheduled to begin in calendar year 1998.

  20. Building America Case Study: Evaluation of Passive Vents in New-Construction Multifamily Buildings, New York, New York

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-15

    Exhaust ventilation and corresponding outdoor air strategies are being implemented in high-performance new construction multifamily buildings to meet program or code requirements for improved indoor air quality, but a lack of clear design guidance is resulting in poor performance of these systems despite the best intentions of the programs or standards. CARB's 2014 'Evaluation of Ventilation Strategies in New Construction Multifamily Buildings' consistently demonstrated that commonly used outdoor air strategies are not performing as expected. Of the four strategies evaluated in 2014, the exhaust ventilation system that relied on outdoor air from a pressurized corridor was ruled out as a potential best practice due to its conflict with meeting requirements within most fire codes. Outdoor air that is ducted directly to the apartments was a strategy determined to have the highest likelihood of success, but with higher first costs and operating costs. Outdoor air through space conditioning systems was also determined to have good performance potential, with proper design and execution. The fourth strategy, passive systems, was identified as the least expensive option for providing outdoor air directly to apartments, with respect to both first costs and operating costs. However, little is known about how they actually perform in real-world conditions or how to implement them effectively. Based on the lack of data available on the performance of these low-cost systems and their frequent use in the high-performance building programs that require a provision for outdoor air, this research project sought to further evaluate the performance of passive vents.

  1. Nickelcobalt layered double hydroxide ultrathin nanoflakes decorated on graphene sheets with a 3D nanonetwork structure as supercapacitive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Tao; Li, Ruiyi; Li, Zaijun

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: The microwave heating reflux approach was developed for the fabrication of nickelcobalt layered double hydroxide ultrathin nanoflakes decorated on graphene sheets, in which ammonia and ethanol were used as the precipitator and medium for the synthesis. The obtained composite shows a 3D flowerclusters morphology with nanonetwork structure and largely enhanced supercapacitive performance. - Highlights: The paper reported the microwave synthesis of nickelcobalt layered double hydroxide/graphene composite. The novel synthesis method is rapid, green, efficient and can be well used to the mass production. The as-synthesized composite offers a 3D flowerclusters morphology with nanonetwork structure. The composite offers excellent supercapacitive performance. This study provides a promising route to design and synthesis of advanced graphene-based materials with the superiorities of time-saving and cost-effective characteristics. - Abstract: The study reported a novel microwave heating reflux method for the fabrication of nickelcobalt layered double hydroxide ultrathin nanoflakes decorated on graphene sheets (GS/NiCo-LDH). Ammonia and ethanol were employed as precipitant and reaction medium for the synthesis, respectively. The resulting GS/NiCo-LDH offers a 3D flowerclusters morphology with nanonetwork structure. Due to the greatly enhanced rate of electron transfer and mass transport, the GS/NiCo-LDH electrode exhibits excellent supercapacitive performances. The maximum specific capacitance was found to be 1980.7 F g{sup ?1} at the current density of 1 A g{sup ?1}. The specific capacitance can remain 1274.7 F g{sup ?1} at the current density of 15 A g{sup ?1} and it has an increase of about 2.9% after 1500 cycles. Moreover, the study also provides a promising approach for the design and synthesis of metallic double hydroxides/graphene hybrid materials with time-saving and cost-effective characteristics, which can be potentially applied in

  2. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability of Pd3V/C nanoparticles with a trace amount of Pt decoration for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Sufen; Han, Lili; Zhu, Jing; Xiao, Weiping; Wang, Jie; Liu, Hongfang; Xin, Huolin; Wang, Deli

    2015-09-14

    In this study, carbon supported Pd3V bimetallic alloy nanoparticles (Pd3V/C) have been successfully synthesized via a simple impregnation–reduction method, followed by high temperature treatment under a H2 atmosphere. Electrochemical tests reveal that the half-wave potential of Pd3V/C-500 shifts positively 40 mV compared with Pd/C. However, the catalytic activity of Pd3V/C-500 suffers from serious degradation after 1k cycles. By a spontaneous displacement reaction or co-reduction method, a trace amount of Pt was decorated on the surface or inside of the Pd3V/C nanoparticles. The catalytic activity and stability of the Pd3V@Pt/C and Pt-Pd3V/C catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are enhanced significantly, and are comparable to commercial Pt/C. In addition, the Pt mass activity of Pd3V@Pt/C and Pt-Pd3V/C improves by factors of 10.9 and 6.5 at 0.80 V relative to Pt/C. Moreover, Pt-decorated Pd3V/C nanoparticles show almost no obvious morphology change after durability tests, because the Pt-rich shell plays an important role in preventing degradation.

