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Sample records for da yan tianzhen

  1. Yan Li | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Yan Li Materials/Ceramics/Metallurgical 2 Telephone (630) 252-2320 E-mail liy

  2. Yan Mei Wang | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Yan Mei Wang Yan Mei Wang Yan Mei Wang Yan Mei Wang Research Affiliate E-mail: ymwang@wuphys.wustl.edu Phone: 314.935.7478 Dr. Wang's research interests focus on elucidating biological mechanisms at the molecular level using single molecule fluorescence imaging techniques. Assistant Professor, Physics Department Research Affiliates

  3. Yan (Joann) Zhou | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Joann Zhou Yan (Joann) Zhou Assistant Transportation Systems Analyst News Chinese delegation visits Argonne for vehicle research project meeting E-mail yzhou@anl.gov Projects Light Duty Electric Drive Vehicles Monthly Sales Updates The VISION Model

  4. Sivers effect in Drell-Yan processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anselmino, M.; Boglione, M.; Melis, S.; Prokudin, A.; D'Alesio, U.; Murgia, F.

    2009-03-01

    The Sivers distributions recently extracted from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering data [M. Anselmino et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 39, 89 (2009)] are used to compute estimates for Sivers asymmetries in Drell-Yan processes which are being planned at several facilities (RHIC, COMPASS, J-PARC, PAX, PANDA, NICA (JINR) and SPASCHARM (IHEP)). Most of these asymmetries turn out to be large and could allow a clear test of the predicted sign change of the Sivers distributions when active in SIDIS and Drell-Yan processes. This is regarded as a fundamental test of our understanding, within QCD and the factorization scheme, of single spin asymmetries.

  5. TMD's in Drell-Yan Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anselmino, M.; Boglione, M.; Melis, S.; Prokudin, A.; D'Alesio, U.; Murgia, F.

    2009-03-23

    Drell-Yan processes allow to fully explore the partonic structure of hadrons due to the presence of a purely leptonic final state. Thus, Transverse Momentum Dependent distributions (TMD's), like the Sivers and the Boer-Mulders functions and the Transversity distribution, can be directly accessed. A formal expression for the cross section of the unpolarized and single polarized Drell-Yan (DY) processes including TMD's is presented. Using our latest extraction of the Sivers functions from a fit on SIDIS data, we give some estimations of the Sivers effect in DY processes.

  6. Yan Liu | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ana Moore Anne Jones Devens Gust Don Seo Giovanna Ghirlanda Hao Yan James Allen Kevin Redding Petra Fromme Thomas Moore Yan Liu Yan Liu Principal Investigator Phone: 480-727-0397 Fax: 480-965-2747 E-mail: yan_liu@asu.edu As a Principal Investigator Assistant Professor Yan Liu mainly contributes to the research on Subtask 2 and Subtask 5. Her efforts are focused towards rational designing of the DNA nanostructures as the framework to assemble short peptide elements into a 3- dimensional spatial

  7. Biographical sketch - Yan Liu | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ten Recent Publications 1. Z. Deng*, H. Yan, Y. Liu*, Band Gap Engineering of Quaternary Alloyed ZnCdSSe Quantum Dots via a Facile Phosphine-Free Colloidal Method, J. Am. Chem. ...

  8. N 3 LO Higgs boson and Drell-Yan production at threshold: The...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    N 3 LO Higgs boson and Drell-Yan production at threshold: The one-loop two-emission contribution Citation Details In-Document Search Title: N 3 LO Higgs boson and Drell-Yan ...

  9. Opportunities for Drell-Yan Physics at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aschenauer, E.; Bland, L.; Crawford, H.; Goto, Y.; Eyser, O.; Kang, Z.; Vossen, A.

    2011-05-24

    Drell-Yan (DY) physics gives the unique opportunity to study the parton structure of nucleons in an experimentally and theoretically clean way. With the availability of polarized proton-proton collisions and asymmetric d+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we have the basic (and unique in the world) tools to address several fundamental questions in QCD, including the expected gluon saturation at low partonic momenta and the universality of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions. A Drell-Yan program at RHIC is tied closely to the core physics questions of a possible future electron-ion collider, eRHIC. The more than 80 participants of this workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment, trying to address imminent questions for the near and mid-term future.

  10. A Future Polarized Drell-Yan Experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinjan, David William

    2015-06-04

    The topic is treated in a series of slides under the following headings: Motivation (Nucleon Spin Puzzle, Quark Orbital Momentum and the Sivers Function, Accessing Sivers via Polarized Drell-Yan (p+p↑ → μ+μ-)); Transition of Seaquest (E906 → E1039) (Building a Polarized proton Target, Status of Polarized Target); and Outlook. The nucleon spin puzzle: when the quark and gluon contributions to the proton spin are evaluated, nearly 50% of the measured spin is missing; lattice QCD calculations indicate as much as 50% may come from quark orbital angular momentum. Sea quarks should carry orbital angular momentum (O.A.M.). The E1039 Polarized Target Drell-Yan Experiment provides opportunity to study possible Sea Quark O.A.M. Data taking is expected to begin in the spring of 2017.

  11. Role of the nonperturbative input in QCD resummed Drell-Yan Q...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Collins-Soper-Sterman (CSS) b-space QCD resummation formalism for Drell-Yan transverse momentum (Qsub T) distributions, and investigate the predictive power of the CSS formalism. ...

  12. Drell-Yan Lepton pair production at NNLO QCD with parton showers

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Hoeche, Stefan; Li, Ye; Prestel, Stefan

    2015-04-13

    We present a simple approach to combine NNLO QCD calculations and parton showers, based on the UNLOPS technique. We apply the method to the computation of Drell-Yan lepton-pair production at the Large Hadron Collider. We comment on possible improvements and intrinsic uncertainties.

  13. Azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized Drell-Yan processes and the Boer-Mulders distributions of antiquarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Barone,S. Melis,A. Prokudin

    2010-12-01

    Using a previous extraction of the quark Boer-Mulders distributions from semiinclusive deep inelastic scattering data, we fit the unpolarized Drell-Yan data on the $\\cos 2 \\phi$ asymmetry, determining the antiquark Boer-Mulders distributions. A good agreement with the data is found in the region of low $q_T$, where the transverse-momentum factorization approach applies.

  14. A polarized Drell-Yan experiment to probe the dynamics of the nucleon sea

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Kleinjan, David W.

    2015-01-01

    In QCD, nucleon spin comes from the sum of the quark spin, gluon spin, and the quark and gluon orbital angular momentum, but how these different components contribute and the interplay among them is not yet understood. For instance, sea quark orbital contribution remains largely unexplored. Measurements of the Sivers function for the sea quarks will provide a probe of the sea quark orbital contribution. The upcoming E1039 experiment at Fermilab will measure the Sivers asymmetry of the sea quarks via the Drell-Yan process using a 120 GeV unpolarized proton beam directed a transversely polarized ammonia target. Lastly, we reportmore » on the status and plans of the E1039 polarized Drell-Yan experiment.« less

  15. A polarized Drell-Yan experiment to probe the dynamics of the nucleon sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinjan, David

    2015-04-10

    In QCD, nucleon spin comes from the sum of the quark spin, gluon spin, and the quark and gluon orbital angular momentum, but how these different components contribute and the interplay among them is not yet understood. For instance, sea quark orbital contribution remains largely unexplored. Measurements of the Sivers function for the sea quarks will provide a probe of the sea quark orbital contribution. The upcoming E1039 experiment at Fermilab will measure the Sivers asymmetry of the sea quarks via the Drell-Yan process using a 120 GeV unpolarized proton beam directed a transversely polarized ammonia target. We report on the status and plans of the E1039 polarized Drell-Yan experiment.

  16. A polarized Drell-Yan experiment to probe the dynamics of the nucleon sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinjan, David W.

    2015-01-01

    In QCD, nucleon spin comes from the sum of the quark spin, gluon spin, and the quark and gluon orbital angular momentum, but how these different components contribute and the interplay among them is not yet understood. For instance, sea quark orbital contribution remains largely unexplored. Measurements of the Sivers function for the sea quarks will provide a probe of the sea quark orbital contribution. The upcoming E1039 experiment at Fermilab will measure the Sivers asymmetry of the sea quarks via the Drell-Yan process using a 120 GeV unpolarized proton beam directed a transversely polarized ammonia target. Lastly, we report on the status and plans of the E1039 polarized Drell-Yan experiment.

  17. A Polarized Drell-Yan Experiment to Probe the Dynamics of the Nucleon Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinjan, David William

    2015-03-26

    After presenting the nucleon spin puzzle as motivation for the experiment, the authors turn to a theoretical overview: sea quark flavor asymmetry and meson cloud model, and accessing quark angular momentum via the Sivers function. Then they describe the experimental equipment and conditions needed to carry out a fixed, polarized target Drell-Yan experiment, E1039. Data taking is expected to start in the middle of 2016.

  18. Spin correlations in the Drell–Yan process, parton entanglement, and other unconventional QCD effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nachtmann, O.

    2014-11-15

    We review ideas on the structure of the QCD vacuum which had served as motivation for the discussion of various non-standard QCD effects in high-energy reactions in articles from 1984 to 1995. These effects include, in particular, transverse-momentum and spin correlations in the Drell–Yan process and soft photon production in hadron–hadron collisions. We discuss the relation of the approach introduced in the above-mentioned articles to the approach, developed later, using transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TDMs). The latter approach is a special case of our more general one which allows for parton entanglement in high-energy reactions. We discuss signatures of parton entanglement in the Drell–Yan reaction. Also for Higgs-boson production in pp collisions via gluon–gluon annihilation effects of entanglement of the two gluons are discussed and are found to be potentially important. These effects can be looked for in the current LHC experiments. In our opinion studying parton-entanglement effects in high-energy reactions is, on the one hand, very worthwhile by itself and, on the other hand, it allows to perform quantitative tests of standard factorisation assumptions. Clearly, the experimental observation of parton-entanglement effects in the Drell–Yan reaction and/or in Higgs-boson production would have a great impact on our understanding how QCD works in high-energy collisions.

  19. Investigation of Drell–Yan processes in the CMS at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbunov, I. N. Shmatov, S. V.

    2015-07-15

    The results obtained by studying dilepton production via γ*/Z exchange in proton–proton collisions at the LHC are presented. Data from the CMS experiment on differential and double-differential cross sections for Drell–Yan processes (dδ/dM and dδ/dM dY ), forward–backward asymmetry (A{sub FB}), and weak mixing angle (sin{sup 2}θ{sub W}) are given. Within the errors, the results agree with respective Standard Model predictions.

  20. TMD PDFs in Drell-Yan lepton pair production at LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranov, S.P.; Lipatov, A.V.; Zotov, N.P.

    2015-04-10

    We consider the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) quark densities of the proton which are very important ingredients for unpolarized Drell-Yan (DY) lepton pair production. We calculate the TMD sea quark density as a convolution of the Catani-Ciafaloni-Fiorani-Marchesini (CCFM)-evolved gluon distribution and the TMD gluon-to-quark splitting function. Based on the O(α{sup 2}) production amplitude q{sup *}+(q-bar){sup *} →Z/γ{sup *}→l{sup +}+l{sup −}, calculated by taking into account the effective q{sup *}(q-bar){sup *}Z/γ{sup *} - vertex, we analyze the distributions on the dilepton invariant mass, transverse momentum and rapidity and specific angular correlations between the produced leptons as measured by the CMS, ATLAS and LHCb collaborations. We briefly duscuss also the process of assiciated lepton pair and jet production in pp collisions at the LHC.

  1. Letter of Intent for a Drell-Yan Experiment with a Polarized Proton Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geesaman, D.; Reimer, P.; Brown, C.; Christian, D.; Diefenthaler, M.; Peng, J. -C.; Chang, W. -C.; Chen, Y. -C.; Sawada, S.; Chang, T. -H.; Huang, J.; Jiang, X.; Leitch, M.; Klein, A.; Liu, K.; Liu, M.; McGaughey, P.; Beise, E.; Nakahara, K.; Aidala, C.; Lorenzon, W.; Raymond, R.; Badman, T.; Long, E.; Slifer, K.; Zielinski, R.; Guo, R. -S.; Goto, Y.; El Fassi, L.; Myers, K.; Ransome, R.; Tadepalli, A.; Tice, B.; Chen, J. -P.; Nakano, K.; Shibata, T. -A.; Crabb, D.; Day, D.; Keller, D.; Rondon, O.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the proton is a spin-1/2 particle, but how the constituents (quarks and gluons) assemble to this quantized spin is still a mystery. There is a worldwide effort to map out the individual contributions to the proton spin [1,2]. It is established that the quark spins contribute around 30%, while the gluon intrinsic angular momentum is still under active investigation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider [3]. Fully resolving the proton spin puzzle requires information on the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of both quarks and gluons. Recent studies have shown that the so-called transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) can inform us about the OAM of the partons. One of the most important TMDs, and the main focus of this LOI, is the so-called Sivers function [4]. To summarize, we propose to make the first measurement of the Sivers function of sea quarks, which is expected to be non-zero if the sea quarks contribute orbital angular momentum to the proton spin, as expected from the pion cloud model which also partially explains the E866 results. Thus, we will be able to deduce whether or not sea quark orbital motion contributes significantly to the proton spin. Specifically, we will determine the contribution from the anti-up quarks, with Bjorken-x in the range of ~ 0.1 to 0.5. Drell-Yan production off a polarized proton target has never been measured and is complementary to the recently approved (stage-1) experiment E1027 at Fermilab [11], which will measure the Sivers function of the valence quarks using a polarized proton beam on an unpolarized proton target. If the measured sea quark Sivers function is non-zero, we will also determine its sign.

  2. Using Drell-Yan to probe the underlying event in Run II at Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kar, Deepak

    2008-12-01

    We study the behavior of charged particles produced in association with Drell-Yan lepton-pairs in the region of the Z-boson in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the Z-boson in each event to define 'toward', 'away', and 'transverse' regions. For Drell-Yan production (excluding the leptons) both the 'toward' and 'transverse' regions are very sensitive to the 'underlying event', which is defined as everything except the two hard scattered components. The data are corrected to the particle level and are then compared with several PYTHIA models (with multiple parton interactions) and HERWIG (without multiple parton interactions) at the particle level (i.e. generator level). The data are also compared with a previous analysis on the behavior of the 'underlying event' in high transverse momentum jet production. The goal is to produce data that can be used by the theorists to tune and improve the QCD Monte-Carlo models of the 'underlying event' that are used to simulate hadron-hadron collisions.

  3. Nuclear Dependence of Proton-Induced Drell-Yan Dimuon Production at 120 GeV at Seaquest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dannowitz, Bryan P.

    2016-01-01

    A measurement of the atomic mass (A) dependence of p + A → µ+µ- + X Drell-Yan dimuons produced by 120 GeV protons is presented here. The data was taken by the SeaQuest experiment at Fermilab using a proton beam extracted from its Main Injector. Over 61,000 dimuon pairs were recorded with invariant mass 4.2 < Mγ* < 10 GeV and target parton momentum fraction 0.1 ≤ x2 ≤ 0.5 for nuclear targets 1H, 2H, C, Fe, and W . The ratio of dimuon yields per nucleon (Y ) for heavy nuclei versus 2H, RDY = 2 2 Y (A)/Y ( H) ≈ u¯(A)(x)/u¯( H)(x), is sensitive to modifications in the anti-quark sea distributions in nuclei for the case of proton-induced Drell-Yan. The data analyzed here and in the future of SeaQuest will provide tighter constraints on various models that attempt to define the anomalous behavior of nuclear modification as seen in deep inelastic lepton scattering, a phenomenon generally known as the EMC effect.

  4. Kinematical correlations of dielectrons from semileptonic decays of heavy mesons and Drell-Yan processes at BNL RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maciula, R.; Slipek, G.; Szczurek, A.

    2011-03-01

    We discuss kinematical correlations between charged leptons from semileptonic decays of open charm/bottom leptons produced in the Drell-Yan mechanism as well as some other mechanisms not included so far in the literature in proton-proton scattering at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The distributions of charm and bottom quarks/antiquarks are calculated in the framework of the k{sub t}-factorization approach. For this calculation we use different unintegrated parton distributions from the literature. The hadronization of heavy quarks is done with the help of well-known fragmentation functions. Uncertainties of our predictions related to heavy quark masses, factorization, and renormalization scales as well as due to the choice of fragmentation model are also discussed. We use semileptonic decay functions found by fitting recent semileptonic data obtained by the CLEO and BABAR collaborations. The Drell-Yan processes were calculated including transverse momenta of quarks and antiquarks, using the Kwiecinski parton distributions. We have also taken into consideration reactions initiated by purely QED {gamma}{sup *{gamma}*} fusion in elastic and inelastic pp collisions as well as a recently proposed diffractive mechanism of exclusive charm-anticharm production. The contribution of the latter mechanism is rather small. We get a good description of the dilepton invariant mass spectrum measured recently by the PHENIX Collaboration and present predictions for the dilepton pair transverse momentum distribution as well as the distribution in the azimuthal angle between electron and positron.

  5. Measurement of the weak mixing angle with the Drell-Yan process in proton-proton collisions at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2011-12-01

    A multivariate likelihood method to measure electroweak couplings with the Drell-Yan process at the LHC is presented. The process is described by the dilepton rapidity, invariant mass, and decay angle distributions. The decay angle ambiguity due to the unknown assignment of the scattered constituent quark and antiquark to the two protons in a collision is resolved statistically using correlations between the observables. The method is applied to a sample of dimuon events from proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.1 inverse femtobarns. From the dominant u-ubar, d-dbar to gamma*/Z to opposite sign dimuons process, the effective weak mixing angle parameter is measured to be sin^2(theta[eff]) = 0.2287 +/- 0.0020 (stat.) +/- 0.0025 (syst.). This result is consistent with measurements from other processes, as expected within the standard model.

  6. Probing Flavor Asymmetry of Anti-quarks in the Proton by Drell-Yan Experiment SeaQuest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyasaka, Shou

    2016-01-01

    A new measurement on the avor asymmetry between d and u in the proton is reported in this thesis. The proton contains a substantial number of antiquarks which arise from dynamical interactions of gluons such as gluon dissociation to a quark-antiquark pair, g ! q + q, and from non-perturbative processes as described by the pion-cloud model, for example. The antiquarks in the proton undertake an important role in determining the dynamic characteristics of the internal structure of the proton, although its distribution in the proton and its origin are not fully understood. Understanding sea quarks in hadron is an important subject for QCD. The SeaQuest experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is a xed target experiment using the 120 GeV proton beam extracted from the Fermilab Main Injector. One of the goals of the experiment is to measure the avor asymmetry between d quark and u quark in the proton as a function of the target Bjorken x using the Drell-Yan process in the p-p or p-d reactions. This process takes place in hadron-hadron collisions when a quark in one hadron in the beam and an antiquark in other hadron in the target annihilate into a virtual photon that decays into a lepton pair. The avor asymmetry between d and u quarks was found by deep-inelastic scattering experiment NMC at CERN. The E866/NuSea experiment at Fermilab obtained the avor asymmetry in the proton for 0:015 < x < 0:35 using the 800 GeV proton beam extracted from the Fermilab Tevatron. The result indicates the dominance of d; it is 70% larger than u at lower x. The SeaQuest experiment was planned to do a new precise measurement at higher x region. The lower energy beam (120 GeV) increases the Drell-Yan cross section and suppresses the background primarily arising from J/ decays. Therefore, SeaQuest will obtain more statistics in a shorter time than the E866 experiment. After detector construction, detector commissioning and accelerator upgrade, physics data taking started

  7. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from W, Z bosons and Drell Yan lepton pairs research of the CDF Electroweak Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Electroweak group studies production and properties of W, Z bosons and Drell Yan lepton pairs. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  8. Drell-Yan Cross Sections: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stirling, W. J.; Whalley, M. R.

    A compilation of data on Drell-Yan cross sections above a lepton-pair mass of 4 GeV/c2 is presented. The relevant experiments at Fermilab and CERN are included dating from approximately 1977 to the present day, covering p, p and pi +or- beams on a variety of nuclear and hydrogen targets, with centre-of-mass energies from 8.6 GeV to 630 GeV. The type of data presented include d sigma /dm, d2 sigma /dm dx and d2 sigma /dm dy distributions as well as other variations of these, and also transverse momentum distributions. The data are compared with a standard theoretical model, and a phenomenological 'K-factor' for each set is calculated. (Taken from the abstract of A Compilation of Drell-Yan Cross sections, W.J. Stirling and M.R. Whalley, Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics), Volume 19, Data Review, 1993.) The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. These data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  9. Measurement of the differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections in proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.,

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections are presented using an integrated luminosity of 4.5(4.8) inverse femtobarns in the dimuon (dielectron) channel of proton-proton collision data recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z-peak region (60-120 GeV) is \\sigma(\\ell \\ell) = 986.4 +/- 0.6 (stat.) +/- 5.9 (exp. syst.) +/- 21.7 (th. syst.) +/- 21.7 (lum.) pb for the combination of the dimuon and dielectron channels. Differential cross sections $d\\sigma/dm$ for the dimuon, dielectron, and combined channels are measured in the mass range 15 to 1500 GeV and corrected to the full phase space. Results are also presented for the measurement of the double-differential cross section d^2\\sigma/dm d |y| in the dimuon channel over the mass range 20 to 1500 GeV and absolute dimuon rapidity from 0 to 2.4. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD calculations at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading orders using various sets of parton distribution functions.

  10. Measurements of differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T. Dos Reis; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. 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A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Mittag, G.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Strologas, J.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. 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S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D’Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Biasotto, M.; Branca, A.; Dall’Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Fantinel, S.; Fanzago, F.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell’Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D’imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Ryu, M. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Moon, D. H.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D’Alfonso, M.; d’Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Guida, R.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rojo, J.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Musella, P.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W. -S.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R. -S.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A. -M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Wu, Z.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Negrete, M. Olmedo; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D’Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O’Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O’Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y. -J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Ratnikov, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Smith, G.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.; Collaboration, The CMS

    2015-04-09

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in the dielectron and dimuon channels are presented. They are based on proton–proton collision data at √s = 8TeV recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z peak region (60–120GeV), obtained from the combination of the dielectron and dimuon channels, is 1138 ± 8 (exp) ± 25 (theo) ± 30 (lumi)\\,pb, where the statistical uncertainty is negligible. The differential cross section dσ/dm in the dilepton mass range 15–2000GeV is measured and corrected to the full phase space. The double-differential cross section d2σ/dmd|y| is also measured over the mass range 20 to 1500GeV and absolute dilepton rapidity from 0 to 2.4. In addition, the ratios of the normalized differential cross sections measured at √s = 7 and 8TeV are presented. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) orders using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs). The results agree with the NNLO theoretical predictions computed with FEWZ 3.1 using the CT10 NNLO and NNPDF2.1 NNLO PDFs. Furthermore, the measured double-differential cross section and ratio of normalized differential cross sections are sufficiently precise to constrain the proton PDFs.

  11. Measurements of differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; et al

    2015-04-09

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell–Yan cross sections in the dielectron and dimuon channels are presented. They are based on proton–proton collision data at √s = 8TeV recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z peak region (60–120GeV), obtained from the combination of the dielectron and dimuon channels, is 1138 ± 8 (exp) ± 25 (theo) ± 30 (lumi)\\,pb, where the statistical uncertainty is negligible. The differential cross section dσ/dm in the dilepton mass range 15–2000GeV is measured and corrected to the fullmore » phase space. The double-differential cross section d2σ/dmd|y| is also measured over the mass range 20 to 1500GeV and absolute dilepton rapidity from 0 to 2.4. In addition, the ratios of the normalized differential cross sections measured at √s = 7 and 8TeV are presented. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) orders using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs). The results agree with the NNLO theoretical predictions computed with FEWZ 3.1 using the CT10 NNLO and NNPDF2.1 NNLO PDFs. Furthermore, the measured double-differential cross section and ratio of normalized differential cross sections are sufficiently precise to constrain the proton PDFs.« less

  12. Measurements of differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-09

    Measurements of the differential and double-differential Drell-Yan cross sections in the dielectron and dimuon channels are presented. They are based on proton-proton collision data at $\\sqrt{s}$ - 8 TeV recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns. The measured inclusive cross section in the Z peak region (60-120 GeV), obtained from the combination of the dielectron and dimuon channels, is 1138 +/- 8 (exp) +/- 25 (theo) +/- 30 (lumi) pb, where the statistical uncertainty is negligible. The differential cross section $d\\sigma/dm$ in the dilepton mass range 15 to 2000moreGeV is measured and corrected to the full phase space. The double-differential cross section $d^2 \\sigma / d(m) d(abs(y))$ is also measured over the mass range 20 to 1500 GeV and absolute dilepton rapidity from 0 to 2.4. In addition, the ratios of the normalized differential cross sections measured at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 and 8 TeV are presented. These measurements are compared to the predictions of perturbative QCD at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) orders using various sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs). The results agree with the NNLO theoretical predictions computed with FEWZ 3.1 using the CT10 NNLO and NNPDF2.1 NNLO PDFs. The measured double-differential cross section and ratio of normalized differential cross sections are sufficiently precise to constrain the proton PDFs.less

  13. Energetica Serra da Prata | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    da Prata Jump to: navigation, search Name: Energetica Serra da Prata Place: Bahia, Brazil Product: SHP developer based in the state of Bahia, Brazil. References: Energetica Serra...

  14. Measurement of the double-differential high-mass Drell-Yan cross section in pp collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2016-08-01

    This study presents a measurement of the double-differential cross section for the Drell-Yan Z/γ* → ℓ+ℓ– and photon-induced γγ → ℓ+ℓ– processes where ℓ is an electron or muon. The measurement is performed for invariant masses of the lepton pairs, mℓℓ, between 116 GeV and 1500 GeV using a sample of 20.3 fb–1 of pp collisions data at centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC in 2012. The data are presented double differentially in invariant mass and absolute dilepton rapidity as well as in invariant mass and absolute pseudorapidity separation of themore » lepton pair. The single-differential cross section as a function of mℓℓ is also reported. The electron and muon channel measurements are combined and a total experimental precision of better than 1% is achieved at low mℓℓ. A comparison to next-to-next-to-leading order perturbative QCD predictions using several recent parton distribution functions and including next-to-leading order electroweak effects indicates the potential of the data to constrain parton distribution functions. In particular, a large impact of the data on the photon PDF is demonstrated.« less

  15. Measurement of the transverse momentum and $$\\phi ^*_{\\eta }$$ distributions of Drell–Yan lepton pairs in proton–proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=8$$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-05-23

    Distributions of transverse momentum pTℓℓ and the related angular variablemore » $$\\phi ^*_{\\eta }$$ of Drell-Yan lepton pairs are measured in 20.3 fb–1 of proton-proton collisions at √s=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Measurements in electron-pair and muon-pair final states are corrected for detector effects and combined. Compared to previous measurements in protonΓÇôproton collisions at √s=7 TeV these new measurements benefit from a larger data sample and improved control of systematic uncertainties. Measurements are performed in bins of lepton-pair mass above, around and below the Z -boson mass peak. The data are compared to predictions from perturbative and resummed QCD calculations. For values of $$\\phi ^*_{\\eta }$$<1 the predictions from the Monte Carlo generator ResBos are generally consistent with the data within the theoretical uncertainties. However, at larger values of $$\\phi ^*_{\\eta }$$ this is not the case. Monte Carlo generators based on the parton-shower approach are unable to describe the data over the full range of pTℓℓ while the fixed-order prediction of Dynnlo falls below the data at high values of pTℓℓ. Here, ResBos and the parton-shower Monte Carlo generators provide a much better description of the evolution of the $$\\phi ^*_{\\eta }$$ and pTℓℓ distributions as a function of lepton-pair mass and rapidity than the basic shape of the data.« less

  16. Biopalma da Amaz nia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    da Amaznia Place: Belem, Para, Brazil Product: Brazilian palm oil plantation for food industry developer company. Coordinates: -1.454426, -48.502537 Show Map Loading...

  17. Women @ Energy: Yan Li | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    projects are being carried out by a talented team of scientists. 3) How can our country engage more women, girls, and other underrepresented groups in STEM? Equally important ...

  18. Women @ Energy: Yan Li | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers

    ... I love playing badminton and I was still practicing when I was five months into pregnancy with my baby girl, who seems to have inherited the sports gene. Such exercise not only ...

  19. Eolica Cajueiro da Praia Ltda | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Eolica Cajueiro da Praia Ltda Jump to: navigation, search Name: Eolica Cajueiro da Praia Ltda Place: Fortaleza, Ceara, Brazil Zip: 60170-251 Sector: Renewable Energy, Wind energy...

  20. DA (Distribution Automation) (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    DA (Distribution Automation) (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name DA (Distribution Automation) Country Netherlands Coordinates 52.132633, 5.291266...

  1. Mercado Abastecedor da Regiao de Lisboa MARL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Mercado Abastecedor da Regiao de Lisboa MARL Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mercado Abastecedor da Regiao de Lisboa (MARL) Place: Lisbon, Portugal Zip: 2660-421 Product: Mercado...

  2. Incubadora de Empresas da Universidade de Aveiro IEUA | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Incubadora de Empresas da Universidade de Aveiro IEUA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Incubadora de Empresas da Universidade de Aveiro (IEUA) Place: Portugal Sector: Services...

  3. Data Assimilation (UQ/DA) Study

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Uncertainty Quantification and Data Assimilation (UQ/DA) Study on a VERA Core Simulator Component for CRUD Analysis Hany S. Abdel-Khalik North Carolina State University Reviewed by J. Michael Doster (NCSU) Rod Schmidt (SNL) August 30, 2013 CASL-U-2013-0184-000 Milestone Report for L2:VUQ:P7.02 Uncertainty Quantification and Data Assimilation (UQ/DA) Study on a VERA Core Simulator Component for CRUD Analysis CASL-I-2013-0184-000 Jason M. Hite 1 , Hany S. Abdel-Khalik 1 , Ralph C. Smith 2 , Mami

  4. Eletricidade da Amaz nia S A ELETRAM | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Amaz nia S A ELETRAM Jump to: navigation, search Name: Eletricidade da Amaznia SA (ELETRAM) Place: Cuiaba, Mato Grosso, Brazil Zip: 78040-570 Sector: Hydro Product: Small...

  5. Hao Yan | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Principal Investigators Postdoctoral Fellows Center researchers Graduate Students Undergraduate Students All Bisfuel Center Personnel Ana Moore Anne Jones Devens Gust Don Seo ...

  6. Biographical sketch - Hao Yan | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Society Meeting, San Francisco, CA, 2010. Co-Organizer, DNA Nanotechnology Workshop, Beijing, China, 2009. Co-Organizer, International Workshop on DNA-based nanotechnology: ...

  7. QCD mechanisms of (semi)exclusive Drell-Yan processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pivovarov, A.A.; Teryaev, O.V.

    2015-04-10

    Two mechanisms for the lepton pair production in exclusive proton-meson collisions are considered and compared. Amplitudes and differential cross sections are calculated. The interference of these mechanisms is taken into account. The skewness dependence of the result is discussed.

  8. CoDA 2016, the Conference on Data Analysis

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    March » CoDA 2016, the Conference on Data Analysis CoDA 2016, the Conference on Data Analysis WHEN: Mar 02, 2016 8:00 AM - Mar 04, 2016 5:00 PM WHERE: Eldorado Hotel 309 W. San Francisco St., Santa Fe, NM CONTACT: Kary Myers (505) 606-1455 CATEGORY: Science TYPE: Conference INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Join us for the Conference on Data Analysis, highlighting data-driven problems of interest to the Department of Energy. We invite you to present your data-focused work at the poster

  9. Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award August 19, 2013 - 5:07pm Addthis...

  10. EERE Success Story-Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award EERE Success Story-Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award August 19, 2013 - ...

  11. Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award August 19, 2013 - 5:07pm Addthis ...

  12. Funda o Parque Tecnol gico da Paraiba PaqTc Incubator | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Funda o Parque Tecnol gico da Paraiba PaqTc Incubator Jump to: navigation, search Name: Fundao Parque Tecnolgico da Paraiba (PaqTc Incubator) Place: Brazil Sector: Services...

  13. Roles and Delegation of Authority (R/DA) System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ABBOTT,JOHN P.; HUTCHINS,JAMES C.; SCHOCH,DAVID G.

    1999-11-01

    The processes of defining managerial roles and providing for delegation of authority are essential to any enterprise. At most large organizations, these processes are defined in policy manuals and through sets of standard operating procedures for many, if not all, business and administrative functions. Many of these staff-initiated, administrative functions require the routing of documents for approval to one or more levels of management. These employee-oriented, back office types of workflows tend to require more flexibility in determining to whom these documents should go to, while, at the same time, providing the responsible parties with the flexibility to delegate their approval authority or allow others to review their work. Although this practice is commonplace in manual, paper-based processes that exist in many organizations, it is difficult to provide the same flexibility in the more structured, electronic-based, workflow systems. The purpose of this report is to present a framework or architecture for creating a R/DA system and provide some insights associated with its design and utilization. To improve understanding and clarify subsequent discussion, the goals and requirements for the major R/DA system components, namely, the database and interface modules, are initially presented along with the identification of important concepts and the definition of critical terms. Next high-level functions relating the types of inputs to the outputs of the R/DA interface module are introduced and discussed. Then the relationships between the major R/DA modules and the primary components associated with its creation and maintenance are presented and analyzed. Finally, some conclusions are drawn relative to the advantages associated with developing a R/DA system for use in implementing an enterprise-wide, work-facilitating information system.

  14. Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Developed jointly by Da Vinci Emissions Services Ltd., Cummins Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil (DAFIO) technology uses a fiber optic probe to obtain real-time measurements of oil in an operating engine to quantify the fuel dissolved in the lubricant oil.

  15. 70 DA WHITE DWARFS IDENTIFIED IN LAMOST PILOT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, J. K.; Luo, A. L.; Zhao, G. [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Oswalt, T. D., E-mail: zjk@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: gzhao@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: lal@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: toswalt@fit.edu [Physics and Space Science Department, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    We present a spectroscopically identified catalog of 70 DA white dwarfs (WDs) from the LAMOST pilot survey. Thirty-five are found to be new identifications after cross-correlation with the Eisenstein et al. and Villanova catalogs. The effective temperature and gravity of these WDs are estimated by Balmer lines fitting. Most of them are hot WDs. The cooling times and masses of these WDs are estimated by interpolation in theoretical evolution tracks. The peak of the mass distribution is found to be {approx}0.6 M {sub Sun }, which is consistent with prior work in the literature. The distances of these WDs are estimated using the method of synthetic spectral distances. All of these WDs are found to be in the Galactic disk from our analysis of space motions. Our sample supports the expectation that WDs with high mass are concentrated near the plane of the Galactic disk.

  16. Near-UV absorption in very cool DA white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saumon, D.; Holberg, J. B.; Kowalski, P. M. E-mail: holberg@argus.lpl.arizona.edu

    2014-07-20

    The atmospheres of very cool, hydrogen-rich white dwarfs (WDs) (T{sub eff} < 6000 K) are challenging to model because of the increased complexity of the equation of state, chemical equilibrium, and opacity sources in a low-temperature, weakly ionized dense gas. In particular, many models that assume relatively simple models for the broadening of atomic levels and mostly ideal gas physics overestimate the flux in the blue part of their spectra. A solution to this problem that has met with some success is that additional opacity at short wavelengths comes for the extreme broadening of the Lyman α line of atomic H by collisions primarily with H{sub 2}. For the purpose of validating this model more rigorously, we acquired Hubble Space Telescope STIS spectra of eight very cool WDs (five DA and three DC stars). Combined with their known parallaxes, BVRIJHK, and Spitzer IRAC photometry, we analyze their entire spectral energy distribution (from 0.24 to 9.3 μm) with a large grid of model atmospheres and synthetic spectra. We find that the red wing of the Lyman α line reproduces the rapidly decreasing near-UV flux of these very cool stars very well. We determine better constrained values of T{sub eff} and gravity as well as upper limits to the helium abundance in their atmospheres.

