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Sample records for bridgeport ct connecticut

  1. Category:Bridgeport, CT | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT Connecticut Light & Power Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 64 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Bridgeport CT...

  2. Bridgeport, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Bridgeport, Connecticut Clean Diesel Technologies References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil...

  3. EERE Success Story-Connecticut: Bridgeport Multifamily Weatherization |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Connecticut: Bridgeport Multifamily Weatherization EERE Success Story-Connecticut: Bridgeport Multifamily Weatherization November 8, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis EERE's Weatherization Assistance Program weatherized a multifamily facility in Bridgeport, Connecticut, that provides safe housing for individuals, veterans, and the homeless received weatherization; the services performed have saved the facility nearly $7,000 in annual energy costs. Because the state had not yet

  4. EERE Success Story-Connecticut: Bridgeport Multifamily Weatherization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    EERE Success Story-Connecticut: Bridgeport Multifamily ... saved the facility nearly 7,000 in annual energy costs. ... of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. ...

  5. Radiological survey results at the former Bridgeport Brass Company facility, Seymour, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1993-06-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey of the former Bridgeport Brass Company facility, Seymour, Connecticut. The survey was performed in May 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine if the facility had become contaminated with residuals containing radioactive materials during the work performed in the Ruffert building under government contract in the 1960s. The survey included a gamma scanning over a circumscribed area around the building, and gamma and beta-gamma scanning over all indoor surfaces as well as the collection of soil and other samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in indoor and outdoor samples, and radiation measurements over floor and wall surfaces, in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines. Elevated uranium concentrations outdoors were limited to several small, isolated spots. Radiation measurements exceeded guidelines indoors over numerous spots and areas inside the building, mainly in Rooms 1--6 that had been used in the early government work.

  6. Results of the independent radiological verification survey at the former Bridgeport Brass Company Facility, Seymour, Connecticut (SSC001)

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, R.D.; Rice, D.E.; Allred, J.F.; Brown, K.S.

    1995-03-01

    At the request of the USDOE, a team from ORNL conducted an independent radiological verification survey at the former Bridgeport Brass Company Facility, Seymour, Connecticut, from September 1992 to March 1993. Purpose of the survey was to determine whether residual levels of radioactivity inside the Ruffert Building and selected adjacent areas were rmediated to levels below DOE guidelines for FUSRAP sites. The property was contaminated with radioactive residues of {sup 238}U from uranium processing experiments conducted by Reactive Metals, Inc., from 1962 to 1964 for the Atomic Energy Commission. A previous radiological survey did not characterize the entire floor space because equipment which could not be moved at the time made it inaccessible for radiological surveys. During the remediation process, additional areas of elevated radioactivity were discovered under stationary equipment, which required additional remediation and further verification. Results of the independent radiological verification survey confirm that, with the exception of the drain system inside the building, residual uranium contamination has been remediated to levels below DOE guidelines for unrestricted release of property at FUSRAP sites inside and outside the Ruffert Building. However, certain sections of the drain system retain uranium contamination above DOE surface guideline levels. These sections of pipe are addressed in separate, referenced documentation.

  7. Connecticut: Bridgeport Multifamily Weatherization | Department...

    Energy Saver

    the building and addressed health and safety issues, including improving indoor air quality, increasing domestic hot water temperature, ventilating the boiler room, and...

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Seymour CT Site - CT 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Seymour CT Site - CT 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Seymour, CT Alternate Name(s): Bridgeport Brass Company Seymour Specialty Wire Reactive Metals, Inc. National Distillers and Chemical Co. Havens Plant CT.02-2 CT.02-3 CT.02-6 Location: 15 Franklin Street, Seymour, Connecticut CT.02-4 Historical Operations: Procured, processed and stored uranium oxides, salts, and metals for AEC and processed the products by cold-forming or extruding natural uranium metal. CT.02-3 CT.02-9 Eligibility Determination:

  9. Solar Connecticut | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Connecticut Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Connecticut Address: PO Box 515 Place: Higganum, Connecticut Zip: 06441 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Website:...

  10. Connecticut - Compare - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut Connecticut

  11. Connecticut - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut Connecticut

  12. Connecticut - Search - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut Connecticut

  13. Connecticut/Incentives | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    State Rebate Program No CL&P - Residential Heating and Cooling Rebates (Connecticut) Utility Rebate Program No CT Solar Loan (Connecticut) State Loan Program Yes Clean Energy...

  14. Connecticut Light and Power | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Connecticut Light and Power Address: P.O. Box 270 Place: Hartford, Connecticut Zip: 06141 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer...

  15. Wheelabrator Bridgeport Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Database Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWheelabratorBridgeportBiomassFacility&oldid398316" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  16. Bridgeport, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Bridgeport is a borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. It falls under Pennsylvania's 7th congressional...

  17. PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF BRIDGEPORT BRASS COMPANY SEYMOUR, CONNECTICUT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Contract work involved the developmental process of cold-forming (extrusion) of natural ... The only ffxtures and equipment tn evidence wem itghtfng fLxture8, slectrb& gas and ...

  18. Windham County, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    South Windham, Connecticut South Woodstock, Connecticut Sterling, Connecticut Thompson, Connecticut Wauregan, Connecticut Willimantic, Connecticut Windham, Connecticut...

  19. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Connecticut State University

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy Connecticut State University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Connecticut State University Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Connecticut State University Joined the Challenge: September 2015 Headquarters: Willimantic, CT Charging Location: Willimantic, CT Domestic Employees: 980 As part of the University's commitment to Sustainability, Eastern Connecticut State University installed its first Level 2 charging station in December 2014, creating

  20. Madison, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Madison, Connecticut: Energy Resources (Redirected from Madison, CT) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.2795429, -72.5984258 Show Map Loading...

  1. Norwalk, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Norwalk, Connecticut: Energy Resources (Redirected from Norwalk, CT) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.1175966, -73.4078968 Show Map Loading...

  2. Danbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Danbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources (Redirected from Danbury, CT) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.394817, -73.4540111 Show Map Loading...

  3. New Haven County, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Connecticut North Branford, Connecticut North Haven, Connecticut Orange, Connecticut Oxford, Connecticut Prospect, Connecticut Seymour, Connecticut Southbury, Connecticut...