  3. Variable leak gas source

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A variable leak gas source and a method for obtaining the same which includes filling a quantity of hollow glass micro-spheres with a gas, storing said quantity in a confined chamber having a controllable outlet, heating said chamber above room temperature, and controlling the temperature of said chamber to control the quantity of gas passing out of said controllable outlet. Individual gas filled spheres may be utilized for calibration purposes by breaking a sphere having a known quantity of a known gas to calibrate a gas detection apparatus.

  4. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transportation...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Corridors > Major U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates ...

  5. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Development...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Pipelinesk > Development & Expansion About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipeline ...

  6. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Compressor Stations Illustration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline ...

  7. Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Release Date: 09302016 Next Release Date: 10312016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Illinois Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production ...

  8. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Underground Natural Gas...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Storage About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Underground Natural Gas Storage Overview | Regional ...

  9. Natural Gas Treatment and Fuel Gas Conditioning: Membrane Technology...

    Office of Science (SC)

    Natural Gas Treatment and Fuel Gas Conditioning: Membrane Technology Applied to New Gas Finds Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer ...

  10. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transmission...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Transmission Path Diagram About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Natural Gas Transmission Path Natural ...

  11. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Mileage by State About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Estimated Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage in the ...

  12. Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working ... Underground Working Natural Gas in Storage - All Operators Virginia Underground Natural ...

  13. Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Texas--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  14. Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Alabama Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  15. US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells ...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) US--Federal Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  16. Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  17. Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana--State Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  18. Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Texas Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas ... Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Offshore Gross ...

  19. New Mexico Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) ...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working ... Underground Working Natural Gas in Storage - All Operators New Mexico Underground Natural ...

  20. New York Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas) (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Working Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working ... Underground Working Natural Gas in Storage - All Operators New York Underground Natural ...

  1. World Natural Gas Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1994-12-01

    RAMSGAS, the Research and Development Analysis Modeling System World Natural Gas Model, was developed to support planning of unconventional gaseoues fuels research and development. The model is a scenario analysis tool that can simulate the penetration of unconventional gas into world markets for oil and gas. Given a set of parameter values, the model estimates the natural gas supply and demand for the world for the period from 1980 to 2030. RAMSGAS is based onmore » a supply/demand framwork and also accounts for the non-renewable nature of gas resources. The model has three fundamental components: a demand module, a wellhead production cost module, and a supply/demand interface module. The demand for gas is a product of total demand for oil and gas in each of 9 demand regions and the gas share. Demand for oil and gas is forecast from the base year of 1980 through 2030 for each demand region, based on energy growth rates and price-induced conservation. For each of 11 conventional and 19 unconventional gas supply regions, wellhead production costs are calculated. To these are added transportation and distribution costs estimates associated with moving gas from the supply region to each of the demand regions and any economic rents. Based on a weighted average of these costs and the world price of oil, fuel shares for gas and oil are computed for each demand region. The gas demand is the gas fuel share multiplied by the total demand for oil plus gas. This demand is then met from the available supply regions in inverse proportion to the cost of gas from each region. The user has almost complete control over the cost estimates for each unconventional gas source in each year and thus can compare contributions from unconventional resources under different cost/price/demand scenarios.« less

  2. Enhanced membrane gas separations

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, R.

    1993-07-13

    An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

  3. Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse Stakeholders | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Initiatives Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse Stakeholders Natural Gas Modernization Clearinghouse Stakeholders Regulators ...