  17. PanDaTox: a tool for accelerated metabolic engineering (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Such engineering efforts are frequently hampered by foreign genes that are toxic to the E. coli host. We have developed PanDaTox (www.weizmann.ac.ilpandatox), a web-based resource ...

  18. EERE Success Story—Tennessee: Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil Reduces Emissions, Wins R&D 100 Award

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Developed jointly by Da Vinci Emissions Services Ltd., Cummins Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Da Vinci Fuel-in-Oil (DAFIO™) technology uses a fiber optic probe to obtain real-time measurements of oil in an operating engine to quantify the fuel dissolved in the lubricant oil.

  19. STRESS AND FAILURE ANALYSIS OF RAPIDLY ROTATING ASTEROID (29075) 1950DA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Rozitis et al. recently reported that near-Earth asteroid (29075) 1950DA, whose bulk density ranges from 1.0 g cm{sup 3} to 2.4g cm{sup 3}, is a rubble pile and requires a cohesive strength of at least 44-76 Pa to keep from failing due to its fast spin period. Since their technique for giving failure conditions required the averaged stress over the whole volume, it discarded information about the asteroid's failure mode and internal stress condition. This paper develops a finite element model and revisits the stress and failure analysis of 1950DA. For the modeling, we do not consider material hardening and softening. Under the assumption of an associated flow rule and uniform material distribution, we identify the deformation process of 1950DA when its constant cohesion reaches the lowest value that keeps its current shape. The results show that to avoid structural failure the internal core requires a cohesive strength of at least 75-85 Pa. It suggests that for the failure mode of this body, the internal core first fails structurally, followed by the surface region. This implies that if cohesion is constant over the whole volume, the equatorial ridge of 1950DA results from a material flow going outward along the equatorial plane in the internal core, but not from a landslide as has been hypothesized. This has additional implications for the likely density of the interior of the body.

  20. Exclusive soft function for Drell-Yan at next-to-next-to-leading...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NUCLEONS; TRANSVERSE MOMENTUM; WILSON LOOP BARYONS; ELEMENTARY PARTICLES; FERMIONS; FUNCTIONS; HADRONS; LINEAR MOMENTUM; SCALE DIMENSION Word Cloud More Like This Full Text...

  1. Exclusive soft function for Drell-Yan at next-to-next-to-leading...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher: American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text ...

  2. Z-Bed Recovery Water Disposal

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    OVERVIEW OVERVIEW YAN Demographics Biomass Study Team YAN Biomass Study Background Project Rationale & Outline Project Progress Future Q&A YAN DEMOGRAPHICS YAN DEMOGRAPHICS * YAN Population = 1800 Enrolled Members * YAN Geography = 650 Acres in 5 Locations * Projected location of a Biomass Facility - Located in Verde Valley of Central Arizona - Middle Verde (On reservation) - Drake (30 Miles from the Reservation) YAN BIOMASS STUDY TEAM YAN BIOMASS STUDY TEAM * YAN Energy Director- Tracy

  3. STATES GOVERI TO :H. J. He&man, Chief, Tonaw&da Sub-Of&e DATE...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    STATES GOVERI TO :H. J. He&man, Chief, Tonaw&da Sub-Of&e DATE: ,i; .; .c. sgmbo1: PPS:W:mjf .. ,i. -'. i:.. :: (PPS447-53) I ..-:;..c. ' ..I-,-.. . i .,,. " :, ,, .T. ....

  4. Research Affiliates | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Affiliates Research Affiliates Yan Mei Wang Yan Mei Wang Research Affiliate Read more about Yan Mei Wang Rienk van Grondelle Rienk van Grondelle Research Affiliate Read more about...

  5. Test of ''Crab-Waist'' Collisions at the DA{Phi}NE {Phi} Factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zobov, M.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M. E.; Biscari, C.; Bocci, A.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G. O.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.

    2010-04-30

    The electron-positron collider DA{Phi}NE, the Italian {Phi} factory, has been recently upgraded in order to implement an innovative collision scheme based on large crossing angle, small beam sizes at the crossing point, and compensation of beam-beam interaction by means of sextupole pairs creating a ''crab-waist'' configuration in the interaction region. Experimental tests of the novel scheme exhibited an increase by a factor of 3 in the peak luminosity of the collider with respect to the performances reached before the upgrade. In this Letter we present the new collision scheme, discuss its advantages, describe the hardware modifications realized for the upgrade, and report the results of the experimental tests carried out during commissioning of the machine in the new configuration and standard operation for the users.

  6. NMR Analysis of Methyl Groups at 100-500 kDa: Model Systems and Arp2/3 Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreishman-Deitrick, Mara; Egile, Coumaran; Hoyt, David W.; Ford, Joseph J.; Rong, Li; Rosen, Michael K.

    2003-07-01

    Large macromolecular machines are among the most important and challenging targets for structural and mechanistic analyses. Consequently, there is great interest in development of NMR methods for the study of multicomponent systems in the 50-500 kDa range. Biochemical methods also must be developed in concert to produce such systems in selectively labeled form. Here, we present 1H/13C-HSQC spectra of protonated methyl groups in a model system that mimics molecular weights up to ~560 kDa. Signals from side chain methyl groups of Ile, Leu, and Val residues are clearly detectable at correlation times up to ~330 ns. We have also developed a biochemical procedure to produce the 240 kDa, heteroheptameric Arp2/3 actin nucleation complex selectively labeled at one subunit and obtained 1H/13C-HSQC spectra of this assembly. Sensitivity in spectra of both the Arp2/3 complex and the model system indicate that methyl groups will be useful sources of information in nonsymmetric systems with molecular weights greater than 600 kDa at concentrations less than 100 μM. Methyl analyses will complement TROSY and CRINEPT analyses of amides in NMR studies of structure and molecular interactions of extremely large macromolecules and assemblies.

  7. L3:MPO.CRUD.P6.01 D.A. Andersson, C. R. Stanek LANL December 18, 2012

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    P6.01 D.A. Andersson, C. R. Stanek LANL December 18, 2012 CASL-8-2013-0145-000 CASL-U-2013-0145-000 L3:MPO.CRUD.P6.01 Mixing and non-stoichiometry in Fe-Ni-Cr-Zn-O spinel compounds: Density functional theory calculations D. A. Andersson Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 C. R. Stanek Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (Dated: December 18, 2012) Density functional theory (DFT)

  8. The 21.5-kDa isoform of myelin basic protein has a non-traditional PY-nuclear-localization signal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Graham S.T.; Seymour, Lauren V.; Boggs, Joan M.; Harauz, George

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full-length 21.5-kDa MBP isoform is translocated to the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesized that the exon-II-encoded sequence contained the NLS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We mutated this sequence in RFP-tagged constructs and transfected N19-cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Abolition of two key positively-charged residues resulted in loss of nuclear-trafficking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 21.5-kDa isoform of classic MBP contains a non-traditional PY-NLS. -- Abstract: The predominant 18.5-kDa classic myelin basic protein (MBP) is mainly responsible for compaction of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system, but is multifunctional, having numerous interactions with Ca{sup 2+}-calmodulin, actin, tubulin, and SH3-domains, and can tether these proteins to a lipid membrane in vitro. The full-length 21.5-kDa MBP isoform has an additional 26 residues encoded by exon-II of the classic gene, which causes it to be trafficked to the nucleus of oligodendrocytes (OLGs). We have performed site-directed mutagenesis of selected residues within this segment in red fluorescent protein (RFP)-tagged constructs, which were then transfected into the immortalized N19-OLG cell line to view protein localization using epifluorescence microscopy. We found that 21.5-kDa MBP contains two non-traditional PY-nuclear-localization signals, and that arginine and lysine residues within these motifs were involved in subcellular trafficking of this protein to the nucleus, where it may have functional roles during myelinogenesis.

  9. Study of the K{sub stop}{sup -}A{yields}{Sigma}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}A' reaction at DA{Phi}NE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnello, M.; Benussi, L.; Bertani, M.; Fabbri, F. L.; Gianotti, P.; Lucherini, V.; Bhang, H. C.; Bonomi, G.; Moia, F.; Zenoni, A.; Botta, E.; Bressani, T.; Bufalino, S.; Busso, L.; Calvo, D.; De Mori, F.; Feliciello, A.; Filippi, A.; Marcello, S.; Wheadon, R.

    2010-12-28

    This work describes an experimental study of the K{sub stop}{sup -}A{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{Sigma}{sup {+-}}A' reaction performed with the FINUDA spectrometer at the DA{Phi}NE {phi}-factory. The reaction is studied via the detection of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n events on {sup 6,7}Li, {sup 9}Be, {sup 13}C and {sup 16}O.

  10. Data:B485777c-c4fb-42b3-8d2a-3da95f7c7c10 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    a-3da95f7c7c10 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information...

  11. DA326576 (2 pages)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

  12. Crystallization and X-ray data analysis of the 10 kDa C-terminal lid subdomain from Caenorhabditis elegans Hsp70

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrall, Liam; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D., E-mail: m.walkinshaw@ed.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, The Kings Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JR,Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2006-09-01

    Crystals of the C-terminal 10 kDa lid subdomain from the C. elegans chaperone Hsp70 have been obtained that diffract X-rays to ?3.5 and belong to space group I2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. Analysis of X-ray data and initial heavy-atom phasing reveals 24 monomers in the asymmetric unit related by 432 non-crystallographic symmetry. Hsp70 is an important molecular chaperone involved in the regulation of protein folding. Crystals of the C-terminal 10 kDa helical lid domain (residues 542640) from a Caenorhabditis elegans Hsp70 homologue have been produced that diffract X-rays to ?3.4 . Crystals belong to space group I2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 197, c = 200 . The Matthews coefficient, self-rotation function and Patterson map indicate 24 monomers in the asymmetric unit, showing non-crystallographic 432 symmetry. Molecular-replacement studies using the corresponding domain from rat, the only eukaryotic homologue with a known structure, failed and a mercury derivative was obtained. Preliminary MAD phasing using SHELXD and SHARP for location and refinement of the heavy-atom substructure and SOLOMON for density modification produced interpretable maps with a clear proteinsolvent boundary. Further density-modification, model-building and refinement are currently under way.

  13. Measurement of the low-mass Drell-Yan differential cross section at √s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Aad, G.

    2014-06-18

    The differential cross section for the process Z/γ → ℓℓ (ℓ = e,μ) as a function of dilepton invariant mass is measured in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV at the LHC using the ATLAS detector. The measurement is performed in the e and μ channels for invariant masses between 26 GeV and 66 GeV using an integrated luminosity of 1.6 fb-1 collected in 2011 and these measurements are combined. The analysis is extended to invariant masses as low as 12 GeV in the muon channel using 35 pb-1 of data collected in 2010. The cross sections are determinedmore » within fiducial acceptance regions and corrections to extrapolate the measurements to the full kinematic range are provided. Next-to-next-to-leading-order QCD predictions provide a significantly better description of the results than next-to-leading order QCD calculations, unless the latter are matched to a parton shower calculation.« less

  14. Forward–backward asymmetry of Drell–Yan lepton pairs in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-06-14

    A measurement of the forward-backward asymmetrymore » $$A_{\\mathrm{FB}}$$ of oppositely charged lepton pairs ($$\\mu\\mu$$ and $$\\mathrm{ ee } $$) produced via $$\\mathrm{ Z }/\\gamma^*$$ boson exchange in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 8 TeV is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$$^{-1}$$ collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement of $$A_{\\mathrm{FB}}$$ is performed for dilepton masses between 40 GeV and 2 TeV and for dilepton rapidity up to 5. As a result, the $$A_{\\mathrm{FB}}$$ measurements as a function of dilepton mass and rapidity are compared with the standard model predictions.« less

  15. Modeling and Simulation of Human Behavior in Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Tianzhen Hong, thong@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Modeling and Simulation of Human Behavior in Buildings 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Energy-related occupant behavior in buildings, e.g.: * Open/close windows * Switch/dim lights * Adjust thermostat * Move around * Turn on/off HVAC * Operate shades 2 Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 1/1/2013 Planned end date: 12/31/2015 Key Milestones 1. Behavior framework; 12/2013 2. IEA EBC Annex 66; 11/2013, 11/2014 3.

  16. Human Behavior, Standards and Tools to Improve Design & Operation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Human Behavior, Standards and Tools to Improve Design & Operation 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Tianzhen Hong, thong@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 10/1/2012 planned, 1/1/2013 actual Planned end date: 9/30/2015 Key Milestones 1. Behavior data mining and models; 6/28/2013 2. Behavior framework; 12/20/2013 3. IEA EBC Annex 66 launched; 11/14/2013 Budget: Total DOE $ to date: $380K (FY13 + FY14) Total future DOE $: $220K, FY15

  17. Green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits TLR4 signaling through the 67-kDa laminin receptor on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Choi, Han-Gyu; Sung, Nak-Yun; Byun, Eui-Hong

    2012-10-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expressions of CD80, CD86, and MHC class I/II were inhibited by EGCG via 67LR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG-treated DCs inhibited LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines via 67LR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG-treated DCs inhibited MAPKs activation and NF-{kappa}B p65 translocation via 67LR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGCG elevated the expression of the Tollip protein through 67LR in DCs. -- Abstract: Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major active polyphenol of green tea, has been shown to down-regulate inflammatory responses in dendritic cells (DCs); however, the underlying mechanism has not been understood. Recently, we identified the 67-kDa laminin receptor (67LR) as a cell-surface EGCG receptor. In this study, we showed the molecular basis for the down-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signal transduction by EGCG in DCs. The expressions of CD80, CD86, and MHC class I and II, which are molecules essential for antigen presentation by DCs, were inhibited by EGCG via 67LR. In addition, EGCG-treated DCs inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-{alpha}, interleukin [IL]-1{beta}, and IL-6) and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), e.g., extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) p65 translocation through 67LR. Interestingly, we also found that EGCG markedly elevated the expression of the Tollip protein, a negative regulator of TLR signaling, through 67LR. These novel findings provide new insight into the understanding of negative regulatory mechanisms of the TLR4 signaling pathway and consequent inflammatory responses that are implicated in the development and progression of many chronic diseases.

  18. Da Liu | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Information Resources » Energy Analysis » DYNAMIC MANUFACTURING ENERGY SANKEY TOOL (2010, UNITS: TRILLION BTU) DYNAMIC MANUFACTURING ENERGY SANKEY TOOL (2010, UNITS: TRILLION BTU) About the Energy Data Use this diagram to explore (zoom, pan, select) and compare energy flows across U.S. manufacturing and key subsectors. Line widths indicate the volume of energy flow in trillions of British thermal units (TBtu). The 15 manufacturing subsectors together consume 95% of all

  19. Ana Moore | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ana Moore Anne Jones Devens Gust Don Seo Giovanna Ghirlanda Hao Yan James Allen Kevin Redding Petra Fromme Thomas Moore Yan Liu Ana Moore Principal Investigator Subtask 4 Leader ...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Yan, X" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent Journal ... Search for: All records CreatorsAuthors contains: "Yan, X" Sort by Relevance Sort by ...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...China) (1) Wu, Zhenkun (1) Yan, Lihe (1) Yan, Yaqi Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China...

  2. Kevin Redding | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ana Moore Anne Jones Devens Gust Don Seo Giovanna Ghirlanda Hao Yan James Allen Kevin Redding Petra Fromme Thomas Moore Yan Liu Kevin Redding Associate Director of the Center...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Elucidation of the Local and Long-Range Structural Changes that Occur in Germanium Anodes in Lithium-Ion Batteries Jung, Hyeyoung ; Allan, Phoebe K ; Hu, Yan-Yan ; Borkiewicz, Olaf ...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Elucidation of the Local and Long-Range Structural Changes that Occur in Germanium Anodes in Lithium-Ion Batteries Jung, Hyeyoung ; Allan, Phoebe K ; Hu, Yan-Yan ; Borkiewicz, Olaf ...

  5. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Materials...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... City University of Hong Kong Tan, Chew Lim (Chew Lim Tan) - Department of Computational Science, National University of Singapore Tan, Colin Keng-Yan (Colin Keng-Yan Tan) - ...

  6. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fossil...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cui, Yan (Yan Cui) - Department of Molecular Sciences, University of Tennessee Health Science Center Go back to Individual Researchers Collections: A B C D E F G H I J K L ...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Allan, Phoebe K (1) Borkiewicz, Olaf (1) Chapman, Karena W. (1) Chupas, Peter J. (1) Du, Lin-Shu (1) Grey, Clare P. (1) Han, Wei-Qiang (1) Hu, Yan-Yan (1) Jung, Hyeyoung (1) ...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Chapman, Karena W. (1) Cheng, Jun (1) Chupas, Peter J. (1) Du, Lin-Shu (1) Dunstan, Matthew (1) Grey, Clare P. (1) Hu, Yan-Yan (1) Hua, Xiao (1) Liu, Zigeng (1) Nam, Kyung-Wan (1) ...

  9. First Measurement of the Angular Coefficients of Drell-Yan e⁺e⁻ Pairs in the Z Mass Region from pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2011-06-15

    We report on the first measurement of the angular distributions of final state electrons in pp̄→γ*/Z→e⁺e⁻+X events produced in the Z boson mass region at √s=1.96 TeV. The data sample collected by the CDF II detector for this result corresponds to 2.1 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity. The angular distributions are studied as a function of the transverse momentum of the electron-positron pair and show good agreement with the Lam-Tung relation, consistent with a spin-1 description of the gluon, and demonstrate that, at high values of the transverse momentum, Z bosons are produced via quark-antiquark annihilation and quark-gluon Compton processes.

  10. First Measurement of the Angular Coefficients of Drell-Yan e?e? Pairs in the Z Mass Region from pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; DellOrso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Martnez-Ballarn, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.

    2011-06-01

    We report on the first measurement of the angular distributions of final state electrons in pp???*/Z?e?e?+X events produced in the Z boson mass region at ?s=1.96 TeV. The data sample collected by the CDF II detector for this result corresponds to 2.1 fb? of integrated luminosity. The angular distributions are studied as a function of the transverse momentum of the electron-positron pair and show good agreement with the Lam-Tung relation, consistent with a spin-1 description of the gluon, and demonstrate that, at high values of the transverse momentum, Z bosons are produced via quark-antiquark annihilation and quark-gluon Compton processes.

  11. First Measurement of the Angular Coefficients of Drell-Yan $e^{+}e^{-}$ pairs in the Z Mass Region from $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    We report on the first measurement of the angular distributions of final state electrons in p{bar p} {yields} {gamma}*/Z {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} + X events produced in the Z boson mass region at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data sample collected by the CDF II detector for this result corresponds to 2.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The angular distributions are studied as a function of the transverse momentum of the electron-positron pair and show good agreement with the Lam-Tung relation, consistent with a spin-1 description of the gluon, and demonstrate that at high values of the transverse momentum, Z bosons are produced via quark anti-quark annihilation and quark-gluon Compton processes.

  12. Measurement of d sigma/dy of Drell-Yan e+ e- pairs in the Z Mass Region from p anti-p Collisions at s88(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-08-01

    We report on a CDF measurement of the total cross section and rapidity distribution, d{sigma}/dy, for q{bar q} {yields} {gamma}*/Z {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} events in the Z boson mass region (66 < M{sub ee} < 116 GeV/c{sup 2}) produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with 2.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The measured cross section of 256 {+-} 16 pb and d{sigma}/dy distribution are compared with Next-to-Leading-Order and Next-to-Next-to-Leading-Order QCD theory predictions with CTEQ and MRST parton distribution functions (PDFs). There is good agreement between data and theory except at large rapidity for which further tuning of PDF models may be needed.

  13. Measurement of $d\\sigma/dy$ of Drell-Yan $e^+e^-$ pairs in the $Z$ Mass Region from $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Adelman, Jahred A.; Gonzalez, Barbara Alvarez; Amerio, Silvia; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A.; Apresyan, Artur; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-03-01

    We report on a CDF measurement of the total cross section and rapidity distribution, d{sigma}/dy, for q{bar q} {yields} {gamma}{sup *}/Z {yields} e{sup +} e {sup -} events in the Z boson mass region (66 < M {sub ee} < 116 GeV/c {sub 2}) produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with 2.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The measured cross section of 257 {+-} 16pb and d{sigma}/dy distribution are compared with Next-to-Leading-Order (NLO) and Next-to-Next-to-Leading-Order (NNLO) QCD theory predictions with CTEQ and MRST/MSTW parton distribution functions (PDFs). There is good agreement between the experimental total cross section and d{sigma}/dy measurements with theoretical calcualtion with the most recent NNLO PDFs.

  14. Combined Use of Residual Dipolar Couplings and Solution X-ray Scattering To Rapidly Probe Rigid-Body Conformational Transitions in a Non-phosphorylatable Active-Site Mutant of the 128 kDa Enzyme I Dimer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takayama, Yuki; Schwieters, Charles D.; Grishaev, Alexander; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Clore, G. Marius (NIH)

    2012-10-23

    The first component of the bacterial phosphotransferase system, enzyme I (EI), is a multidomain 128 kDa dimer that undergoes large rigid-body conformational transitions during the course of its catalytic cycle. Here we investigate the solution structure of a non-phosphorylatable active-site mutant in which the active-site histidine is substituted by glutamine. We show that perturbations in the relative orientations and positions of the domains and subdomains can be rapidly and reliably determined by conjoined rigid-body/torsion angle/Cartesian simulated annealing calculations driven by orientational restraints from residual dipolar couplings and shape and translation information afforded by small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. Although histidine and glutamine are isosteric, the conformational space available to a Gln side chain is larger than that for the imidazole ring of His. An additional hydrogen bond between the side chain of Gln189 located on the EIN{sup {alpha}/{beta}} subdomain and an aspartate (Asp129) on the EIN{sup {alpha}} subdomain results in a small ({approx}9{sup o}) reorientation of the EIN{sup {alpha}} and EIN{sup {alpha}/{beta}} subdomains that is in turn propagated to a larger reorientation ({approx}26{sup o}) of the EIN domain relative to the EIC dimerization domain, illustrating the positional sensitivity of the EIN domain and its constituent subdomains to small structural perturbations.

  15. MEMORANDUM TO: FSLE DA-C

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Iics;i*cl, ?oztoz, &ss. Kcdlsnl rescx-2% :.ith rzdioi:oto?es (R) 'L:CDmiel ;izfrnc?xrg- Car;., YT-X Fnlls, Pn. PrcFeration 0I bery?li2 ref;actcries (Xi) i' . nd hnfniuz. (se n. ...

  16. Jayme da Costa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    energy Product: Electrical goods manufacturer that is developing and building wind, solar and hydro projects in Portugal and wind projects in Spain. Coordinates: 40.875332,...

  17. PLEAEERUSH ANALYTICAL DA-~-A SHEET

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ...lectedby-CESS-.Route to CBS LocationTITANIUM Type of Sample airnalyzed for F Alpham Remarks NIAGARA pALI+S* N.Y. U Beta Bldg. 103 - furnace room - -NO, Ra Oil PH Be Th Sample No. ...

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    ... Electrolytes Xiang, Hongfa ; Mei, Donghai ; Yan, Pengfei ; Bhattacharya, Priyanka ; Burton, Sarah D. ; Cresce, Arthur V. ; Cao, Ruiguo ; Engelhard, Mark H. ; Bowden, Mark E. ; ...

  19. Dynamics and heterogeneity of a fate determinant during transition towards cell differentiation

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Peláez, Nicolás; Gavalda-Miralles, Arnau; Wang, Bao; Navarro, Heliodoro Tejedor; Gudjonson, Herman; Rebay, Ilaria; Dinner, Aaron R.; Katsaggelos, Aggelos K.; Amaral, Luís AN; Carthew, Richard W.

    2015-11-19

    Yan is an ETS-domain transcription factor responsible for maintaining Drosophila eye cells in a multipotent state. Yan is at the core of a regulatory network that determines the time and place in which cells transit from multipotency to one of several differentiated lineages. Using a fluorescent reporter for Yan expression, we observed a biphasic distribution of Yan in multipotent cells, with a rapid inductive phase and slow decay phase. Transitions to various differentiated states occurred over the course of this dynamic process, suggesting that Yan expression level does not strongly determine cell potential. Consistent with this conclusion, perturbing Yan expressionmore » by varying gene dosage had no effect on cell fate transitions. However, we observed that as cells transited to differentiation, Yan expression became highly heterogeneous and this heterogeneity was transient. Signals received via the EGF Receptor were necessary for the transience in Yan noise since genetic loss caused sustained noise. Since these signals are essential for eye cells to differentiate, we suggest that dynamic heterogeneity of Yan is a necessary element of the transition process, and cell states are stabilized through noise reduction.« less

  20. High Temperature Dynamics Strain Hardening Behavior in Stainless...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Yu, Xinghua 1 ; Qiao, Dongxiao 1 ; Feng, Zhili 1 ; Crooker, Paul 2 ; Wang, Yanli 1 + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) ...

  1. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Performance and characterization of a MEMS-based device for alignment and manipulation of x-ray nanofocusing optics Xu, Weihe ; Lauer, Kenneth ; Yan, Hui ; Milanovic, Veljko ; Lu, ...

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    ... needed for reliable calculations of Drell-Yan transverse ... on the collision energy S in addition to its ... With a simple model for the trigluon correlation functions, ...

  3. Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hao 3 ; Xiong, Jie 3 ; Yan, Li 3 ; Jia, Quanxi 1 ; Trugman, Stuart A. 1 ; Taylor, Antoinette J. 1 ; Nelson, Keith A. 2 ; Chen, Houtong 1 + Show Author ...

  4. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions Yan, Li ; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves ; Poskanzer, Arthur M. Full Text Available March 2015 , Elsevier Triangularity and ...

  5. Microsoft Word - 254_FinalPaper.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    NURETH14-254 Coupled Computational Fluid Dynamics and MOC Neutronic Simulations of Westinghouse PWR Fuel Assemblies with Grid Spacers Jin Yan 1 , Brendan Kochunas 2 , Mathieu ...

  6. Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of California Riverside University of California, Riverside - Yushan Yan Virginia Tech Virginia Tech - James McGrath Johnson Matthey y Fuel Cells - Nadia Permogorov Smart ...

  7. Family-wide Characterization of Histone Binding Abilities of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Liu, Yanli ; Tempel, Wolfram ; Zhang, Qi ; Liang, Xiao ; Loppnau, Peter ; Qin, Su ; Min, Jinrong 1 ; Toronto) 2 + Show Author Affiliations (CCNL--China) ( Publication ...

  8. Toward a Materials Genome Approach for Ionic Liquids: Synthesis...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Toward a Materials Genome Approach for Ionic Liquids: Synthesis Guided by Ab Initio Property Maps Previous Next List Fangyong Yan, Michael Lartey, Kuldeep Jariwala, Sage Bowser,...

  9. Two for the Price of One: Water and Carbon Dioxide Splitting...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    and carbon dioxide splitting, two difficult yet key reactions for solar energy conversion. ... Image courtesy of UNC Chapel Hill (graphic art by Yan Liang) Electrochemical cell for ...

  10. Working on Advanced Battery Technologies With National Labs ...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Working on Advanced Battery Technologies With National Labs Click to email this to a ... in new window) Working on Advanced Battery Technologies With National Labs Yan Gao ...

  11. Introduction

    Energy Savers

    VP, Product Strategy Cree Yan Rodriguez VP, Product and Technology Acuity Brands Lighting Ed Clark Sustainable Strategist ZGF Architects Chris Bailey Dir. of Bus. Develop. & Prod....

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    suggestions for a way to improve these results? Trapping penguins with entangled B mesons Dadisman, Ryan ; Gardner, Susan ; Yan, Xinshuai Full Text Available March 2016, Elsevier...

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    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dadisman, Ryan ; Gardner, Susan ; Yan, Xinshuai Full Text Available March 2016, Elsevier Radiative decay for studies of C P violation Gardner, Susan ; He, Daheng Full Text...

  14. 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    cloud microphysical conversion processes." Atmospheric Research 33, 207-233. Chou, M, M Suarez, X Liang, and M-H Yan. 2001. A thermal infrared radiation parameterization for...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, MO (United States) West Valley Demonstration ... Sahonta, Suman -Lata (1) Wang, Haiyan (1) Xiong, Jie (1) Yan, Li (1) Save Results Save ...

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    ... Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, MO (United States) West Valley Demonstration ... Torchinsky, Darius (1) Trugman, Stuart A. (1) Yan, Li (1) Save Results Save this search to ...

  17. Understanding the effect of side groups in ionic liquids on carbon...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    the effect of side groups in ionic liquids on carbon-capture properties: a combined experimental and theoretical effort Previous Next List Fangyong Yan, Michael Lartey, Krishnan...

  18. Mapping of Functional Groups in Metal-Organic Frameworks | Center...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Mapping of Functional Groups in Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List Xueqian Kong, Hexiang Deng, Fangyong Yan, Jihan Kim, Joseph A. Swisher, Berend Smit, Omar M. Yaghi,...

  19. Principal Investigator CV's | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

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    Principal Investigator CV's Biographical sketch - Devens Gust Biographical sketch - James Allen Biographical sketch - Petra Fromme Biographical sketch - Giovanna Ghirlanda Biographical sketch - Anne Jones Biographical sketch - Yan Liu Biographical sketch - Ana Moore Biographical sketch - Thomas Moore Biographical sketch - Kevin Redding Biographical sketch - Dong-Kyun Seo Biographical sketch - Hao Yan

  20. CoDA 2016, the Conference on Data Analysis

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    program explores six themes: Really Expensive Data Power Grid Data Multisource Data Cybersecurity Subsurface Modeling Data Analysis at Exascale We welcome posters on these and...

  1. dI UNIVERSITY OF NEV\\DA SYSTEM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ;"9.-5q Mierofiehe 3.50 l: ' , 1 , it t1 l t: s a DOEDP01253-20 BADIOLOGICAL ... A b o u t 1 r 0 0 0 b a r r e l s o f c o n t a m i n a t e d s o i l w e r e r e m o v e ...

  2. Domingos da Silva Teixeira SA DST | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Portugal Zip: 4711 911 Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: A group that is involved in civil construction and public works as well as project development in the wind and solar...

  3. MHK Projects/Figueira da Foz Portugal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    a commercial power project site in Figueira de Foz, Portugal to build a 100 MW offshore wave energy plant. Initially, a 2 MW demonstration plant is planned followed by the...

  4. fdm3da_parV1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-01-23

    FORTRAN90 software computes synthetic induction log responses in fully 3D anistropic geoelectric media.

  5. fdm3daV1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-06-06

    FORTRAN90 software computes synthetic induction log responses in fully 3D anistropic geoelectric media.

  6. fdm3da_allocV1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-01-23

    FORTRAN90 software computes synthetic induction log responses in fully 3D anistropic geoelectric media.

  7. RUMINATIONS ON NDA MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTY COMPARED TO DA UNCERTAINTY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salaymeh, S.; Ashley, W.; Jeffcoat, R.

    2010-06-17

    It is difficult to overestimate the importance that physical measurements performed with nondestructive assay instruments play throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. They underpin decision making in many areas and support: criticality safety, radiation protection, process control, safeguards, facility compliance, and waste measurements. No physical measurement is complete or indeed meaningful, without a defensible and appropriate accompanying statement of uncertainties and how they combine to define the confidence in the results. The uncertainty budget should also be broken down in sufficient detail suitable for subsequent uses to which the nondestructive assay (NDA) results will be applied. Creating an uncertainty budget and estimating the total measurement uncertainty can often be an involved process, especially for non routine situations. This is because data interpretation often involves complex algorithms and logic combined in a highly intertwined way. The methods often call on a multitude of input data subject to human oversight. These characteristics can be confusing and pose a barrier to developing and understanding between experts and data consumers. ASTM subcommittee C26-10 recognized this problem in the context of how to summarize and express precision and bias performance across the range of standards and guides it maintains. In order to create a unified approach consistent with modern practice and embracing the continuous improvement philosophy a consensus arose to prepare a procedure covering the estimation and reporting of uncertainties in non destructive assay of nuclear materials. This paper outlines the needs analysis, objectives and on-going development efforts. In addition to emphasizing some of the unique challenges and opportunities facing the NDA community we hope this article will encourage dialog and sharing of best practice and furthermore motivate developers to revisit the treatment of measurement uncertainty.

  8. Understand morphology of organic semiconductors, for better tailoring...

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    for energy related applications. References: 1 H. Yan, B. A. Collins, E. Gann, C. Wang, H. Ade, and C. R. McNeill, ACS Nano 6, 677 (2012). 2 B. A. Collins, J. E. Cochran,...

  9. Microsoft Word - 2012 Research Day Winners.docx

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    C-NR Marcus Weigand, MPA-CMMS Blake Sturtevant, MPA-11 Satish Karra, EES-16 Graham King, LANSCE-LC Eric Daub, EES-17T-CNLS Louise Evans, NEN-1 Benjamin Ueland, MPA-CMMS Yan...

  10. A unifying phase diagram with correlation-drivensuperconductor...

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    Authors: Niu, X. H. ; Chen, S. D. ; Jiang, J. ; Ye, Z. R. ; Yu, T. L. ; Xu, D. F. ; Xu, M. ; Feng, Y. ; Yan, Y. J. ; Xie, B. P. ; Zhao, J. ; Gu, D. C. ; Sun, L. L. ; Mao, Qianhui ; ...

  11. A comparison between spectra of runaway electron beams in SF...

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    Authors: Zhang, Cheng ; Wang, Ruexue ; Yan, Ping ; Shao, Tao, E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn 1 ; Key Laboratory of Power Electronics and Electric Drive, Chinese Academy of Sciences, ...

  12. TRANSIENT BEAM-LOADING DETECTION IN AN SNS CAVITY-SIMULATIONS...

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    Authors: Zhang, Yan 1 ; Campisi, Isidoro E 1 ; Chu, Paul 2 ; Kang, Yoon 1 ; Wilson, Joshua L 1 ; Henderson, Stuart D 1 ; Galambos, John D 1 ; Ma, Hengjie 1 ; ...

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    ... Jpsi Production in Quark-Gluon Plasma Yan, Li ; Zhuang, Pengfei ; Xu, Nu We study Jpsi ... in phase space and the hydrodynamic equation for evolution of quark-gluon plasma. ...

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    ... Linear Boltzmann transport for jet propagation in the quark-gluon plasma: Elastic processes and medium recoil He, Yayun ; Luo, Tan ; Wang, Xin-Nian ; Zhu, Yan May 2015 , American ...

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  17. Improving Diesel Engine Sweet-spot Efficiency and Adapting it...

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  19. Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity...

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  20. Structure of a eukaryotic SWEET transporter in a homotrimeric...

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    Authors: Tao, Yuyong ; Cheung, Lily S. ; Li, Shuo ; Eom, Joon-Seob ; Chen, Li-Qing ; Xu, Yan ; Perry, Kay ; Frommer, Wolf B. ; Feng, Liang 1 ; Cornell) 2 + Show Author ...

  1. Encapsulation of Gold Nanoparticles in a DNA Origami Cage

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    Encapsulation of Gold Nanoparticles in a DNA Origami Cage Authors: Zhao, Z., Jacovetty, E. L., Liu, Y., and Yan, H. Title: Encapsulation of Gold Nanoparticles in a DNA Origami Cage ...

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    Brophy, John R. (1) Buratti, Bonnie J. (1) Ervin, Joan (1) Fernandez, Yan R. (1) Grundy, ... John R. ; Buratti, Bonnie J. ; Ervin, Joan ; et al Today, our questions and ...

  3. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Archived CNMS...

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    A. Burger, N.l J. Ghimire, J. Yan, D. G. Mandrus, S. J. Pennycook, S. T. Pantelides Nature Nanotechnology DOI: 10.1038nnano.201481 September 2014 PDF In-situ Fabrication of...

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  5. In-situ Electrical Conductivity of LixMnO2 Nanowires as a Function...

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    of LixMnO2 Nanowires as a Function of "x" and Size Authors: Le, Mya ; Liu, Yu ; Wang, Hui ; Dutta, Rajen ; Yan, Wenbo ; Hemminger, John C ; Wu, Ruqian ; Penner, Reginald...