  4. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Connecticut | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Connecticut Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Connecticut Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in Connecticut. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 9, 2016 CX-100751 Categorical Exclusion Determination High Performance PEFC Electrode Structures Award Number: DE-EE0007652 CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B3.15 Fuel Cell Technologies Office Date: 8/11/2016 Location(s): CT Office(s): Golden Field Office September 8, 2016 CX-100740 Categorical Exclusion Determination

  5. New London County, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Electric Co Inc Energy Generation Facilities in New London County, Connecticut American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Wheelabrator Lisbon Biomass Facility Utility Companies...

  6. Tolland County, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    LLC Catelectric Corp Places in Tolland County, Connecticut Andover, Connecticut Bolton, Connecticut Central Somers, Connecticut Columbia, Connecticut Coventry Lake,...

  7. ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

    2003-04-01

    Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

  8. ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

    2003-03-01

    Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bridgeport Brass Co - Havens...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CT.06-3 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.06-4 Site Operations: From 1953 to 1962, conducted research on drawingextruding uranium and zirconium tube fabrication. CT.06-3 CT.06-5 CT.06-6...

  10. Seymour, Connecticut, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Seymour, Connecticut, Site. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Seymour, Connecticut, Site Location of the Seymour, Connecticut, Site Site Description and History The Seymour, Connecticut, Site (formerly the Seymour Specialty Wire site) is located in Seymour, Connecticut, at 15 Franklin Street, approximately 50 miles southwest of Hartford, Connecticut. The site occupies 60 acres along the

  11. Connecticut Fuel Cell Activities: Markets, Programs, and Models |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Activities: Markets, Programs, and Models Connecticut Fuel Cell Activities: Markets, Programs, and Models Presented by the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology, Inc. at the bi-monthly informational call for the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program on December 16, 2009 ccat_hydrogen_ct.pdf (1.39 MB) More Documents & Publications Job Creation Analysis in the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Industry State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2011 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program

  12. Connecticut Clean Energy Fund | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Connecticut Clean Energy Fund Jump to: navigation, search Name: Connecticut Clean Energy Fund Address: 200 Corporate Place Place: Rocky Hill, Connecticut Zip: 06067 Region:...

  13. Connecticut Clean Energy Fund

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Connecticut's 1998 electric restructuring legislation (Public Act 98-28) created separate funds to support energy efficiency and renewable energy.* This information summarizes the renewable energ...

  14. Connecticut State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Connecticut State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Connecticut State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, ...

  15. Greenwich, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Registered Energy Companies in Greenwich, Connecticut Davenport Resources LLC Digital Power Capital LLC Registered Financial Organizations in Greenwich, Connecticut Asia...

  16. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State ...

  17. Connecticut Wells | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Zip: 6751 Sector: Geothermal energy Product: A Connecticut-based geothermal heat pump installer and well driller. Coordinates: 40.04446, -80.690839 Show Map Loading...

  18. Connecticut's 5th congressional district: Energy Resources |...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    in Connecticut. Registered Energy Companies in Connecticut's 5th congressional district Efficiency Lighting & Maintenance Inc Electro Energy Inc FuelCell Energy Inc FuelCell...

  19. Freedom Energy (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Freedom Energy Place: Connecticut Phone Number: (603)-625-2244 Website: felpower.comabout-us Outage Hotline: (603)-625-2244...

  20. Stamford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Connecticut 4 References Registered Energy Companies in Stamford, Connecticut Clean Diesel Technologies Inc International Plasma Sales Group IPSG Natural State Research, Inc....

  1. Litchfield County, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy Capital Energy Generation Facilities in Litchfield County, Connecticut New Milford Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Places in Litchfield County, Connecticut Bantam,...

  2. Suffield, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Connecticut.1 Registered Energy Companies in Suffield, Connecticut Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil...

  3. Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dominion Retail Inc Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 1-888-216-3718 Website: www.dominionenergy.comen Outage...

  4. Connecticut's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources |...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Connecticut. Registered Energy Companies in Connecticut's 3rd congressional district Avalence...

  5. Connecticut's 2nd congressional district: Energy Resources |...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Connecticut. US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Connecticut's 2nd congressional district...

  6. Spark Energy, LP (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Spark Energy, LP Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 1-877-547-7275 Website: www.sparkenergy.comenconnect Outage Hotline:...

  7. Liberty Power Corp. (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Liberty Power Corp. Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 1-866-769-3799 Website: www.libertypowercorp.comresid Outage Hotline:...

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Olin Mathieson - CT 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Name: United Nuclear Corporation CT.0-02-1 Location: New Haven , Connecticut CT.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CT.0-02-1 Site Operations: Began fabrication of nuclear reactor fuel ...

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dorr Corp - CT 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Stamford , Connecticut CT.14-2 Evaluation Year: 1990 CT.14-3 Site Operations: Conducted heat treatment tests of source material using depleted uranium in an enclosed calciner ...

  10. CONNECTICUT BIOFUELS TECHNOLOGY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    BARTONE, ERIK

    2010-09-28

    DBS Energy Inc. (“DBS”) intends on using the Connecticut Biofuels Technology Project for the purpose of developing a small-scale electric generating systems that are located on a distributed basis and utilize biodiesel as its principle fuel source. This project will include research and analysis on the quality and applied use of biodiesel for use in electricity production, 2) develop dispatch center for testing and analysis of the reliability of dispatching remote generators operating on a blend of biodiesel and traditional fossil fuels, and 3) analysis and engineering research on fuel storage options for biodiesel of fuels for electric generation.

  11. Connecticut Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC)

    for your school's state, county, city, or district. For more information, please visit the High School Coach page. Connecticut Region High School Regional Connecticut Connecticut...

  12. Connecticut Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC)

    state, county, city, or district. For more information, please visit the Middle School Coach page. Connecticut Region Middle School Regional Connecticut Connecticut Regional...

  13. Connecticut Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    Summary of Reported Data Connecticut Summary of Reported Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Connecticut. Connecticut Summary of Reported ...

  14. Covanta Mid-Connecticut Energy Biomass Facility | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Mid-Connecticut Energy Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Covanta Mid-Connecticut Energy Biomass Facility Facility Covanta Mid-Connecticut Energy Sector Biomass...