  4. SIMPLE TRANSIENT CALCULATIONS OF CELL FLAMMABLE GAS CONCENTRATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    , J; David Allison , D; John Mccord, J

    2009-05-06

    The Saltstone Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) mixes low-level radiological liquid waste with grout for permanent disposal as cement in vault cells. The grout mixture is poured into each cell in approximately 17 batches (8 to 10 hours duration). The grout mixture contains ten flammable gases of concern that are released from the mixture into the cell. Prior to operations, simple parametric transient calculations were performed to develop batch parameters (including schedule of batch pours) to support operational efficiency while ensuring that a flammable gas mixture does not develop in the cell vapor space. The analysis demonstrated that a nonflammable vapor space environment can be achieved, with workable operational constraints, without crediting the ventilation flow as a safety system control. Isopar L was identified as the primary flammable gas of concern. The transient calculations balanced inflows of the flammable gases into the vapor space with credited outflows of diurnal breathing through vent holes and displacement from new grout pours and gases generated. Other important features of the analyses included identifying conditions that inhibited a well-mixed vapor space, the expected frequency and duration of such conditions, and the estimated level of stratification that could develop.

  5. Mississippi Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    401,660 443,351 452,915 59,272 54,446 58,207 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 387,026 429,829 404,457 47,385 43,020 44,868 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 8,714 8,159 43,421 7,256 7,136 9,220 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 5,921 5,363 5,036 4,630 4,289 4,119 2002-2015 Repressuring 3,480 3,788 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 8,685 9,593 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 315,775 348,482 389,072 0 NA 0 1980-2015 Marketed Production 73,721 81,487 63,843

  6. North Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    113,867 157,025 258,568 345,787 463,216 584,743 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 10,501 14,287 22,261 24,313 21,956 25,969 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 38,306 27,739 17,434 12,854 13,973 11,515 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 65,060 114,998 218,873 308,620 427,287 547,258 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 NA 0 1981-2015 Vented and Flared 24,582 49,652 79,564 102,855 129,717 106,590 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 7,448 10,271 6,762 7,221 7,008 6,650 1984-2015

  7. Tennessee Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    5,144 4,851 5,825 5,400 5,294 4,276 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 5,144 4,851 5,825 5,400 5,294 4,276 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2015 Marketed Production 5,144 4,851 5,825 5,400 5,294 4,276 1967-2015 Dry Production 4,638 4,335 5,324 4,912 4,912 3,937 Feet)

    Year Jan Feb Mar

  8. Texas Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Kansas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    7,565,123 7,910,898 8,127,004 8,285,436 8,647,988 8,791,961 1992-2015 From Gas Wells 4,413,767 3,771,162 3,603,948 3,101,759 2,661,424 2,307,184 1992-2015 From Oil Wells 848,406 1,073,301 860,123 1,166,425 1,557,704 1,800,946 1992-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 3,662,933 4,408,980 4,683,831 2012-2015 Repressuring 558,854 502,020 437,367 423,413 440,153 533,047 1992-2015 Vented and Flared 39,569 35,248 47,530 76,113 90,125 113,786 1992-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 279,981 284,557 183,118 166,328

  9. Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ,514,657 2,375,301 2,225,622 2,047,757 1,998,505 1,983,731 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 1,673,667 1,668,749 1,685,213 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 151,871 152,589 24,544 29,134 39,827 56,197 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 5,519 4,755 9,252 16,175 25,783 31,186 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 569,667 508,739 429,731 328,780 264,146 211,134 2002-2015 Repressuring 2,810 5,747 6,630 2,124 5,293 10,640 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 42,101 57,711 45,429 34,622 27,220 7,883 1967-2015

  10. Illinois Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ,702 2,121 2,125 2,887 1,929 2,080 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 1,697 2,114 2,125 2,887 1,929 2,080 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 5 7 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 NA 0 2006-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 NA 0 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 NA 0 2006-2015 Marketed Production 1,702 2,121 2,125 2,887 1,929 2,080 1967-2015 Dry Production 1,357 1,078 2,125 2,887 1,882 2,038 Feet)

    Coalbed Wells

  11. Indiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    6,802 9,075 8,814 7,938 6,616 7,250 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 6,802 9,075 8,814 7,938 6,616 7,250 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2015 Repressuring 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003-2015 Vented and Flared 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2015 Marketed Production 6,802 9,075 8,814 7,938 6,616 7,250 1967-2015 Dry Production 6,802 9,075 8,814 7,938 6,616 7,25 Feet)