  6. The Title Goes Here

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    Data for Flow in a 5 5 Rod Bundle with Spacer-Grids Peng Yuan 1 , Jin Yan 1 , Yiban Xu 1 , and Zeses Karoutas 1 1 Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA, USA ...

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  10. Syngas Conversion to Hydrocarbon Fuels through Mixed Alcohol...

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    M., Yan W., Toghiani, H., White, M.G., Applied Catalysis A: General, 2009, 363, 115-121. less Authors: Dagle, Robert A. ; Lebarbier, Vanessa M. ; Albrecht, Karl O. ; Li, ...

  11. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Archived CNMS...

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    HIGHLIGHTS Correlating Electronic Transport to Atomic Structures in Self-Assembled Quantum Wires Shengyong Qin,1 Tae-Hwan Kim,1 Yanning Zhang,2 Wenjie Ouyang,2 Hanno H....

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    ... X-ray microdiffraction patterns Zhang, Yan ; Liu, Jilang ; Makowski, Lee ; NWU) January 2016 , 2015 IEEE Biomedical Circuits and Systems Conference (BioCAS);IEEE;1-4 Prev Next

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  15. CX-002672: Categorical Exclusion Determination

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    Drell-Yan SeaQuest ProjectCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 05/19/2010Location(s): IllinoisOffice(s): Fermi Site Office, Science

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    ... of Nonproliferation and National Security (NN) (United States) USDOE Office of Nuclear ... in Au+Au collisions at sq root(ssub NN)200 GeV Yan Yuliang ; Li Xiaomei ; Ma ...

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    Chen, Jay (4) Lin Jun (4) Tuskan, Gerald A (4) Zhang Cuimiao (4) Abbot, Dorian S. (3) ... sensor via an electric field Zhang, Yue ; Yan, Baiqian ; Ou-Yang, Jun ; Zhu, ...

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    Authors: Schaff, Ulrich Y. ; Koh, Chung-Yan ; Sommer, Gregory J. Publication Date: 2016-04-05 OSTI Identifier: 1245445 Report Number(s): 9,304,129 14597,601 DOE Contract Number: ...

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    for dispersing the particle pellet over a larger surface area. Authors: Schaff, Ulrich Y ; Koh, Chung-Yan ; Sommer, Gregory J Publication Date: 2015-02-24 OSTI Identifier: ...

  1. 2015 Colloquium Archive | Argonne National Laboratory

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    December 16, 2015 4:00 pm Bldg. 440, A105-106 "The Status and Challenges of Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells", Yanfa Yan, University of Toledo, hosted by Jianguo J.G. Wen ...

  2. Coherent revival of tunneling (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

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    Authors: Hsu, Liang-Yan ; Rabitz, Herschel Publication Date: 2015-07-08 OSTI Identifier: 1198628 GrantContract Number: FG02-02ER15344 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal ...

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    Authors: Hsu, Liang-Yan ; Rabitz, Herschel Publication Date: 2015-07-08 OSTI Identifier: 1198628 GrantContract Number: FG02-02ER15344 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal ...

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    ... Fractional quantum spin Hall effect in flat-band checkerboard lattice model Li, Wei ; Sheng, D. N. ; Ting, C. S. ; Chen, Yan Full Text Available August 2014 , American Physical ...

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    New York Benton, New York Dresden, New York Dundee, New York Italy, New York Jerusalem, New York Middlesex, New York Milo, New York Penn Yan, New York Potter, New York...

  6. Enhanced Cycling Stability of Rechargeable Li-O2 Batteries Using...

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    reversibility. As a results, the cyclability of Li-O2 can be largely improved. Authors: Liu, Bin ; Xu, Wu ; Yan, Pengfei ; Sun, Xiuliang ; Bowden, Mark E. ; Read, Jeffrey ; Qian, ...

  7. Coherent revival of tunneling (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

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    Coherent revival of tunneling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coherent revival of tunneling Authors: Hsu, Liang-Yan ; Rabitz, Herschel Publication Date: 2015-07-08 OSTI ...

  8. What is the deal with DC Microgrids?

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    2015 Acuity Brands What is the deal with DC Microgrids? and why would a Lighting company care? Yan Rodriguez VP Product and Technology 2015 Acuity Brands * Why DC Microgrids? *...

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    ... Collins-Soper-Sterman (CSS) b-space QCD resummation formalism for Drell-Yan transverse momentum (Qsub T) distributions, and investigate the predictive power of the CSS formalism. ...

  10. Nanotube/Nanowire Based ORR Catalyst | Department of Energy

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    Nanotube/Nanowire Based ORR Catalyst Nanotube/Nanowire Based ORR Catalyst Presentation about nanotube or nanowire-based oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts, presented by Yushan Yan, University of Delaware, at the kick-off meeting of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program's Catalysis Working Group, held May 14, 2012, in Arlington, Virginia. 8_cwg_may2012_yan.pdf (113.57 KB) More Documents & Publications Past, Present, and Future Challenges in Electrocatalysis for

  11. Thomas Moore | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

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    Principal Investigators Postdoctoral Fellows Center researchers Graduate Students Undergraduate Students All Bisfuel Center Personnel Ana Moore Anne Jones Devens Gust Don Seo Giovanna Ghirlanda Hao Yan James Allen Kevin Redding Petra Fromme Thomas Moore Yan Liu Thomas Moore Principal Investigator Subtask 1 Leader Phone: 480-965-3308 Fax: 480-965-2747 E-mail: tmoore@asu.edu Regents' Professor Thomas Moore contributes to the EFRC as Subtask 1 Leader and the member of the EFRC Executive Committee.

  12. DNA origami with Complex Curvatures in 3D

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    with Complex Curvatures in 3D 15 Apr 2011 Center researchers have developed a new DNA origami design strategy for engineering complex, arbitrarily shaped 3D DNA nanostructures that have substantial intrinsic curvatures. This strategy has been presented in a paper by Professors Hao Yan, Yan Liu and coworkers that was featured on the cover of Science for April 15, 2011. Use of DNA as a structural material is in the basis of the DNA nanotechnology searching for ways to assemble nanoscale structures

  13. Devens Gust | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

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    Principal Investigators Postdoctoral Fellows Center researchers Graduate Students Undergraduate Students All Bisfuel Center Personnel Ana Moore Anne Jones Devens Gust Don Seo Giovanna Ghirlanda Hao Yan James Allen Kevin Redding Petra Fromme Thomas Moore Yan Liu Devens Gust Director of the Center Principal Investigator Phone: 480-965-4547 Fax: 480-965-5927 E-mail: gust@asu.edu Regents' Professor Devens Gust contributes to the EFRC in the areas of management and research. In management, Dr. Gust

  14. Data:Dba74d36-87bb-4a6d-a55b-67d341da9431 | Open Energy Information

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    contentdampacificpowerdocAboutUsRatesRegulationWashingtonApprovedTariffsWAPriceSummary.pdf Source Parent: https:www.pacificpower.netaboutrrwri.html Comments...

  15. Giovanna Ghirlanda | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

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    Ana Moore Anne Jones Devens Gust Don Seo Giovanna Ghirlanda Hao Yan James Allen Kevin Redding Petra Fromme Thomas Moore Yan Liu Giovanna Ghirlanda Principal Investigator Subtask 3 Leader Phone: 480-965-6645 Fax: 480-965-2747 E-mail: gghirlanda@asu.edu Associate Professor Giovanna Ghirlanda serves as a Subtask Leader of Subtask 3- Fuel Production and as a member of Subtask 2 - Water Splitting. Major research efforts are centered on Subtask 3 with a focus on utilizing reducing electrons generated

  16. James Allen | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

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    Ana Moore Anne Jones Devens Gust Don Seo Giovanna Ghirlanda Hao Yan James Allen Kevin Redding Petra Fromme Thomas Moore Yan Liu James Allen Principal Investigator Subtask 2 Leader Phone: 480-965-8241 Fax: 480-965-2747 E-mail: jallen@asu.edu Professor James Allen is a member of the Executive Committee and is the leader of Subtask 2 (Artificial water oxidation complex). His major management function as the subtask leader is the coordination of the activities of Subtask 2. This includes the

  17. DNA origami using "tiles" not "staples"

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    using "tiles" not "staples" 2 Mar 2010 The group of Yan Liu and Hao Yan has discovered a way to scale up DNA origami using tiles not staples to pin the DNA into place. Their method has great potential for providing cheap access to complicated nanostructures. The research was recently published in Angewandte Chemie International Edition and is highlighted this week in Nature Materials. It is titled "A Route to Scale Up DNA Origami Using DNA Tiles as Folding Staples."

  18. Don Seo | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

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    Ana Moore Anne Jones Devens Gust Don Seo Giovanna Ghirlanda Hao Yan James Allen Kevin Redding Petra Fromme Thomas Moore Yan Liu Don Seo Principal Investigator Subtask 5 Leader Phone: 480-727-7789 Fax: 480-965-2747 E-mail: dseo@asu.edu Professor Don Seo contributes to the EFRC management as a Member of the Executive Committee and a leader of Subtask 5 (Functional nanostructured transparent electrode materials). His research in the Center is focused on two areas: (1) synthetic development of

  19. CASL - PWR Reactor Vessel Multi-Physics CFD Model

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    PWR Reactor Vessel Multi-Physics CFD Model Jin Yan*1, Yiban Xu1, Andrew Petrarca1, Zeses Karoutas1, Emre Tatli1, Emilio Baglietto2, Jess Gehin3 1Westinghouse Electric Company LLC 2Massachusetts Institute of Technology 3Oak Ridge National Lab *Correspondence to: yan3j@westinghouse.com A complete 3D SolidWorks CAD model of Watts Bar Unit 1 was constructed based on drawings. A single fuel assembly CAD model including all geometrical details was created based on the Westinghouse V5H 17x17 fuel

  20. TO. TO. , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA ...

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    To determine the minimum explosive concent d. To determine minimum electrical energy necc ... B. Harris - 2 5 3, Distribution of Personnel a. Dr. I. Hartm ann - Chief, Explosive ...

  1. DOE-EIS-0222-SA-01_-_Rev_0_-_[DA07313710].pdf

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  2. Numerical Analysis of Parasitic Crossing Compensation with Wires in DA$\\Phi$NE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valishev, A.; Shatilov, D.; Milardi, C.; Zobov, M.

    2015-06-24

    Current-bearing wire compensators were successfully used in the 2005-2006 run of the DAΦNE collider to mitigate the detrimental effects of parasitic beam-beam interactions. A marked improvement of the positron beam lifetime was observed in machine operation with the KLOE detector. In view of the possible application of wire beam-beam compensators for the High Luminosity LHC upgrade, we revisit the DAΦNE experiments. We use an improved model of the accelerator with the goal to validate the modern simulation tools and provide valuable input for the LHC upgrade project.

  3. Simulation of Crab Waist Collisions In DA$\\Phi$NE With KLOE-2 Interaction Region

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    Zobov, M.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Milardi, C.; Shatilov, D.; Valishev, A.

    2015-06-24

    After the successful completion of the SIDDHARTA experiment run with crab waist collisions, the electron-positron collider DAΦNE has started routine operations for the KLOE-2 detector. The new interaction region also exploits the crab waist collision scheme, but features certain complications including the experimental detector solenoid, compensating anti-solenoids, and tilted quadrupole magnets. We have performed simulations of the beam-beam collisions in the collider taking into account the real DAΦNE nonlinear lattice. In particular, we have evaluated the effect of crab waist sextupoles and beam-beam interactions on the DAΦNE dynamical aperture and energy acceptance, and estimated the luminosity that can be potentially achieved with and without crab waist sextupoles in the present working conditions. A numerical analysis has been performed in order to propose possible steps for further luminosity increase in DAΦNE such as a better working point choice, crab sextupole strength optimization, correction of the phase advance between the sextupoles and the interaction region. The proposed change of the e- ring working point was implemented and resulted in a significant performance increase.

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    ... Guo, Peijun (1) Hao, Yulin (1) Hu, Yan (1) Kai, Ji-Jung (1) Lee, Chi-Hung (1) Leonardi, ... Tsai, Shuo-Cheng ; Huang, E-Wen ; Kai, Ji-Jung ; Chen, Fu-Rong ; NTHU-Taiwan) March 2013 ...

  5. Visualizing Electric Vehicle Sales | Department of Energy

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    Visualizing Electric Vehicle Sales Visualizing Electric Vehicle Sales Data compiled by Yan (Joann) Zhou at Argonne National Laboratory. (*) Sales from the second quarter of 2013 for Tesla Model S are based off of estimates provided by the Hybrid Market Dashboard. Data updated 1/20/15

  6. Minding the Gap Makes for More Efficient Solar Cells

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    molecule or unit cell) Work performed on ALS Beamline 10.0.1 Citation: Y. Zhang, T.-R. Chang, B. Zhou, Y.-T. Cui, H. Yan, Z. Liu, F. Schmitt, J. Lee, R. G. Moore, Y. L. Chen, H....

  7. Summer 2010 Intern Project- Christopher Roberts | Center for Energy

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    Efficient Materials Christopher Roberts POLARIZATION SWITCHING ON InGaN LED Christopher Roberts Physics UC Santa Barbara Mentors: Qimin Yan, Maosheng Miao Faculty Advisor: Chris Van de Walle Department: Materials Science The polarization of light is an important aspect of many lighting and display technologies. Due to the anisotrophic nature of the wurtzite crystal structure, light emitted from InGaN/GaN quantum wells may switch polarization with increasing indium composition, a property

  8. Gold Nanoparticles Self-Similar Chain Structure Organized by DNA Origami

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    Gold Nanoparticles Self-Similar Chain Structure Organized by DNA Origami Authors: Ding, B., Deng, Z., Yan, H., Cabrini, S., Zukerman, R., and Boker, J. Title: Gold Nanoparticles Self-Similar Chain Structure Organized by DNA Origami Source: Journal of the American Chemical Society Year: 2010 Volume: 132 Pages: 3248-3249 ABSTRACT: Here we demonstrate Au nanoparticle self-similar chain structure organized by triangle DNA origami with well-controlled orientation and <10 nm spacing. We show for

  9. Immobilization and One-Dimensional Arrangement of Virus Capsids with

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    Nanoscale Precision Using DNA Origami Immobilization and One-Dimensional Arrangement of Virus Capsids with Nanoscale Precision Using DNA Origami Authors: Stephanopoulos, N., Liu, M., Tong, G., Li, Z., Liu, Y., Yan, H., and Francis, M. Title: Immobilization and One-Dimensional Arrangement of Virus Capsids with Nanoscale Precision Using DNA Origami Source: Nano Letters Year: 2010 Volume: 10 Pages: 2714-2720 ABSTRACT: DNA origami was used as a scaffold to arrange spherical virus capsids into

  10. Interconnecting gold islands with DNA origami

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    Interconnecting gold islands with DNA origami Authors: Ding, B., Wu, H., Xu, W., Zhao, Z., Liu, Y., Yu, H., and Yan, H. Title: Interconnecting gold islands with DNA origami Source: Nano Lett. Year: 2010 Volume: 10 Pages: 5065-5069 ABSTRACT: Scaffolded DNA origami has recently emerged as a versatile, programmable method to fold DNA into arbitrarily shaped nanostructures that are spatially addressable, with sub-10-nm resolution. Toward functional DNA nanotechnology, one of the key challenges is to

  11. Coalescence and Chemical Equilibrium in Multifragmentation at Intermediate Energies, T

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    2 - March 31, 2003 Measurement of the Absolute Drell-Yan Dimuon Cross Section in 800 GeV/c pp and pd Collisions, C. A. Gagliardi, Invited Talk, (for the FNAL E866/NuSea Collaboration), XVIth Particles and Nuclei International Conference (PANIC02), referred, Osaka, Japan (September 2002). Spin Physics and Ultra-Peripheral Collisions at STAR, C. A. Gagliardi, Invited Talk, (for the STAR Collaboration), 18 th Lake Louise Winter Institute, Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada (February 2003). Fragment

  12. Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity THz

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radiation (Conference) | SciTech Connect Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity THz Radiation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Response of High-Tc Superconductor Metamaterials to High Intensity THz Radiation Authors: Grady, Nathaniel [1] ; Perkins Jr., Bradford G. [2] ; Hwang, Harold Y. [2] ; Brandt, Nate [2] ; Torchinsky, Darius [2] ; Singh, Ranjan [1] ; Yan, Li [3] ; Jia, Quanxi [1] ; Trugman, Stuart A. [1] ; Taylor, Antoinette J. [1] ; Nelson, Keith

  13. Site-Specific Synthesis and In Situ Immobilization of Fluorescent Silver

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    Nanoclusters on DNA Nanoscaffolds by Use of the Tollens Reaction Site-Specific Synthesis and In Situ Immobilization of Fluorescent Silver Nanoclusters on DNA Nanoscaffolds by Use of the Tollens Reaction Authors: Pal, S., Varghese, R., Deng, Z., Zhao, Z., Kumar, A., Yan, H., and Liu, Y. Title: Site-Specific Synthesis and In Situ Immobilization of Fluorescent Silver Nanoclusters on DNA Nanoscaffolds by Use of the Tollens Reaction Source: Angewandte Chemie International Edition Year: 2011

  14. Research Highlight

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    Light Absorption of Primary Organic Aerosol Paper Named ACS Editors' Choice Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lu, Z., Argonne National Laboratory Streets, D. ., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lu Z, DG Streets, E Winijkul, F Yan, Y Chen, TC Bond, Y Feng, MK Dubey, S Liu, JP Pinto, and GR Carmichael. 2015. "Light absorption properties and radiative effects of primary organic aerosol emissions."

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Yan, Li" Name Name ORCID Product Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX

  16. Structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 reveals an active site for an

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    atypical phosphatase (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 reveals an active site for an atypical phosphatase Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rtr1 reveals an active site for an atypical phosphatase Authors: Irani, Seema ; Yogesha, S.D. ; Mayfield, Joshua ; Zhang, Mengmeng ; Zhang, Yong ; Matthews, Wendy L. ; Nie, Grace ; Prescott, Nicholas A. ; Zhang, Yan Jessie [1] + Show Author Affiliations (Texas)

  17. irt (Dataset) | Data Explorer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    irt Title: irt Ingest data for Infrared Thermometer Authors: Shi, Yan Publication Date: 2016-10-18 OSTI Identifier: 1329238 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Dataset Data Type: Numeric Data Research Org: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Archive, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (US); Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Country of Publication: United States Availability: ORNL Language: English

  18. Visualizing Redox Dynamics of a Single Ag/AgCl Heterogeneous Nanocatalyst

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Visualizing Electric Vehicle Sales Visualizing Electric Vehicle Sales July 25, 2013 - 2:48pm Addthis Data compiled by Yan (Joann) Zhou at Argonne National Laboratory. (*) Sales from the second quarter of 2013 for Tesla Model S are based off of estimates provided by the Hybrid Market Dashboard. Data updated 1/20/15. Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs More on eGallon: Read more about electric vehicle sales and eGallon's continued

  19. 15.01.21 RH Computational and Experimental ID - JCAP

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational and Experimental Identification of an Earth-Abundant Light Absorber for Solar Water Splitting Yan, Q. et al. Mn2V2O7: An Earth Abundant Light Absorber for Solar Water Splitting. Advanced Energy Materials, DOI: 10.1002/aenm.201401840 (2015). Scientific Achievement Computation, synthesis, and spectroscopy are used to first identify and then study the earth-abundant Mn2V2O7 as a highly promising light absorber for photocatalytic water splitting. Significance & impact The detailed

  20. A DNA tweezer-actuated enzyme nanoreactor

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    A DNA tweezer-actuated enzyme nanoreactor Authors: Liu, M., Fu, J., Hejesen, C., Yang, Y., Woodbury, N.W., Gothelf, K., Liu, Y., and Yan, H. Title: A DNA tweezer-actuated enzyme nanoreactor Source: Nature Communications Year: 2013 Volume: 4 Pages: article 2127 ABSTRACT: Date of online publication: Wed, 2013-07-03 Link online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms3127

  1. Office Of Nuclear Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    28-29, 2015 2 Project Overview n Goal, and Objectives * Develop new optical fibers for nuclear industry * Demonstrate distributed multi-functional fiber optical sensors for high spatial resolution measurements - µε, T, P, level, chemical, and radiation with high spatial resolutions * Evaluate various distributed sensing schemes and demonstrate unique capability n Participants (End-to-End, Rapid Advancing TRLs) * University of Pittsburgh: Dr. Kevin P. Chen (PI), Zsolt Poole, Aidong Yan,

  2. Nuclear effects in lepton-pair production in hadron-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berdnikov, Ya. A.; Zavatsky, M. E.; Kim, V. T.; Kosmach, V. F.; Ryzhinskiy, M. M. Samsonov, V. M.

    2006-03-15

    The results of experimental investigations of Drell-Yan dimuon production in pBe and pW collisions at an energy of 800 GeV on a fixed target are analyzed. The ratios of the inclusive differential cross sections for lepton-pair production are calculated. It is shown that allowance for the effect of multiple soft rescattering of a projectile-hadron quark inside the target nucleus improves agreement between theoretical and experimental results.

  3. W and Z cross sections at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Dorigo

    2003-07-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron have used p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV to measure the cross section of W and Z boson production using several leptonic final states. An indirect measurement of the total W width has been extracted, and the lepton charge asymmetry in Drell-Yan production has been studied up to invariant masses of 600 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  4. Unidirectional Scaffold-Strand Arrangement in DNA Origami

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Unidirectional Scaffold-Strand Arrangement in DNA Origami Authors: Han, D., Jiang, S., Samanta, A., Liu, Y., and Yan, H. Title: Unidirectional Scaffold-Strand Arrangement in DNA Origami Source: Angewandte Chemie International Edition Year: 2013 Volume: 52 Pages: 9031-9034 ABSTRACT: Date of online publication: Sun, 2013-07-14 Link online: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/anie.201302177/suppinfo

  5. Beam On Target! - CEBAF Accelerator Achieves 12 GeV Commissioning Milestone

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    | Jefferson Lab Beam On Target! - CEBAF Accelerator Achieves 12 GeV Commissioning Milestone Beam On Target! CEBAF Accelerator Achieves 12 GeV Commissioning Milestone The accelerator crew on hand The accelerator crew on hand for the beam-on-target achievement included (l-r) Crew Chief Mike McCaughan, Accelerator Operators Dan Moser and Brandi Cade. Yves Roblin was the Accelerator Physics Experimental Liaison for the Hall A beamline, Accelerator Scientist Yan Wang recorded and provided insight

  6. Charge Transport within a Three-Dimensional DNA Nanostructure Framework

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Characters Characters Meet the characters of the game! Meet the characters of the game! Dr Raoul Fernandez's profile Helena Edison's profile Jerome Zabel's profile Nancy Sanders' profile Roc Bridges' profile

    Charge Transport within a Three-Dimensional DNA Nanostructure Framework Authors: Lu, N., Pei, H., Ge, Z., Simmons, C.R., Yan, H., and Fan, C. Title: Charge Transport within a Three-Dimensional DNA Nanostructure Framework Source: Journal of the American Chemical Society Year: 2012 Volume:

  7. Visualizing Electric Vehicle Sales | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Visualizing Electric Vehicle Sales Visualizing Electric Vehicle Sales July 25, 2013 - 2:48pm Addthis Data compiled by Yan (Joann) Zhou at Argonne National Laboratory. (*) Sales from the second quarter of 2013 for Tesla Model S are based off of estimates provided by the Hybrid Market Dashboard. Data updated 1/20/15. Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs More on eGallon: Read more about electric vehicle sales and eGallon's continued

  8. DNA Gridiron Nanostructures Based on Four-Arm Junctions

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    DNA Gridiron Nanostructures Based on Four-Arm Junctions Authors: Han, D., Pal, S., Yang, Y., Jiang, S., Nangreave, J., Liu, Y., and Yan, H. Title: DNA Gridiron Nanostructures Based on Four-Arm Junctions Source: Science Year: 2013 Volume: 339 Pages: 1412-1415 ABSTRACT: Engineering wireframe architectures and scaffolds of increasing complexity is one of the important challenges in nanotechnology. We present a design strategy to create gridiron-like DNA structures. A series of four-arm junctions

  9. DNA Origami Directed Self-Assembly of Discrete Silver Nanoparticle

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Architectures DNA Origami Directed Self-Assembly of Discrete Silver Nanoparticle Architectures Authors: Pal, S., Deng, Z., Ding, B., Yan, H., and Liu, Y. Title: DNA Origami Directed Self-Assembly of Discrete Silver Nanoparticle Architectures Source: Angewandte Chemie International Edition Year: 2010 Volume: 49 Pages: 2700-2704 ABSTRACT: DNA origami nanostructures were utilized as spatially addressable templates to organize noble-metal nanoparticles of silver and gold into well-defined

  10. DNA Origami: A History and Current Perspective

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Origami: A History and Current Perspective Authors: Nangreave, J., Han, D., Liu, Y., and Yan, H. Title: DNA Origami: A History and Current Perspective Source: Current Opinion in Chemical Biology Year: 2010 Volume: 14 Pages: 608-615 ABSTRACT: Researchers have been using DNA for the rational design and construction of nanoscale objects for nearly 30 years. Recently, [`]scaffolded DNA origami' has emerged as one of the most promising assembly techniques in DNA nanotechnology with a broad range of

  11. DNA-Directed Artificial Light-Harvesting Antenna

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    DNA-Directed Artificial Light-Harvesting Antenna Authors: Dutta, P. K., Varghese, R., Nangreave, J., Lin, S., Yan, H., and Liu, Y. Title: DNA-Directed Artificial Light-Harvesting Antenna Source: Journal of the American Chemical Society Year: 2011 Volume: 133 Pages: 11985-11993 ABSTRACT: Designing and constructing multichromophoric, artificial light-harvesting antennas with controlled interchromophore distances, orientations, and defined donor?acceptor ratios to facilitate efficient

  12. CASL - Initial Modeling and Analysis of the Departure from Nucleate Boiling

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Challenge Problem Initial Modeling and Analysis of the Departure from Nucleate Boiling Challenge Problem Yixing Sung, Jin Yan, Zeses E. Karoutas of Westinghouse Electric Company LLC Anh V. Bui, Hongbin Zhang of Idaho National Laboratories Nam Dinh of North Carolina State University Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) is one of the safety-related Challenge Problems (CP) that CASL is addressing in support of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) power uprate, high fuel burnup and plant lifetime

  13. fn{EE49F893-CA64-40D2-9A32-E9DA8936271E}EIMS+Content&dbwisle...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ...DS agree on DEO? Yes SCR invokes dispute resolution clause in contract No An independent review with SMEs may be required prior to dispute resolution Design Errors and ...

  14. Data:C9125b18-da0a-4612-b0c6-3eb6421ac6c2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    b0c6-3eb6421ac6c2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  15. Data:Ea824b4e-a3bf-4763-a763-da0599d9d760 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  16. Data:Ed681d16-9c5b-4ae3-a097-4da62829c05b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  17. Estudo da Oscilação de Neutrinos Muônicos Usando Dados Atmosféricos e de Acelerador nos Experimentos MINOS e MINOS+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medeiros, Michelle Mesquita de

    2015-01-01

    The MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) and MINOS+ experiments were designed to study neutrino oscillations using a muon neutrino beam which is detected in two different locations, in the Near Detector and in the Far Detector. The distance between the detectors allows the beam neutrinos to oscillate to a different flavor. Therefore, a disappearance of the muon neutrinos from the beam is observed in the Far Detector. The Far Detector has a special apparatus which makes possible the selection of atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos. These come from interactions of cosmic rays with the Earth’s atmosphere. Both detectors have a magnetic field, allowing the distiction between neutrinos and antineutrinos interactions. This thesis presents the first combined analysis of data from the MINOS and MINOS+ experiments. We have analyzed the combined neutrino energy spectrum from the complete MINOS beam data and the first, more energetic, MINOS+ beam data. The disappearance of the muon neutrinos was observed and the data has shown to be congruent with the oscillation model. Beyond that, we have measured the atmospheric oscillation parameters of the beam and atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos from MINOS combined with the atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos from MINOS+. Assuming the same oscillation parameters for both neutrinos and antineutrinos, the best fit is obtained for inverted hierarchy and lower octant with Δm2 32 = 2:37 X 10-3 eV2 and sin2 θ 23 = 0:43, and the limits m2 32 = [2,29 - 2,49] 10-3 eV2 (68%) and sin2 θ23 = 0.36 - 0.66 (90%). These results are the most precise measurement of the neutrinos mass splitting using muon neutrino disappearance data only.

  18. C:\Documents and Settings\h8965051\Local Settings\Temporary Internet Files\Content.IE5\U725WVST\DA03362690[2].PDF

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    , Modification 145 Section F Page F-2 F.1 Period of Performance The period of performance (exclusive of the Transition Period) for the work specified in Section C, Statement of Work, of this Contract shall commence on June 6, 2004 and continue through September 30, 2012, unless terminated sooner as provided for in other provisions of this contract. The Transition Period shall commence when a written Notice-to-Proceed is issued by the Contracting Officer. F.2 Principal Place of Performance The

  19. Measuring the flavor asymmetry in the sea quarks of the proton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimer, Paul E.; /Argonne

    2010-01-01

    The proton is a composite object made of fundamental, strongly-interacting quarks. Many of the features of the proton can be described by a simple picture based on three valence quarks bound by the exchange of gluons. However, protons are much more complex objects with the vast majority of their mass dynamically generated by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This mass manifests itself through a 'sea' of gluons and quark-antiquark pairs. By measuring Drell-Yan scattering, the Fermilab E-906/SeaQuest experiment will study the sea quark distribution in the proton and, in particular, the unusually large asymmetry between anti-up and anti-down quarks measured by earlier Drell-Yan experiments. This asymmetry cannot simply be generated through pair creation, but rather indicates an underlying, fundamental antiquark component in the proton. Using the same technique, E-906/SeaQuest will also investigate the differences between the antiquark distributions of the free proton and a proton bound in a nucleus. Nuclear binding is expected to modify the quark distributions and it has long been known that the overall quark distributions are different (the EMC effect). Surprisingly, present data suggests that the antiquark distributions and hence the sea distributions are not modified. To accomplish these goals, the experiment will used a 120 GeV proton beam extracted from the Fermilab Main Injector. While the experiment will be taking advantage of equipment from earlier Drell-Yan experiments, the changes in kinematics of the experiment require several, significant upgrades to the spectrometer. The collaboration expects to begin data collection in fall 2010.

  20. High-Quality Manganese-Doped Zinc Sulfide Quantum Rods with Tunable

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Dual-Color and Multiphoton Emissions High-Quality Manganese-Doped Zinc Sulfide Quantum Rods with Tunable Dual-Color and Multiphoton Emissions Authors: Deng, Z., Tong, L., Flores, M., Lin, S., Cheng, J.-X., Yan, H., and Liu, Y. Title: High-Quality Manganese-Doped Zinc Sulfide Quantum Rods with Tunable Dual-Color and Multiphoton Emissions Source: Journal of the American Chemical Society Year: 2011 Volume: 133 Pages: 5389-5396 ABSTRACT: We report a simple, fast and green phosphine-free

  1. Merging weak and QCD showers with matrix elements

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Christiansen, Jesper Roy; Prestel, Stefan

    2016-01-22

    In this study, we present a consistent way of combining associated weak boson radiation in hard dijet events with hard QCD radiation in Drell–Yan-like scatterings. This integrates multiple tree-level calculations with vastly different cross sections, QCD- and electroweak parton-shower resummation into a single framework. The new merging strategy is implemented in the P ythia event generator and predictions are confronted with LHC data. Improvements over the previous strategy are observed. Results of the new electroweak-improved merging at a future 100 TeV proton collider are also investigated.

  2. Low Temperature Assembly of Functional 3D DNA-PNA-Protein Complexes

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Low Temperature Assembly of Functional 3D DNA-PNA-Protein Complexes Authors: Flory, J. D., Simmons, C. R., Lin, S., Johnson, T., Andreoni, A., Zook, J., Ghirlanda, G., Liu, Y., Yan, H., and Fromme, P. Title: Low Temperature Assembly of Functional 3D DNA-PNA-Protein Complexes Source: J. Am. Chem. Soc. Year: 2014 Volume: 136 (23) Pages: 8283-8295 ABSTRACT: Proteins have evolved to carry out nearly all the work required of living organisms within complex inter and intracellular environments.

  3. Size-Selective Incorporation of DNA Nanocages into Nanoporous

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Antimony-Doped Tin Oxide Materials Size-Selective Incorporation of DNA Nanocages into Nanoporous Antimony-Doped Tin Oxide Materials Authors: Simmons, C. R., Schmitt, D., Wei, X., Han, D., Volosin, A. M., Ladd, D. M., Seo, D.-K., Liu, Y., and Yan, H. Title: Size-Selective Incorporation of DNA Nanocages into Nanoporous Antimony-Doped Tin Oxide Materials Source: ACS Nano Year: 2011 Volume: 5 Pages: 6060-6068 ABSTRACT: A conductive nanoporous antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) powder has been

  4. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol-mediated Changes in Deep Convective Cloud Radiative Forcing over the SGP Download a printable PDF Submitter: Cribb, M. C., University of Maryland Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Yan H, Z Li, J Huang, M Cribb, and J Liu. 2014. "Long-term aerosol-mediated changes in cloud radiative forcing of deep clouds at the top and bottom of the atmosphere over the Southern Great Plains."

  5. Catalytic Effect of Ti for Hydrogen Cycling in NaAlH4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Effect of Ti for Hydrogen Cycling in NaAlH 4 Mei-Yin Chou School of Physics Georgia Institute of Technology (DE-FG02-05ER46229) Acknowledgment: Yan Wang, Roland Stumpf Why is NaAlH 4 interesting? A viable candidate for hydrogen-storage material: High theoretical weight-percent hydrogen content of 5.55% and low cost But (before 1997) Dehydrogenation occurs at high temperature; rehydrogenation is difficult. Bogdanovic and Schwickardi, 1997 Hydrogen can be reversibly absorbed and desorbed from

  6. Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials Grigorii Soloveichik, John Lemmon, Jun Cui, Yan Gao, Tom Raber, Job Rijssenbeek, Gosia Rubinzstajn, J.C. Zhao 2 Outline Approach: Parallel synthesis accompanied by high throughput screening for a desired property. - Methods * Preparation/parallel synthesis * Analytical techniques * Scale-up - Selected results * Al-Li-Si system * Al-Mg-Ti system * AlH 3 + Si * Mg(BH 4 ) 2 - Summary 3 Down-selection of the combi process High energy 96-well Shaker Production

  7. Spent Nuclear Fuel Transport Reliability Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Jiang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    This conference paper was orignated and shorten from the following publisehd PTS documents: 1. Jy-An Wang, Hao Jiang, and Hong Wang, Dynamic Deformation Simulation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly and CIRFT Deformation Sensor Stability Investigation, ORNL/SPR-2015/662, November 2015. 2. Jy-An Wang, Hong Wang, Mechanical Fatigue Testing of High-Burnup Fuel for Transportation Applications, NUREG/CR-7198, ORNL/TM-2014/214, May 2015. 3. Jy-An Wang, Hong Wang, Hao Jiang, Yong Yan, Bruce Bevard, Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study 16332, WM2016 Conference, March 6 10, 2016, Phoenix, Arizona.