  15. Veteran's Affairs Health Care System, West Haven, Connecticut...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Veteran's Affairs Health Care System, West Haven, Connecticut Veteran's Affairs Health Care System, West Haven, Connecticut Overview The West Haven (Connecticut) Campus of the...

  16. Milford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Milford is a city in New Haven County, Connecticut. It falls under Connecticut's 3rd...

  17. Glacial Energy Holdings (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Glacial Energy Holdings Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 800.286.2000 or 800.722.5584 Website: www.glacialenergy.comoutage-n Outage...

  18. GEXA Corp. (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    GEXA Corp. (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: GEXA Corp. Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 866-961-9399 Website: www.gexaenergy.com Outage Hotline: 866-961-9399...

  19. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",544,363,556,510,391 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-","...

  20. Connecticut Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Data Dashboard Connecticut Data Dashboard The data dashboard for Connecticut, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Connecticut Data Dashboard (310.65 KB) More Documents & Publications Austin Energy Data Dashboard Massachusetts -- SEP Data Dashboard Phoenix, Arizona Data Dashboard

  1. Market Transformation in Connecticut: Integrating Home Performance Into Existing Trades

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Market Transformation in Connecticut: Integrating Home Performance Into Existing Trades, Evolving to Whole Home Success, Session 2: Sustainable Business Models presentation. Provides an overview of Connecticut's various home energy programs, the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, and contractor involvement.

  2. Mid-Connecticut MRF offers integrated approach

    SciTech Connect

    Thoresen, C.

    1993-11-01

    Mandatory recycling hit Connecticut in 1987, with a goal set at recycling 25% of the state's municipal solid waste. Once municipalities, haulers, and commercial operators were required to separate recyclables from garbage, no project moved forward to take the materials. CRRA already had 44 municipalities using its Mid-Connecticut waste-to-energy facility. The quickest way to accommodate these towns was to move aggressively forward to develop a Mid-Connecticut materials recycling facility and bring the recyclables in.

  3. Recovery Act State Memos Connecticut

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Connecticut For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION

  4. Thompson, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Thompson, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9587089, -71.8625715 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  5. Guilford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    lt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Guilford is a town in New Haven County, Connecticut.1 Registered Energy Companies in...

  6. Stamford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Registered Energy Companies in Stamford, Connecticut Clean Diesel Technologies Inc International Plasma Sales Group IPSG Natural State Research, Inc. Noble Americas...

  7. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  8. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  9. Branford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Connecticut Apricus Solar References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  10. Granby, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Connecticut.1 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  11. Hartland, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Connecticut.1 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  12. Chaplin, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Connecticut.1 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  13. Farmington, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Connecticut.1 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  14. Marlborough, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Connecticut.1 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  15. Ridgefield, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Connecticut.1 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  16. Simsbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Connecticut.1 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  17. Danbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    in Danbury, Connecticut Electro Energy Inc FuelCell Energy Inc FuelCell Energy, Inc. New England Energy Management Inc Praxair Technipower Systems formerly Solomon...

  18. CONNECTICUT RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Connecticut are ...

  19. Weston, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Weston, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.2009294, -73.3806748 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  20. Windsor, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Windsor, Connecticut Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Inc References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor...

  1. Connecticut's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources |...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    1st congressional district Aztech Engineers Connecticut Light and Power Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Inc LiquidPiston Inc Nxegen SmartPower United Technologies Corp...

  2. Hartford County, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Systems Connecticut Light and Power DBS Energy Inc Energy Recovery Associates Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen National Energy Resource Corporation Pioneer Valley Photovoltaics...

  3. Connecticut/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Guidebook >> Connecticut Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical...

  4. Portland, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titlePortland,Connecticut&oldid...

  5. Middlefield, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMiddlefield,Connecticut&old...

  6. Wethersfield, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWethersfield,Connecticut&ol...

  7. Fairfield, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Fairfield, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.1412077, -73.2637258 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  8. Bethlehem, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Bethlehem, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6398184, -73.2084471 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  9. Glastonbury Center, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Glastonbury Center, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7009327, -72.5995347 Show Map Loading map......

  10. Quinebaug, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Quinebaug, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.0237077, -71.9497954 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  11. Sherman, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Sherman, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.5792607, -73.4956795 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  12. Middlesex County, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Middlesex County, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4698505, -72.4731529 Show Map Loading map......

  13. Lake Pocotopaug, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Lake Pocotopaug, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.5984325, -72.5103654 Show Map Loading map......

  14. Simsbury Center, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Simsbury Center, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.88295, -72.81138 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  15. Lyme, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Lyme, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.400812, -72.3429525 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  16. Canterbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Canterbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6984319, -71.9709075 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  17. Woodstock, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Woodstock, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9484307, -71.9739625 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  18. Newington, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Newington, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6978777, -72.7237063 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  19. Stratford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Stratford, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.1845415, -73.1331651 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  20. Norwalk, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Norwalk, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.1175966, -73.4078968 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  1. Plainfield Village, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Plainfield Village, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6753587, -71.9253141 Show Map Loading map......

  2. Clinton, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Clinton, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.2787104, -72.5275903 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  3. Westbrook Center, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Westbrook Center, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.28008, -72.443454 Show Map Loading map......

  4. Shelton, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Shelton, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.3164856, -73.0931641 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  5. Chester, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Chester, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4031547, -72.4509204 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  6. Trumbull, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Trumbull, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.2428742, -73.2006687 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  7. Burlington, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Burlington, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7692648, -72.9645484 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  8. Bristol, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Bristol, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6717648, -72.9492703 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  9. Eastford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Eastford, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9020418, -72.0797979 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  10. Hampton, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hampton, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7839873, -72.0547977 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  11. Brooklyn, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Brooklyn, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7881541, -71.9497957 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  12. Moosup, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Moosup, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7128767, -71.8809054 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  13. Berlin, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Berlin, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.621488, -72.7456519 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  14. Wilton, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Wilton, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.1953739, -73.4378988 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  15. Moodus, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Moodus, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.5028768, -72.4500867 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  16. Thompsonville, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Thompsonville, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9970407, -72.5989777 Show Map Loading map......

  17. Middletown, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Middletown, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.5623209, -72.6506488 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  18. Central Manchester, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Central Manchester, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7812924, -72.514567 Show Map Loading map......

  19. South Woodstock, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    South Woodstock, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9389864, -71.9595179 Show Map Loading map......