    Year Jan Feb Mar

  12. Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2,218,283 3,040,523 2,955,437 2,366,943 1,968,618 1,784,797 1967-2015 From Gas Wells 911,967 883,712 775,506 780,623 720,416 619,242 1967-2015 From Oil Wells 63,638 68,505 49,380 51,948 50,722 44,748 1967-2015 From Shale Gas Wells 1,242,678 2,088,306 2,130,551 1,534,372 1,197,480 1,120,806 2007-2015 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002-2015 Repressuring 3,606 5,015 0 2,829 3,199 4,248 1967-2015 Vented and Flared 4,578 6,302 0 3,912 4,606 3,748 1967-2015 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed 0 0 0 0 0 0

  13. Gas generation from low-level radioactive waste: Concerns for disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Siskind, B.

    1992-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste (ACNW) has urged the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to reexamine the topic of hydrogen gas generation from low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in closed spaces to ensure that the slow buildup of hydrogen from water-bearing wastes in sealed containers does not become a problem for long-term safe disposal. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has prepared a report, summarized in this paper, for the NRC to respond to these concerns. The paper discusses the range of values for G(H{sub 2}) reported for materials of relevance to LLW disposal; most of these values are in the range of 0.1 to 0.6. Most studies of radiolytic hydrogen generation indicate a leveling off of pressurization, probably because of chemical kinetics involving, in many cases, the radiolysis of water within the waste. Even if no leveling off occurs, realistic gas leakage rates (indicating poor closure by gaskets on drums and liners) will result in adequate relief of pressure for radiolytic gas generation from the majority of commercial sector LLW packages. Biodegradative gas generation, however, could pose a pressurization hazard even at realistic gas leakage rates. Recommendations include passive vents on LLW containers (as already specified for high integrity containers) and upper limits to the G values and/or the specific activity of the LLW.

  14. Gas generation from low-level radioactive waste: Concerns for disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Siskind, B.

    1992-04-01

    The Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste (ACNW) has urged the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to reexamine the topic of hydrogen gas generation from low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in closed spaces to ensure that the slow buildup of hydrogen from water-bearing wastes in sealed containers does not become a problem for long-term safe disposal. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has prepared a report, summarized in this paper, for the NRC to respond to these concerns. The paper discusses the range of values for G(H{sub 2}) reported for materials of relevance to LLW disposal; most of these values are in the range of 0.1 to 0.6. Most studies of radiolytic hydrogen generation indicate a leveling off of pressurization, probably because of chemical kinetics involving, in many cases, the radiolysis of water within the waste. Even if no leveling off occurs, realistic gas leakage rates (indicating poor closure by gaskets on drums and liners) will result in adequate relief of pressure for radiolytic gas generation from the majority of commercial sector LLW packages. Biodegradative gas generation, however, could pose a pressurization hazard even at realistic gas leakage rates. Recommendations include passive vents on LLW containers (as already specified for high integrity containers) and upper limits to the G values and/or the specific activity of the LLW.

  15. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

    2011-06-01

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

  16. Shale Gas Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Notes: Shale Gas production data collected in conjunction with proved reserves data on Form EIA-23 are unofficial. Official Shale Gas production data from Form EIA-895 can be found ...

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    delivery volumes. Northern Natural Gas Company issued a system overrun limitation (SOL) for all market-area zones for gas day February 21, 2008. The SOL was the result of...

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A4 of the Annual Energy Review 2002. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas in storage...

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A4 of the Annual Energy Review 2002. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas in...

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A2 of the Annual Energy Review 2001. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas in storage...

  1. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    gas in storage, as well as decreases in the price of crude oil. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working gas in storage increased to 2,905 Bcf as of...

  2. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A2 of the Annual Energy Review 2001. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas in...

  3. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    of natural gas into storage, despite robust inventories. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working gas in storage increased to 3,258 Bcf as of...

  4. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    to withdraw natural gas from storage to meet current demand. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working gas in storage decreased to 2,406 Bcf as of...

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Btu per cubic foot as published in Table A2 of the Annual Energy Review 2001. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas inventories...

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Working gas in storage was 3,121 Bcf as of Friday, Oct 24, 2003, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. This is 2.7...

  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Table A2 of the Annual Energy Review 2001. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas in storage was 2,414 Bcf as of Friday, January 9,...