  8. Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop 3 Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    AMFC Workshop 3 Overview Bryan Pivovar National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Sheraton Grand Phoenix, AZ April 1, 2016 2 Agenda 8:30 - 8:50 am AMFC Challenges-Anion Exchange Membrane: Chulsung Bae (RPI) 8:50 - 9:15 am AMFC Challenges-Electrocatalysis: Yushan Yan (U. Delaware) 9:15 - 9:30 am BREAK 9:30 - 10:00 am AMFC Challenges-Membrane Electrode Assembly: Yu Seung Kim (LANL) 10:00 -10:20 am AMFC Challenges-System/Other Issues (Water/Carbonate): Miles Page (Elbit Energy) 10:20 -12:00

  9. transims-studies-at-the-university

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Studies at the University at Buffalo, the State University of New York Adel W. Sadek, Ph.D. Associate Professor University at Buffalo, The State University of New York 233 Ketter Hall Buffalo, NY 14260 Phone: (716) 645-4367 FAX: (716) 645-3733 E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. List of Authors ================ Adel W. Sadek, Ph.D. Shan Huang Liya Guo Yan Yang Irene Casas, Ph.D. University at Buffalo, The State University of New

  10. PowerPoint Presentation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    SpinDx: rapid, sensitive, multiplexed biodetection Chung-Yan Koh Senior R&D Scientist February 25, 2015 Sandia MedTech Showcase Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2015-1192PE Immunoassays WBC Count DNA assay Multiplexed quantitation: 1. Proteins 2. DNA 3.

  11. Process-dependent transverse momentum distributions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernhard Musch

    2011-12-01

    Certain single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive DIS (SIDIS) and the Drell-Yan process (DY) can be explained by transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) that are predicted to differ in sign for SIDIS and DY. On the lattice, we can use non-local operators with U-shaped Wilson lines to study these TMDs, in particular the Sivers- and the Boer-Mulders function. We discuss the method, its limitations and preliminary results from an exploratory calculation using lattices generated by the MILC and LHP collaborations.

  12. Phenomenological implementations of TMD evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boglione, Mariaelena; Gonzalez Hernandez, Jose Osvaldo; Melis, Stefano; Prokudin, Alexey

    2015-03-01

    Although the theoretical set-up of TMD evolution appears to be well established, its phenomenological implementations still require special attention, particularly as far as the interplay between perturbative and non-perturbative contributions is concerned. These issues have been extensively studied in Drell-Yan processes, where they seem to be reasonably under control. Instead, applying the same prescriptions and methodologies to Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic (SIDIS) processes is, at present, far from obvious. Some of the controversies related to the applications of TMD Evolution to SIDIS processes will be discussed with practical examples, exploring different kinematical configurations of SIDIS experiments.

  13. PNA-peptide Assembly in a 3D DNA Nanocage at Room Temperature

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    PNA-peptide Assembly in a 3D DNA Nanocage at Room Temperature Authors: Flory, J.D., Shinde, S., Lin, S., Liu, Y., Yan, H., Ghirlanda, G., and Fromme, P. Title: PNA-peptide Assembly in a 3D DNA Nanocage at Room Temperature Source: J. Am. Chem. Soc. Year: 2013 Volume: 135 (18) Pages: 6985-6993 ABSTRACT: Proteins and peptides fold into dynamic structures that access a broad functional landscape, however, designing artificial polypeptide systems is still a great challenge. Conversely, DNA

  14. Monthly EV Sales Shatter Records | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Monthly EV Sales Shatter Records Monthly EV Sales Shatter Records September 25, 2013 - 3:51pm Addthis Data compiled by Yan (Joann) Zhou at Argonne National Laboratory. (*) Sales from the second quarter of 2013 for Tesla Model S are based off of estimates provided by the Hybrid Market Dashboard. Data updated 1/20/15. Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Learn More About Electric Vehicles To find out how much you can save at the pump by

  15. Molecular behavior of DNA origami in higher order self-assembly

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular behavior of DNA origami in higher order self-assembly Authors: Li, Z., Liu, M., Wang, L., Nangreave, J., Yan, H., and Liu, Y. Title: Molecular behavior of DNA origami in higher order self-assembly Source: Journal of the American Chemical Society Year: 2010 Volume: 132 Pages: 13545-13552 ABSTRACT: DNA-based self-assembly is a unique method for achieving higher-order molecular architectures made possible by the fact that DNA is a programmable information-coding polymer. In the past

  16. NRFE-07-28

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Non-Proprietary Class 3 Page 1 of 10 FFT-13-34 ©2013 Westinghouse Electric Company LLC All Rights Reserved To: Jess Gehin - AMA FA Lead Rose Montgomery - AMA Deputy Lead cc: Z. Karoutas (W) From: J. Yan (W) Date: April 16, 2013 Tel: (803) 647-2047 Our Ref: PFT-13-34 Fax: (803) 695-3985 Subject: CASL Technical Note: Fibrous Debris Pilot Simulation Keywords: Fibrous Debris Pilot Simulation, LOCA, CFD Fibrous Debris Pilot Simulation Pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment buildings are

  17. CASL Plan of Record 2 (1/11-6/11)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Thermal Hydraulic Validation Report CASL Mile Stone: L3:AMA.VAL.P4.02 Authors: J. Yan, P. Yuan, Y. Xu, Zeses Karoutas Westinghouse Electric Company Emilio Popov, Sreekanth Pannala, Alan Stagg Oak Ridge National Lab Scott Lucas, Hongbin Zhang Idaho National Lab Robert Brewster, Emilio Baglietto CD-Adapco Elvis Dominguez-Ontiveros, Yassin Hassan Texas A&M March 2012 CASL-8-2012-0037-000 <Document Name> ii CASL-8-2012-0037-000 Please complete sections appropriate for this record. a)

  18. CNS 2008 Template

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    338X-F7E6A3J6H9 NURETH14-338 ADVANCED THERMAL HYDRAULIC METHOD USING 3X3 PIN MODELING Z. Karoutas 1 , Jin Yan 1 , M. Conner 1 and A. Mandour 1 1 Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Columbia, SC KaroutZE@westinghouse.com Abstract Advanced thermal hydraulic methods are being developed as part of the US DOE sponsored Nuclear Hub program called CASL (Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs). One of the key objectives of the Hub program is to develop a multi-physics tool which evaluates neutronic,

  19. A Novel Mechanism of Regulating the ATPase VPS4 by Its Cofactor LIP5 and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT)-III Protein CHMP5 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Novel Mechanism of Regulating the ATPase VPS4 by Its Cofactor LIP5 and the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT)-III Protein CHMP5 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Novel Mechanism of Regulating the ATPase VPS4 by Its Cofactor LIP5 and the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT)-III Protein CHMP5 Authors: Vild, Cody J. ; Li, Yan ;

  20. Search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles in pp collisions at √s = 8  TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    None

    2015-08-08

    A search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles is performed using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Data collected in 2012 at √s = 8 TeV from pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 are examined. Particles producing anomalously high ionisation, consistent with long-lived massive particles with electric charges from |q| = 2e to |q| = 6e are searched for. No signal candidate events are observed, and 95 % confidence level cross-section upper limits are interpreted as lower mass limits for a Drell–Yan production model. The mass limits range between 660 and 785 GeV.

  1. DNA Origami with Complex Curvatures in Three-Dimensional Space

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    DNA Origami with Complex Curvatures in Three-Dimensional Space Authors: Han, D., Pal, S., Nangreave, J., Deng, Z., Liu, Y., and Yan, H. Title: DNA Origami with Complex Curvatures in Three-Dimensional Space Source: Science Year: 2011 Volume: 332 Pages: 342-346 ABSTRACT: We present a strategy to design and construct self-assembling DNA nanostructures that define intricate curved surfaces in three-dimensional (3D) space using the DNA origami folding technique. Double-helical DNA is bent to follow

  2. DNA origami: A quantum leap for self assembly of complex structures

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    DNA origami: A quantum leap for self assembly of complex structures Authors: Tørring, T., Voigt, N.V., Nangreave, J., Yan, H., and Gothelf, K.V. Title: DNA origami: A quantum leap for self assembly of complex structures Source: Chem. Soc. Rev. Year: 2011 Volume: 40 Pages: 5636 - 5646 ABSTRACT: The spatially controlled positioning of functional materials by self-assembly is one of the fundamental visions of nanotechnology. Major steps towards this goal have been achieved using DNA as a

  3. Solco Europe Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Solco Europe Ltd Place: Sao Joao da Madeira, Portugal Zip: Sao Joao da Madeira Product: Joint venture to distribute Solco products within Portugal. References: Solco Europe...

  4. Categorical Exclusion 4567, MPLE Test Stand Replacement Project

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    and Guidelines DA 14 - Approval of technical exchange arrangements DA 15 - International umbrella agreements for energy R&D Facility Operations DB 1.2 - Training exercises and...

  5. Destilaria PAL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    PAL Jump to: navigation, search Name: Destilaria PAL Place: Nazare da Mata, Brazil Zip: 55800-00 Product: Brazil based ethanol producer located in Nazare da Mata, Pernambuco....

  6. Understanding the large-distance behavior of transverse-momentum-dependent parton densities and the Collins-Soper evolution kernel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, John; Rogers, Ted

    2015-04-01

    There is considerable controversy about the size and importance of non-perturbative contributions to the evolution of transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions. Standard fits to relatively high-energy Drell-Yan data give evolution that when taken to lower Q is too rapid to be consistent with recent data in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering. Some authors provide very different forms for TMD evolution, even arguing that non-perturbative contributions at large transverse distance bT are not needed or are irrelevant. Here, we systematically analyze the issues, both perturbative and non-perturbative. We make a motivated proposal for the parameterization of the non-perturbative part of the TMD evolution kernel that could give consistency: with the variety of apparently conflicting data, with theoretical perturbative calculations where they are applicable, and with general theoretical non-perturbative constraints on correlation functions at large distances. We propose and use a scheme- and scale-independent function A(bT) that gives a tool to compare and diagnose different proposals for TMD evolution. We also advocate for phenomenological studies of A(bT) as a probe of TMD evolution. The results are important generally for applications of TMD factorization. In particular, they are important to making predictions for proposed polarized Drell- Yan experiments to measure the Sivers function.

  7. Understanding the large-distance behavior of transverse-momentum-dependent parton densities and the Collins-Soper evolution kernel

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Collins, John; Rogers, Ted

    2015-04-01

    There is considerable controversy about the size and importance of non-perturbative contributions to the evolution of transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions. Standard fits to relatively high-energy Drell-Yan data give evolution that when taken to lower Q is too rapid to be consistent with recent data in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering. Some authors provide very different forms for TMD evolution, even arguing that non-perturbative contributions at large transverse distance bT are not needed or are irrelevant. Here, we systematically analyze the issues, both perturbative and non-perturbative. We make a motivated proposal for the parameterization of the non-perturbative part ofmore » the TMD evolution kernel that could give consistency: with the variety of apparently conflicting data, with theoretical perturbative calculations where they are applicable, and with general theoretical non-perturbative constraints on correlation functions at large distances. We propose and use a scheme- and scale-independent function A(bT) that gives a tool to compare and diagnose different proposals for TMD evolution. We also advocate for phenomenological studies of A(bT) as a probe of TMD evolution. The results are important generally for applications of TMD factorization. In particular, they are important to making predictions for proposed polarized Drell- Yan experiments to measure the Sivers function.« less

  8. fn{EE49F893-CA64-40D2-9A32-E9DA8936271E}EIMS+Content&dbwisle@srn.sandia.gov.vsd

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Errors and Omissions Process ID: PCS.062 Revision #: 5 Revision Date: 04/27/2012 Page: 1 of 2 Task Owner: * PA Project Associate * DS Design Supplier * SCR Sandia Contracting Representative Process Owner: Senior Manager Customer Operations and Projects Printed Copies Of This Document are NOT Controlled Follow the Continual Improvement Process to Update this Process Manage Change FMS Design Error or Omission (DEO) PA Determines Associated Cost of NVA Error & Omission Cost Estimating NVA Cost

  9. Novel QCD Effects from Initial and Final State Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2007-09-12

    Initial-state and final-state interactions which are conventionally neglected in the parton model, have a profound effect in QCD hard-scattering reactions. The effects, which arise from gluon exchange between the active and spectator quarks, cause leading-twist single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, diffractive hard hadronic reactions, and the breakdown of the Lam-Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions. Diffractive deep inelastic scattering also leads to nuclear shadowing and non-universal antishadowing of nuclear structure functions through multiple scattering reactions in the nuclear target. Factorization-breaking effects are particularly important for hard hadron interactions since both initial-state and final-state interactions appear. Related factorization breaking effects can also appear in exclusive electroproduction reactions and in deeply virtual Compton scattering. None of the effects of initial-state and final-state interactions are incorporated in the light-front wavefunctions of the target hadron computed in isolation.

  10. Search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=8$$ s = 8  TeV using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J. Da; Via, C. Da; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. 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R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn’ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S. -C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Inamaru, Y.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R. 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C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Saadi, D. Shoaleh; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Denis, R. D. St.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-08-01

    A search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles is performed using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Data collected in 2012 at √s=8 TeV TeV from pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 are examined. Particles producing anomalously high ionisation, consistent with long-lived massive particles with electric charges from |q|=2e to |q|=6e are searched for. No signal candidate events are observed, and 95 % confidence level cross-section upper limits are interpreted as lower mass limits for a Drell–Yan production model. The mass limits range between 660 and 785 GeV.

  11. Calculation of TMD Evolution for Transverse Single Spin Asymmetry Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mert Aybat, Ted Rogers, Alexey Prokudin

    2012-06-01

    In this letter, we show that it is necessary to include the full treatment of QCD evolution of Transverse Momentum Dependent parton densities to explain discrepancies between HERMES data and recent COMPASS data on a proton target for the Sivers transverse single spin asymmetry in Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS). Calculations based on existing fits to TMDs in SIDIS, and including evolution within the Collins-Soper-Sterman with properly defined TMD PDFs are shown to provide a good explanation for the discrepancy. The non-perturbative input needed for the implementation of evolution is taken from earlier analyses of unpolarized Drell-Yan (DY) scattering at high energy. Its success in describing the Sivers function in SIDIS data at much lower energies is strong evidence in support of the unifying aspect of the QCD TMD-factorization formalism.

  12. Transverse momentum-dependent parton distribution functions in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelhardt, Michael G. [New Mexico State University; Musch, Bernhard U. [Tech. University Munich; Haegler, Philipp G. [Tech. University Munich; Negele, John W. [MIT; Schaefer, Andreas [Regensburg

    2013-08-01

    A fundamental structural property of the nucleon is the distribution of quark momenta, both parallel as well as perpendicular to its propagation. Experimentally, this information is accessible via selected processes such as semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and the Drell-Yan process (DY), which can be parametrized in terms of transversemomentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs). On the other hand, these distribution functions can be extracted from nucleon matrix elements of a certain class of bilocal quark operators in which the quarks are connected by a staple-shaped Wilson line serving to incorporate initial state (DY) or final state (SIDIS) interactions. A scheme for evaluating such matrix elements within lattice QCD is developed. This requires casting the calculation in a particular Lorentz frame, which is facilitated by a parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes. Exploratory results are presented for the time-reversal odd Sivers and Boer-Mulders transverse momentum shifts.

  13. ${{\\bar{d}} - {\\bar{u}}}$ Flavor Asymmetry in the Proton in Chiral Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salamu, Y.; Ji, Cheung-Ryong; Melnitchouk, Wally; Wang, P.

    2015-09-01

    The ${\\bar d - \\bar u}$ flavor asymmetry in the proton arising from pion loops is computed using chiral effective field theory. The calculation includes both nucleon and ? intermediate states, and uses both the fully relativistic and heavy baryon frameworks. The x dependence of ${\\bar d - \\bar u}$ extracted from the Fermilab E866 DrellYan data can be well reproduced in terms of a single transverse momentum cutoff parameter regulating the ultraviolet behavior of the loop integrals. In addition to the distribution at x > 0, corrections to the integrated asymmetry from zero momentum contributions are computed, which arise from pion rainbow and bubble diagrams at x = 0. These have not been accounted for in previous analyses, and can make important contributions to the lowest moment of ${\\bar d-\\bar u}$ .

  14. WIPP Update 8_15_14

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    A ugust 1 5, 2014 Town H all v ideo, a dditional p hotos o f S ecretary's v isit p osted Energy S ecretary E rnest M oniz, S enator T om U dall, S enator M artin H einrich, C ongressman S teve P earce, a nd N ew Mexico E nvironment S ecretary R yan F lynn v isited C arlsbad e arlier t his w eek, p articipating i n a t own h all m eeting and a n a ll---employee m eeting a t t he W IPP s ite. T hey a lso t oured t he a bove g round p ortions o f t he W IPP f acility. Photos a nd a l ink t o a v

  15. nCTEQ15 - Global analysis of nuclear parton distributions with uncertainties in the CTEQ framework

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Kovarik, K.; Kusina, A.; Jezo, T.; Clark, D. B.; Keppel, C.; Lyonnet, F.; Morfin, J. G.; Olness, F. I.; Owens, J. F.; Schienbein, I.; et al

    2016-04-28

    We present the new nCTEQ15 set of nuclear parton distribution functions with uncertainties. This fit extends the CTEQ proton PDFs to include the nuclear dependence using data on nuclei all the way up to 208Pb. The uncertainties are determined using the Hessian method with an optimal rescaling of the eigenvectors to accurately represent the uncertainties for the chosen tolerance criteria. In addition to the Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and Drell-Yan (DY) processes, we also include inclusive pion production data from RHIC to help constrain the nuclear gluon PDF. Here, we investigate the correlation of the data sets with specific nPDFmore » flavor components, and asses the impact of individual experiments. We also provide comparisons of the nCTEQ15 set with recent fits from other groups.« less

  16. First Measurement of the Cross Section for Top-Quark Pair Production in Proton-Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-01-01

    The first measurement of the cross section for top-quark pair production in pp collisions at the LHC at center-of-mass energy sqrt(s)= 7 TeV has been performed using 3.1 {\\pm} 0.3 inverse pb of data recorded by the CMS detector. This result utilizes the final state with two isolated, highly energetic charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and two or more jets. Backgrounds from Drell-Yan and non-W/Z boson production are estimated from data. Eleven events are observed in the data with 2.1 {\\pm} 1.0 events expected from background. The measured cross section is 194 {\\pm} 72 (stat.) {\\pm} 24 (syst.) {\\pm} 21 (lumi.) pb, consistent with next-to-leading order predictions.

  17. Computational identification of promising thermoelectric materials among known quasi-2D binary compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorai, Prashun; Toberer, Eric S.; Stevanović, Vladan

    2016-01-01

    Quasi low-dimensional structures are abundant among known thermoelectric materials, primarily because of their low lattice thermal conductivities. In this work, we have computationally assessed the potential of 427 known binary quasi-2D structures in 272 different chemistries for thermoelectric performance. To assess the thermoelectric performance, we employ an improved version of our previously developed descriptor for thermoelectric performance [Yan et al., Energy Environ. Sci., 2015, 8, 983]. The improvement is in the explicit treatment of van der Waals interactions in quasi-2D materials, which leads to significantly better predictions of their crystal structures and lattice thermal conductivities. The improved methodology correctly identifies known binary quasi-2D thermoelectric materials such as Sb2Te3, Bi2Te3, SnSe, SnS, InSe, and In2Se3. As a result, we propose candidate quasi-2D binary materials, a number of which have not been previously considered for thermoelectric applications.

  18. A Direct Search for Dirac Magnetic Monopoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulhearn, Michael James

    2004-10-01

    Magnetic monopoles are highly ionizing and curve in the direction of the magnetic field. A new dedicated magnetic monopole trigger at CDF, which requires large light pulses in the scintillators of the time-of-flight system, remains highly efficient to monopoles while consuming a tiny fraction of the available trigger bandwidth. A specialized offline reconstruction checks the central drift chamber for large dE/dx tracks which do not curve in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. We observed zero monopole candidate events in 35.7 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This implies a monopole production cross section limit {sigma} < 0.2 pb for monopoles with mass between 100 and 700 GeV, and, for a Drell-Yan like pair production mechanism, a mass limit m > 360 GeV.

  19. Scheme dependence and transverse momentum distribution interpretation of Collins-Soper-Sterman resummation

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Prokudin, Alexei; Sun, Peng; Yuan, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Following an earlier derivation by Catani-de Florian-Grazzini (2000) on the scheme dependence in the Collins-Soper- Sterman (CSS) resummation formalism in hard scattering processes, we investigate the scheme dependence of the Transverse Momentum Distributions (TMDs) and their applications. By adopting a universal C-coefficient function associated with the integrated parton distributions, the difference between various TMD schemes can be attributed to a perturbative calculable function depending on the hard momentum scale. Thus, we further apply several TMD schemes to the Drell-Yan process of lepton pair production in hadronic collisions, and find that the constrained non-perturbative form factors in different schemes are remarkablymoreconsistent with each other and with that of the standard CSS formalism.less

  20. Search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles in pp collisions at √s = 8  TeV using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-08

    A search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles is performed using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Data collected in 2012 at √s = 8 TeV from pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 are examined. Particles producing anomalously high ionisation, consistent with long-lived massive particles with electric charges from |q| = 2e to |q| = 6e are searched for. No signal candidate events are observed, and 95 % confidence level cross-section upper limits are interpreted as lower mass limits for a Drell–Yan production model. The mass limits range between 660 and 785 GeV.

  1. Slide 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    DaBrisha Smith November 14, 2013 Page 2 ORP Safety Culture Update * How did the leadership transition go? - SC Team Lead turnover from Steve Pfaff to DaBrisha Smith has gone ...

  2. A Measuring

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This has made the DA system an important topic in research in the . neurosciences and ... From within the DA cells dopamine is released into the synapse in response to an action ...

  3. Slide 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Infrastructure (AMI) * Outage management system (OMS) * Distribution automation (DA) * Conservation Voltage Reduction (CVR) * Condition-based maintenance and asset health ...

  4. US ITER | Media Corner

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    India DA Project Director Visits US ITER Project Office India DA Project Director Visits US ITER Project Office Published Janaury 5, 2012 India DA Project Director Visits US ITER Project Office US ITER project manager Ned Sauthoff and India DA project director Shishir Deshpande share a laugh while watching a skit during the US ITER staff holiday luncheon. Photo: US ITER/ORNL Shishir P. Deshpande, Project Director for the ITER India Domestic Agency, visited the US ITER Project Office on December

  5. Development of the scintillator-based probe for fast-ion losses in the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y. P. Liu, Yi; Yuan, G. L.; Song, X. Y.; Yang, J. W.; Li, X.; Chen, W.; Li, Y.; Yan, L. W.; Song, X. M.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Luo, X. B.; Liu, Y. Q.; Hua, Y.; Isobe, M.

    2014-05-15

    A new scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) has been developed and operated in the HL-2A tokamak [L. W. Yan, X. R. Duan, X. T. Ding, J. Q. Dong, Q. W. Yang, Yi Liu, X. L. Zou, D. Q. Liu, W. M. Xuan, L. Y. Chen, J. Rao, X. M. Song, Y. Huang, W. C. Mao, Q. M. Wang, Q. Li, Z. Cao, B. Li, J. Y. Cao, G. J. Lei, J. H. Zhang, X. D. Li, W. Chen, J. Chen, C. H. Cui, Z. Y. Cui, Z. C. Deng, Y. B. Dong, B. B. Feng, Q. D. Gao, X. Y. Han, W. Y. Hong, M. Huang, X. Q. Ji, Z. H. Kang, D. F. Kong, T. Lan, G. S. Li, H. J. Li, Qing Li, W. Li, Y. G. Li, A. D. Liu, Z. T. Liu, C. W. Luo, X. H. Mao, Y. D. Pan, J. F. Peng, Z. B. Shi, S. D. Song, X. Y. Song, H. J. Sun, A. K. Wang, M. X. Wang, Y. Q. Wang, W. W. Xiao, Y. F. Xie, L. H. Yao, D. L. Yu, B. S. Yuan, K. J. Zhao, G. W. Zhong, J. Zhou, J. C. Yan, C. X. Yu, C. H. Pan, Y. Liu, and the HL-2A Team , Nucl. Fusion 51, 094016 (2011)] to measure the losses of neutral beam ions. The design of the probe is based on the concept of the ?-particle detectors on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) using scintillator plates. The probe is capable of traveling across an equatorial plane port and sweeping the aperture angle rotationally with respect to the axis of the probe shaft by two step motors, in order to optimize the radial position and the collimator angle. The energy and the pitch angle of the lost fast ions can be simultaneously measured if the two-dimensional image of scintillation light intensity due to the impact of the lost fast ions is detected. Measurements of the fast-ion losses using the probe have been performed during HL-2A neutral beam injection discharges. The clear experimental evidence of enhanced losses of beam ions during disruptions has been obtained by means of the SLIP system. A detailed description of the probe system and the first experimental results are reported.

  6. Final report: Efficient and user friendly C++ library for differential algebra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svetlana G. Shasharina

    1998-09-29

    In Phase I we proposed the following tasks: Task 1: Identify the units of the Differential Algebra (DA) library, i.e. determine the abstract data types of the DA and the relations between them. Develop the interfaces (.h files) for the DA vectors. Task 2: Implement the DA vector class with garbage collection and expression templates for optimizing all overloaded operators by minimizing creation of temporaries and fusing loops. Task 3: Implement the prototype GUI for instantiating systems from files and invoking the DA methods. Task 4: Develop a suite of tests for the DA vector class and the needed utilities classes. Task 5: Write the final report on this work. This will include documentation on the use of the code. We have completed these tasks. In this section we discuss the results of our work.

  7. Nonplanar dust acoustic solitary waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with superthermal ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Labany, S. K. Zedan, N. A.; El-Taibany, W. F. E-mail: eltaibany@du.edu.eg; El-Shamy, E. F.

    2014-12-15

    The nonplanar amplitude modulation of dust acoustic (DA) envelope solitary waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP) has been investigated. By using a reductive perturbation technique, a modified nonlinear Schrdinger equation (NLSE) including the effects of geometry, polarization, and ion superthermality is derived. The modulational instability (MI) of the nonlinear DA wave envelopes is investigated in both planar and nonplanar geometries. There are two stable regions for the DA wave propagation strongly affected by polarization and ion superthermality. Moreover, it is found that the nonlinear DA waves in spherical geometry are the more structurally stable. The larger growth rate of the nonlinear DA MI is observed in the cylindrical geometry. The salient characteristics of the MI in the nonplanar geometries cannot be found in the planar one. The DA wave propagation and the NLSE solutions are investigated both analytically and numerically.

  8. TECHNICAL/PEER REVIEW RECORD FORM PS-3 Pressure System Number

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    TECHNICAL/PEER REVIEW RECORD FORM PS-3 Pressure System Number Component(s) (if applicable) Design Authority (DA) DA Group/Division Note: Excluded Elements require a Peer Review. Peer Review must be completed by one or more DAs not associated with the project. Technical Review is applicable to code compliant components and can be performed by any DA. Type of Review (check) ____Technical Review ____Peer Review Description: Scope of Review: Applicable Code(s): The undersigned have reviewed the

  9. Gamesa Services Brasil Ltda | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gamesa Services Brasil Ltda Place: Simes Filho, Estado da Bahia, Brazil Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind farm developer and independent...

  10. Dedini A ucar e lcool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    to: navigation, search Name: Dedini Aucar e lcool Place: So Ja da Boa Vista, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 13870 Product: Dedini Aucar e lcool is a local...

  11. Welcome to the Webinar!

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Document - Josh Sneideman Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow EERE- ... of Energy DaNel Hogan, Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow, Energy ...

  12. Destilaria Americana SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search Name: Destilaria Americana SA Place: Nova Amrica da Colina, Parana, Brazil Zip: 86230-000 Product: Ethanol producer in Paran, Brazil. References: Destilaria...

  13. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Renewable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Detector Gro)up Buscaglia, Gustavo C. (Gustavo C. Buscaglia) - Departamento de Cincia da Computao, Universidade de So Paulo Go back to Individual Researchers ...

  14. June 2016 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry | OSTI, US Dept...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chemistry Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous electrolyte solutions at high temperatures and high pressures Ho, P.C.; Palmer, D.A. (1995) 223 Decomposition of calcium ...

  15. Most Viewed Documents - Materials | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    energy Canonico, D.A.; Stelzman, W.J.; Berggren, R.G.; et al. (1975) Thermal and electrical conductivities and Seebeck coefficients of unirradiated and irradiated graphites ...

  16. 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... World Climate Research Programme GEWEX Newsletter, 11, No. 1, 11-12. Rutan, DA and TP Charlock. 2004. "Validation of CERESSARB data product using ARM surface flux observations." ...

  17. An Introduction to SAE Hydrogen Fueling Standardization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... SAE INTERNATIONAL Zero Emission L.D. Vehicles Reference Comparison: BEV Charging vs. ... INTERNATIONAL *Transparent to customer * Wireless, IrDA is an Available Technology * ...

  18. Pulsed Power Technology at Sandia National Laboratories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Programs and Capabilities Experimental and Theoretical Programs Electromagnetic Technology at Sandia National Laboratories HEDP & ICF Simulation Codes ALEGRA Spect3D--A...

  19. Onsite Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plant UF6 Cylinder Destructive Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong; Carter, Jennifer C.; McNamara, Bruce K.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Phillips, Jon R.; Curtis, Michael M.

    2012-07-17

    The IAEA safeguards approach for gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) includes measurements of gross, partial, and bias defects in a statistical sampling plan. These safeguard methods consist principally of mass and enrichment nondestructive assay (NDA) verification. Destructive assay (DA) samples are collected from a limited number of cylinders for high precision offsite mass spectrometer analysis. DA is typically used to quantify bias defects in the GCEP material balance. Under current safeguards measures, the operator collects a DA sample from a sample tap following homogenization. The sample is collected in a small UF6 sample bottle, then sealed and shipped under IAEA chain of custody to an offsite analytical laboratory. Current practice is expensive and resource intensive. We propose a new and novel approach for performing onsite gaseous UF6 DA analysis that provides rapid and accurate assessment of enrichment bias defects. DA samples are collected using a custom sampling device attached to a conventional sample tap. A few micrograms of gaseous UF6 is chemically adsorbed onto a sampling coupon in a matter of minutes. The collected DA sample is then analyzed onsite using Laser Ablation Absorption Ratio Spectrometry-Destructive Assay (LAARS-DA). DA results are determined in a matter of minutes at sufficient accuracy to support reliable bias defect conclusions, while greatly reducing DA sample volume, analysis time, and cost.

  20. Geochemical Behaviour of S, Cl and Fe in Silicate Melts/Glasses...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    E. Paris, P. Glatzel, S. Eeckhout, M. Carroll, School of Science and Technology, Geology Division, University of Camerino, Via G. III da Varano, 62032 Camerino; e-mail:...

  1. file://Z:\\2010 CX Rulemaking\\01 Comments on Proposed Rule\\Comme

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... para la Promocin y el Desarrollo de la Comunidad CEIBA Friends of the Earth Guatemala Associao para do Desenvolvimento da Agroecologia (Brazil) Biofuelswatch Center ...

  2. CPL Participacoes Ltda | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Participacoes Ltda Jump to: navigation, search Name: CPL Participacoes Ltda Place: Salvador, Estado da Bahia, Brazil Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind farm developer and...

  3. Gary Trott

    Energy Savers

    ENTROPY Lighting Controls are not Simple "Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication." - Leonardo Da Vinci Lighting Controls - Switched Installation Commissioning fdfgfdg Layout...

  4. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    for Energy Research Applications (CAMERA). Handout Research conducted by: D.A. Shapiro (Advanced Light Source), Y.S. Yu (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University...

  5. Record-Setting Microscopy Illuminates Energy Storage Materials

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Division and runs optimized reconstruction algorithms developed by the Center for Applied Mathematics for Energy Research Applications (CAMERA). Handout Research conducted by: D.A....

  6. Categorical ExclusionUetermlnatton Fonn

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    and Guidelines DAI4. Approval oftechnieal exchange arrangements DA 15 - International umbrella agreements for energy R&D Facility Operations DB 1.2 - Training exercises and...

  7. Chapter_11_Incidents_of_Security_Concern

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... compromise, the extent of dissemination (e.g., number of individuals and their citizenship; global disclosure via cyber media; open source publication; etc.) * If a DA was ...

  8. Augmenting system reliability analyses with observation priors...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    missing data may be imputed using standard data augmentation (DA). This process is already used in the current implementation of the JMP complex-system reliability modeling codes. ...

  9. ELECTROCHEMICALLY-MODULATED SEPARATIONS FOR SAFEGUARDS MEASUREMENTS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Current methods for DA involve grab sampling and laboratory based column extractions that ... Due to the challenges associated with complex matrices, a systematic investigation of the ...

  10. Lisbon, Portugal: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy Companies in Lisbon, Portugal EDP Renovaveis Martifer Renewables Formerly Eviva Mercado Abastecedor da Regiao de Lisboa MARL Solar Plus SA References http:...

  11. Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon : Nanoparticle...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Counter DMA Differential Mobility Analyzer DOE U.S. Department of Energy GoAmazon 201415 INPA Green Ocean Amazon 201415 Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia LBA ...

  12. This form may be submitted to the EIA by mail, fax, e-mail, or...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...www.eia.govsurveyformeia782alist782a.pdf" "Phone No.:",,,..."Ex... you are reporting:" "Type of Report (Check One):" ,,"Original",,,..."Mo",,,"Da...

  13. Brasil Bio Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Bio Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name: Brasil Bio Fuels Place: So Joo da Baliza, Roraima, Brazil Product: Brazil based ethanol producer located in Roraima, Brazil....

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Ubiquitous Interplay Between Charge Ordering and High-Temperature Superconductivity in Cuprates da Silva Neto, Eduardo H. ; Aynajian, Pegor ; Frano, Alex ; Comin, Riccardo ; ...

  15. Charge-transfer absorption and emission in polymer: fullerene...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    In order to probe these interfacial properties directly, highly sensitive measurements of the photocurrent and electroluminescent spectra of organic DA photovoltaic devices are ...

  16. Development of fine-resolution analyses and expanded large-scale...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Community Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation system is implemented in a multiscale data assimilation (MS-DA) framework that is used within the Weather Research and Forecasting ...

  17. Parameterizing the Mixing State of Complex Submicron Aerosols...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    DA Knopf, MK Gilles, and RC Moffet. 2015. "Chemical imaging of ambient aerosol particles: Observational constraints on mixing state parameterization." Journal of Geophysical...

  18. Westinghouse Cementation Facility of Solid Waste Treatment System - 13503

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, Torsten; Aign, Joerg

    2013-07-01

    During NPP operation, several waste streams are generated, caused by different technical and physical processes. Besides others, liquid waste represents one of the major types of waste. Depending on national regulation for storage and disposal of radioactive waste, solidification can be one specific requirement. To accommodate the global request for waste treatment systems Westinghouse developed several specific treatment processes for the different types of waste. In the period of 2006 to 2008 Westinghouse awarded several contracts for the design and delivery of waste treatment systems related to the latest CPR-1000 nuclear power plants. One of these contracts contains the delivery of four Cementation Facilities for waste treatment, s.c. 'Follow on Cementations' dedicated to three locations, HongYanHe, NingDe and YangJiang, of new CPR-1000 nuclear power stations in the People's Republic of China. Previously, Westinghouse delivered a similar cementation facility to the CPR-1000 plant LingAo II, in Daya Bay, PR China. This plant already passed the hot functioning tests successfully in June 2012 and is now ready and released for regular operation. The 'Follow on plants' are designed to package three 'typical' kind of radioactive waste: evaporator concentrates, spent resins and filter cartridges. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the Westinghouse experience to design and execution of cementation facilities. (authors)

  19. Search for multiply charged Heavy Stable Charged Particles in data collected with the CMS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh

    2013-10-30

    Several models of new physics yield particles that are massive, long-lived, and have an electric charge, Q, greater than that of the electron, e. A search for evidence of such particles was performed using 5.0 fb-1 and 18.8 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at √s = 7 TeV and √s = 8 TeV, respectively, with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The distinctive detector signatures of these particles are that they are slow-moving and highly ionizing. Ionization energy loss and time-of- flight measurements were made using the inner tracker and the muon system, respectively. The search is sensitive to 1e ≤ |Q| ≤ 8e. Data were found to be consistent with standard model expectations and upper limits on the production cross section of these particles were computed using a Drell-Yan-like production model. Masses below 517, 687, 752, 791, 798, 778, 753, and 724 GeV are excluded for |Q| = 1e, 2e, 3e, 4e, 5e, 6e, 7e, and 8e, respectively.