  20. Plainfield, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Plainfield, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6764876, -71.915073 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  1. Enfield, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Enfield, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9762077, -72.5917554 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  2. Plainville, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Plainville, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6745432, -72.8581558 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  3. Killingworth, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Killingworth, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.3581545, -72.5637023 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  4. Southwood Acres, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Southwood Acres, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.962567, -72.571962 Show Map Loading map......

  5. Monroe, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Monroe, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.3325962, -73.2073358 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  6. Georgetown, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Georgetown, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.2556512, -73.4348438 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  7. Essex, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Essex, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.353432, -72.3906406 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  8. Canton, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Canton, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8245424, -72.8937122 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  9. Haddam, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Haddam, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4773213, -72.5120333 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  10. Killingly, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Killingly, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8122401, -71.8334145 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  11. Westbrook, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Westbrook, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.2853769, -72.4475874 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  12. Storrs, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Storrs, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8084314, -72.2495231 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  13. Yalesville, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Yalesville, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4937084, -72.8237109 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  14. Putnam, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Putnam, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9150978, -71.9089613 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  15. Hartford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hartford, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7637111, -72.6850932 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  16. Southington, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Southington, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.5964869, -72.8776013 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  17. Collinsville, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Collinsville, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8128757, -72.9201022 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  18. Windham, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Windham, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6998208, -72.1570219 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  19. Southbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Southbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4814847, -73.2131693 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  20. Putnam District, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Putnam District, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9257629, -71.9104934 Show Map Loading map......

  1. Hazardville, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hazardville, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9873187, -72.5448093 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  2. Higganum, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Higganum, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4970432, -72.5570348 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  3. Wauregan, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Wauregan, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7442655, -71.9092393 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  4. Salisbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Salisbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.983426, -73.4212318 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  5. Ashford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ashford, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8731532, -72.1214653 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  6. Norwich, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Norwich, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.5242649, -72.0759105 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  7. Weatogue, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Weatogue, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8437093, -72.8284317 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  8. Brookfield, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Brookfield, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4825947, -73.4095652 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  9. Tariffville, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Tariffville, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9087087, -72.7600951 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  10. Scotland, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Scotland, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6984319, -72.081465 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  11. Sterling, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Sterling, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.707599, -71.828682 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  12. Westport, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Westport, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.1414855, -73.3578955 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  13. Willimantic, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Willimantic, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7106543, -72.2081338 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  14. Bloomfield, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Bloomfield, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.826488, -72.7300945 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  15. Fenwick, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Fenwick, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.2709316, -72.3536947 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  16. Cromwell, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Cromwell, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.5950989, -72.6453705 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  17. Pomfret, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Pomfret, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8975977, -71.9625736 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  18. Redding, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Redding, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.3025955, -73.3834532 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  19. Kensington, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Kensington, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6353769, -72.7687083 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  20. Danielson, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Danielson, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8025986, -71.8859054 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  1. Glastonbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Glastonbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7123218, -72.608146 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  2. Newtown, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Newtown, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4139843, -73.3034505 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  3. Easton, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Easton, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.2528738, -73.2973394 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  4. Durham, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Durham, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4817647, -72.6812059 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  5. Manchester, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Manchester, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7759324, -72.5214754 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  6. Avon, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    "alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Avon is a town in Hartford County, Connecticut.1 Registered Energy Companies in Avon,...

  7. Wallingford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4570418, -72.8231552 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  8. Connecticut Light & Power- Small ZREC Tariff

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In July 2011, Connecticut enacted legislation amending the state's Renewables Portfolio Standard and creating two new classes of renewable energy credits (RECs): Zero Emission Renewable Energy...

  9. Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Consolidated Edison Sol Inc (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Consolidated Edison Sol Inc Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 1-888-320-8991 Website:...

  10. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second...

    Energy Saver

    Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and ...

  11. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third...

    Energy Saver

    Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third Evaluation Report and Appendices Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third Evaluation Report and ...

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Utility Fleet Operates...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Connecticut Utility Fleet Operates Vehicles on Alternative Fuels Find out how Norwich Public Utilities operates the largest municipal fleet of natural gas vehicles in Connecticut. ...

  13. Suez Energy Resources North America (Connecticut) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Suez Energy Resources North America (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Suez Energy Resources North America Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 713.636.0000 or...

  14. New Canaan, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Connecticut.1 Registered Financial Organizations in New Canaan, Connecticut Advanced Materials Partners Inc References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor...

  15. Energy Plus Holdings LLC (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy Plus Holdings LLC (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Energy Plus Holdings LLC Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 1-888-766-3509 Website: www.energypluscompany.com...

  16. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 212-997-8500...

  17. EERE Success Story-California and Connecticut: National Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    California and Connecticut: National Fuel Cell Bus Programs Drive Fuel Economy Higher EERE Success Story-California and Connecticut: National Fuel Cell Bus Programs Drive Fuel ...

  18. Integrys Energy Services, Inc. (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Integrys Energy Services, Inc. (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Integrys Energy Services, Inc. Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 1-866-938-2139 Website:...

  19. City of South Norwalk, Connecticut (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    South Norwalk, Connecticut (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of South Norwalk Place: Connecticut Phone Number: (203) 866-3366 Website: snew.org Outage...

  20. Clean Cities: Connecticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities coalition

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Connecticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities Coalition The Connecticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and...

  1. City of Norwich, Connecticut (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Norwich, Connecticut (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: City of Norwich Place: Connecticut Phone Number: (860) 887-2555 Website: norwichpublicutilities.com...

  2. City of Jewett City, Connecticut (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Jewett City, Connecticut (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Jewett City City of Place: Connecticut Phone Number: (860) 376-2877 Website: jewettcitydpu.com Outage...

  3. South Jersey Energy Company (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Company (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: South Jersey Energy Company Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 800-266-6020 Website: www.southjerseyenergy.com Twitter:...

  4. Clean Cities: Capitol Clean Cities of Connecticut coalition

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Capitol Clean Cities of Connecticut Coalition The Capitol Clean Cities of Connecticut coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders...

  5. Noble Americas Energy Solutions LLC (Connecticut) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    LLC (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Noble Americas Energy Solutions LLC Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 1 877273-6772 Website: www.noblesolutions.com Outage...