  8. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Table A2 of the Annual Energy Review 2001. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas in storage was 821 Bcf as of May 2, according to...

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Table A4 of the Annual Energy Review 2002. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Natural gas stocks stood at 2,155 Bcf as of Friday, July 9,...

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Table A4 of the Annual Energy Review 2002. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas. Storage: Working gas in storage as of September 2 totaled 2,669 Bcf,...

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    The report provides an overview of U.S. international trade in 2008 as well as historical data on natural gas imports and exports. Net natural gas imports accounted for only 13...

  12. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, John F.

    1992-01-01

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

  13. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1992-02-25

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

  14. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...S3","N3010MS3","N3020MS3","N3035MS3","NA1570SMS3","N3045MS3" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas Imports ...

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    heating-related demand for natural gas that limited the size of the net addition to storage. The economic incentives for storing natural gas for next winter are considerably...

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 17) Natural gas spot prices increased this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 2-9) as a late season cold front moved into major gas-consuming...

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    next heating season. Net injections reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report brought natural gas storage supplies to 2,163 Bcf as of Friday, June 1,...

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    while the OFO was in effect. Pacific Gas and Electric Company extended a systemwide high-inventory OFO on its California Gas Transmission system through Saturday, July 5. It was...

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    the OFO customers who delivered more than 110 percent of their actual gas usage into the system would be assessed for charges. Pacific Gas and Electric Company issued a...

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    of natural gas into storage. However, shut-in natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico reduced available current supplies, and so limited net injections during the report...

  1. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    the Northeast were expected to be in the single digits. Prices off Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line in New York and Algonquin Gas Transmission in the New England region yesterday...

  2. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    gas in combination with water. Gas hydrate is thought to exist in great abundance in nature and has the potential to be a significant new energy source to meet future energy...

  3. ,"Texas Natural Gas Prices"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","2... 6:46:23 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050TX3"...

  4. Natural gas annual 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

  5. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, C.M.

    1996-12-10

    A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

  6. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    1996-01-01

    A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    withdrawal from working gas storage reported last Thursday. A contributing factor to the run-up in natural gas prices could be climbing crude oil prices, which rallied late last...

  8. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    by 14.4 percent. During this period, U.S. manufacturers used less petroleum and coal in manufacturing processes. This expansion of gas use occurred although natural gas prices to...

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the August 2011 natural gas contract price also lost ground over the week, closing at 4.217 per MMBtu on Wednesday. The natural gas rotary rig...

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the August 2011 natural gas contract price also lost ground over the week, closing at 4.315 per MMBtu on Wednesday. The natural gas rotary rig...

  11. EIA - Natural Gas Publications

    Annual Energy Outlook

    these data from 2005 to 2009 are presented for each State. (12282010) U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves: 2009 National and State...

  12. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    week's gas markets. As of Friday, May 11, 2001, the spot price of natural gas at the Henry Hub dropped 0.24 from the previous Friday to 4.25 per MMBtu. The NYMEX price of...

  13. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    of 1 Tcf from the 1994 estimate of 51 Tcf. Ultimate potential for natural gas is a science-based estimate of the total amount of conventional gas in the province and is an...

  14. offshore_gas.pdf

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Source: Energy Information Administration based on data from MMS, HPDI, CA Dept of Oil , Gas & Geothermal Updated: April 8, 2009 Alabama 20 0 m Gas Production, Last Reported Year ...

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    on Thursday, May 9, 2002. A sample of EIA's report can be seen at: Weekly Gas Storage Test Page. The Natural Gas Weekly Market Update report will convert to the new data series...

  16. Landfill Gas | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Gas Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Landfill Gas Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLandfillGas&oldid267173...

  17. ARM - Methane Gas

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Methane Gas Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Methane Gas Methane gas is another naturally occurring greenhouse gas. It is produced as a result of microbial activity in the absence of oxygen. Pre-industrial concentrations of methane were about 700 ppb and in 1994 they were up

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    . Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

  19. Residual gas analysis device

    DOEpatents

    Thornberg, Steven M.

    2012-07-31

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 . Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels |...