  20. QCD, Tevatron results and LHC prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvira, V.Daniel; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    We present a summary of the most recent measurements relevant to Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) delivered by the D0 and CDF Tevatron experiments by May 2008. CDF and D0 are moving toward precision measurements of QCD based on data samples in excess of 1 fb-1. The inclusive jet cross sections have been extended to forward rapidity regions and measured with unprecedented precision following improvements in the jet energy calibration. Results on dijet mass distributions, bbbar dijet production using tracker based triggers, underlying event in dijet and Drell-Yan samples, inclusive photon and diphoton cross sections complete the list of measurements included in this paper. Good agreement with pQCD within errors is observed for jet production measurements. An improved and consistent theoretical description is needed for photon+jets processes. Collisions at the LHC are scheduled for early fall 2008, opening an era of discoveries at the new energy frontier, 5-7 times higher than that of the Tevatron.

  1. Electroweak Corrections at the LHC with MCFM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, John M.; Wackeroth, Doreen; Zhou, Jia

    2015-07-10

    Electroweak (EW) corrections at the LHC can be enhanced at high energies due to soft/collinear radiation of W and Z bosons, being dominated by Sudakov-like corrections in the form of $\\alpha_W^l\\log^n(Q^2/M_W^2)$ $(n \\le 2l, \\alpha_W = \\alpha/(4\\pi\\sin\\theta_W^2))$ when the energy scale $Q$ enters the TeV regime. Thus, the inclusion of EW corrections in LHC predictions is important for the search of possible signals of new physics in tails of kinematic distributions. EW corrections should also be taken into account in virtue of their comparable size ($\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha)$) to that of higher order QCD corrections ($\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha_s^2)$). We calculated the next-to-leading-order (NLO) weak corrections to the neutral-current (NC) Drell-Yan process, top-quark pair production and di-jet producion, and implemented them in the Monte-Carlo program MCFM. This enables a combined study with the corresponding NLO QCD corrections. We provide both the full NLO weak corrections and their weak Sudakov approximation valid at high energies. The latter is often used for a fast evaluation of weak effects, and having the exact result available as well allows to quantify the validity of the Sudakov approximation.

  2. Intrinsic transverse momentum and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian Weiss, Peter Schweitzer, Mark Strikman

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of QCD vacuum structure on the intrinsic transverse momentum distribution of partons in the nucleon at a low scale. The dynamical breaking of chiral symmetry is caused by non-perturbative interactions at distances of the order rho ~ 0.2 - 0.3 fm, much smaller than the typical nucleon size R ~ 1 fm, resulting in a two-scale picture of nucleon structure. Using an effective dynamical model based on chiral constituent quark degrees of freedom and the 1/N_c expansion (chiral quark-soliton model), we calculate the transverse momentum distribution of quarks and antiquarks at a low scale. The distribution of valence quarks is localized at p_T ~ 1/R. The distribution of flavor-singlet unpolarized sea quarks exhibits a power-like tail extending up to the chiral-symmetry-breaking scale 1/{rho}. A similar tail is present in the flavor-nonsinglet polarized sea. These features are model-independent and represent the imprint of the QCD vacuum on the nucleon's partonic structure. At the level of the nucleon's light-cone wave function, we show that sea quarks partly exist in correlated pairs of transverse size {rho} << R, analogous to short-range NN correlations in nuclei. We discuss the implications of our findings for the transverse momentum distributions in hard scattering processes (semi-inclusive DIS, Drell-Yan pair production) and possible experimental tests of the non-perturbative parton correlations induced by QCD vacuum structure.

  3. In-Situ Real Time Measurements of Molten Glass Properties, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert De Saro; Joe Craparo

    2007-12-16

    Energy Research Company (ERCo) of Staten Island, NY has developed a sensor capable of measuring in situ and in real time, both the elemental composition and the temperature of molten glass. A prototype sensor has been designed, constructed and tested in ERCo's laboratory. The sensor was used to collect atomic emission spectra from molten fiberglass via Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). From these spectra, we were able to readily identify all elements of interest (B, Si, Ca, Fe, Mg, Na, Sr, Al). The high signal-to-background signals achieved suggest that data from the sensor can be used to determine elemental concentrations, either through calibration curves or using ERCo's calibrationless method. ERCo's technology fits in well with DOE's Glass Industry Technology Roadmap which emphasizes the need for accurate process and feedstock sensors. Listed first under technological barriers to increased production efficiency is the 'Inability to accurately measure and control the production process'. A large-scale glass melting furnace, developed by SenCer Inc. of Penn Yan, NY was installed in ERCo's laboratory to ensure that a large enough quantity of glass could be melted and held at temperature in the presence of the water-cooled laser sensor without solidifying the glass.

  4. Pion structure function from leading neutron electroproduction and SU(2) flavor asymmetry

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    McKenney, Joshua R.; Sato, Nobuo; Melnitchouk, Wally; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2016-03-07

    In this paper, we examine the efficacy of pion exchange models to simultaneously describe leading neutron electroproduction at HERA and themore » $$\\bar{d}-\\bar{u}$$ flavor asymmetry in the proton. A detailed $$\\chi^2$$ analysis of the ZEUS and H1 cross sections, when combined with constraints on the pion flux from Drell-Yan data, allows regions of applicability of one-pion exchange to be delineated. The analysis disfavors several models of the pion flux used in the literature, and yields an improved extraction of the pion structure function and its uncertainties at parton momentum fractions in the pion of $$4 \\times 10^{-4} \\lesssim x_\\pi \\lesssim 0.05$$ at a scale of $Q^2$=10 GeV$^2$. Also, we provide estimates for leading proton structure functions in upcoming tagged deep-inelastic scattering experiments on the deuteron with forward protons, based on the fit results, at Jefferson Lab.« less

  5. Measurement of the angular coefficients in Z-boson events using electron and muon pairs from data taken at $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2016-08-29

    The angular distributions of Drell-Yan charged lepton pairs in the vicinity of the Z-boson mass peak probe the underlying QCD dynamics of Z-boson production. This paper presents a measurement of the complete set of angular coefficients A0–7 describing these distributions in the Z-boson Collins-Soper frame. The data analysed correspond to 20.3 fb–1 of pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV, collected by the ATLAS detector at the CERN LHC. The measurements are compared to the most precise fixed-order calculations currently available (O(α2s)) and with theoretical predictions embedded in Monte Carlo generators. The measurements are precise enough to probe QCD correctionsmore » beyond the formal accuracy of these calculations and to provide discrimination between different parton-shower models. A significant deviation from the (O(α2s)) predictions is observed for A0 – A2. In conclusion, evidence is found for non-zero A5,6,7, consistent with expectations.« less

  6. Fermilab E866 (NuSea) Figures and Data Plots

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    None

    The NuSea Experiment at Fermilab studied the internal structure of protons, in particular the difference between up quarks and down quarks. This experiment also addressed at least two other physics questions: nuclear effects on the production of charmonia states (bound states of charm and anti-charm quarks) and energy loss of quarks in nuclei from Drell-Yan measurements on nuclei. While much of the NuSea data are available only to the collaboration, figures, data plots, and tables are presented as stand-alone items for viewing or download. They are listed in conjunction with the published papers, theses, or presentations in which they first appeared. The date range is 1998 to 2008. To see these figures and plots, click on E866 publications or go directly to http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/papers.html. Theses are at http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/e866theses/e866theses.html and the presentations are found at http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/e866talks/e866talks.html. Many of the items are postscript files.

  7. Correlating sampling and intensity statistics in nanoparticle diffraction experiments

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Öztürk, Hande; Yan, Hanfei; Hill, John P.; Noyan, I. Cevdet

    2015-07-28

    It is shown in a previous article [Öztürk, Yan, Hill & Noyan (2014).J. Appl. Cryst.47, 1016–1025] that the sampling statistics of diffracting particle populations within a polycrystalline ensemble depended on the size of the constituent crystallites: broad X-ray peak breadths enabled some nano-sized particles to contribute more than one diffraction spot to Debye–Scherrer rings. Here it is shown that the equations proposed by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys.(1948),19, 742–753] (AKK) to link diffracting particle and diffracted intensity statistics are not applicable if the constituent crystallites of the powder are below 10 nm. In this size range, (i) themore » one-to-one correspondence between diffracting particles and Laue spots assumed in the AKK analysis is not satisfied, and (ii) the crystallographic correlation between Laue spots originating from the same grain invalidates the assumption that all diffracting plane normals are randomly oriented and uncorrelated. Such correlation produces unexpected results in the selection of diffracting grains. For example, three or more Laue spots from a given grain for a particular reflection can only be observed at certain wavelengths. In addition, correcting the diffracted intensity values by the traditional Lorentz term, 1/cos θ, to compensate for the variation of particles sampled within a reflection band does not maintain fidelity to the number of poles contributing to the diffracted signal. A new term, cos θB/cos θ, corrects this problem.« less

  8. Production and decays of the light pseudoscalar boson {eta} at the CERN LHC in the simplest little Higgs model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung Kingman; Yan Qishu; Song, Jeonghyeon; Tseng Poyan

    2008-09-01

    In many extensions of the standard model, the Higgs sector often contains an additional pseudoscalar boson. A good example is the SU(3) simplest little Higgs model, which accommodates a light pseudoscalar boson {eta} with quite different characteristics from those in other multi-Higgs-doublet models. We study various phenomenological signatures of the {eta} at the CERN LHC. In particular, we calculate in details both production and decays in the Drell-Yan type channel qq{yields}Z/Z{sup '}{yields}h{eta}, and in the associated production with a tt pair, gg(qq){yields}tt{eta}. We emphasize the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} decay mode of the {eta} boson when its mass is below the bb threshold. We show that tt{eta} production is in fact large enough to give a sizable number of events while suppressing the backgrounds. We also comment on the direct gluon fusion process and the indirect decay from the heavy T quark (T{yields}t{eta})

  9. Electroweak and top physics at CDF in Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Taffard

    2003-06-12

    The CDF experiment at the Tevatron has used p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV to measure the production cross sections of W and Z bosons using several leptonic final states. An indirect measurement of the W width and the ratio of tau and electron electroweak couplings have been extracted. The forward-backward charge asymmetry, A{sub FB}, in Drell-Yan dilectron production has been measured up to an invariant mass of 600 GeV/c{sup 2}. CDF has also started looking for WW production in the dilepton channel, WW{prime} {yields} ll{prime}vv, with the aim of measuring its cross section and derive limits on the anomalous WWZ and WW{gamma} couplings. The presence of a top quark signal in the Tevatron data has been reestablished by measuring the top quark pair production cross section in the dilepton channel, t{bar t} {yields} WbW{bar b} {yields} {bar l}v{sub l}bl{prime}{bar v}{sub l{prime}}{bar b} and in the lepton plus jets channel, t{bar t} {yields} WbW{bar b} {yields} q{bar q}lbl{bar b}{sub l}{bar b} + {bar l}v{sub l}bq{bar q}{prime}{bar b}. A pre-tagged lepton plus jets sample has also been used to reconstruct the top quark mass.

  10. Structure and Spin of the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avakian, Harut A.

    2014-03-01

    Parton distribution functions, describing longitudinal momentum, helicity and transversity distributions of quarks and gluons, have been recently generalized to account also for transverse degrees of freedom. Two new sets of more general distributions, Transverse Momentum Distributions and Generalized Parton Distributions, were introduced to describe transverse momentum and space distributions of partons. Great progress has been made since then in measurements of different Single Spin Asymmetries (SSAs) in semi-inclusive and hard exclusive processes providing access to TMDs and GPDs, respectively. Facilities world-wide involved in studies of the 3D structure of nucleon include HERMES, COMPASS, BELLE, BaBar, Halls A, B, and C at JLab, and PHENIX and STAR at RHIC (BNL). TMD studies in the Drell-Yan process are also becoming an important part of the program of hadron scattering experiments. Studies of TMDs are also among the main driving forces of the JLab 12-GeV upgrade project, several of the forward upgrade proposals of STAR and PHENIX at RHIC, and future facilities, such as the Electron Ion Collider (EIC), FAIR in Germany, and NICA in Russia. In this contribution we present an overview of the latest developments in studies of parton distributions and discuss newly released results, ongoing activities, as well as some future measurements.

  11. J/{psi} production in indium-indium collisions at SPS energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pillot, P.; Ducroux, L.; Guichard, A.; Tieulent, R.; Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Keil, M.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.

    2006-01-12

    The NA60 experiment collected data on dimuon production in indium-indium collisions at 158 GeV/c per incident nucleon, in year 2003, to contribute to the clarification of several questions raised by previous experiments studying high-energy heavy-ion physics at the CERN SPS in search of the quark gluon plasma. Among these previous results stands the observation, by NA50, that the production yield of J/{psi} mesons is suppressed in central Pb-Pb collisions beyond the normal nuclear absorption defined by proton-nucleus data. By comparing the centrality dependence of the suppression pattern between different colliding systems, S-U, Pb-Pb and In-In, we should be able to identify the corresponding scaling variable, and the physics mechanism driving the suppression. In this paper, we will present the ratio of J/{psi} and Drell-Yan production cross-sections in indium-indium collisions, in three centrality bins, and how these values compare to previous measurements. We will also present a study of the transverse momentum distributions of the J/{psi} mesons, in seven centrality bins.

  12. Extracting the Sivers function from polarized semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering data and making predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anselmino, M.; Boglione, M.; Prokudin, A.; D'Alesio, U.; Murgia, F.; Kotzinian, A.

    2005-11-01

    The most recent data on the weighted transverse single spin asymmetry A{sub UT}{sup sin({phi}{sub h}{sup -}{phi}{sub S})} from HERMES and COMPASS Collaborations are analyzed within the LO parton model with unintegrated parton distribution and fragmentation functions; all transverse motions are taken into account, with exact kinematics, in the elementary interactions. The overall quality of the data is such that, for the first time, a rather well constrained extraction of the Sivers function for u and d quarks is possible and is performed. Comparisons with models are made. Based on the extracted Sivers functions, predictions for A{sub UT}{sup sin({phi}{sub h}{sup -}{phi}{sub S})} asymmetries at JLab are given; suggestions for further measurements at COMPASS, with a transversely polarized hydrogen target and selecting favorable kinematical ranges, are discussed. Predictions are also presented for single spin asymmetries in Drell-Yan processes at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research at GSI-Darmstadt.

  13. Parton intrinsic motion in inclusive particle production: unpolarized cross sections, single spin asymmetries, and the Sivers effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Alesio, Umberto; Murgia, Francesco

    2004-10-01

    The relevance of intrinsic (or primordial) transverse momentum of partons in the inclusive production of particles at high energy and moderately large p{sub T} has been known for a long time, beginning with Drell-Yan and diphoton processes, and continuing with photon and meson production in hadronic collisions. In view of its renewed interest in the context of polarized processes and single spin asymmetries we perform, in the framework of perturbative QCD with the inclusion of spin and k{sub perpendicular} effects, a detailed analysis of several such processes in different kinematical situations. We show that the inclusion of these effects leads, at the level of accuracy reachable in this approach, to an overall satisfactory agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental unpolarized data, thus giving support to the study of spin effects and single spin asymmetries within the same scheme. We present results for transverse single spin asymmetries, generated by the so-called Sivers effect, in inclusive pion and photon production in proton-proton collisions. We compare our results with the available experimental data and with previous results obtained using simplified versions of this approach.

  14. Energy loss of fast quarks in nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, G. T.; Johnson, Mikkel B.; Leitch, M. J.; McGaughey, P. L.; Peng, J. C.; Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Moss, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We report an analysis of the nuclear dependence of the yield of Drell-Yan (DY) dimuons from the 800 GeV/c proton bombardment of {sup 2}H, C, Ca, Fe, and W targets. A light-cone formulation of the DY process is employed in the rest frame of the nucleus. In this frame, for x{sub 2} <

  15. Adsorptive Films in Support of In-field UF6 Destructive Assay Sample Collection and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Christopher A.; Martinez, Alonzo; McNamara, Bruce K.; Cannon, Bret D.; Anheier, Norman C.

    2014-07-20

    International Atom Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguard verification measures in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) rely on environmental sampling, non-destructive assay (NDA), and destructive assay (DA) sampling and analysis to determine uranium enrichment. UF6 bias defect measurements are made by DA sampling and analysis to assure that enrichment is consistent with declarations. DA samples are collected from a limited number of cylinders for high precision, offsite mass spectrometer analysis. Samples are typically drawn from a sampling tap into a UF6 sample bottle, then packaged, sealed, and shipped under IAEA chain of custody to an offsite analytical laboratory. Future DA safeguard measures may require improvements in efficiency and effectiveness as GCEP capacities increase and UF6 shipping regulations become increasingly more restrictive. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) DA sampler concept and Laser Ablation Absorption Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) assay method are under development to potentially provide DA safeguard tools that increase inspection effectiveness and reduce sample shipping constraints. The PNNL DA sampler concept uses a handheld sampler to collect DA samples for either onsite LAARS assay or offsite laboratory analysis. The DA sampler design will use a small sampling planchet that is coated with an adsorptive film to collect controlled quantities of UF6 gas directly from a cylinder or process sampling tap. Development efforts are currently underway at PNNL to enhance LAARS assay performance to allow high-precision onsite bias defect measurements. In this paper, we report on the experimental investigation to develop adsorptive films for the PNNL DA sampler concept. These films are intended to efficiently capture UF6 and then stabilize the collected DA sample prior to onsite LAARS or offsite laboratory analysis. Several porous material composite films were investigated, including a film designed to maximize the chemical adsorption

  16. Microsoft Word - summer.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    b trac ting fro m th e da ily a ve rag e hig h te m p e ra tu res fo r th e la st 10 y ea rs a n am o un t e qu al to tw ice a n estim ate o f the stan da rd de via tion for h igh...

  17. U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 99-310

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    r e d fr om Gr a v i t y D a ta , Ne va da Test Si te , N e va da by G.A. Phelps 1 , V.E. ... Figure 1. Map showing simplified geology of the Nevada Test Site region. White, Cenozoic ...

  18. Cybersecurity Intrusion Detection and Security Monitoring for Field Area Networks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Intrusion Detection and Security Monitoring for Field Area Networks Continuous security validation, intrusion detection, and situational awareness for advanced metering infrastructure and distribution automation Background Advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) and distribution automation (DA) field area networks (FANs) are among the largest, possibly most complex, networks operated by utilities in the United States. Exploitable vulnerabilities in AMI and DA systems may arise from weaknesses in

  19. Timeline

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Timeline Timeline Date Event July 1, 2010 Charging starts. June 16, 2010 DaVinci decommisioned. Last DaVinci user logins on June 15. May 12, 2010 All active NERSC user accounts enabled. April 27, 2010 Selected NERSC user accounts enabled. January 26, 2010 System arrived. Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:04

  20. A=19F (1983AJ01)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    1978DA1N, 1978MA2H, 1979DA15, 1980KU05, 1980MC1L, 1981ER03, 1981GR06, 1982KI02). Cluster, collective and rotational models: (1977BU22, 1977FO1E, 1978BR21, 1978CH26,...

  1. Head-on collision of dust-acoustic shock waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EL-Shamy, E. F.; Al-Asbali, A. M.

    2014-09-15

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to study the propagation and the head-on collision of dust-acoustic (DA) shock waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma consisting of negative dust fluid, Maxwellian distributed electrons and ions. Applying the extended Poincaré–Lighthill–Kuo method, a couple of Korteweg–deVries–Burgers equations for describing DA shock waves are derived. This study is a first attempt to deduce the analytical phase shifts of DA shock waves after collision. The impacts of physical parameters such as the kinematic viscosity, the unperturbed electron-to-dust density ratio, parameter determining the effect of polarization force, the ion-to-electron temperature ratio, and the effective dust temperature-to-ion temperature ratio on the structure and the collision of DA shock waves are examined. In addition, the results reveal the increase of the strength and the steepness of DA shock waves as the above mentioned parameters increase, which in turn leads to the increase of the phase shifts of DA shock waves after collision. The present model may be useful to describe the structure and the collision of DA shock waves in space and laboratory dusty plasmas.

  2. A novel PGC-1α isoform in brain localizes to mitochondria and associates with PINK1 and VDAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Joungil; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Baltimore, MD 21201 ; Batchu, Vera Venkatanaresh Kumar; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Baltimore, MD 21201 ; Schubert, Manfred; Castellani, Rudolph J.; Russell, James W.; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Baltimore, MD 21201

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Novel 35 kDa PGC-1α localizes to mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix in brain. •Mitochondrial localization of 35 kDa PGC-1α depends on VDAC protein. •Mitochondrial localization of 35 kDa PGC-1α depends on membrane potential. •The 35 kDa PGC-1α associates and colocalizes with PINK in brain mitochondria. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) and PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) are powerful regulators of mitochondrial function. Here, we report that a previously unrecognized, novel 35 kDa PGC-1α isoform localizes to the mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix in brain as determined by protease protection and carbonate extraction assays, as well as by immunoelectron microscopy. Immunoelectron microscopy and import experiments in vitro revealed that 35 kDa PGC-1α colocalizes and interacts with the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), and that its import depends on VDAC. Valinomycin treatment which depolarizes the membrane potential, abolished mitochondrial localization of the 35 kDa PGC-1α. Using blue native-PAGE, co-immunoprecipitation, and immunoelectron microscopy analyses, we found that the 35 kDa PGC-1α binds and colocalizes with PINK1 in brain mitochondria. This is the first report regarding mitochondrial localization of a novel 35 kDa PGC-1α isoform and its association with PINK1, suggesting possible regulatory roles for mitochondrial function in the brain.

  3. In-line phase shift tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammonds, Jeffrey C.; Price, Ronald R.; Pickens, David R.; Donnelly, Edwin F.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to (1) demonstrate laboratory measurements of phase shift images derived from in-line phase-contrast radiographs using the attenuation-partition based algorithm (APBA) of Yan et al.[Opt. Express 18(15), 1607416089 (2010)], (2) verify that the APBA reconstructed images obey the linearity principle, and (3) reconstruct tomosynthesis phase shift images from a collection of angularly sampled planar phase shift images.Methods: An unmodified, commercially available cabinet x-ray system (Faxitron LX-60) was used in this experiment. This system contains a tungsten anode x-ray tube with a nominal focal spot size of 10 ?m. The digital detector uses CsI/CMOS with a pixel size of 50 50 ?m. The phantoms used consisted of one acrylic plate, two polystyrene plates, and a habanero pepper. Tomosynthesis images were reconstructed from 51 images acquired over a 25 arc. All phase shift images were reconstructed using the APBA.Results: Image contrast derived from the planar phase shift image of an acrylic plate of uniform thickness exceeded the contrast of the traditional attenuation image by an approximate factor of two. Comparison of the planar phase shift images from a single, uniform thickness polystyrene plate with two polystyrene plates demonstrated an approximate linearity of the estimated phase shift with plate thickness (?1600 rad vs ?2970 rad). Tomographic phase shift images of the habanero pepper exhibited acceptable spatial resolution and contrast comparable to the corresponding attenuation image.Conclusions: This work demonstrated the feasibility of laboratory-based phase shift tomosynthesis and suggests that phase shift imaging could potentially provide a new imaging biomarker. Further investigation will be needed to determine if phase shift contrast will be able to provide new tissue contrast information or improved clinical performance.

  4. Search for r-parity violating supersymmetry in the multilepton final state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attal, Alon Jacques

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a search for physics beyond the standard model of elementary particles in events containing three or more charged leptons in the final state. The search is based on an R-parity violating supersymmetric model that assumes supersymmetric particles are pair produced at hadron colliders and the R-parity violating coupling is small enough so that these particles ''cascade'' decay into the lightest supersymmetric particle. The lightest supersymmetric particle may only decay into two charged leptons (electrons or muons) plus a neutrino through a lepton number violating interaction. Proton-antiproton collision events produced with √ s= 1.96 TeV are collected between March 2002 and August 2004 with an integrated luminosity of 346 pb-1. R-parity violating supersymmetry is sought for in two data samples, one with exactly three leptons and one with four or more leptons. The trilepton sample has a modest background primarily from Drell-Yan events where an additional lepton is a result of photon conversions or jet misidentification while the four or more lepton sample has an extremely low background. In the three lepton samples 6 events are observed while in the four or more lepton sample zero events are observed. These results are consistent with the standard model expectation and are interpreted as mass limits on the lightest neutralino and lightest chargino particles. The neutralino mass is constrained to be heavier than 97.7 to 110.4 GeV/c2, while the chargino mass is constrained to be heavier than 185.3 to 202.7 GeV/c2, depending on the supersymmetry scenario.

  5. New Perspectives for QCD Physics at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Stanford U. /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins

    2011-02-07

    I review a number of topics where conventional wisdom relevant to hadron physics at the LHC has been challenged. For example, the initial-state and final-state interactions of the quarks and gluons entering perturbative QCD hard-scattering subprocesses lead to the breakdown of traditional concepts of factorization and universality for transverse-momentum-dependent observables at leading twist. These soft-gluon rescattering effect produce single-spin asymmetries, the breakdown of the Lam-Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions, as well as diffractive deep inelastic scattering, The antishadowing of nuclear structure functions is predicted to depend on the flavor quantum numbers of each quark and antiquark. Isolated hadrons can be produced at large transverse momentum directly within a hard higher-twist QCD subprocess, rather than from jet fragmentation, even at the LHC. Such 'direct' processes can explain the observed deviations from pQCD predictions of the power-law fall-off of inclusive hadron cross sections as well as the 'baryon anomaly' seen in high-centrality heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. The intrinsic charm contribution to the proton structure function at high x can explain the large rate for high p{sub T} photon plus charm-jet events observed at the Tevatron and imply a large production rate for charm and bottom jets at high p{sub T} at the LHC, as well as a novel mechanism for Higgs and Z{sup 0} production at high x{sub F}. The light-front wavefunctions derived in AdS/QCD can be used to calculate jet hadronization at the amplitude level. The elimination of the renormalization scale ambiguity for the QCD coupling using the scheme-independent BLM method will increase the sensitivity of searches for new physics at the LHC. The implications of 'in-hadron condensates' for the QCD contribution to the cosmological constant are also discussed.

  6. Intensity-Frontier Antiproton Physics with The Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TAPAS) at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Asner, David M.; Baldini, Wander; Bartoszek, Larry; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; Chakravorty, Alak; Colas, Paul; Derwent, Paul; Drutskoy, Alexey; Fortner, Michael; /Northern Illinois U. /Saclay /Indian Inst. Tech., Hyderabad

    2011-11-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source is the world's most intense source of antimatter. With the Tevatron program now behind us, this unique facility can help make the case for Fermilab's continued accelerator operations. The Antiproton Source can be used for unique, dedicated antimatter studies, including medium-energy {bar p}-annihilation experiments. We propose to assemble a powerful, yet cost-effective, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events, and to use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states, and make the first measurements of the Drell-Yan continuum in medium-energy antiproton annihilation. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The observation of charm or hyperon CP violation would be evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, with possible implications for the origin of the baryon asymmetry of the universe - the question of what happened to all the antimatter that must have been produced in the Big Bang. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration and will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S. It will thus help us to continue attracting creative and capable young people into science and technology, and introducing them to the important technologies of accelerators, detectors, and data acquisition and analysis - key roles in society that accelerator-based particle physics has historically played.

  7. Correlating sampling and intensity statistics in nanoparticle diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Öztürk, Hande; Yan, Hanfei; Hill, John P.; Noyan, I. Cevdet

    2015-07-28

    It is shown in a previous article [Öztürk, Yan, Hill & Noyan (2014).J. Appl. Cryst.47, 1016–1025] that the sampling statistics of diffracting particle populations within a polycrystalline ensemble depended on the size of the constituent crystallites: broad X-ray peak breadths enabled some nano-sized particles to contribute more than one diffraction spot to Debye–Scherrer rings. Here it is shown that the equations proposed by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys.(1948),19, 742–753] (AKK) to link diffracting particle and diffracted intensity statistics are not applicable if the constituent crystallites of the powder are below 10 nm. In this size range, (i) the one-to-one correspondence between diffracting particles and Laue spots assumed in the AKK analysis is not satisfied, and (ii) the crystallographic correlation between Laue spots originating from the same grain invalidates the assumption that all diffracting plane normals are randomly oriented and uncorrelated. Such correlation produces unexpected results in the selection of diffracting grains. For example, three or more Laue spots from a given grain for a particular reflection can only be observed at certain wavelengths. In addition, correcting the diffracted intensity values by the traditional Lorentz term, 1/cos θ, to compensate for the variation of particles sampled within a reflection band does not maintain fidelity to the number of poles contributing to the diffracted signal. A new term, cos θB/cos θ, corrects this problem.

  8. Novel QCD Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins

    2011-08-12

    I review a number of topics where conventional wisdom in hadron physics has been challenged. For example, hadrons can be produced at large transverse momentum directly within a hard higher-twist QCD subprocess, rather than from jet fragmentation. Such 'direct' processes can explain the deviations from perturbative QCD predictions in measurements of inclusive hadron cross sections at fixed x{sub T} = 2p{sub T}/{radical}s, as well as the 'baryon anomaly', the anomalously large proton-to-pion ratio seen in high centrality heavy ion collisions. Initial-state and final-state interactions of the struck quark, the soft-gluon rescattering associated with its Wilson line, lead to Bjorken-scaling single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, the breakdown of the Lam-Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions, as well as nuclear shadowing and antishadowing. The Gribov-Glauber theory predicts that antishadowing of nuclear structure functions is not universal, but instead depends on the flavor quantum numbers of each quark and antiquark, thus explaining the anomalous nuclear dependence measured in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering. Since shadowing and antishadowing arise from the physics of leading-twist diffractive deep inelastic scattering, one cannot attribute such phenomena to the structure of the nucleus itself. It is thus important to distinguish 'static' structure functions, the probability distributions computed from the square of the target light-front wavefunctions, versus 'dynamical' structure functions which include the effects of the final-state rescattering of the struck quark. The importance of the J = 0 photon-quark QCD contact interaction in deeply virtual Compton scattering is also emphasized. The scheme-independent BLM method for setting the renormalization scale is discussed. Eliminating the renormalization scale ambiguity greatly improves the precision of QCD predictions and increases the sensitivity of searches for new physics at the LHC

  9. Discriminant forest classification method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Barry Y.; Hanley, William G.; Lemmond, Tracy D.; Hiller, Lawrence J.; Knapp, David A.; Mugge, Marshall J.

    2012-11-06

    A hybrid machine learning methodology and system for classification that combines classical random forest (RF) methodology with discriminant analysis (DA) techniques to provide enhanced classification capability. A DA technique which uses feature measurements of an object to predict its class membership, such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA) or Andersen-Bahadur linear discriminant technique (AB), is used to split the data at each node in each of its classification trees to train and grow the trees and the forest. When training is finished, a set of n DA-based decision trees of a discriminant forest is produced for use in predicting the classification of new samples of unknown class.

  10. Angular Distributions of High-Mass Dilepton Production in Hadron Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClellan, Randall Evan

    2016-01-01

    The SeaQuest experiment is a fixed-target dimuon experiment currently running at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). By utilizing the high-intensity, 120 GeV proton beam delivered by the FNAL Main Injector (MI), SeaQuest is able to measure proton-induced Drell-Yan dimuon production off of various nuclear targets in kinematic regions inaccessible to previous similar experiments. A suitably large fraction of the final dataset has been recorded, reconstructed, and analyzed. Very preliminary results from light-sea flavor asymmetry, nuclear dependence, and partonic energy loss analyses have been presented at numerous international conferences. A novel, FPGA-based trigger system has been designed, implemented, and optimized for the SeaQuest experiment. By implementing the trigger decision logic in FPGA firmware, it is more adaptable to changing experimental conditions. Additionally, the peripheral tasks of timing alignment, “trigger matrix” generation, and firmware uploading have been mostly automated, reducing the likelihood of user error in the maintenance and operation of the trigger system. Significant upgrades to hardware and firmware have greatly improved the performance of the trigger system since the 2012 commissioning run of SeaQuest. Four additional v1495 modules were added to facilitate thorough pulser testing of the firmware designs and in-situ pulser tests of all compiled firmware. These pulser tests proved crucial for diagnosing many errors that may have otherwise gone unnoticed. A significant change to the internal clocking of the trigger system eliminated a subtle source of rate-dependent trigger efficiency. With this upgrade, the trigger finally meets the “dead-time free” design specification. Drell-Yan dimuon data have been collected and analyzed for central θCS , with nearly flat acceptance in φCS , in the mass range 5.0 GeV < Mγ* < 10.0 GeV at forward xF with the SeaQuest spectrometer at FNAL. A very preliminary extraction of

  11. Alteraes Climticas

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    da tua janela neste momento; talvez frio, nublado e com chuva, ou ento quente e com sol, com cu descoberto e azul. O clima como o "estado do tempo", excepto o facto de...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bearinger, Jane P. (1) Da Silva, Luiz (1) Jensen, Wayne A. (1) Loge, Jeffrey M. (1) ... IV, Ward ; Schumann, Daniel L. ; Jensen, Wayne A. ; Ortega, Jason M. ; Marion, III, John ...

  13. System Plan Revision 5 + 6

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan Revision 7 General Overview DaBrisha Smith (DOEORP) April 10, 2013 System Plan 101 * What is System Planning - A process used by organizations to design, analyze and define ...

  14. LSU EFRC - Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design - Project

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    He, J.H. McAliley, D.A. Bruce, "Ethanol Synthesis from Syn-Gas: A Combined Computational Chemistry and Microkinetics Modeling Approach for the Atomic-Scale Design of Bimetallic ...

  15. Effect of anisotropic dust pressure and superthermal electrons on propagation and stability of dust acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bashir, M. F.; Behery, E. E.; El-Taibany, W. F.

    2015-06-15

    Employing the reductive perturbation technique, Zakharov–Kuznetzov (ZK) equation is derived for dust acoustic (DA) solitary waves in a magnetized plasma which consists the effects of dust anisotropic pressure, arbitrary charged dust particles, Boltzmann distributed ions, and Kappa distributed superthermal electrons. The ZK solitary wave solution is obtained. Using the small-k expansion method, the stability analysis for DA solitary waves is also discussed. The effects of the dust pressure anisotropy and the electron superthermality on the basic characteristics of DA waves as well as on the three-dimensional instability criterion are highlighted. It is found that the DA solitary wave is rarefactive (compressive) for negative (positive) dust. In addition, the growth rate of instability increases rapidly as the superthermal spectral index of electrons increases with either positive or negative dust grains. A brief discussion for possible applications is included.

  16. BPA-2015-01323-FOIA Response

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ave., N.W., Suite 720 Washington, DC 20006 Main: 202.787.1900 Shelly DaMore Jordan Ramis PC P.O. Box 230669 Portland, OR 97281 E-mail: shelly.damore@jordanramis.com...

  17. A Key Enzyme to the Potency of an Anticancer Agent

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    that 5'-ClDA is a biosynthesis intermediate. SalL recombinant protein purified from E. coli organizes as a homotrimer (30 kDamonomer). Biochemical in vitro analyses showed it...

  18. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Environmenta...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    S T U V W X Y Z Saha, Tapan Kumar (Tapan Kumar Saha) - School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland Silva, Filipe Faria Da (Filipe Faria ...

  19. 1,"General James M Gavin","Coal","AEP Generation Resources Inc...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Ohio" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"General James M Gavin","Coal","AEP Generation Resources Inc",2598 2,"J M Stuart","Coal","Da...

  20. 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Krueger,W Lin, U Lohmann, MA Miller, DA Randall, RCJ Somerville, YC Sud, GK Walker, A Wolf, X Wu, K Xu, JJ Yio, G Zhang, and J Zhang. 2005. "Simulations of midlatitude frontal ...

  1. A. Hampel (Scientific Consultant)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    FEPs development activities G. Freeze (SNL) 15:35-15:50 FEPs development activities J. Wolf (GRS) 15:50-16:10 IGD-TP Joint Activity: Handling of uncertainties D-A. Becker (GRS) ...