  6. Sandy Hook, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hook is a city in Connecticut.1 Registered Energy Companies in Sandy Hook, Connecticut Environmental Energy Services Inc References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and...

  7. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results This ...

  8. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2009 Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report ... 2009 Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report ...

  9. Connecticut Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Connecticut Recovery Act State Memo (1.13 MB) More Documents & Publications CONNECTICUT RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Final Report - Sun Rise New England - Open for Buisness State of the ...

  10. Connecticut Weatherization Project Improves Lives, Receives National

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Recognition | Department of Energy Connecticut Weatherization Project Improves Lives, Receives National Recognition Connecticut Weatherization Project Improves Lives, Receives National Recognition May 6, 2014 - 12:24pm Addthis Donna Hawkins Technology Transfer Specialist, Weatherization Assistance Program Harris Walker Communications Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program MORE WEATHERIZATION STORIES Improving Energy Efficiency and Creating Jobs through Weatherization

  11. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Millstone Unit 2, Unit 3","2,103","16,750",100.0,"Dominion Nuclear Conn Inc" "1 Plant 2 Reactors","2,103","16,750",100.0

  12. CONNECTICUT CHALLENGES TOWNS TO REDUCE ENERGY USE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    CONNECTICUT CHALLENGES TOWNS TO REDUCE ENERGY USE CONNECTICUT CHALLENGES TOWNS TO REDUCE ENERGY USE CONNECTICUT CHALLENGES TOWNS TO REDUCE ENERGY USE With both the household use and cost of electricity increasing and an abundance of older homes, Connecticut's market was ripe for residential energy efficiency upgrades. Through a two-year pilot program, the Connecticut Neighbor to Neighbor Energy Challenge (N2N) sought to improve the state's existing residential energy efficiency programs, with

  13. Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Assessment for New York and Connecticut

    Reports and Publications

    2004-01-01

    In October 2003, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) published a review of the status of the methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban transition in New York (NY) and Connecticut (CT) that noted significant uncertainties in gasoline supply for those states for the summer of 2004. To obtain updated information, EIA spoke to major suppliers to the two states over the past several months as the petroleum industry began the switch from winter- to summer-grade gasoline.

  14. Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  15. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Eastern Connecticut State...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... The town will also be receiving 3,000 from the Connecticut Hydrogen and Electric Auto Purchase Rebate Program (CHEAPR). Building Official Peter W. Zvingilas will use the car for ...

  16. Strategic Energy LLC (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Strategic Energy LLC Place: Connecticut References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 18193 This article is a stub. You can...

  17. CX-002340: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Connecticut Clean Cities Future Fuels Project - BridgeportCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 05/11/2010Location(s): Bridgeport, ConnecticutOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  18. Title 10 Chapter 45 Connecticut River Flood Control Compact ...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    5 Connecticut River Flood Control Compact Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Title 10 Chapter 45 Connecticut River...

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Transportation Data for

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Connecticut Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Transportation Data for Alternative Fuels and Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative

  20. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",147,122,122,122,122 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-","...

  1. Veteran's Affairs Health Care System, West Haven, Connecticut | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Veteran's Affairs Health Care System, West Haven, Connecticut Veteran's Affairs Health Care System, West Haven, Connecticut Overview The West Haven (Connecticut) Campus of the Veterans Affairs Connecticut Health Care System was the first Veteran's Hospital to award a shared energy savings (SES) contract (now known as energy savings performance contracts). The project involves replacement of the lighting system, installation of a cooling system, maintenance of the new chiller

  2. Confirmatory Survey Results for the Emergency Operations Facility (EOF) at the Connecticut Yankee Haddam Neck Plant, Haddam, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    W. C. Adams

    2007-07-03

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested that the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) perform a confirmatory survey on the Emergency Operations Facility (EOF) at the Connecticut Yankee Haddam Neck Plant (HNP) in Haddam, Connecticut

  3. Connecticut Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Summary of Reported Data Connecticut Summary of Reported Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Connecticut. Connecticut Summary of Reported Data (1.73 MB) More Documents & Publications Virginia -- SEP Summary of Reported Data University Park Summary of Reported Data Alabama -- SEP Summary of Reported Data

  4. CT. L-2 United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOE F 7325.8 (a-a9J - EFG (OMOJ CT. L-2 United States Government 8 ",> I,: Ti -& d .- " * memorandum (' -. r_l DATE: AUG 10 1993 REPLY TO ATTN OF: EM-421 (W. Williams, 903-8149) SUSJECT: Hazard Assessment for Radioactive Contamination at the Seymour Site, Seymour, Connecticut To' L. Price, OR - We have reviewed the Hazard Assessment for the Radioactive Contamination at the Sevmour Site. Sevmour, Connecticut dated May 1993. This hazard assessment is related to residual

  5. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1996 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n5060ct2a.xls"

  6. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Report and Appendices | Department of Energy Second Evaluation Report and Appendices Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. 45670-2.pdf (1.25 MB) More Documents & Publications Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third

  7. Connecticut Fuel Cell Programs - From Demonstration to Deployment |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Programs - From Demonstration to Deployment Connecticut Fuel Cell Programs - From Demonstration to Deployment Presentation by the Connecticut Clean Energy Fund on Connecticut fuel cell programs. Presented September 12, 2007. doe_nha.pdf (1.05 MB) More Documents & Publications CESA-fuelcell-advancing-state-policies2010.pdf State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2011 State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2014

  8. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Connecticut Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,284 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 281 3.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 122 1.5 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 159 1.9 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net

  9. Connecticut Rooftop Solar PV Permitting Guide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Connecticut Rooftop Solar PV Permitting Guide is a compilation of best practices and resources for solar PV permitting. The guide includes a summary of current codes and regulations affecting solar PV, best practices for streamlining the municipal permitting process, and tools to assist municipalities in creating a streamlined permit process for residential solar PV. Resources include a solar PV permit application, a structural review worksheet, an inspection checklist, and a model solar zoning ordinance.

  10. Salmon Brook, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Brook, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9564854, -72.795374 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  11. Broad Brook, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Broad Brook, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9123195, -72.5450873 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  12. East Granby, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Connecticut.1 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  13. East Windsor, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Connecticut.1 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  14. New Fairfield, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Connecticut.1 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  15. East Hartford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    County, Connecticut.1 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  16. Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 ...