  1. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  2. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-17

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  3. Working Gas Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 2015 Working Gas Capacity (billion cubic feet) ≥ 100 75 to 99 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual Figure 15. Locations of existing natural gas underground storage fields in the United States, 2015 50 to 74 Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-191, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." Reservoir Type Sites = Depleted Field 329 = Salt Cav

  4. Position for determining gas phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A. Spangler, L.R.

    1995-12-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. The EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is unnecessary. A test program was conducted to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative.

  5. Natural gas industry directory

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    This directory has information on the following: associations and organizations; exploration and production; gas compression; gas processors; gathering and transmission companies; liquefied natural gas; local distribution companies; marketing firms; regulatory agencies; service companies; suppliers and manufacturers; and regional buyer`s guide.

  6. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

    1982-03-17

    The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  7. Static gas expansion cooler

    DOEpatents

    Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

  8. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Combined Natural Gas Transportati...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline ...

  9. Natural Gas Regulation | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation Natural Gas Regulation The Natural Gas Act of 1938, as amended, requires any person who wishes to import andor export natural gas, ...

  10. wipp _vents.png

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    1) 1 Winter Fuels Outlook: 2001/2002 Introduction Tension in world oil markets, due to anticipated U.S. military action in response to the September 11 terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, has added an obvious dimension of uncertainty to any particular view of winter oil prices. We assume that expressed levels of support and cooperation for U.S. actions by the international community, including members of OPEC, include a willingness to at least maintain the level of oil supply that

  11. Vented nuclear fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Leonard N.; Kaznoff, Alexis I.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear fuel cell for use in a thermionic nuclear reactor in which a small conduit extends from the outside surface of the emitter to the center of the fuel mass of the emitter body to permit escape of volatile and gaseous fission products collected in the center thereof by virtue of molecular migration of the gases to the hotter region of the fuel.

  12. Natural gas leak mapper

    DOEpatents

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Luong, Amy Khai; Kulp, Thomas J.; Devdas, Sanjay

    2008-05-20

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  13. Gas revenue increasingly significant

    SciTech Connect

    Megill, R.E.

    1991-09-01

    This paper briefly describes the wellhead prices of natural gas compared to crude oil over the past 70 years. Although natural gas prices have never reached price parity with crude oil, the relative value of a gas BTU has been increasing. It is one of the reasons that the total amount of money coming from natural gas wells is becoming more significant. From 1920 to 1955 the revenue at the wellhead for natural gas was only about 10% of the money received by producers. Most of the money needed for exploration, development, and production came from crude oil. At present, however, over 40% of the money from the upstream portion of the petroleum industry is from natural gas. As a result, in a few short years natural gas may become 50% of the money revenues generated from wellhead production facilities.

  14. Flue gas desulfurization

    DOEpatents

    Im, Kwan H.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

    1985-01-01

    A process and apparatus for removing sulfur oxide from combustion gas to form Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and for reducing the harmful effects of Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 on auxiliary heat exchangers in which a sodium compound is injected into the hot combustion gas forming liquid Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 in a gas-gas reaction and the resultant gas containing Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 is cooled to below about 1150.degree. K. to form particles of Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 prior to contact with at least one heat exchanger with the cooling being provided by the recycling of combustion gas from a cooled zone downstream from the introduction of the cooling gas.

  15. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  16. U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Supplemental Gas - Biomass Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  17. Flue gas desulfurization

    DOEpatents

    Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

    1984-05-01

    The invention involves a combustion process in which combustion gas containing sulfur oxide is directed past a series of heat exchangers to a stack and in which a sodium compound is added to the combustion gas in a temparature zone of above about 1400 K to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Preferably, the temperature is above about 1800 K and the sodium compound is present as a vapor to provide a gas-gas reaction to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as a liquid. Since liquid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ may cause fouling of heat exchanger surfaces downstream from the combustion zone, the process advantageously includes the step of injecting a cooling gas downstream of the injection of the sodium compound yet upstream of one or more heat exchangers to cool the combustion gas to below about 1150 K and form solid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The cooling gas is preferably a portion of the combustion gas downstream which may be recycled for cooling. It is further advantageous to utilize an electrostatic precipitator downstream of the heat exchangers to recover the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It is also advantageous in the process to remove a portion of the combustion gas cleaned in the electrostatic precipitator and recycle that portion upstream to use as the cooling gas. 3 figures.