  2. Wave Energy Centre | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Centre Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wave Energy Centre Address: Wave Energy Centre Av Manuela da Maia 36 R C Dto Place: Lisboa Zip: 1000-201 Region: Portugal Sector: Marine...

  3. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) | Seawater Cooling - Depth...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Author National Renewable Energy Laboratory Maintainer Nicholas Langle bureaucode 019:20 Catalog DOE harvestobjectid 3ba3acfd-d54a-4a3d-a971-1cf4ac97fcb0 harvestsourceid...

  4. BPA-2011-01782-FOIA Request

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    F 1 ET 1S The following is a New FOIA request: DATE: Q DUE DA E: Name: Richard van Dijk 4,ag-ZY .. F Organization: Another Way BPA Address: Phone: L OG J7 d 7 No FAX...

  5. Virginia Senate Approves Budget Deal to Include Money for FEL...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Virginia Senate Approves Budget Deal to Include Money for FEL (Daily Press) External Link: http:articles.dailypress.com2012-04-18newsdp-nws-general-assembly-budget-da... By ...

  6. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dien, Bruce S. (1) Kurtzman, Cletus P. (1) Shea-Andersh, Maureen A. (1) Slininger, Patricia J. (1) Thompson, Stephanie R. (1) Uppugundla, Nirmal (1) da Costa Sousa, Leonardo (1) ...

  7. 3H

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    properties. 1969DA18: 3H; measured E; deduced Q, rest mass, ft. 1969SA21: 3H; measured E; deduced rest mass, Gamow-Teller matrix element. 1970LE15: 3H; measured ...

  8. 2014 > Publications > Research > The Energy Materials Center...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    HD Abrua, D Muller, and T Hanrath ACS Nano, 8(5), pp 5315-5322, 2014 DOI: 10.1021... TA Arias, HD Abrua, and DA Muller Nano Letters, 14(3), pp 1453-1459, 2014 DOI: ...

  9. A Key Enzyme to the Potency of an Anticancer Agent

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    SalL, however, uses chloride to displace L-methionine from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) and generate 5'-chloro-5'deoxyadenosine (5'-ClDA) in a rarely observed nucleophilic...

  10. Competing charge, spin, and superconducting orders in underdoped...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ruixing ; Bonn, D.A. ; Hardy, W.N. ; Gutowski, O. ; Zimmermann, M.v. ; Hayden, S.M. ; Chang, J. 1 ; Denmark) 2 ; UBC) 2 ; DESY) 2 ; Ecole) 2 ; CIFAR) 2 ; Bristol) 2 ...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Chambliss, Charles (1) Cheng, Gang (1) Chundawat, Shishir P. (1) Chundawat, Shishir P. S. (1) Clum, Alicia (1) Cotta, Michael A (1) Da Costa Sousa, Leonardo (1) Dale, Bruce (1) ...

  12. Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    modifications of the chemistry. Research conducted by C.-F. Lee, D.A. Leigh, and D. Schultz, (University of Edinburgh, UK); R.G. Pritchard, G.A. Timco, and R.E.P. Winpenny...

  13. A New Light on Disordered Ensembles

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    M.J. Bogan (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory); S. Marchesini (ALS); D.A. Shapiro (Brookhaven National Laboratory); and H.C. Poon and D.K. Saldin (University of...

  14. Iodine valence and local environments in borosilicate waste glasses...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    319 5226; fax: +1 (202) 319 4469. E-mail address: davidm@vsl.cua.edu (D.A. McKeown). Journal of Nuclear Materials 456 (2015) 182-191 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect...

  15. Cinco de Mayo

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    May 5. It is celebrated in the United States and in Mexico, primarily in the state of Puebla, where the holiday is called El Da de la Batalla de Puebla (English: The Day of the...

  16. umk2001.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Another motivation for laboratory-scale studies was to evaluate whether spatial scaling da&XIShipS might eXkt. (h?2pafk)ll Of best-fit d Values from eXperilnellts at dlree spatial ...

  17. ARM TR-008

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... of parameter files for temps * Work Order: Data nonexistence or apparent malfunction ... J. Atmos. and Oceanic Tech. 12, pp. 421-426. * Merritt, D.A. 1995. Statistical Averaging ...

  18. 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    thermal emission spectra made at Trent University were collected using a Bomem DA8 Fourier Transform Infrared Radiometer (FTIR) spectrometer at a resolution of 0.25 cm -1 . The...

  19. Smith Electric Vehicles SEV Group Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    SEV Group Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Smith Electric Vehicles (SEV) Group Ltd Place: Tyne & Wear, United Kingdom Zip: NE38 9DA Sector: Vehicles Product: UK-based...

  20. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada, water years 1983--85 Pabst, M.E.; Beck, D.A.; Glancy, P.A.; Johnson, J.A. Commercial Environmental Cleanup -- The products and services directory. ...

  1. NREL's 91-Year-Old Palmer Carlin-a Wind Energy Pioneer | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    who was convinced he had a major discovery. After discussing the details of the invention with the modern-day Da Vinci, Carlin paused, and then asked the man if the invention...

  2. 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Journal of Atmospheric Science, 55:3313-3339. Minnis, P, L Nguyen, WL. Smith, Jr, MM Khaiyer, R Palikonda, DA Spangenberg, DR Doelling, D Phan, GD Nowicki, PW Heck, and C Wolff. ...

  3. 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Khaiyer, R Palikonda, DA Spangenberg, DR Doelling, D Phan, GD Nowicki, PW Heck, and C Wolff. 2004. "Real-time cloud, radiation, and aircraft icing parameters from GOES over the ...

  4. Microsoft Word - Magnuson-DOE-FinalRpt091013.docx

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cytochrome c and 42kDa monoheme outer membrane cytochrome c from A. cryptum, and OmcB ... Examination of redox protein complexes that reside in membrane vesicles and the ...

  5. b815152k 2046..2053

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    membrane with a MW cut-off of 10 kDa in the sample loading region of the chip. Polymeric gels with larger pores are located adjacent to the size exclusion membrane to ...

  6. The European Physical Journal C CrossMark

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil W. Carvalho, J. Chinellato6, A. Custodio, E. M. Da Costa, D. De Jesus Damiao, C. De Oliveira Martins, S. Fonseca De Souza, H. Malbouisson, D....

  7. Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    A Centuries-old Tradition ItWe often associate renewable energy as future, forward-thinking technology. However, just as in the case of da Vinci's curved mirror - many of...

  8. Renewable Energy: A Centuries-old Tradition

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    ItWe often associate renewable energy as future, forward-thinking technology. However, just as in the case of da Vinci’s curved mirror – many of these technologies are based on centuries old concepts and inventions.

  9. Title

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (USGS Open file Report 92-xxxx) Author Laczniak, R. J., Cole, J. C, Sawyer D.A. and Trudeau, D. A. Document Date 5792 Document Type Report Recipients DOENV 100960 ...

  10. March Events

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    event highlights Mar 2 Wed 8:00 AM CoDA 2016, the Conference on Data Analysis Eldorado Hotel - 309 W. San Francisco St., Santa Fe, NM Join us for the Conference on Data Analysis,...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reboredo, Fernando A., E-mail: reboredofa@ornl.gov (3) Al-Hassanieh, K. A. (2) Choi, Woo Seok (2) Dias Da Silva, Luis G (2) Save Results Save this search to My Library Excel (limit ...

  12. Final Technical Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Biophys. Mol. Biol. 89:292-329. Pereira, LA., A. R. Ramos, F. Grein, M.C. Marques, S.M. da Silva, and S.S. Venceslau. (2011) A comparative genomic analysis of energy metabolism in ...

  13. my title

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Matter 25 (2013) 396002. xviii A. Magnus G. Carvalho, F. Garcia, V. S. R. de Sousa, P. J. von Ranke, D. L. Rocco, G. D. Loula, E. J. de Carvalho, A. A. Coelho, L.M. da Silva, F. ...

  14. ARM XDC Datastreams

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 81: 797-808. Spangenberg, DA, GG Mace, TP Ackerman, NL Seaman, and BJ Soden. 1997. "Evaluation of Model Simulated Upper-Tropospheric ...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... 0.05) here by denoted as NKNLST and Mn doped NKNLST were prepared by mixed oxide method. ... ; Hall, D.A. ; Sinha, Abhinav Bismuth containing crystalline solutions of (1 - ...

  16. 2011 > Publications > Research > The Energy Materials Center...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    connected quantum dots H Zhang, B Hu, L Sun, R Hovden, FW Wise, DA Muller, and RD ... Revealing atomic-scale surface segregation, intermixing and internal ordering in fuel cell ...

  17. BPA-2013-01353-FOIA Request

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    the time the request is submitted. Enter description: Zit I1 LI) K IWA OI '. oETICE TIUS DA DUE DATE: - LOG 7232013 Ex 6 A compete record of all competitive hiring events...

  18. BPA-2011-00504-FOIA Request

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Atterbu ry , aura M - -7 . CEIVED BY BPA Oi: OFFICE THIS From: rchapman , < < is I * 2 Sent: Thursday, Janua ry 20, 2011 4:42 PM ,;t E DA1E: Subject: FOIA Request Z-" I e The...

  19. Knoxville Utilities Board Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Thermostats Customer Systems for 4,200 customers Home Area Networks Web Portal Access In-Home DisplaysEnergy Management Systems Distribution Automation (DA) Equipment for 5 out...

  20. Nova Alinca Agricola e Comercial | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Alinca Agricola e Comercial Jump to: navigation, search Name: Nova Alinca Agricola e Comercial Place: So Joaquim da Barra, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 14.600-000 Product: Sao...

  1. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    liuxiaojun@nju.edu.cn 1 ; State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 2 ; Zhou, Chen ; Wei, Qi ; Wu, DaJian 1 +...

  2. Next Generation Workload Management System For Big Data on Heterogeneous Distributed Computing

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Klimentov, A.; Buncic, P.; De, K.; Jha, S.; Maeno, T.; Mount, R.; Nilsson, P.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Petrosyan, A.; et al

    2015-05-22

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, and were recently credited for the discovery of a Higgs boson. ATLAS and ALICE are the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences and are at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, both experiments rely on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production and Data Analysis) Workload Managementmore » System (WMS) for managing the workflow for all data processing on hundreds of data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data centers are physically scattered all over the world. The scale is demonstrated by the following numbers: PanDA manages O(102) sites, O(105) cores, O(108) jobs per year, O(103) users, and ATLAS data volume is O(1017) bytes. In 2013 we started an ambitious program to expand PanDA to all available computing resources, including opportunistic use of commercial and academic clouds and Leadership Computing Facilities (LCF). The project titled 'Next Generation Workload Management and Analysis System for Big Data' (BigPanDA) is funded by DOE ASCR and HEP. Extending PanDA to clouds and LCF presents new challenges in managing heterogeneity and supporting workflow. The BigPanDA project is underway to setup and tailor PanDA at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) and at the National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute" together with ALICE distributed computing and ORNL computing professionals. Our approach to integration of HPC platforms at the OLCF and elsewhere is to reuse, as much as possible, existing components of the PanDA system

  3. Next Generation Workload Management System For Big Data on Heterogeneous Distributed Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klimentov, A.; Buncic, P.; De, K.; Jha, S.; Maeno, T.; Mount, R.; Nilsson, P.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Porter, R. J.; Read, K. F.; Vaniachine, A.; Wells, J. C.; Wenaus, T.

    2015-05-22

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, and were recently credited for the discovery of a Higgs boson. ATLAS and ALICE are the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences and are at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, both experiments rely on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production and Data Analysis) Workload Management System (WMS) for managing the workflow for all data processing on hundreds of data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data centers are physically scattered all over the world. The scale is demonstrated by the following numbers: PanDA manages O(102) sites, O(105) cores, O(108) jobs per year, O(103) users, and ATLAS data volume is O(1017) bytes. In 2013 we started an ambitious program to expand PanDA to all available computing resources, including opportunistic use of commercial and academic clouds and Leadership Computing Facilities (LCF). The project titled 'Next Generation Workload Management and Analysis System for Big Data' (BigPanDA) is funded by DOE ASCR and HEP. Extending PanDA to clouds and LCF presents new challenges in managing heterogeneity and supporting workflow. The BigPanDA project is underway to setup and tailor PanDA at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) and at the National Research Center "Kurchatov Institute" together with ALICE distributed computing and ORNL computing professionals. Our approach to integration of HPC platforms at the OLCF and elsewhere is to reuse, as much as

  4. Slide 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    HAB Briefing on ORP Organizational and Safety Culture Improvement Council DaBrisha Smith November 14, 2013 Page 2 ORP Safety Culture Update * How did the leadership transition go? - SC Team Lead turnover from Steve Pfaff to DaBrisha Smith has gone remarkably well. * Has anything changed on the team? - New Members * over half of the original 2012 team members changed out. We have received 8 new members: Nuclear Safety (1), Contracts (1), WTP Start & Commissioning (2), WED (1), TF (1),

  5. Alkaline tolerant dextranase from streptomyces anulatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Decker, Stephen R. (Berthoud, CO); Adney, William S. (Golden, CO); Vinzant, Todd B. (Golden, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Littleton, CO)

    2003-01-01

    A process for production of an alkaline tolerant dextranase enzyme comprises culturing a dextran-producing microorganism Streptomyces anulatus having accession no. ATCC PTA-3866 to produce an alkaline tolerant dextranase, Dex 1 wherein the protein in said enzyme is characterized by a MW of 63.3 kDa and Dex 2 wherein its protein is characterized by a MW of 81.8 kDa.

  6. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G. -J.; Logan, J.; Alexoff, D.; Fowler, J. S.; Thanos, P. K.; Wong, C.; Casado, V.; Ferre, S.; Tomasi, D.

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release inmore » striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). Furthermore, the association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.« less

  7. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G. -J.; Logan, J.; Alexoff, D.; Fowler, J. S.; Thanos, P. K.; Wong, C.; Casado, V.; Ferre, S.; Tomasi, D.

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release in striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). Furthermore, the association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.

  8. Addiction: Beyond dopamine reward circuitry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Tomasi, D.; Telang, F.

    2011-09-13

    Dopamine (DA) is considered crucial for the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, but its role in addiction is much less clear. This review focuses on studies that used PET to characterize the brain DA system in addicted subjects. These studies have corroborated in humans the relevance of drug-induced fast DA increases in striatum [including nucleus accumbens (NAc)] in their rewarding effects but have unexpectedly shown that in addicted subjects, drug-induced DA increases (as well as their subjective reinforcing effects) are markedly blunted compared with controls. In contrast, addicted subjects show significant DA increases in striatum in response to drug-conditioned cues that are associated with self-reports of drug craving and appear to be of a greater magnitude than the DA responses to the drug. We postulate that the discrepancy between the expectation for the drug effects (conditioned responses) and the blunted pharmacological effects maintains drug taking in an attempt to achieve the expected reward. Also, whether tested during early or protracted withdrawal, addicted subjects show lower levels of D2 receptors in striatum (including NAc), which are associated with decreases in baseline activity in frontal brain regions implicated in salience attribution (orbitofrontal cortex) and inhibitory control (anterior cingulate gyrus), whose disruption results in compulsivity and impulsivity. These results point to an imbalance between dopaminergic circuits that underlie reward and conditioning and those that underlie executive function (emotional control and decision making), which we postulate contributes to the compulsive drug use and loss of control in addiction.

  9. Development of Patients' Decision Aid for Older Women With Stage I Breast Cancer Considering Radiotherapy After Lumpectomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Jennifer; D'Alimonte, Laura; Angus, Jan; Paszat, Larry; Metcalfe, Kelly; Whelan, Tim; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary; Warner, Eiran; Franssen, Edmee; Szumacher, Ewa

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a patient decision aid (PtDA) for older women with Stage I, pathologically node negative, estrogen receptor-positive progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer who are considering adjuvant radiotherapy after lumpectomy and to examine its impact on patients' decision making. Methods and Materials: A PtDA was developed and evaluated in three steps according to the Ottawa Decision Support Framework: (1) needs assessment (n = 16); (2) Pilot I to examine PtDA acceptability (n = 12); and (3) Pilot II, a pretest posttest (n = 38) with older women with estrogen receptor-positive progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer after lumpectomy who were receiving adjuvant radiation therapy. Measures included patients' satisfaction with the PtDA, self-reported decisional conflict, level of distress, treatment-related knowledge, and choice predisposition. Results: The PtDA is a booklet that details each adjuvant treatment option's benefits, risks, and side effects tailored to the patient's clinical profile; includes a values clarification exercise; and includes steps to guide patients towards their decision. On the basis of qualitative comments and satisfaction ratings, all women thought that the PtDA was helpful and informative. In comparison with their baseline scores, patients had a statistically significant (p < 0.05) reduction in decisional conflict (adjusted mean difference [AMD], -7.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], -13.50 to 12.59); increased clarity of the benefits and risks (AMD, -10.86; CI, -20.33 to 21.49); and improved general treatment knowledge (AMD, 8.99; CI, 2.88-10.28) after using the PtDA. General trends were also reported in the patients' choice predisposition scores that suggested potential differences in treatment decision after PtDA use. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that this PtDA may be a helpful educational tool for this group of women. The quality of care for older breast cancer patients may be enhanced by the use of a

  10. Comparative Study of Corn Stover Pretreated by Dilute Acid and Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Fractionation: Enzymatic Hydrolysis, Supramolecular Structure, and Substrate Accessibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Z.; Sathitsuksanoh, N.; Vinzant, T.; Schell, D. J.; McMillian, J. D.; Zhang, Y. H. P.

    2009-07-01

    Liberation of fermentable sugars from recalcitrant biomass is among the most costly steps for emerging cellulosic ethanol production. Here we compared two pretreatment methods (dilute acid, DA, and cellulose solvent and organic solvent lignocellulose fractionation, COSLIF) for corn stover. At a high cellulase loading [15 filter paper units (FPUs) or 12.3 mg cellulase per gram of glucan], glucan digestibilities of the corn stover pretreated by DA and COSLIF were 84% at hour 72 and 97% at hour 24, respectively. At a low cellulase loading (5 FPUs per gram of glucan), digestibility remained as high as 93% at hour 24 for the COSLIF-pretreated corn stover but reached only {approx}60% for the DA-pretreated biomass. Quantitative determinations of total substrate accessibility to cellulase (TSAC), cellulose accessibility to cellulase (CAC), and non-cellulose accessibility to cellulase (NCAC) based on adsorption of a non-hydrolytic recombinant protein TGC were measured for the first time. The COSLIF-pretreated corn stover had a CAC of 11.57 m{sup 2}/g, nearly twice that of the DA-pretreated biomass (5.89 m{sup 2}/g). These results, along with scanning electron microscopy images showing dramatic structural differences between the DA- and COSLIF-pretreated samples, suggest that COSLIF treatment disrupts microfibrillar structures within biomass while DA treatment mainly removes hemicellulose. Under the tested conditions COSLIF treatment breaks down lignocellulose structure more extensively than DA treatment, producing a more enzymatically reactive material with a higher CAC accompanied by faster hydrolysis rates and higher enzymatic digestibility.

  11. 43-kilodalton protein of Torpedo nicotinic postsynaptic membranes: purification and determination of primary structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, C.; McCourt, D.; Cohen, J.B.

    1987-11-03

    The primary structure of the 43-kilodalton peripheral membrane protein (43-kDa protein) of Torpedo nicotinic postsynaptic membrane has been determined. The /sup 14/C-labelled 43-kDa protein, which was isolated by preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, has an amino terminus resistant to Edman degradation, while the sequence at the carboxyl terminus is Tyr-Val. An amino acid sequence of 405 residues was obtained by NH/sub 2/-terminal sequence analysis of complementary peptides generated by digestion with trypsin, chymotrypsin, Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, and endoproteinase Lys-C, as well as by chemical cleavage at methionine. This sequence of molecular mass 45,618 daltons lacks the amino terminus but extends to the carboxyl terminus of the 43-kDa protein. Unusual structural features of the 43-kDa protein include two regions of approx. 80 residues, each containing 10% cysteine, as well as stretches predicted to exist as amphipathic ..cap alpha..-helices. Other than the group blocking the amino terminus, no evidence was found for posttranslational modification of amino acids. The 43-kDa protein may represent a novel protein family because a computer search of this sequence with the National Biomedical Research Foundation data base (Release 12.0) did not reveal any significant homology to known protein sequences.

  12. Syngas Conversion to Hydrocarbon Fuels through Mixed Alcohol Intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa M.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Li, Jinjing; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

    2013-05-13

    , 2116-2127. 2. Zhu, Y., Jones, S.B., Biddy, M.J., Dagle, R.A., Palo, D.P., Bioresource Technology, 2012, 117, 341-351. 3. Gujar, A.C., Guda, V.K., Nolan, M., Yan W., Toghiani, H., White, M.G., Applied Catalysis A: General, 2009, 363, 115-121.

  13. Measurement of top anti-top cross section in proton - anti-proton collider at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mal, Prolay Kumar

    2005-04-01

    Discovery of the top quark in 1995 at the Fermilab Tevatron collider concluded a long search following the 1977 discovery of bottom (b) quark [1] and represents another triumph of the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particles. Top quark is one of the fundamental fermions in the Standard Model of electroweak interactions and is the weak-isospin partner of the bottom quark. A precise measurement of top pair production cross-section would be a test of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) prediction. Presently, Tevatron is the world's highest energy collider where protons (p) and anti-protons ({anti p}) collide at a centre of mass energy (ps) of 1.96 TeV. At Tevatron top (t) and anti-top ({anti t}) quarks are predominantly pair produced through strong interactions--quark annihilation ({approx_equal} 85%) and gluon fusion ({approx_equal} 15%). Due to the large mass of top quark, t or {anti t} decays ({approx} 10{sup -25} sec) before hadronization and in SM framework, it decays to a W boson and a b quark with {approx} 100% branching ratio (BR). The subsequent decay of W boson determines the major signatures of t{anti t} decay. If both W bosons (coming from t and {anti t} decays) decay into leptons (viz., ev{sub e}, {mu}{nu}{sub {mu}} or {tau}{nu}{sub {tau}}) the corresponding t{bar t} decay is called dileptonic decay. Of all dileptonic decay modes of t{bar t}, the t{bar t} {yields} WWb{anti b} {yields} ev{sub e}{mu}{nu}{sub {mu}}b{anti b} (e{mu} channel) decay mode has the smallest background contamination from Z{sup 0} production or Drell-Yan process; simultaneously, it has the highest BR ({approx} 3.16%) [2] amongst all dileptonic decay modes of t{bar t}. During Run I (1992-1996) of Tevatron, three e{mu} candidate events were detected by D0 experiment, out of 80 candidate events (inclusive of all decay modes of t{bar t}). Due to the rarity of the t{bar t} events, the measured cross-section has large uncertainty in its value (viz., 5.69 {+-} 1.21(stat) {+-} 1.04(sys) pb {at

  14. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Progress in High-pT Physics at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazilevsky, A.; Bland, L.; Vogelsang, W.

    2010-03-17

    This volume archives the presentations at the RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop 'Progress in High-PT Physics at RHIC', held at BNL in March 2010. Much has been learned from high-p{sub T} physics after 10 years of RHIC operations for heavy-ion collisions, polarized proton collisions and d+Au collisions. The workshop focused on recent progress in these areas by both theory and experiment. The first morning saw review talks on the theory of RHIC high-p{sub T} physics by G. Sterman and J. Soffer, and on the experimental results by M. Tannenbaum. One of the most exciting recent results from the RHIC spin program is the first observation of W bosons and their associated single-spin asymmetry. The new preliminary data were reported on the first day of our workshop, along with a theoretical perspective. There also were detailed discussions on the global analysis of polarized parton distributions, including the knowledge on gluon polarization and the impact of the W-data. The main topic of the second workshop day were single-transverse spin asymmetries and their analysis in terms of transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. There is currently much interest in a future Drell-Yan program at RHIC, thanks to the exciting physics opportunities this would offer. This was addressed in some of the talks. There also were presentations on the latest results on transverse-spin physics from HERMES and BELLE. On the final day of the workshop, the focus shifted toward forward and small-x physics at RHIC, which has become a cornerstone of the whole RHIC program. Exciting new data were presented and discussed in terms of their possible implications for our understanding of strong color-field phenomena in QCD. In the afternoon, there were discussions of nuclear parton distributions and jet observables, among them fragmentation. The workshop was concluded with outlooks toward the near-term (LHC, JLab) and longer-term (EIC) future. The workshop has been a great success. We had

  15. Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth Relationships in Hydrogen Gas for Pressure Swing Adsorber Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somerday, Brian P.; Barney, Monica

    2014-12-04

    We measured the hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for SA516 Grade 70 steel as a function of stress-intensity factor range (ΔK) and load-cycle frequency to provide life-prediction data relevant to pressure swing adsorber (PSA) vessels. For ΔK values up to 18.5 MPa m1/2, the baseline da/dN versus ΔK relationship measured at 1Hz in 2.8 MPa hydrogen gas represents an upper bound with respect to crack growth rates measured at lower frequency. However, at higher ΔK values, we found that the baseline da/dN data had to be corrected to account for modestly higher crack growth rates at the lower frequencies relevant to PSA vessel operation.

  16. Electrochemically-Modulated Separations for Material Accountability Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arrigo, Leah M.; Liezers, Martin; Douglas, Matthew; Green, Michael A.; Farmer, Orville T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Peper, Shane M.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

    2010-05-07

    The Safeguards community recognizes that an accurate and timely measurement of accountable material mass at the head-end of the facility is critical to a modern materials control and accountability program at fuel reprocessing plants. For material accountancy, it is critical to detect both acute and chronic diversions of nuclear materials. Therefore, both on-line nondestructive (NDA) and destructive analysis (DA) approaches are desirable. Current methods for DA involve grab sampling and laboratory based column extractions that are costly, hazardous, and time consuming. Direct on-line gamma measurements of Pu, while desirable, are not possible due to contributions from other actinide and fission products. A technology for simple, online separation of targeted materials would benefit both DA and NDA measurements.

  17. Analytic Evolution of Singular Distribution Amplitudes in QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.; Tandogan Kunkel, Asli

    2014-03-01

    We describe a method of analytic evolution of distribution amplitudes (DA) that have singularities, such as non-zero values at the end-points of the support region, jumps at some points inside the support region and cusps. We illustrate the method by applying it to the evolution of a flat (constant) DA, anti-symmetric at DA and then use it for evolution of the two-photon generalized distribution amplitude. Our approach has advantages over the standard method of expansion in Gegenbauer polynomials, which requires infinite number of terms in order to accurately reproduce functions in the vicinity of singular points, and over a straightforward iteration of an initial distribution with evolution kernel. The latter produces logarithmically divergent terms at each iteration, while in our method the logarithmic singularities are summed from the start, which immediately produces a continuous curve, with only one or two iterations needed afterwards in order to get rather precise results.

  18. Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth Relationships in Hydrogen Gas for Pressure Swing Adsorber Vessel Steels

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Somerday, Brian P.; Barney, Monica

    2014-12-04

    We measured the hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for SA516 Grade 70 steel as a function of stress-intensity factor range (ΔK) and load-cycle frequency to provide life-prediction data relevant to pressure swing adsorber (PSA) vessels. For ΔK values up to 18.5 MPa m1/2, the baseline da/dN versus ΔK relationship measured at 1Hz in 2.8 MPa hydrogen gas represents an upper bound with respect to crack growth rates measured at lower frequency. However, at higher ΔK values, we found that the baseline da/dN data had to be corrected to account for modestly higher crack growth rates at the lower frequenciesmore » relevant to PSA vessel operation.« less

  19. Head-on-collision of modulated dust acoustic waves in strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Labany, S. K.; El-Depsy, A.; Zedan, N. A.; El-Taibany, W. F.; El-Shamy, E. F.

    2012-10-15

    The derivative expansion perturbation method is applied to a strongly coupled dusty plasma system consisting of negatively charged dust grains, electrons, and ions. The basic equations are reduced to a nonlinear Schroedinger type equation appropriate for describing the modulated dust acoustic (DA) waves. We have examined the modulation (in) stability and the dependence of the system physical parameters (angular frequency and group velocity) on the polarization force variation. Finally, the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo technique is employed to investigate the head-on collision (HoC) between two DA dark solitons. The analytical phase shifts and the trajectories of these dark solitons after the collision are derived. The numerical illustrations show that the polarization effect has strong influence on the nature of the phase shifts and the trajectories of the two DA dark solitons after collision.

  20. Dust-acoustic waves modulational instability and rogue waves in a polarized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouzit, Omar; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-10-15

    The polarization force-induced changes in the dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) modulational instability (MI) are examined. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that governs the MI of the DAWs is obtained. It is found that the effect of the polarization term R is to narrow the wave number domain for the onset of instability. The amplitude of the wave envelope decreases as R increases, meaning that the polarization force effects render weaker the associated DA rogue waves. The latter may therefore completely damp in the vicinity of R ∼ 1, i.e., as the polarization force becomes close to the electrostatic one (the net force acting on the dust particles becomes vanishingly small). The DA rogue wave profile is very sensitive to any change in the restoring force acting on the dust particles. It turns out that the polarization effects may completely smear out the DA rogue waves.

  1. Mass Spectrometry and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy for Analysis of Biological Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Timothy J.

    2014-12-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry along with statistical analysis was utilized to study metabolic profiles among rats fed resistant starch (RS) diets. Fischer 344 rats were fed four starch diets consisting of 55% (w/w, dbs) starch. A control starch diet consisting of corn starch was compared against three RS diets. The RS diets were high-amylose corn starch (HA7), HA7 chemically modified with octenyl succinic anhydride, and stearic-acid-complexed HA7 starch. A subgroup received antibiotic treatment to determine if perturbations in the gut microbiome were long lasting. A second subgroup was treated with azoxymethane (AOM), a carcinogen. At the end of the eight week study, cecal and distal-colon contents samples were collected from the sacrificed rats. Metabolites were extracted from cecal and distal colon samples into acetonitrile. The extracts were then analyzed on an accurate-mass time-of-flight mass spectrometer to obtain their metabolic profile. The data were analyzed using partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). The PLS-DA analysis utilized a training set and verification set to classify samples within diet and treatment groups. PLS-DA could reliably differentiate the diet treatments for both cecal and distal colon samples. The PLS-DA analyses of the antibiotic and no antibiotic treated subgroups were well classified for cecal samples and modestly separated for distal-colon samples. PLS-DA analysis had limited success separating distal colon samples for rats given AOM from those not treated; the cecal samples from AOM had very poor classification. Mass spectrometry profiling coupled with PLS-DA can readily classify metabolite differences among rats given RS diets.

  2. Protein kinase C and its substrates in tumor promoter-sensitive and -resistant cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, B.M.; Colburn, N.H.

    1988-05-05

    Calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C activity and substrates were characterized in cell lysates of preneoplastic JB6 cells, a model system of genetic variants for sensitivity to tumor promoter-induced neoplastic transformation. Protein kinase C activity was similar for sensitive and resistant variants, as measured by calcium- and phospholipid-dependent phosphorylation of an exogenous substrate (histone HIII). Of 13 endogenous protein kinase C substrates, identified by labeling proteins with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P) ATP, at least two (80 and 23 kDa) are potential candidates for mediating events on the pathway for promotion of transformation. /sup 32/P incorporation into the 80-kDa protein kinase C substrate was stimulated by tetradecanoylphorbol acetate and correlated with phenotype: the highest incorporation was found in promotion-insensitive cells, an intermediate level in promotion-sensitive cells and the lowest in the transformed cells. The phosphorylation of an 80-kDa protein, found by labeling intact cells in monolayer growth with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate, was also stimulated by tetradecanoylphorbol acetate and correlated inversely with phenotype. The 80 kDa protein kinase C substrate from cells lysates and the 80-kDa phosphoprotein from intact cells appear to be identical, as indicated by peptide mapping with protease V8 from Staphylococcus aureus. This finding suggests that the 80-kDa substrate is relevant to promoter-induced signal transduction in the intact cell. In summary, there are no unique substrates that distinguish the variants. Quantitative differences in certain substrates or their phosphorylation may, however, account for the difference in promotion sensitivity among the variants.

  3. A Laser-Based Method for On-Site Analysis of UF6 at Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Martinez, Alonzo; Barrett, Christopher A.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Smith, Leon E.

    2014-11-23

    The International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s) long-term research and development plan calls for more cost-effective and efficient safeguard methods to detect and deter misuse of gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). The IAEA’s current safeguards approaches at GCEPs are based on a combination of routine and random inspections that include environmental sampling and destructive assay (DA) sample collection from UF6 in-process material and selected cylinders. Samples are then shipped offsite for subsequent laboratory analysis. In this paper, a new DA sample collection and onsite analysis approach that could help to meet challenges in transportation and chain of custody for UF6 DA samples is introduced. This approach uses a handheld sampler concept and a Laser Ablation, Laser Absorbance Spectrometry (LAARS) analysis instrument, both currently under development at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. A LAARS analysis instrument could be temporarily or permanently deployed in the IAEA control room of the facility, in the IAEA data acquisition cabinet, for example. The handheld PNNL DA sampler design collects and stabilizes a much smaller DA sample mass compared to current sampling methods. The significantly lower uranium mass reduces the sample radioactivity and the stabilization approach diminishes the risk of uranium and hydrogen fluoride release. These attributes enable safe sample handling needed during onsite LAARS assay and may help ease shipping challenges for samples to be processed at the IAEA’s offsite laboratory. The LAARS and DA sampler implementation concepts will be described and preliminary technical viability results presented.

  4. Formation of calcium carbonate films on chitosan substrates in the presence of polyacrylic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Linghao; Xue, Rui; Song, Rui

    2009-05-15

    In this investigation, chitosan membranes with different surface average degrees of deacetylation (DA) are prepared and then are employed as the support matrix to culture calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}). In the presence of high concentration of polyacrylic acid (PAA), the CaCO{sub 3} films obtained on the surface of all chitosan films mainly consisted of vaterite, which suggests the presence of bulk PAA plays an overwhelming part in stabilizing the vaterite. As a comparison, the influences of active groups indicate that only in case of low concentration PAA the thin CaCO{sub 3} films grown on chitosan with 8% DA mainly consisted of vaterite owing to the strong nucleation ability of -NH{sub 2} group, whereas, for those grown on chitosan with 80% DA the CaCO{sub 3} films mainly consisted of aragonite. A more complex scenario revealed that in the case of intermediate concentration of PAA the formed polymorphs behave as mixtures of vaterite and aragonite. - Graphical abstract: Chitosan membranes with different degrees of deacetylation (DA) are employed as support to culture calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}). In high concentration of polyacrylic acid (PAA), the CaCO{sub 3} films obtained consisted of vaterite. However, the CaCO{sub 3} film grown on chitosan with 8% DA mainly consisted of vaterite as opposed to aragonite for chitosan with 8% DA. The schematic presentation of the formation of calcium carbonate on chitosan films with different degrees of acetylation in the presence of PAA with low-, mid- and high concentrations.

  5. Guideline for Evaluating Analytical Chemistry Capabilities and Recommending Upgraded Methods and Instrumentation for Nuclear Material Control and Accountability at Russian Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russ, G.P.

    1999-10-21

    Analytical chemistry plays a key role in nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A). A large part of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) inventories and virtually all of the highly attractive SNM inventories are based on sampling bulk materials followed by destructive assay (DA) of these materials. These measurements support MC and A in process control, physical inventory verification, evaluation of the effects of process changes, detecting and resolving shipper-receiver differences, and the resolution of inspector-facility differences. When evaluating these important functions, US Project Teams need to carefully assess the existing Russian analytical chemistry capabilities and to specify appropriate upgrades where needed. This evaluation and the specification of upgrades have proven difficult, in part, because of the highly specialized and technical nature of DA and because of the wide variety of methods and applications. In addition, providing a DA capability to a Russian analytical laboratory requires much more than simply supplying new instrumentation. Experience has shown that DA upgrades at Russian analytical facilities require more support equipment than was originally anticipated by US Teams. The purpose of this guidance document is to: (1) recommend criteria for US Projects Teams to use in their evaluation of Russian DA capabilities; (2) provide a basis for selection of appropriate upgrades where capabilities are inadequate to support MC and A goals; and (3) to provide a list of Da methods suitable for MC and A with the following information: performance and applications information, strengths and limitations, and references and information on cost. Criteria for evaluating existing capabilities and determining appropriate upgrades are difficult to define. However, this is the basic information needed by the US project Teams. Section IV addresses these criteria.