  17. Connecticut Clean Cities Future Fuels Project | Department of...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    (1.67 MB) More Documents & Publications Connecticut Clean Cities Future Fuels Project New York State-wide Alternative Fuel Vehicle Program for Vehicles and Fueling Stations

  18. Constellation NewEnergy, Inc (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 1-866-237-7693 Website: www.constellation.comresident Twitter: @ConstellationEG Facebook: https:www.facebook.comConstellationEnergy Outage...

  19. Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

  20. West Hartford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    "alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map West Hartford is a town in Hartford County, Connecticut.1 References US Census Bureau...

  1. Connecticut Fuel Cell Activities: Markets, Programs, and Models

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Stations and Zero Emission Fuel Cell Vehicles (In Development) * Renewable Portfolio Standards * Project 150 and Grant Programs * Connecticut Hydrogen Fuel Cell Economy * ...

  2. East Haddam, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleEastHaddam,Connecticut&old...

  3. East Hampton, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleEastHampton,Connecticut&ol...

  4. Old Saybrook, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleOldSaybrook,Connecticut&ol...

  5. Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr...

  6. Sherwood Manor, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Sherwood Manor, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.0134293, -72.5642544 Show Map Loading map......

  7. South Windham, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    South Windham, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.679543, -72.1703555 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  8. North Granby, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    North Granby, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.017967, -72.843623 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  9. Chester Center, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Chester Center, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.400461, -72.453803 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  10. Essex Village, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Essex Village, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.355949, -72.389488 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  11. Deep River, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Deep River, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.3856546, -72.4356422 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  12. Canton Valley, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Canton Valley, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8342645, -72.8917676 Show Map Loading map......

  13. Deep River Center, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Deep River Center, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.3729131, -72.4435674 Show Map Loading map......

  14. North Grosvenor Dale, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    North Grosvenor Dale, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9856531, -71.8986833 Show Map Loading map......

  15. Old Saybrook Center, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Old Saybrook Center, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.2917769, -72.3607108 Show Map Loading map......

  16. Saybrook Manor, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Saybrook Manor, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.2853765, -72.3989743 Show Map Loading map......

  17. South Windsor, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    South Windsor, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8489872, -72.5717551 Show Map Loading map......

  18. East Brooklyn, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    East Brooklyn, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7967652, -71.8972946 Show Map Loading map......

  19. New Britain, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    New Britain, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6612104, -72.7795419 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  20. Suffield Depot, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Suffield Depot, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9812074, -72.6498129 Show Map Loading map......

  1. New Haven, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    New Haven, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.3081527, -72.9281577 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  2. Windsor Locks, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Windsor Locks, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9292639, -72.6273123 Show Map Loading map......

  3. Connecticut Fuel Cell Programs - From Demonstration to Deployment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Connecticut Fuel Cell Programs - From Demonstration to Deployment September 12, 2007 Lise ... Wind 7 Project 100 Onsite DG Company Development Demonstration Industry Infrastructure ...

  4. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Report and Appendices | Department of Energy 2.pdf (1.02 MB) More Documents & Publications Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Third Evaluation Report - Appendices Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results

  5. TransCanada Power Mktg Ltd (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Connecticut Phone Number: 1.800.661.3805 Website: www.transcanada.compowermarke Twitter: @TransCanada Outage Hotline: 1-800-447-8066 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data...

  6. Connecticut Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",5498,5361,5466,5582,5845 " ... "Renewables",316,285,287,287,281 "Pumped Storage",4,29,29,29,29 "Other",27,27,27,27,27 ...

  7. Connecticut Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",16046,14982,12970,12562,147...wables",1307,1093,1290,1268,1130 "Pumped Storage","-",-15,7,5,9 "Other",739,726,710,713,71...

  8. Preparations for Meeting New York and Connecticut MTBE Bans

    Reports and Publications

    2003-01-01

    In response to a Congressional request, the Energy Information Administration examined the progress being made to meet the bans on the use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) being implemented in New York and Connecticut at the end of 2003.

  9. Rocky Hill, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Rocky Hill, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6648216,...

  10. Blue Hills, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Blue Hills is a census-designated place in Hartford County, Connecticut.1 References ...

  11. Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

  12. Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 ...

  13. Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

  14. Connecticut Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  15. West Simsbury, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. West Simsbury is a census-designated place in Hartford County, Connecticut.1 References...

  16. Connecticut Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",5498,5361,5466,5582,5845 " Coal",551,551,553,564,564 " Petroleum",2926,2709,2741,2749,2989 " Natural ...

  17. Connecticut Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",16046,14982,12970,12562,14743 " Coal",4282,3739,4387,2453,2604 " Petroleum",1279,1311,514,299,409 " Natural ...

  18. Connecticut Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  19. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Evaluation Results | Department of Energy Preliminary Evaluation Results Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results This report provides preliminary results from the evaluation of a protoptye fuel cell transit bus operating at Connecticut Transit in Hartford. Included are descriptions of the planned fuel cell bus demonstration and equipment, early results and agency experience are also provided. 43847.pdf (1.59 MB) More Documents & Publications

  20. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Report and Appendices | Department of Energy Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. 45670-1.pdf (836.62 KB) More Documents & Publications SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit

  1. Reservoir Characterization of Bridgeport and Cypress Sandstones in Lawrence Field Illinois to Improve Petroleum Recovery by Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Flood

    SciTech Connect

    Seyler, Beverly; Grube, John; Huff, Bryan; Webb, Nathan; Damico, James; Blakley, Curt; Madhavan, Vineeth; Johanek, Philip; Frailey, Scott