  18. Unconventional gas systems analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zammerilli, A.M.; Duda, J.R.; Layne, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    Gas systems analysis at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) crosscuts all sectors of the natural gas industry from resource to utilization. The board-based analysis identifies market needs that are required to maintain and expand the competitive position of natural gas in the overall energy supply by providing market pull'' options. METC systems analyses continually explore the impact of cost-lowering alternatives, which lead to the development of production and economic strategies to improve and promote the utilization of natural gas. Results of systems analyses identify socioeconomic, environmental, and regulatory barrier issues, providing a strategic base for guiding and improving future gas research, development, and demonstration initiative. Some recent analyses have focused on METC's directional well projects, targeting unconventional formations throughout the United States. Specifically, cost supply relationships and risk assessments are being developed for low-permeability gas formations underlying the Maverick, Greater Green River, Piceance, and Appalachian Basins.

  19. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1985-12-31

    An apparatus is disclosed for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area. 3 figs.

  20. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  1. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, Daniel

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  2. GAS METERING PUMP

    DOEpatents

    George, C.M.

    1957-12-31

    A liquid piston gas pump is described, capable of pumping minute amounts of gas in accurately measurable quantities. The pump consists of a flanged cylindrical regulating chamber and a mercury filled bellows. Sealed to the ABSTRACTS regulating chamber is a value and having a gas inlet and outlet, the inlet being connected by a helical channel to the bellows. A gravity check valve is in the gas outlet, so the gas passes through the inlet and the helical channel to the bellows where the pumping action as well as the metering is accomplished by the actuation of the mercury filled bellows. The gas then flows through the check valve and outlet to any associated apparatus.

  3. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, Charles A.; Burbage, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  4. Pulsed gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Louis W.; Fitzsimmons, William A.

    1978-01-01

    A pulsed gas laser is constituted by Blumlein circuits wherein space metal plates function both as capacitors and transmission lines coupling high frequency oscillations to a gas filled laser tube. The tube itself is formed by spaced metal side walls which function as connections to the electrodes to provide for a high frequency, high voltage discharge in the tube to cause the gas to lase. Also shown is a spark gap switch having structural features permitting a long life.

  5. Oil & Gas Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil & Gas Research Unconventional Resources NETL's onsite research in unconventional resources is focused on developing the data and modeling tools needed to predict and quantify potential risks associated with oil and gas resources in shale reservoirs that require hydraulic fracturing or other engineering measures to produce. Fugitive Emissions | Produced Water Management | Subsurface Fluid & Gas Migration | Induced Seismicity Offshore Resources Building the scientific understanding and

  6. No-migration variance petition: Draft. Volume 4, Appendices DIF, GAS, GCR (Volume 1)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-31

    The Department of Energy is responsible for the disposition of transuranic (TRU) waste generated by national defense-related activities. Approximately 2.6 million cubic feet of the se waste have been generated and are stored at various facilities across the country. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), was sited and constructed to meet stringent disposal requirements. In order to permanently dispose of TRU waste, the DOE has elected to petition the US EPA for a variance from the Land Disposal Restrictions of RCRA. This document fulfills the reporting requirements for the petition. This report is volume 4 of the petition which presents details about the transport characteristics across drum filter vents and polymer bags; gas generation reactions and rates during long-term WIPP operation; and geological characterization of the WIPP site.

  7. Multiple complementary gas distribution assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Ng, Tuoh-Bin; Melnik, Yuriy; Pang, Lily L; Tuncel, Eda; Nguyen, Son T; Chen, Lu

    2016-04-05

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a first gas distribution assembly that includes a first gas passage for introducing a first process gas into a second gas passage that introduces the first process gas into a processing chamber and a second gas distribution assembly that includes a third gas passage for introducing a second process gas into a fourth gas passage that introduces the second process gas into the processing chamber. The first and second gas distribution assemblies are each adapted to be coupled to at least one chamber wall of the processing chamber. The first gas passage is shaped as a first ring positioned within the processing chamber above the second gas passage that is shaped as a second ring positioned within the processing chamber. The gas distribution assemblies may be designed to have complementary characteristic radial film growth rate profiles.

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