  6. Effect of dust-charge fluctuations on dust acoustic solitary waves in an inhomogeneous dusty plasma with nonextensive electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Labany, S. K.; Selim, M. M. E-mail: mselim2000@yahoo.com; Al-Abbasy, O. M.; El-Bedwehy, N. A.

    2015-02-15

    The effects of adiabatic dust grain charge fluctuation and inhomogeneity on the nonlinear properties of dust acoustic (DA) solitary waves are studied. The plasma under consideration is a hot magnetized dusty plasma consisting of negatively charged dust particles, Boltzmann ions, and nonextensive electrons. A modified Zakharov-Kusnetsov equation, which admits a solitary wave solution, is derived using the reductive perturbation theory. It is found that the charge fluctuation of the dust grain modifies the nature of DA solitary structures. The numerical results may be useful to understand phenomena in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  7. Limite Marinha A Estrutura de Pesquisa Climática do Programa Atmospheric

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuvens, Aerossóis e Precipitação na Camada Limite Marinha A Estrutura de Pesquisa Climática do Programa Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM), do Departamento de Ener- gia dos E.U. da América, patrocina, durante 20 meses, uma campanha científica que se realiza na Ilha Graciosa, arquipélago dos Açores. Os cientistas envolvidos na campanha de estudo das Nuvens, Aerossóis e Precipitação da Camada Limite Marinha, utilizam um dispositivo móvel do ARM (ARM Mobile Facility - AMF) para o

  8. Defining the needs for non-destructive assay of UF6 feed, product, and tails at gas centrifuge enrichment plants and possible next steps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Brian D; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Moran, Bruce W; Lebrun, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Current safeguards approaches used by the IAEA at gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) need enhancement in order to detect undeclared LEU production with adequate detection probability using non destructive assay (NDA) techniques. At present inspectors use attended systems, systems needing the presence of an inspector for operation, during inspections to verify the mass and {sup 235}U enrichment of UF{sub 6} bulk material used in the process of enrichment at GCEPS. The inspectors also take destructive assay (DA) samples for analysis off-site which provide accurate, on the order of 0.1 % to 0.5% uncertainty, data on the enrichment of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product. However, DA sample taking is a much more labor intensive and resource intensive exercise for the operator and inspector. Furthermore, the operator must ship the samples off-site to the IAEA laboratory which delays the timeliness of the results and contains the possibility of the loss of the continuity of knowledge of the samples during the storage and transit of the material. Use of the IAEA's inspection sampling algorithm shows that while total sample size is fixed by the total population of potential samples and its intrinsic qualities, the split of the samples into NDA or DA samples is determined by the uncertainties in the NDA measurements. Therefore, the larger the uncertainties in the NDA methods, more of the sample taken must be DA samples. Since the DA sampling is arduous and costly, improvements in NDA methods would reduce the number of DA samples needed. Furthermore, if methods of on-site analysis of the samples could be developed that have uncertainties in the 1-2% range, a lot of the problems inherent in DA sampling could be removed. The use of an unattended system that could give an overview of the entire process giving complementary data on the enrichment process as well as accurate measures of enrichment and weights of the UF{sub 6} feed, tails, and product would be a major step

  9. A=18Ne (1983AJ01)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18Ne) GENERAL: See also (1978AJ03) and Table 18.21 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1979DA15, 1979SA31, 1980ZH01). Electromagnetic transitions: (1977HA1Z, 1979SA31, 1982LA26). Special states: (1977HE18, 1978KR1G, 1979DA15, 1979SA31, 1980OK01, 1982ZH1D). Astrophysical questions: (1978WO1E). Complex reactions involving 18Ne: (1979HE1D). Pion-induced capture and reactions (See also reaction 6.): (1977PE12, 1977SP1B, 1978BU09,

  10. TRACKING CODE DEVELOPMENT FOR BEAM DYNAMICS OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, L.

    2011-03-28

    Dynamic aperture (DA) optimization with direct particle tracking is a straight forward approach when the computing power is permitted. It can have various realistic errors included and is more close than theoretical estimations. In this approach, a fast and parallel tracking code could be very helpful. In this presentation, we describe an implementation of storage ring particle tracking code TESLA for beam dynamics optimization. It supports MPI based parallel computing and is robust as DA calculation engine. This code has been used in the NSLS-II dynamics optimizations and obtained promising performance.

  11. SU-E-J-70: Feasibility Study of Dynamic Arc and IMRT Treatment Plans Utilizing Vero Treatment Unit and IPlan Planning Computer for SRS/FSRT Brain Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huh, S; Lee, S; Dagan, R; Malyapa, R; Mendenhall, N; Mendenhall, W; Ho, M; Hough, D; Yam, M; Li, Z

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of utilizing Dynamic Arc (DA) and IMRT with 5mm MLC leaf of VERO treatment unit for SRS/FSRT brain cancer patients with non-invasive stereotactic treatments. The DA and IMRT plans using the VERO unit (BrainLab Inc, USA) are compared with cone-based planning and proton plans to evaluate their dosimetric advantages. Methods: The Vero treatment has unique features like no rotational or translational movements of the table during treatments, Dynamic Arc/IMRT, tracking of IR markers, limitation of Ring rotation. Accuracies of the image fusions using CBCT, orthogonal x-rays, and CT are evaluated less than ∼ 0.7mm with a custom-made target phantom with 18 hidden targets. 1mm margin is given to GTV to determine PTV for planning constraints considering all the uncertainties of planning computer and mechanical uncertainties of the treatment unit. Also, double-scattering proton plans with 6F to 9F beams and typical clinical parameters, multiple isocenter plans with 6 to 21 isocenters, and DA/IMRT plans are evaluated to investigate the dosimetric advantages of the DA/IMRT for complex shape of targets. Results: 3 Groups of the patients are divided: (1) Group A (complex target shape), CI's are same for IMRT, and DGI of the proton plan are better by 9.5% than that of the IMRT, (2) Group B, CI of the DA plans (1.91+/−0.4) are better than cone-based plan, while DGI of the DA plan is 4.60+/−1.1 is better than cone-based plan (5.32+/−1.4), (3) Group C (small spherical targets), CI of the DA and cone-based plans are almost the same. Conclusion: For small spherical targets, cone-based plans are superior to other 2 plans: DS proton and DA plans. For complex or irregular plans, dynamic and IMRT plans are comparable to cone-based and proton plans for complex targets.

  12. Dust-acoustic shock waves in a charge varying electronegative magnetized dusty plasma with suprathermal electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Bacha, Mustapha

    2012-12-15

    The combined effects of an oblique magnetic field and electron suprathermality on weak dust-acoustic (DA) waves in a charge varying electronegative dusty plasmas with application to the Halley Comet are investigated. The correct suprathermal electron charging current is derived based on the orbit-motion limited approach. A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to derive a Korteweg-de Vries-Burger equation. The electron suprathermality, the obliqueness, and magnitude of the magnetic field are found to modify the dispersive properties of the DA shock structure. Our results may aid to explain and interpret the nonlinear oscillations that may occur in the Halley Comet plasma.

  13. The Complexes of Bisphosphonate and Magnetite Nanoparticles to Remove Uranyl Ions from Aqueous Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, L.; Yang, Z.; Gao, J.; Xu, K.; Gu, H.; Xu, B.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, X.

    2007-03-20

    Using tetraethyl-3-amino-propane-1,1-bisphosphonate (BP) as the functional molecule, we functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles via dopamine (DA) linkage to create a system with an Fe3O4-DA-BP nanostructure, which possesses high specificity for removing uranyl ions from water or blood. This work demonstrates that magnetic nanoparticles, combined with specific receptor-ligand interactions, promise a sensitive and rapid platform for the detection, recovery, and decorporation of radioactive metal toxins from biological environment.

  14. Dissociation of the cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid occurs with the formation of truncated polypeptides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Sang Ki; Ljungdahl, L.G.

    1996-04-16

    The cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum JW20 consists of 14-26 different polypeptides as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The intact cellulosome hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} and thiols. This activity is inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Ca is incorporated into the cellulosome and is tightly bound as demonstrated using {sup 45}Ca added to the growth medium. Upon incubation in 50 mM Tris (pH 7.5), 0.1 M NaCl, and 5 mM EDTA at 37{degrees}C, C is released form the cellulosome, which disintegrates into polypeptides. The SDS-PAGE pattern of cellulosomal polypeptides is remarkably different after the EDTA treatment when compared to this pattern of untreated cellulosomes. Polypeptide bands corresponding to molecular masses of 160, 98, 76, and 54 kDa disappear, and new bands of masses 150, 132, 91, 71, 57,and 46 kDa appear. N-terminal analyses of the 98, 76, 91, and 71 kDa polypeptides show that the 91 and 71 kDa polypeptides are truncated products of the 98 and 76 kDa polypeptides, respectively. The 76 and 71 kDa polypeptides correspond to CelS. The 71 kDa polypeptide is formed from the 76 kDa polypeptide during the EDTA treatment, by a cleavage that occurs at asparagine residue 681. It involves the removal of 60 amino acid residues from the C-terminal end. All catalytic subunits so far characterized contain an asparagine residue corresponding to residue 681 of CelS. This residue is part of the conserved duplicated region found in catalytically active subunits, and it is postulated that several of these subunits also are truncated by the EDTA treatment. The polypeptides truncated by the EDTA treatment had reduced Ca binding capacities compared to their native subunits, indicating a Ca-binding site within the conserved duplicated region. 63 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Crabbed Waist Collisions in DAFNE and Super-B Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raimondi, P.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Biscari, C.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.O.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, Giovanni; Milardi, C.; /Frascati /Orsay, LAL /CERN /Rome III U. /Rome U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /KEK, Tsukuba /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Cosenza /SLAC /Frascati

    2011-11-02

    The new idea of increasing the luminosity of a collider with crab waist collisions and first experimental results from the DA{Phi}NE {Phi}-Factory at LNF, Frascati, using this concept are presented. Consequences for the design of future factories will be discussed. An outlook to the performance reach with crab waist collisions is given, with emphasis on future B Factories.

  16. bectno-evgreb | netl.doe.gov

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... J.M. Stuart Station Unit No.4 (Sept 1992) R.J. Kleisley and C.E. Latham (The Babcock & Wilcox Company), and D.A. Moore, C.P. Bellanca, and H.V. Duong (Dayton Power and Light), ...

  17. A MANUAL FOR THE PREDICTION OF BLAST AND FRAGMENT LOADINGS ON...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... n Da t t l e s i i i p Hardware. (loaded motor and n o r r l e 10.654 Ih) wetgilt of ... r r s t t o p t t con- t a i n i n g one motor; L I n room ad- j o i n i n g sol- v e n t ...

  18. DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop: Final Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    T Th hu ur rs sd da ay y ( (R Ro oo om m G GH H- -0 01 19 ... am HyTrans Model - David Greene, ORNL 10:10 am Market ... Marianne Mintz (ANL), and Mark Ruth (NREL) 12:00 pm Lunch ...

  19. LAX XXlCfl jX?iK, Idd+?KYLViG?IA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    urtim bi:aPing eres and far t3-u jx*uctim and acquisitian 6f W ;aniU CCm- csa:ratc fhzi awes wit2n Lhe Six&e of Pemlsyzvania. 1 da not b&i- the projscrt fmr the ...

  20. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Download Full Report URL: http:en.openei.orgdatasetsdataset6b40f428-2af0-40b3-8a53-0c32c7e35973resource9bfc4b34-78a1-4da9-8928-48a1f72ee8e8downloadmappingandassessmentofth...

  1. Data acquisition for FNAL E665

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geesaman, D.F.; Green, M.C.; Kaufman, S.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Bartlett, J.F.; Melanson, H.L.; Petravick, D.; Michael, D.G.; McLeod, D.; Vidal, M.

    1989-01-01

    The data acquisition system for FNAL E665, an experiment to study deep inelastic muon scattering from nucleons and nuclei, is described. The system is built with the FNAL VAXONLINE and RSX DA building blocks. The structure, capabilities and limitations for data flow, control and monitoring are discussed. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  2. QER- Comment of Christopher Fee

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Until you stop subsidizing and worshipping at the altar of Big Energy, all this "We the people" crapola is just that. We no longer have. Democracy, Mr. Reed, because our government is owned by heartless men with big pockets. Sent from my iPhone. La dee freakin' da.

  3. Remedial investigation concept plan for the groundwater operable units at the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-07-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are conducting cleanup activities at two properties--the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area (the latter includes the training area)--located in the Weldon Spring area in St. Charles County, Missouri. These areas are on the National Priorities List (NPL), and cleanup activities at both areas are conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE and DA are conducting a joint remedial investigation (RI) and baseline risk assessment (BRA) as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the groundwater operable units for the two areas. This joint effort will optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts and facilitate overall remedial decision making since the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. A Work Plan issued jointly in 1995 by DOE and the DA discusses the results of investigations completed at the time of preparation of the report. The investigations were necessary to provide an understanding of the groundwater system beneath the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area. The Work Plan also identifies additional data requirements for verification of the evaluation presented.

  4. ARM - 2011 AGU Presentations Featuring ARM Data

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... (NPOL) Radar Data from MC3E DA Marks, DB Wolff 1:40 pm, M-South Poster A23A-0125. ... WA Petersen, PN Gatlin, M Wingo, DB Wolff, LD Carey 1:40 pm, M-South Poster ...

  5. Three dimensional dust-acoustic solitary waves in an electron depleted dusty plasma with two-superthermal ion-temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borhanian, J.; Shahmansouri, M.

    2013-01-15

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to study the existence and characteristics of propagation of dust-acoustic (DA) waves in an electron-depleted dusty plasma with two-temperature ions, which are modeled by kappa distribution functions. A three-dimensional cylindrical Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation governing evolution of small but finite amplitude DA waves is derived by means of a reductive perturbation method. The influence of physical parameters on solitary wave structure is examined. Furthermore, the energy integral equation is used to study the existence domains of the localized structures. It is found that the present model can be employed to describe the existence of positive as well as negative polarity DA solitary waves by selecting special values for parameters of the system, e.g., superthermal index of cold and/or hot ions, cold to hot ion density ratio, and hot to cold ion temperature ratio. This model may be useful to understand the excitation of nonlinear DA waves in astrophysical objects.

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Matthews, D.L. (3) Maxwell, R (3) Singhal, P (3) Benett, W (2) Chinn, S C (2) Chinn, S. C. (2) Da Silva, L.B. (2) Dinh, L N (2) Gee, R. H. (2) Glascoe, E A (2) Heredia, N.J. (2) ...

  7. Aquantis Ocean Current Turbine Development Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, Alex J.

    2014-08-23

    The Aquantis® Current Plane (“C-Plane”) technology developed by Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) and Aquantis, Inc. is an ocean current turbine designed to extract kinetic energy from ocean currents. The technology is capable of achieving competitively priced base-load, continuous, and reliable power generation from a source of renewable energy not before possible in this scale or form.

  8. IT'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ry, Staff A8rirto;lt - * lL : .., . . . . ir Dso8lubsr e, 1947 B. 8a Wdf, YbDa, W tSrir Dlruotw a, :', - , , , SU3OL1 . -* ,, r:-, . -11 m . ..' I: ., ' y . .' .I '.,',y .I. . ...

  9. Virginia Senate Approves Budget Deal to Include Money for FEL (Daily Press)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    | Jefferson Lab Virginia Senate Approves Budget Deal to Include Money for FEL (Daily Press) External Link: http://articles.dailypress.com/2012-04-18/news/dp-nws-general-assembly-budget-da... By jlab_admin on Wed, 2012-04-18

  10. Subunit composition and glycosidic activities of the cellulase complex from Clostridium thermocellum JW20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohring, S.; Mayer, F. ); Wiegel, J. )

    1990-12-01

    The subunit composition of the extracellular complex from Clostridium thermocellum was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Twenty-six bands, representing proteins with apparent molecular sizes ranging from 37,500 to 185,000 Da, could be detected by silver staining. Endoglucanase activity was exhibited in 15 of 26 bands and 13 showed xylanase activity. In 8 of the 26 bands, both activities could be found. As minor activities, {beta}-glucosidase, {beta}-xylosidase, {beta}-galactosidase, and {beta}-mannosidase activities could be demonstrated in the cellulase complex. Upon measuring the release of para-nitrophenol (PNP) from PNP-cellobioside and determining the amount of glucose formed, the presence of exoglucanase activity was indicated. Upon glycoprotein staining of SDS-polyacrylamide gels, 14 of the 26 bands reacted positive, indicating the glycoprotein nature of the respective proteins. Four proteins (apparent molecular sizes, 58,000, 72,500, 94,000, and 110,000 Da) could be enriched from the originally bound cellulase complex by preparative SDS-PAGE. The two smaller proteins exhibited xylanase activity, whereas the 94,000-Da protein had endo- and exoglucanase activity, and the 110,000-Da protein degraded PNP-pyranosides.

  11. 9Be Cross Section

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    S-factor Ecm 0.16 - 1.87 S(E) X4 01242012 2011GI05 9Be(, n): for n1 0.3 - 7.9 linear scale, log scale 06182012 1968DA05 9Be(, n): excitation function at 0...

  12. A thiocyanate hydrolase of Thiobacillus thioparus. A novel enzyme catalyzing the formation of carbonyl sulfide from thiocyanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katayama, Y.; Narahara, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Amano, F.; Kanagawa, T.; Kuraishi, H. (Faculty of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, (Japan))

    1992-05-05

    A thiocyanate hydrolase that catalyzes the first step in thiocyanate degradation was purified to homogeneity from Thiobacillus thioparus, an obligate chemolithotrophic eubacterium metabolizing thiocyanate to sulfate as an energy source. The thiocyanate hydrolase was purified 52-fold by steps involving ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-Sephacel column chromatography, and hydroxylapatite column chromatography. The enzyme hydrolyzed 1 mol of thiocyanate to form 1 mol of carbonyl sulfide and 1 mol of ammonia as follows: SCN- + 2H2O----COS + NH3 + OH-. This is the first report describing the hydrolysis of thiocyanate to carbonyl sulfide by an enzyme. The enzyme had a molecular mass of 126 kDa and was composed of three different subunits: alpha (19 kDa), beta (23 kDa), and gamma (32 kDa). The enzyme exhibited optimal activities at pH 7.5-8.0 and at temperatures ranging from 30 to 40 degrees C. The Km value for thiocyanate was approximately 11 mM. Immunoblot analysis with polyclonal antibodies against the purified enzyme suggested that it was induced in T. thioparus cells when the cells were grown with thiocyanate.

  13. A=18O (1983AJ01)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    1979DA15, 1979WU06, 1980GO01, 1980KU05, 1980MA18, 1981EL1D, 1982KI02, 1982OL01). Cluster, collective and deformed models: (1977BU22, 1978BU03, 1978CH26, 1978PI1E,...

  14. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Rapp, D.R. Doelling, M.L. Nordeen, W.L. Smith, Jr., and P. Minnis A 4-Year Study of the ... Experiment D.A. Rutan, F.G. Rose, N. Smith, and T.P. Charlock Characterization of ...

  15. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; Fowler, Joanna S.; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-07-21

    Metamphetamine’s widepread abuse and concerns that it may increase Parkinson’s disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [11C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [11C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [11C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when compared to controls (n=15). In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of

  16. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: Comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J. Timothy; Champion, Paul M.

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical “gating” distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working

  17. INTEGRATION OF PANDA WORKLOAD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM WITH SUPERCOMPUTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De, K; Jha, S; Maeno, T; Mashinistov, R.; Nilsson, P; Novikov, A.; Oleynik, D; Panitkin, S; Poyda, A.; Ryabinkin, E.; Teslyuk, A.; Tsulaia, V.; Velikhov, V.; Wen, G.; Wells, Jack C; Wenaus, T

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the funda- mental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe, and were recently credited for the dis- covery of a Higgs boson. ATLAS, one of the largest collaborations ever assembled in the sciences, is at the forefront of research at the LHC. To address an unprecedented multi-petabyte data processing challenge, the ATLAS experiment is relying on a heterogeneous distributed computational infrastructure. The ATLAS experiment uses PanDA (Production and Data Analysis) Workload Management System for managing the workflow for all data processing on over 140 data centers. Through PanDA, ATLAS physicists see a single computing facility that enables rapid scientific breakthroughs for the experiment, even though the data cen- ters are physically scattered all over the world. While PanDA currently uses more than 250000 cores with a peak performance of 0.3+ petaFLOPS, next LHC data taking runs will require more resources than Grid computing can possibly provide. To alleviate these challenges, LHC experiments are engaged in an ambitious program to expand the current computing model to include additional resources such as the opportunistic use of supercomputers. We will describe a project aimed at integration of PanDA WMS with supercomputers in United States, Europe and Russia (in particular with Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge Leadership Com- puting Facility (OLCF), Supercomputer at the National Research Center Kurchatov Institute , IT4 in Ostrava, and others). The current approach utilizes a modified PanDA pilot framework for job submission to the supercomputers batch queues and local data management, with light-weight MPI wrappers to run single- threaded workloads in parallel on Titan s multi-core worker nodes. This implementation was tested with a variety of

  18. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; Fowler, Joanna S.; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-07-21

    Metamphetamine’s widepread abuse and concerns that it may increase Parkinson’s disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [11C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [11C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [11C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when compared to controls (n=15).more » In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of dopamine terminals.« less

  19. Corotating solar wind structures and recurrent trains of enhanced diurnal variation in galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeeram, T.; Ruffolo, D.; Siz, A.; Kamyan, N.; Nutaro, T. E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th E-mail: p_chang24@hotmail.com

    2014-04-01

    Data from the Princess Sirindhorn Neutron Monitor at Doi Inthanon, Thailand, with a vertical cutoff rigidity of 16.8 GV, were utilized to determine the diurnal anisotropy (DA) of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) near Earth during solar minimum conditions between 2007 November and 2010 November. We identified trains of enhanced DA over several days, which often recur after a solar rotation period (?27 days). By investigating solar coronal holes as identified from synoptic maps and solar wind parameters, we found that the intensity and anisotropy of cosmic rays are associated with the high-speed streams (HSSs) in the solar wind, which are in turn related to the structure and evolution of coronal holes. An enhanced DA was observed after the onset of some, but not all, HSSs. During time periods of recurrent trains, the DA was often enhanced or suppressed according to the sign of the interplanetary magnetic field B, which suggests a contribution from a mechanism involving a southward gradient in the GCR density, n, and a gradient anisotropy along B ?n. In one non-recurrent and one recurrent sequence, an HSS from an equatorial coronal hole was merged with that from a trailing mid-latitude extension of a polar coronal hole, and the slanted HSS structure in space with suppressed GCR density can account for the southward GCR gradient. We conclude that the gradient anisotropy is a source of temporary changes in the GCR DA under solar minimum conditions, and that the latitudinal GCR gradient can sometimes be explained by the coronal hole morphology.

  20. Dust-acoustic solitary structures in a magnetized dusty plasma with two-temperature nonextensive electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emamuddin, M.; Yasmin, S.; Asaduzzaman, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-08-15

    The nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic (DA) waves in an obliquely propagating magnetized dusty plasma, containing nonextensively distributed electrons of distinct temperatures (namely lower and higher temperature nonextensive electrons), negatively charged mobile dust grains, and Maxwellian ions, is rigorously studied and analyzed by deriving the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation. It is found that the characteristics of the DA solitary waves (DASWs) are significantly modified by the external magnetic field, obliqueness of the system, nonextensivity of the electrons, electron temperature-ratios, and the respective number densities of two species of electrons. The results obtained from this analysis can be employed in understanding and treating the structures and the characteristics of DASWs both in laboratory and astrophysical plasma system.

  1. Combined Dilute Acid and Solvent Based Pretreatment of Agricultural Wastes for Efficient Lignocellulosic Fractionation and Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodeur, G.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Wilson, C.; Telotte, J.; Collier, J.; Stickel, J.

    2013-01-01

    A true biorefinery for processing lignocellulosic biomass should achieve maximum utilization of all major constituents (cellulose, hemicellulose, & lignin) within the feedstock. In this work a combined pretreatment process of dilute acid (DA) and N-methyl morpholine N-oxide (NMMO) is described that allows for both fractionation and subsequent complete hydrolysis of the feedstocks (corn stover and sugarcane bagasse). During this multi-step processing, the dilute acid pretreatment solubilizes the majority (>90%) of the hemicellulosic fraction, while the NMMO treatment yields a cellulosic fraction that is completely digestible within 48 hours at low enzyme loadings. With both the cellulosic and hemicellulosic fractions being converted into separate, dissolved sugar fractions, the remaining portion is nearly pure lignin. When used independently, DA and NMMO pretreatments are only able to achieve ~80% and ~45% cellulosic conversion, respectively. Mass balance calculations along with experimental results are used to illustrate the feasibility of separation and recycling of NMMO.

  2. A=16O (1959AJ76)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 16O) GENERAL: See also Table 16.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (DE54C, FL54A, HE55F, JA55A, MA55F, MA55O, SC55A, WI55F, EL56, FE56B, JA56C, KA56A, MO56, PE56A, RE56B, WI56C, EL57B, FE57D, GR57C, HE57B, RE57, TA57A, TO57A, CA58C, DA58A, DA58D, FE58A, FE58B, HA58B, MO58, RA58F, UM58, WI58G). 1. 12C(α, γ)16O Qm = 7.148 Resonant capture radiation to 16Og.s. is observed at Eα ~ 3.24 MeV, corresponding to the known J = 1- state at

  3. A=18F (1983AJ01)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18F) GENERAL: See also (1978AJ03) and Table 18.11 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1977AN1P, 1977GR16, 1977SO1C, 1978CO08, 1978DA1N, 1978MA2H, 1979BU12, 1979DA15, 1980GO01, 1980KU05, 1980MA18, 1981EL1D, 1981ER03, 1981GR06, 1982KI02). Cluster, collective and deformed models: (1977BU22, 1978BU03, 1978PI1E, 1978SA15, 1978TA1A, 1979BU12, 1979SA31, 1980RO19, 1981CH24). Electromagnetic transitions: (1976MC1G, 1977BU22, 1977HA1Z, 1977HE1L,

  4. A=19Ne (1983AJ01)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19Ne) GENERAL: See (1978AJ03) and Table 19.23 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1978MA2H, 1978PE09, 1978PI06, 1979DA15, 1979MA27, 1979PE16, 1982KI02). Electromagnetic transitions: (1978PE09, 1978SC19, 1979MA27, 1979PE16). Special states: (1978MA2H, 1978PE09, 1978PI06, 1978SC19, 1979DA15, 1980OK01, 1982KI02). Astrophysical questions: (1977SI1D, 1978WO1E, 1979RA1C). Applied topics: (1979AL1Q). Complex reactions involving 19Ne:

  5. A=19O (1983AJ01)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19O) GENERAL: See (1978AJ03) and Table 19.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1977GR16, 1979DA15, 1980KU05, 1982KI02). Electromagnetic transitions: (1976MC1G, 1978KR19, 1980KU05). Special states: (1977GR16, 1977SH18, 1979DA15, 1982KI02). Astrophysical questions: (1978WO1E). Complex reactions involving 19O: (1978KO01, 1979AL22, 1981GR08). Other topics: (1977GR16, 1977SH18, 1979BE1H, 1979CO09, 1980SH1H, 1982KI02). Ground-state properties

  6. Ultrafast electron transfer at organic semiconductor interfaces: Importance of molecular orientation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayzner, Alexander L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do -Hwan; Bao, Zhenan; Toney, Michael F.

    2014-12-04

    Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.

  7. Regional

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    3 AÇORIANO ORIENTAL SEGUNDA-FEIRA, 5 DE MARÇO DE 2012 PUB Da Graciosa para a Índia graças à estação atmosférica Carlos está atualmente a trabalhar na estação atmosférica móvel instalada na Índia, a dois mil metros de altitude Estar no lugar certo na hora cer- ta pode mudar radicalmente a vida de uma pessoa. Foi isso que aconteceu ao graciosense Carlos Sousa, de 41 anos, que começou por ser trabalhador daconstrução civil antes de emigrar para os Es- tados Unidos da América. No

  8. The application of a logic framework for fatigue crack growth analyses to microstructural effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, J.G.; Liu, H.W.

    1995-12-31

    {Delta}K has been widely used to correlate da/dN data. The relation between da/dN and {Delta}K is usually found empirically. However, fatigue crack growth relations can also be derived theoretically. Three fatigue crack growth theories are derived for the state of small scale yielding and plane strain. These three theories constitute a logic framework useful for fatigue crack growth analyses. The application of the logic framework to the analyses of microstructural effects on fatigue crack growth is illustrated. The fatigue crack growth curve of 7075-T651 aluminum alloy has five distinct regions. A fatigue crack grows by crack-tip shear decohesion forming striations and by brittle fractures of particles followed by localized shear decohesion at these microcracks forming dimples. The logic framework helps to relate the fatigue crack growth behaviors in these five regions to the fractures of inclusions and to the resistance of grain boundaries and dispersoids to shear decohesion.

  9. Agenda for the Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    January 25, 2006 U.S. Department of Energy Forrestal Building, Room GJ-015 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 F FI IN NA AL L A AG GE EN ND DA A J Ja an nu ua ar ry y 2 25 5, , W We ed dn ne es sd da ay y ( (R Ro oo om m G GJ J- -0 01 15 5) ) (attendance is limited to members of the FreedomCAR & Fuel Partnership Tech Teams and invited presenters) 8:00 am Registration 8:30 am Welcome and Introductions 8:45 am Agenda and Purpose - Mark Paster, DOE-HFCIT 9:00 am On-Board Storage

  10. Optimization of dynamic aperture for hadron lattices in eRHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing, Yichao; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Trbojevic, Dejan

    2015-05-03

    The potential upgrade of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to an electron ion collider (eRHIC) involves numerous extensive changes to the existing collider complex. The expected very high luminosity is planned to be achieved at eRHIC with the help of squeezing the beta function of the hadron ring at the IP to a few cm, causing a large rise of the natural chromaticities and thus bringing with it challenges for the beam long term stability (Dynamic aperture). We present our effort to expand the DA by carefully tuning the nonlinear magnets thus controlling the size of the footprints in tune space and all lower order resonance driving terms. We show a reasonably large DA through particle tracking over millions of turns of beam revolution.

  11. Three-Stage Production Cost Modeling Approach for Evaluating the Benefits of Intra-Hour Scheduling between Balancing Authorities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samaan, Nader A.; Milligan, Michael; Hunsaker, Matthew; Guo, Tao

    2015-07-30

    This paper introduces a Production Cost Modeling (PCM) approach to evaluate the benefits of intra-hour scheduling between Balancing Authorities (BAs). The system operation is modeled in a three-stage sequential manner: day ahead (DA)-hour ahead (HA)-real time (RT). In addition to contingency reserve, each BA will need to carry out “up” and “down” load following and regulation reserve capacity requirements in the DA and HA time frames. In the real-time simulation, only contingency and regulation reserves are carried out as load following is deployed. To model current real-time operation with hourly schedules, a new constraint was introduced to force each BA net exchange schedule deviation from HA schedules to be within NERC ACE limits. Case studies that investigate the benefits of moving from hourly exchange schedules between WECC BAs into 10-min exchange schedules under two different levels of wind and solar penetration (11% and 33%) are presented.

  12. Development of a removable conformal coating through the synthetic incorporation of Diels-Adler thermally reversible adducts into an epoxy resin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, James Henry; Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Tallant, David Robert; Garcia, Manuel Joseph

    2005-02-01

    An epoxy-based conformal coating with a very low modulus has been developed for the environmental protection of electronic devices and for stress relief of those devices. The coating was designed to be removable by incorporating thermally-reversible Diels-Alder (D-A) adducts into the epoxy resin utilized in the formulation. The removability of the coating allows us to recover expensive components during development, to rebuild during production, to upgrade the components during their lifetime, to perform surveillance after deployment, and it aids in dismantlement of the components after their lifetime. The removability is the unique feature of this coating and was characterized by modulus versus temperature measurements, dissolution experiments, viscosity quench experiments, and FTIR. Both the viscosity quench experiments and the FTIR measurements allowed us to estimate the equilibrium constant of the D-A adducts in a temperature range from room temperature to 90 C.

  13. Ultrafast electron transfer at organic semiconductor interfaces: Importance of molecular orientation

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Ayzner, Alexander L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do -Hwan; Bao, Zhenan; Toney, Michael F.

    2014-12-04

    Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximatelymore » 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.« less

  14. Structure of Glycerol Dehydratase Reactivase: A New Type of Molecular Chaperone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Der-Ing; Reiss, Lisa; Turner, Jr., Ivan; Dotson, Garry

    2010-03-08

    The function of glycerol dehydratase (GDH) reactivase is to remove damaged coenzyme B{sub 12} from GDH that has suffered mechanism-based inactivation. The structure of GDH reactivase from Klebsiella pneumoniae was determined at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution by the single isomorphous replacement with anomalous signal (SIR/AS) method. Each tetramer contains two elongated 63 kDa {alpha} subunits and two globular 14 kDa {beta} subunits. The {alpha} subunit contains structural features resembling both GroEL and Hsp70 groups of chaperones, and it appears chaperone like in its interactions with ATP. The fold of the {beta} subunit resembles that of the {beta} subunit of glycerol dehydratase, except that it lacks some coenzyme B12 binding elements. A hypothesis for the reactivation mechanism of reactivase is proposed based on these structural features.

  15. 13N

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    N β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1950HO01: 13N. 1953CH34: 13N. 1954GR66: 13N. 1955WI43: 13N. 1957DA08: 13N. 1957DE22: 13N. 1957NO17: 13N. 1958AR15: 13N. 1958DA09: 13N. 1960JA12: 13N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960KI02: 13N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1965BO42: 13N; measured T1/2. 1965EB01: 13N; measured T1/2. 1968RI15: 13N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1971GO40: 13N. 1973SIYS: 13N; measured T1/2. 1977AZ01: 13N;

  16. Polymer blend containing a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer and a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    matrix polymer (Patent) | DOEPatents Polymer blend containing a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer and a matrix polymer Title: Polymer blend containing a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer and a matrix polymer Dense star polymers or dendrimers, modified by capping with a hydrophobic group capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell, act as molecular nucleating agents in forming a polymer blend. Inventors: Hedstrand, D.M. ; Tomalia, D.A. Issue Date: 1995-02-28 OSTI Identifier:

  17. Present Status of the DAFNE Upgrade And Perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milardi, C.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Biscari, C.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, G.; Murtas, F.; /Frascati /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN /INFN, Cosenza /INFN, Rome /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL /Rome U. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /SLAC /Rome III U.

    2009-06-05

    The DA{Phi}NE collider has been recently upgraded in order to implement a new collision scheme based on large Piwinski angle and cancellation of the synchro-betatron resonances by means of electromagnetic sextupoles (Crab-Waist compensation). The novel approach has proved to be effective in improving beam-beam interaction and collider luminosity. The results and the measurements taken during commissioning as well as the perspectives for the SIDDHARTA run are presented and discussed.