    2012-12-21

    were used to better understand porosity and permeability trends in the region and to characterize barriers and define flow units. Diagenetic alterations that impact porosity and permeability include development of quartz overgrowths, sutured quartz grains, dissolution of feldspar grains, formation of clay mineral coatings on grains, and calcite cementation. Many of these alterations are controlled by facies. Mapping efforts identified distinct flow units in the northern part of the field showing that the Pennsylvanian Bridgeport consists of a series of thick incised channel fill sequences. The sandstones are about 75-150 feet thick and typically consist of medium grained and poorly sorted fluvial to distributary channel fill deposits at the base. The sandstones become indistinctly bedded distributary channel deposits in the main part of the reservoir before fining upwards and becoming more tidally influenced near their top. These channel deposits have core permeabilities ranging from 20 md to well over 1000 md. The tidally influenced deposits are more compartmentalized compared to the thicker and more continuous basal fluvial deposits. Fine grained sandstones that are laterally equivalent to the thicker channel type deposits have permeabilities rarely reaching above 250 md. Most of the unrecovered oil in Lawrence Field is contained in Pennsylvanian Age Bridgeport sandstones and Mississippian Age Cypress sandstones. These reservoirs are highly complex and compartmentalized. Detailed reservoir characterization including the development of 3-D geologic and geocellular models of target areas in the field were completed to identify areas with the best potential to recover remaining reserves including unswept and by-passed oil. This project consisted of tasks designed to compile, interpret, and analyze the data required to conduct reservoir characterization for the Bridgeport and Cypress sandstones in pilot areas in anticipation of expanded implementation of ASP flooding in

  2. Public health assessment for public health implications of radiation contamination at former clock factories located in Bristo (Hartford County), New Haven, (New Haven County), Thomaston (Litchfield County), and Waterbury (New Haven County), Connecticut, Region 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-29

    This public health assessment was developed (1) to evaluate the radiation data collected by the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CT DEP) at structures that once housed clock factories in four Connecticut municipalities, and (2) to determine whether a public health hazard exists at any of these sites from the contamination. Contamination was detected at levels that may pose a health risk to current occupants at the former Waterbury Clock Factory, the former Lux Clock Factory, and the former Benrus Clock Company buildings in Waterbury; the former Sessions Clock Company in Bristol; and the former Seth Thomas Clock Company in Thomaston. However, none of the radiation levels detected pose an immediate health problem. The Connecticut Department of Public Health recommends that individuals be disassociated from areas with radiation at levels exceeding 15 mRem/year.

  3. CT Clean Energy Communities

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Communities program, offered by the Clean Energy Finance & Investment Authority and the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, offers incentives for communities that pledge their...

  4. FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AND PULASKI STREETS BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT i Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site ...

  5. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2008-10-01

    This report provides preliminary results from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluation of a protoptye fuel cell transit bus operating at Connecticut Transit in Hartford. Included are descriptions of the planned fuel cell bus demonstration and equipment; early results and agency experience are also provided.

  6. Building America Case Study: Field Performance of Inverter-Driven Heat Pumps in Cold Climates - Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont (Fact Sheet), Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Performance of Inverter-Driven Heat Pumps in Cold Climates Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Field Performance of Inverter-Driven Heat Pumps in Cold Climates Location: CT, MA, and VT Partners: Efficiency Vermont, efficiencyvermont.com Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, carb-swa.com Building Component: Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning Application: New and retrofit; single- family and multifamily Year Tested: 2013-2014 Climate Zone(s):

  7. Building America Case Study: Singer Village: A Cold Climate Zero Energy Ready Home, Derby, Connecticut (Fact Sheet), Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Singer Village: A Cold Climate Zero Energy Ready Home Derby, Connecticut PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Singer Village Home Location: Derby, CT Partners: Brookside Development, LLC. brooksidedevelopment.com Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, carb-swa.com Size: 4,456 ft 2 including basement Year Completed: 2014 Climate Zone: Cold PERFORMANCE DATA Source energy savings: 29.6% HERS index: 45 Projected annual utility costs: $2,443 Incremental cost of energy efficiency measures: 5.5%

  8. Connecticut launches nation's first statewide Home Energy Score...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Using the Energy Department's Home Energy Score, EnergizeCT's Home Energy Solutions program ... the multiple listing service, putting future homeowners in a better position to ...

  9. U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.

    1995-07-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydro-power potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The software measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven software program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the State of Connecticut.

  10. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 38 40,886 41,594 43,703 1990's 45,364 45,925 46,859 45,529 45,042 45,935 47,055 48,195 47,110 49,930 2000's 52,384 49,815 49,383 50,691 50,839 52,572 52,982 52,389 53,903 54,510 2010's 54,842 55,028 55,407 55,500 56,591 57,403 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  11. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2 2,709 2,818 2,908 1990's 3,061 2,921 2,923 2,952 3,754 3,705 3,435 3,459 3,441 3,465 2000's 3,683 3,881 3,716 3,625 3,470 3,437 3,393 3,317 3,196 3,138 2010's 3,063 3,062 3,148 4,454 4,217 3,945 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  12. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 400 411,349 417,831 424,036 1990's 428,912 430,078 432,244 427,761 428,157 431,909 433,778 436,119 438,716 442,457 2000's 458,388 458,404 462,574 466,913 469,332 475,221 478,849 482,902 487,320 489,349 2010's 490,185 494,970 504,138 513,492 522,658 531,380 - = No Data Reported; --

  13. Connecticut Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,492 833 2,943 2000's 3,020 2,948 2,515 3,382 3,383 3,327 3,178 4,361 4,225 5,831 2010's 6,739 6,302 4,747 4,381 4,696 5,103 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring

  14. Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Feet) Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 12.45 8.97 7.74 6.08 6.66 5.68 5.21 5.11 2000's 7.51 8.84 8.84 10.72 12.65 14.60 18.39 20.57 24.04 15.26 2010's 16.31 18.59 13.70 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  15. Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0.85 0.86 0.84 0.84 0.81 0.78 0.81 2000's 0.83 0.86 0.82 0.90 0.91 0.92 0.89 0.92 0.88 0.92 2010's 0.89 0.95 0.99 0.96 1.01 1.11 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  16. Connecticut Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Delivered to Commercial Consumers for the Account of Others (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 533 513 2,680 1990's 1,169 1,887 1,037 602 7,455 6,836 5,193 7,709 13,270 17,692 2000's 10,509 9,953 11,188 12,350 11,013 10,606 9,458 10,252 11,032 12,324 2010's 14,068 15,519 14,774 19,561

  17. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-29

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in teh State of Connecticut.

  18. Connecticut State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive-waste management

    SciTech Connect

    1981-06-01

    The Connecticut State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Connecticut. The profile is the result of a survey of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensees in Connecticut. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Connecticut.