  18. Chemical Physics | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics FWP/Project Description: Project Leader(s): James Evans, Mark Gordon Principal Investigators: James Evans, Mark Gordon, Klaus Ruedenberg, Theresa Windus Key Scientific Personnel: Da-Jiang Liu, Michael Schmidt. The theoretical Chemical Physics program at Ames Laboratory supports integrated efforts in electronic structure theory and non-equilibrium statistical mechanical & multiscale modeling. The primary focus is on the development and especially application of methods that enable the

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - NGF-NUG

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Global File System Update Shane Canon Data Systems Group Leader Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory NERSC All Hands Meeting September 24, 2008 NERSC Global File System * NERSC Global File System (NGF) provides a common global file system for the NERSC systems. * Currently mounted on all major systems - Bassi, Da Vinci, Franklin (login only), Jacquard, PDSF * Currently provides Project space * Targeted for files that need to be shared across a project and/or used on multiple systems. NGF and

  20. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    New Method for Retrieving Cloud Heights from Satellite Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Chang, F., Science Systems and Applications, Inc. Minnis, P., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Chang F, P Minnis, B Lin, MM Khaiyer, R Palikonda, and DA Spangenberg. 2010. "A modified method for inferring cloud top height using GOES-12 imager 10.7- and 13.3-µm data." Journal of

  1. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Parameterizing the Mixing State of Complex Submicron Aerosols Using Chemical Imaging Download a printable PDF Submitter: Moffet, R., University of the Pacific Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: O'Brien RE, B Wang, A Laskin, N Riemer, M West, Q Zhang, Y Sun, X Yu, P Alpert, DA Knopf, MK Gilles, and RC Moffet. 2015. "Chemical imaging of ambient aerosol particles: Observational constraints on mixing state parameterization." Journal

  2. ELECTROCHEMICALLY-MODULATED SEPARATIONS FOR SAFEGUARDS MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.; Arrigo, Leah M.; Liezers, Martin; Orton, Christopher R.; Douglas, Matthew; Peper, Shane M.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Hazelton, Sandra G.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

    2010-08-11

    A critical objective of materials accountability in safeguards is the accurate and timely analysis of fuel reprocessing streams to detect both abrupt and prolonged diversions of nuclear materials. For this reason both on-line nondestructive (NDA) and destructive analysis (DA) approaches are sought-after. Current methods for DA involve grab sampling and laboratory based column extractions that are costly, hazardous, and time consuming. While direct on-line gamma measurements of Pu are desirable, they are not possible due to contributions from other actinides and fission products. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are currently investigating electrochemically-modulated separation (EMS) as a straightforward, cost-effective technology for selective separation of Pu or U from aqueous reprocessing streams. The EMS selectivity is electrochemically controlled and results from the sorption of Pu4+ and U4+ redox states onto the anodized target electrode, allowing for selective accumulation of U or Pu from nitric acid streams to be turned “on” or “off.” It is envisioned that this technology can be utilized to isolate Pu for both NDA and DA analysis. For the NDA approach, rapid Pu analysis by gamma-ray spectroscopy could be performed after chemical clean-up of activation and fission products by EMS. Likewise, in the DA approach, EMS could be used to retain and concentrate the Pu in nanogram quantities on the electrode surface to be transported to the lab for analysis using high precision mass spectrometry. Due to the challenges associated with complex matrices, a systematic investigation of the redox-dependent accumulation of Pu using EMS was necessary, and results will be presented. Approaches to mitigate interelement effects using large surface area cells will also be discussed. The EMS chemistry and spectroscopy for Pu isolation and measurement will be presented, proof-of-principle measurements will be described, and the application of this

  3. Identifying and Understanding Environment-Induced Crack propagation Behavior in Ni-based Superalloy INCONEL 617

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Longzhou

    2012-11-30

    The nickel-based superalloy INCONEL 617 is a candidate material for heat exchanger applications in the next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) system. This project will study the crack propagation process of alloy 617 at temperatures of 650°C-950°C in air under static/cyclic loading conditions. The goal is to identify the environmental and mechanical damage components and to understand in-depth the failure mechanism. Researchers will measure the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rate (da/dn) under cyclic and hold-time fatigue conditions, and sustained crack growth rates (da/dt) at elevated temperatures. The independent FCP process will be identified and the rate-controlled sustained loading crack process will be correlated with the thermal activation equation to estimate the oxygen thermal activation energy. The FCP-dependent model indicates that if the sustained loading crack growth rate, da/dt, can be correlated with the FCP rate, da/dn, at the full time dependent stage, researchers can confirm stress-accelerated grain-boundary oxygen embrittlement (SAGBOE) as a predominate effect. Following the crack propagation tests, the research team will examine the fracture surface of materials in various cracking stages using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an optical microscope. In particular, the microstructure of the crack tip region will be analyzed in depth using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) mapping techniques to identify oxygen penetration along the grain boundary and to examine the diffused oxygen distribution profile around the crack tip. The cracked sample will be prepared by focused ion beam nanofabrication technology, allowing researchers to accurately fabricate the TEM samples from the crack tip while minimizing artifacts. Researchers will use these microscopic and spectroscopic results to interpret the crack propagation process, as well as distinguish and understand the environment or

  4. SU-E-T-84: Comparison of Three Different Systems for Patient-Specific Quality Assurance: Cranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery Using VMAT with Multiple Non Coplanar Arcs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fusella, M; Fiandra, C; Giglioli, F; Ricardi, U; Ragona, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Patient-specific quality assurance in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) brain stereotactic radiosurgery raises specific issues on dosimetric procedures, mainly represented by the small radiation fields associated with the lack of lateral electronic equilibrium, the need of small detectors and the high dose delivered. The purpose of the study is to compare three different dosimeters for pre-treatment QA. Methods: Nineteen patients (affected by neurinomas, brain metastases, and by meningiomas) were treated with VMAT plans computed on a Monte Carlo based TPS. Gafchromic films inside a slab phantom (GF), 3-D cylindrical phantom with two orthogonal diodes array (DA), and 3-D cylindrical phantom with a single rotating ionization chambers array (ICA), have been evaluated. The dosimeters are, respectively, characterized by a spatial resolution of: 0.4 (in our method), 5 and 2.5 mm. For GF we used a double channel method for calibration and reading protocol; for DA and ICA we used the 3-D dose distributions reconstructed by the two software sold with the dosimeters. With the need of a common system for analyze different measuring approaches, we used an in-house software that analyze a single coronal plane in the middle of the phantoms and Gamma values (2% / 2 mm and 3% / 3 mm) were computed for all patients and dosimeters. Results: The percentage of points with gamma values less than one was: 95.7% for GF, 96.8% for DA and 95% for ICA, using 3%/3mm criteria, and 90.1% for GF, 92.4% for DA and 92% for ICA, using 2% / 2mm gamma criteria. Tstudent test p-values obtained by comparing the three datasets were not statistically significant for both gamma criteria. Conclusion: Gamma index analysis is not affected by different spatial resolution of the three dosimeters.

  5. Isolation and characterization of Solenopsis invicta virus 3, a new positive-strand RNA virus infecting the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valles, Steven M.; Hashimoto, Yoshifumi

    2009-06-05

    We report the discovery of a new virus from the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) represents the third virus discovered from this ant species using the metagenomics approach. The single (positive)-strand RNA, monopartite, bicistronic genome of SINV-3 was sequenced in entirety (GenBank accession number (FJ528584)), comprised of 10,386 nucleotides, and polyadenylated at the 3' terminus. This genome size was confirmed by Northern analysis. The genome revealed 2 large open reading frames (ORFs) in the sense orientation with an untranslated region (UTR) at each end and between the two ORFs. The 5' proximal ORF (ORF 1) encoded a predicted protein of 299.1 kDa (2580 amino acids). The 3' proximal ORF (ORF 2) encoded a predicted protein of 73.2 kDa (651 amino acids). RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), helicase, and protease domains were recognized in ORF 1. SDS-PAGE separation of purified SINV-3 particles yielded 2 bands (ostensibly capsid proteins) with a combined molecular mass of 77.3 kDa which was similar to the mass predicted by ORF 2 (73.2 kDa). Phylogenetic analysis of the conserved amino acid sequences containing domains I to VIII of the RdRp from dicistroviruses, iflaviruses, plant small RNA viruses, picornaviruses, and 4 unassigned positive-strand RNA viruses revealed a trichotomous phenogram with SINV-3 and Kelp fly virus comprising a unique cluster. Electron microscopic examination of negatively stained samples of SINV-3 revealed isometric particles with apparent projections and a diameter of 27.3 +- 1.3 nm. SINV-3 was successfully transmitted to uninfected workers by feeding. The minus (replicative) strand of SINV-3 was detected in worker ants indicating replication of the virus. The possibility of using SINV-3 as a microbial control agent for fire ants is discussed.

  6. Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine Project Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine Project Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine Project 13_aquantismhk_da_alexfleming.pptx (2.33 MB) More Documents & Publications Aquantis 2.5MW Ocean Current Generation Device 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies CX-005670: Categorical

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    da Costa Sousa, Leonardo" Name Name ORCID Product Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium,

  8. December 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information December 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous electrolyte solutions at high temperatures and high pressures Ho, P.C.; Palmer, D.A. (1995) 184 LITERATURE REVIEW OF BORIC ACID SOLUBILITY DATA Crapse, K.; Kyser, E. (2011) 140 Decomposition of calcium sulfate: a review of the literature. [62 refs] Swift, W M; Panek, A F; Smith, G W; Vogel, G J; Jonke, A A (1976) 130 Devices to improve the

  9. June 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information June 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry Flammability characteristics of combustible gases and vapors. [249 refs] Zabetakis, M.G. (1964) 41 Vapor-liquid equilibria for nitric acid-water and plutonium nitrate-nitric acid-water solutions Maimoni, A. (1980) 25 Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous electrolyte solutions at high temperatures and high pressures Ho, P.C.; Palmer, D.A. (1995) 25 Efficient computation of volume of

  10. June 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information June 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous electrolyte solutions at high temperatures and high pressures Ho, P.C.; Palmer, D.A. (1995) 101 Vapor-liquid equilibria for nitric acid-water and plutonium nitrate-nitric acid-water solutions Maimoni, A. (1980) 97 Nuclear magnetic resonance measurement of ammonia diffusion in dense solid-liquid slurries. Revision 1 Bobroff, S.; Phillips, R.J. [Univ. of

  11. Most Viewed Documents - Chemistry | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information - Chemistry Flammability characteristics of combustible gases and vapors. [249 refs] Zabetakis, M.G. (1964) Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous electrolyte solutions at high temperatures and high pressures Ho, P.C.; Palmer, D.A. (1995) Aqueous electrolyte modeling in ASPEN PLUS{trademark} Bloomingburg, G.F. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)];

  12. Microsoft Word - ayers_jk.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Overview of National Aeronautics and Space Agency Langley Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Project Cloud Products and Validation J.K. Ayers, R. Palikonda, M. Khaiyer, D.R. Doelling, D.A. Spangenberg, M.L. Nordeen, D.N. Phan, and H. Yi Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis and L. Nguyen National Aeronautics and Space Agency Langley Research Center Climate Science Branch Hampton, Virginia Q.Z. Trepte Science Applications International Corporation Hampton, Virginia

  13. Modeling & Simulation publications

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling and Simulation in the Chemical Sciences » Modeling & Simulation Publications Modeling & Simulation publications Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise David Harradine Physical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy Email Josh Smith Chemistry Email The inherent knowledge of transformation has beguiled sorcerers and scientists alike. D.A. Horner, F. Lambert, J.D. Kress,

  14. Molecular Foundry

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    See the Foundry's full equipment list Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis Capabilities & Tools Instrument Scheduler Major Instruments and Capabilities AB SCIEX TF4800 MALDI TOF-TOF Mass Spectrometer This instrument is the tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer systems, providing the excellent level of molecular mass coverage in the range of molecular masses 500 and 150,000 Da, high throughput, and confidence in both qualitative and quantitative analyses. The analyzer combines all of the

  15. Active control of magnetoresistance of organic spin valves using

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ferroelectricity (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Active control of magnetoresistance of organic spin valves using ferroelectricity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Active control of magnetoresistance of organic spin valves using ferroelectricity Authors: Sun, Da-Li [1] ; Xu, Xiaoshan [1] ; Jiang, Lu [1] ; Guo, Hangwen [1] ; Lee, Ho Nyung [1] ; Snijders, Paul C [1] ; Ward, Thomas Zac [1] ; Gai, Zheng [1] ; Zhang, Xiaoguang [1] ; Shen, Jian [2] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL

  16. Aquantis 2.5MW Ocean Current Generation Device | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Aquantis 2.5MW Ocean Current Generation Device Aquantis 2.5MW Ocean Current Generation Device Aquantis 2.5MW Ocean Current Generation Device 12_aquantisawp_da_alexfleming.pptx (2.06 MB) More Documents & Publications Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine Project 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies 2014 Wind Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations

  17. Dynamics of excitons and charges in organic materials and semiconductor

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    nanocrystals for optoelectronics | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics excitons and charges in organic materials and semiconductor nanocrystals for optoelectronics December 5, 2014 at 3pm/RLE Haus 36-428 Laurens D.A. Siebbeles Department of Chemical Engineering, Delft University of Technology Siebbeles01 Abstract: The seminar will report studies on excitons and charge carriers in conjugated polymers, covalent organic frameworks and semiconductor nanocrystals. These materials have fascinating

  18. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud and Radiative Properties Derived Over the ARM NSA Domain From AVHRR Data Heck, P.W., Nguyen, L., Smith, W. L., Jr., Ayers, J.K., Doelling, D.R., and Spangenberg, D.A., Analytical Services and Materials, Inc.; Minnis, P., and Young, D.F., National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Langley Research Center Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's polar sites on the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) measure time

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Collocated Satellite, Surface and Sounding Data Emerges On-line from CAVE (CERES ARM Validation Experiment) at SGP Rose, F.G., Rutan, D.A., Smith, N.M., and Alberta, T.L., Analytical Services and Materials, Inc.; Charlock, T.P., National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Langley Research Center Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) broadband observations from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument on the

  20. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Convective Triggering/Capping Inversions in the Southern Great Plains Cripe, D.G. (a) and Randall, D.A. (b), Colorado State University Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting An algorithm for determining Generalized Convective Available Potential Energy (GCAPE) has been developed at Colorado State University. This particular algorithm differs from other CAPE-determining algorithms in that convective clouds are allowed to originate at multiple levels, and the effects

  1. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact of Clouds on the Atmospheric Absorption of SW - Comparing Theory and Observation at SGP Rose, F.G. (a), Charlock, T.P. (b), and Rutan, D.A. (a), Analytical Services & Materials Inc. (a), NASA Langley Research Center (b) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting This group, and also Li and Trishchenko, have earlier determined the cloud forcing to the atmospheric absorption of SW by combining surface data at SGP with CERES at TOA. Detailed analysis of our

  2. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Similarity of Deep Convection During the ARM Summer 1997 IOP: CRM Study Khairoutdinov, M.F. and Randall, D.A., Colorado State University Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting A three-dimensional cloud-resolving simulation of midlatitude continental convection during the ARM Summer 1997 IOP is used to study similarity of several second and third statistical moments and second-moment budgets among five episodes of deep convection. Several parameter scales relevant to

  3. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Clear-Sky Model and Measurement Comparisons from the First Diffuse Irradiance IOP - Fall 2001 Powell, D.(a), Kato, S.(b), Haeffelin, M.(c), and Dubovik, O.(d), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (a), Hampton University (b), Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (c), NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (d) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting In the fall of 2001 the central facility of the ARM SGP site was the location of the first diffuse irradiance IOP.

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Using XML in the Data Quality Reporter System Stampf, D.(a), Bahrmann, C.P.(b), and Choudhari, C.(a), Brookhaven National Laboratory (a), Penn State University (b) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting In much the same way that ARM uses NETCDF formatted files to permit the interchange of data among researchers, the Data Quality Reporter System (DQ Reporter) uses the standardized XML (eXtensible Markup Language) to permit the interchange of meta-data among

  5. The Multi-Isotope Process Monitor: Multivariate Analysis of Gamma Spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orton, Christopher R.; Rutherford, Crystal E.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2011-10-30

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established international safeguards standards for fissionable material at spent fuel reprocessing plants to ensure that significant quantities of nuclear material are not diverted from these facilities. Currently, methods to verify material control and accountancy (MC&A) at these facilities require time-consuming and resource-intensive destructive assay (DA). The time delay between sampling and subsequent DA provides a potential opportunity to divert the material out of the appropriate chemical stream. Leveraging new on-line nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques in conjunction with the traditional and highly precise DA methods may provide a more timely, cost-effective and resource efficient means for MC&A verification at such facilities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing on-line NDA process monitoring technologies, including the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor. The MIP Monitor uses gamma spectroscopy and pattern recognition software to identify off-normal conditions in process streams. Recent efforts have been made to explore the basic limits of using multivariate analysis techniques on gamma-ray spectra. This paper will provide an overview of the methods and report our on-going efforts to develop and demonstrate the technology.

  6. Nonlinear dust acoustic waves in inhomogeneous four-component dusty plasma with opposite charge polarity dust grains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Taibany, W. F.

    2013-09-15

    The reductive perturbation technique is employed to investigate the propagation properties of nonlinear dust acoustic (DA) waves in a four-component inhomogeneous dusty plasma (4CIDP). The 4CIDP consists of both positive- and negative-charge dust grains, characterized by different mass, temperature, and density, in addition to a background of Maxwellian electrons and ions. The inhomogeneity caused by nonuniform equilibrium values of particle densities, fluid velocities, and electrostatic potential leads to a significant modification to the nature of nonlinear DA solitary waves. It is found that this model reveals two DA wave velocities, one slow, λ{sub s}, and the other is fast, λ{sub f}. The nonlinear wave evolution is governed by a modified Kortweg-de Vries equation, whose coefficients are space dependent. Both the two soliton types; compressive and rarefactive are allowed corresponding to λ{sub s}. However, only compressive soliton is created corresponding to λ{sub f}. The numerical investigations illustrate the dependence of the soliton amplitude, width, and velocity on the plasma inhomogeneities in each case. The relevance of these theoretical results with 4CIDPs observed in a multi-component plasma configurations in the polar mesosphere is discussed.

  7. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM NEUROTOXIN SEROTYPE B.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SWAMINATHAN,S.; ESWARAMOORTHY,S.

    2001-11-19

    The toxigenic strains of Clostridium botulinum produce seven serologically distinct types of neurotoxins labeled A - G (EC 3.4.24.69), while Clostridium tetani produces tetanus neurotoxin (EC 3.4.24.68). Botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins (BoNTs and TeNT) are produced as single inactive chains of molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Most of these neurotoxins are released after being cleaved into two chains, a heavy chain (HI) of 100 kDa and a light chain (L) of 50 kDa held together by an interchain disulfide bond, by tissue proteinases. BoNT/E is released as a single chain but cleaved by host proteinases [1]. Clostvidium botulinum neurotoxins are extremely poisonous proteins with their LD{sub 50} for humans in the range of 0.1 - 1 ng kg{sup -1} [2]. Botulinum neurotoxins are responsible for neuroparalytic syndromes of botulism characterized by serious neurological disorders and flaccid paralysis. BoNTs block the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction causing flaccid paralysis while TeNT blocks the release of neurotransmitters like glycine and {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the inhibitory interneurons of the spinal cord resulting in spastic paralysis. In spite of different clinical symptoms, their aetiological agents intoxicate neuronal cells in the same way and these toxins have similar structural organization [3].

  8. Higher order nonlinear equations for the dust-acoustic waves in a dusty plasma with two temperature-ions and nonextensive electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emamuddin, M.; Yasmin, S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-04-15

    The nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a dusty plasma whose constituents are negatively charged dust, Maxwellian ions with two distinct temperatures, and electrons following q-nonextensive distribution, is investigated by deriving a number of nonlinear equations, namely, the Korteweg-de-Vries (K-dV), the modified Korteweg-de-Vries (mK-dV), and the Gardner equations. The basic characteristics of the hump (positive potential) and dip (negative potential) shaped dust-acoustic (DA) Gardner solitons are found to exist beyond the K-dV limit. The effects of two temperature ions and electron nonextensivity on the basic features of DA K-dV, mK-dV, and Gardner solitons are also examined. It has been observed that the DA Gardner solitons exhibit negative (positive) solitons for qq{sub c}) (where q{sub c} is the critical value of the nonextensive parameter q). The implications of our results in understanding the localized nonlinear electrostatic perturbations existing in stellar polytropes, quark-gluon plasma, protoneutron stars, etc. (where ions with different temperatures and nonextensive electrons exist) are also briefly addressed.

  9. Evaluation of the Dopamine Hypothesis of ADHD with PET Brain Imaging

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Swanson, James [University of California, Irvine, California, United States

    2016-07-12

    The Dopamine (DA) Hypothesis of ADHD (Wender, 1971; Levy, 1990) suggests that abnormalities in the synaptic mechanisms of DA transmission may be disrupted, and specific abnormalities in DA receptors and DA transporters (DAT) have been proposed (see Swanson et al, 1998). Early studies with small samples (e.g., n = 6, Dougherty et al, 1999) used single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and the radioligand (123I Altropane) to test a theory that ADHD may be caused by an over expression of DAT and reported 'a 70% increase in age-corrected dopamine transporter density in patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder compared with healthy controls' and suggested that treatment with stimulant medication decreased DAT density in ADHD patients and corrected an underlying abnormality (Krause et al, 2000). The potential importance of these findings was noted by Swanson (1999): 'If true, this is a major finding and points the way for new investigations of the primary pharmacological treatment for ADHD (with the stimulant drugs - e.g., methylphenidate), for which the dopamine transporter is the primary site of action. The potential importance of this finding demands special scrutiny'. This has been provided over the past decade using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Brain imaging studies were conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in a relatively large sample of stimulant-naive adults assessed for DAT (11C cocaine) density and DA receptors (11C raclopride) availability. These studies (Volkow et al, 2007; Volkow et al, 2009) do not confirm the hypothesis of increased DAT density and suggest the opposite (i.e., decreased rather than increased DAT density), and follow-up after treatment (Wang et al, 2010) does not confirm the hypothesis that therapeutic doses of methylphenidate decrease DAT density and suggests the opposite (i.e., increased rather than decreased DAT density). The brain regions implicated by these PET imaging studies also suggest that a

  10. General single phase wellbore flow model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouyang, Liang-Biao; Arbabi, S.; Aziz, K.

    1997-02-05

    A general wellbore flow model, which incorporates not only frictional, accelerational and gravitational pressure drops, but also the pressure drop caused by inflow, is presented in this report. The new wellbore model is readily applicable to any wellbore perforation patterns and well completions, and can be easily incorporated in reservoir simulators or analytical reservoir inflow models. Three dimensionless numbers, the accelerational to frictional pressure gradient ratio R{sub af}, the gravitational to frictional pressure gradient ratio R{sub gf}, and the inflow-directional to accelerational pressure gradient ratio R{sub da}, have been introduced to quantitatively describe the relative importance of different pressure gradient components. For fluid flow in a production well, it is expected that there may exist up to three different regions of the wellbore: the laminar flow region, the partially-developed turbulent flow region, and the fully-developed turbulent flow region. The laminar flow region is located near the well toe, the partially-turbulent flow region lies in the middle of the wellbore, while the fully-developed turbulent flow region is at the downstream end or the heel of the wellbore. Length of each region depends on fluid properties, wellbore geometry and flow rate. As the distance from the well toe increases, flow rate in the wellbore increases and the ratios R{sub af} and R{sub da} decrease. Consequently accelerational and inflow-directional pressure drops have the greatest impact in the toe region of the wellbore. Near the well heel the local wellbore flow rate becomes large and close to the total well production rate, here R{sub af} and R{sub da} are small, therefore, both the accelerational and inflow-directional pressure drops can be neglected.

  11. The white dwarfs within 25 pc of the Sun: Kinematics and spectroscopic subtypes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sion, Edward M.; McCook, George P.; Wasatonic, Richard; Myszka, Janine; Holberg, J. B.; Oswalt, Terry D. E-mail: george.mccook@villanova.edu E-mail: janine.myszka@villanova.edu E-mail: toswalt@fit.edu

    2014-06-01

    We present the fractional distribution of spectroscopic subtypes, range and distribution of surface temperatures, and kinematical properties of the white dwarfs (WDs) within 25 pc of the Sun. There is no convincing evidence of halo WDs in the total 25 pc sample of 224 WDs. There is also little to suggest the presence of genuine thick disk subcomponent members within 25 pc. It appears that the entire 25 pc sample likely belongs to the thin disk. We also find no significant kinematic differences with respect to spectroscopic subtypes. The total DA to non-DA ratio of the 25 pc sample is 1.8, a manifestation of deepening envelope convection, which transforms DA stars with sufficiently thin H surface layers into non-DAs. We compare this ratio with the results of other studies. We find that at least 11% of the WDs within 25 pc of the Sun (the DAZ and DZ stars) have photospheric metals that likely originate from accretion of circumstellar material (debris disks) around them. If this interpretation is correct, then it suggests the possibility that a similar percentage have planets, asteroid-like bodies, or debris disks orbiting them. Our volume-limited sample reveals a pileup of DC WDs at the well-known cutoff in DQ WDs at T {sub eff} ? 6000 K. Mindful of small number statistics, we speculate on its possible evolutionary significance. We find that the incidence of magnetic WDs in the 25 pc sample is at least 8% in our volume-limited sample, dominated by cool WDs. We derive approximate formation rates of DB and DQ degenerates and present a preliminary test of the evolutionary scenario that all cooling DB stars become DQ WDs via helium convective dredge-up with the diffusion tail of carbon extending upward from their cores.

  12. Identification, cloning, and expression of human estrogen receptor-{alpha}36, a novel variant of human estrogen receptor-{alpha}66

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Zhaoyi; Zhang Xintian; Shen Peng; Loggie, Brian W.; Chang Yunchao; Deuel, Thomas F. . E-mail: tfdeuel@scripps.edu

    2005-11-04

    The identification and subsequent cloning of the 66-kDa human estrogen receptor (here termed hER-{alpha}66), its 46-kDa splice variant hER-{alpha}46, and the closely related hER-{beta} have had a profound impact on the generation of new understanding of estrogen-mediated functions and led to progress in diagnosis and treatment of human breast cancer. However, a persistent problem has been that not all findings previously reported in estrogen-stimulated cell proliferation can be explained through the known properties of the different estrogen receptors described. As the consequence of a search for alternative mechanisms to account for these different findings, we have now identified, cloned, and expressed in HEK 293 cells a previously unrecognized 36-kDa variant of hER-{alpha}66, termed hER-{alpha}36. hER-{alpha}36 differs from hER-{alpha}66 since it lacks both transcriptional activation domains (AF-1 and AF-2) but it retains the DNA-binding domain, and partial dimerization and ligand-binding domains of hER-{alpha}66. It also contains three myristoylation sites postulated to direct ER-{alpha}36 to the plasma membrane. It is concluded that ER-{alpha}36 is a unique variant of ER-{alpha}66; ER-{alpha}36 is predicted to function as a dominant-negative effector of hER-{alpha}66-mediated estrogen-responsive gene pathways and has the potential to trigger membrane-initiated mitogenic estrogen signaling.

  13. Modulation of DNA repair capacity and mRNA expression levels of XRCC1, hOGG1 and XPC genes in styrene-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanova, Monika; Stetina, Rudolf; Vodickova, Ludmila; Vaclavikova, Radka; Hlavac, Pavel; Smerhovsky, Zdenek; Naccarati, Alessio; Polakova, Veronika; Soucek, Pavel; Kuricova, Miroslava; Manini, Paola; Kumar, Rajiv; Hemminki, Kari; Vodicka, Pavel

    2010-11-01

    Decreased levels of single-strand breaks in DNA (SSBs), reflecting DNA damage, have previously been observed with increased styrene exposure in contrast to a dose-dependent increase in the base-excision repair capacity. To clarify further the above aspects, we have investigated the associations between SSBs, micronuclei, DNA repair capacity and mRNA expression in XRCC1, hOGG1 and XPC genes on 71 styrene-exposed and 51 control individuals. Styrene concentrations at workplace and in blood characterized occupational exposure. The workers were divided into low (below 50 mg/m{sup 3}) and high (above 50 mg/m{sup 3}) styrene exposure groups. DNA damage and DNA repair capacity were analyzed in peripheral blood lymphocytes by Comet assay. The mRNA expression levels were determined by qPCR. A significant negative correlation was observed between SSBs and styrene concentration at workplace (R = - 0.38, p = 0.001); SSBs were also significantly higher in men (p = 0.001). The capacity to repair irradiation-induced DNA damage was the highest in the low exposure group (1.34 {+-} 1.00 SSB/10{sup 9} Da), followed by high exposure group (0.72 {+-} 0.81 SSB/10{sup 9} Da) and controls (0.65 {+-} 0.82 SSB/10{sup 9} Da). The mRNA expression levels of XRCC1, hOGG1 and XPC negatively correlated with styrene concentrations in blood and at workplace (p < 0.001) and positively with SSBs (p < 0.001). Micronuclei were not affected by styrene exposure, but were higher in older persons and in women (p < 0.001). In this study, we did not confirm previous findings on an increased DNA repair response to styrene-induced genotoxicity. However, negative correlations of SSBs and mRNA expression levels of XRCC1, hOGG1 and XPC with styrene exposure warrant further highly-targeted study.

  14. Nuclear Forensic Inferences Using Iterative Multidimensional Statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robel, M; Kristo, M J; Heller, M A

    2009-06-09

    Nuclear forensics involves the analysis of interdicted nuclear material for specific material characteristics (referred to as 'signatures') that imply specific geographical locations, production processes, culprit intentions, etc. Predictive signatures rely on expert knowledge of physics, chemistry, and engineering to develop inferences from these material characteristics. Comparative signatures, on the other hand, rely on comparison of the material characteristics of the interdicted sample (the 'questioned sample' in FBI parlance) with those of a set of known samples. In the ideal case, the set of known samples would be a comprehensive nuclear forensics database, a database which does not currently exist. In fact, our ability to analyze interdicted samples and produce an extensive list of precise materials characteristics far exceeds our ability to interpret the results. Therefore, as we seek to develop the extensive databases necessary for nuclear forensics, we must also develop the methods necessary to produce the necessary inferences from comparison of our analytical results with these large, multidimensional sets of data. In the work reported here, we used a large, multidimensional dataset of results from quality control analyses of uranium ore concentrate (UOC, sometimes called 'yellowcake'). We have found that traditional multidimensional techniques, such as principal components analysis (PCA), are especially useful for understanding such datasets and drawing relevant conclusions. In particular, we have developed an iterative partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) procedure that has proven especially adept at identifying the production location of unknown UOC samples. By removing classes which fell far outside the initial decision boundary, and then rebuilding the PLS-DA model, we have consistently produced better and more definitive attributions than with a single pass classification approach. Performance of the iterative PLS-DA method

  15. Identification of Intrinsic Order and Disorder in the DNA Repair Protein XPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iakoucheva, Lilia M.; Kimzey, Amy L.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Bruce, James E.; Garner, Ethan C.; Brown, Celeste J.; Dunker, A. K.; Smith, Richard D.; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2001-03-01

    The damage recognition protein XPA is required to recognize a wide variety of bulky lesions during nucleotide excision repair (NER). Independent NMR solution structures of a human XPA protein (hXPA) fragment comprising approximately one-third of the full-length protein, the minimal DNA-binding domain (MBD), revealed that ~30% of the molecule was structurally disordered. To better characterize structural features of XPA, we performed time-resolved trypsin proteolysis on active, full-length recombinant Xenopus XPA protein (xXPA). The resulting proteolytic fragments were analyzed by electrospray ionization interface coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and selected N-terminal sequence determinations. The mass spectrum of the full-length xXPA was consistent with the predicted sequence, 30922.02 vs. 30922.45 Da; respectively. Moreover, the mass spectrometric data allowed the assignment of multiple xXPA fragments not resolvable by SDS PAGE. Full-length xXPA exhibited aberrant mobility on SDS-PAGE with an apparent MW of ~40 kDa. To test predictions that a Glu-rich region (E70-E76) or other local regions of high charge were responsible for this ~40% aberrant SDS-PAGE mobility, the MW's of partial proteolytic fragments from ~5 to 25 kDa precisely determined by ESI-FTICR MS were correlated with their gel positions. Surprisingly, all tested partial tryptic fragments within this size-range exhibited 10-42% divergence between calculated MW and that estimated by SDS-PAGE, thus indicating the origin of anomalous migration of XPA is not localized. The computer program Predictor of Natural Disordered Regions (PONDR) correctly identified several regions of xXPA either sensitive or resistant to partial proteolysis, thereby indicating that disorder in XPA shares sequence features with other well-characterized intrinsically unstructured proteins.

  16. Portable software for distributed readout controllers and event builders in FASTBUS and VME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pordes, R.; Berg, D.; Berman, E.; Bernett, M.; Brown, D.; Constanta-Fanourakis, P.; Dorries, T.; Haire, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaczar, K.; Mackinnon, B.; Moore, C.; Nicinski, T.; Oleynik, G.; Petravick, D.; Sergey, G.; Slimmer, D.; Streets, J.; Votava, M.; White, V.

    1989-12-01

    We report on software developed as part of the PAN-DA system to support the functions of front end readout controllers and event builders in multiprocessor, multilevel, distributed data acquisition systems. For the next generation data acquisition system we have undertaken to design and implement software tools that are easily transportable to new modules. The first implementation of this software is for Motorola 68K series processor boards in FASTBUS and VME and will be used in the Fermilab accelerator run at the beginning of 1990. We use a Real Time Kernel Operating System. The software provides general connectivity tools for control, diagnosis and monitoring. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  17. A

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    :;~'1 ) A / " & - fOL-J/ ~{Z.-- 3> . \ ABANDONMENT O~ILLED HOLES CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA IT LAS lIEGt\S unRARY PROPERTY OF U.S.GOVERNMENT 6NIX & SCISSON, INC. 5105 EAST 15th STRUT TULS .... OKLAHOMA 74112 MARCH 1973 LFENIX & SCISSON. INC. 300 L"'S VEG S BOULEVARD SOUTH L"'S VEG S. NEV"'DA 89101 L U. I. ATOMIC INBROY COlllolllIlON CONTUCT U(26-1I*18 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the

  18. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater operable units at the Chemical Plant Area and the Ordnance Works Area, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-07-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are evaluating conditions in groundwater and springs at the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The two areas are located in St. Charles County, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The 88-ha (217-acre) chemical plant area is chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of uranium-processing activities conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in the 1950s and 1960s and explosives-production activities conducted by the U.S. Army (Army) in the 1940s. The 6,974-ha (17,232-acre) ordnance works area is primarily chemically contaminated as a result of trinitrotoluene (TNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) manufacturing activities during World War II. This baseline risk assessment (BRA) is being conducted as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RUFS) required under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended. The purpose of the BRA is to evaluate potential human health and ecological impacts from contamination associated with the groundwater operable units (GWOUs) of the chemical plant area and ordnance works area. An RI/FS work plan issued jointly in 1995 by the DOE and DA (DOE 1995) analyzed existing conditions at the GWOUs. The work plan included a conceptual hydrogeological model based on data available when the report was prepared; this model indicated that the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. Hence, to optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts, the DOE and DA have decided to conduct a joint RI/BRA. Characterization data obtained from the chemical plant area wells indicate that uranium is present at levels slightly higher than background, with a few concentrations exceeding the proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 20 {micro}g/L (EPA 1996c). Concentrations of other radionuclides (e

  19. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 11. CONTRACT ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    l PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 3 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. See Block 16C 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 3. EFFECTIVE DA TE 0264 6. ISSUED BY CODE 05003 NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office U.S. Department of Energy NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office 3747 West Jemez Road Los Alamos NM 87544 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, State and ZIP Code) LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL SECURITY, LLC Attn: STEVE K. SHOOK P.O. BOX 1663, MS P222 LOS ALAMOS NM 875450001 CODE 175252894

  20. March Events

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    March March 2016 Events March 2016 event highlights Mar 2 Wed 8:00 AM CoDA 2016, the Conference on Data Analysis Eldorado Hotel - 309 W. San Francisco St., Santa Fe, NM Join us for the Conference on Data Analysis, highlighting data-driven problems of interest to the Department of Energy. Mar 3 Thu 5:30 PM Women in Los Alamos History Los Alamos Golf Course Clubhouse Tietjen is a well-known speaker on the topic of gender issues in the work place, and a motivational speaker for young women working