  19. Connecticut Regional High School Science Bowl| U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC)

    (SC) Connecticut Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us High School Regionals Connecticut Regional High

  20. Connecticut Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC)

    Science (SC) Connecticut Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Connecticut

  1. State of Connecticut Summary of Reported Data From July 1, 2010 - September 30, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Connecticut Summary o f Reported Data From July 1, 2 010 - September 3 0, 2013 Better B uildings Neighborhood Program Report Produced By: U.S. Department of Energy June 2014 STATE OF CONNECTICUT SUMMARY OF REPORTED DATA ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This document presents a summary of data reported by an organization awarded federal financial assistance (e.g., grants or cooperative agreements) through the U.S. Department of Energy's ( DOE's) Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) from July 2010 or

  2. Connecticut State University System Initiative for Nanotechnology-Related Equipment, Faculty Development and Curriculum Development

    SciTech Connect

    Broadbridge, Christine C.

    2013-03-28

    DOE grant used for partial fulfillment of necessary laboratory equipment for course enrichment and new graduate programs in nanotechnology at the four institutions of the Connecticut State University System (CSUS). Equipment in this initial phase included variable pressure scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis capability [at Southern Connecticut State University]; power x-ray diffractometer [at Central Connecticut State University]; a spectrophotometer and spectrofluorimeter [at Eastern Connecticut State University; and a Raman Spectrometer [at Western Connecticut State University]. DOE's funding was allocated for purchase and installation of this scientific equipment and instrumentation. Subsequently, DOE funding was allocated to fund the curriculum, faculty development and travel necessary to continue development and implementation of the System's Graduate Certificate in Nanotechnology (GCNT) program and the ConnSCU Nanotechnology Center (ConnSCU-NC) at Southern Connecticut State University. All of the established outcomes have been successfully achieved. The courses and structure of the GCNT program have been determined and the program will be completely implemented in the fall of 2013. The instrumentation has been purchased, installed and has been utilized at each campus for the implementation of the nanotechnology courses, CSUS GCNT and the ConnSCU-NC. Additional outcomes for this grant include curriculum development for non-majors as well as faculty and student research.

  3. Steven Winters Associates Inc (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Buildings Product: Research, design and consulting for high performance buildings Website: www.swinter.com Coordinates: 41.100098, -73.420395 Show Map...

  4. Connecticut Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.35 0.68 0.30 1970's 0.32 0.32 0.35 0.40 0.50 0.58 0.59 1.50 2.60 2.53 1980's 2.76 2.94 3.53 3.30 3.18 3.71 2.53 2.52 2.13 2.97 1990's 3.68 3.08 2.95 3.53 2.62 2.20 3.50 1.54 3.00 0.59 2000's 4.82 4.93 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  5. ASME XI stroke time testing of solenoid valves at Connecticut Yankee Station

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, C.W.

    1996-12-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company has developed the capability of measuring the stroke times of AC and DC solenoid valves. This allows the station to measure the stroke time of any solenoid valve in the plant, even those valves which do not have valve stem position indicators. Connecticut Yankee has adapted the ITI MOVATS Checkmate 3 system, using a signal input from a Bruel and Kjaer (B&K) Model 4382 acoustic accelerometer and the Schaumberg Campbell Associates (SCA) Model SCA-1148 dual sensor, which is a combined accelerometer and gaussmeter.

  6. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Albany Quadrangle, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire

    SciTech Connect

    Field, M T; Truesdell, D B

    1982-09-01

    The Albany 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m for uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Areas of favorable geology and aeroradioactivity anomalies were examined and sampled. Most Triassic and Jurassic sediments in the Connecticut Basin, in the central part of the quadrangle, were found to be favorable for sandstone uranium deposits. Some Precambrian units in the southern Green Mountains of Vermont were found favorable for uranium deposits in veins in metamorphic rocks.

  7. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-04

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  8. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-05-21

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  9. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut Connecticut

  10. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-05-01

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The evaluation period in this report (January 2008 through February 2009) has been chosen to coincide with a UTC Power propulsion system changeout that occurred on January 15, 2008.

  11. Spare-parts replacement and the commercial grade issues at Connecticut Yankee

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, E.M.; Scott, D.J.; Maret, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    Connecticut Yankee was designed and built according to code B31.1 of the American National Standards Institute for pressure piping and began commercial operations in 1968, 2 yr prior to 10CFR50 Appendix B of the Code of Federal Regulations. Therefore, at the time of commercial operation, the entire plant, except for several major primary plant components, met the current criteria for commercial grade items (CGIs). When spare parts were needed, 10CFR50 Appendix B and 10CFR21 requirements had to be backfitted onto suppliers who had not agreed to these requirements when supplying the original equipment. The problem of identifying original equipment manufacturers that would or would not accept these additional requirements was compounded at Connecticut Yankee by three related problems that also became apparent at approximately the same time: (1) The accuracy of the material, equipment, parts list (Q-list) was being questioned. (2) The use of existing spare parts bought without additional current quality assurance requirements and the adequacy of the existing inventory to support plant operations were being questioned. (3) The general industry concerns over use of GCIs in safety-related applications needed to be resolved. Connecticut Yankee management recognized the need to address each of these problems. Three specific actions were taken: (1) A Q-list upgrade program was funded. (2) A spare parts bill of materials (BOM) project was funded. (3) Connecticut Yankee's engineering department dedicated several engineers to address procurement issues and specifically to develop a CGI program.

  12. QER Public Meeting in Providence, RI & Hartford, CT: New England...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    RI Hartford: Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, Phoenix ... written comments regarding the Enhancing Energy Infrastructure Resiliency and Addressing ...

  13. CT NC0

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I.:e results of a radiation tkat the pIaCt d:sa survey conducted after the operations showed t minat ed I :sed and all equipment had ken thoroughly decvn- T;le air dust samnles ...

  14. CT Solar Lease

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    CT Solar Lease allows homeowners to lease a photovoltaic (PV) or solar thermal system, with fixed monthly payments, for a term of 20 years, at no upfront down payment.* This program, which takes...

  15. CT Solar Loan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered...

  16. Developing a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in Connecticut: Update on progress and new directions

    SciTech Connect

    Gingerich, R.E.

    1993-03-01

    Connecticut is a member of the Northeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Compact (Northeast LLRW Compact). The other member of the Northeast LLRW Compact is New Jersey. The Northeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission (Northeast Compact Commission), the Northeast LLRW Compact`s governing body, has designated both Connecticut and New Jersey as host states for disposal facilities. The Northeast Compact Commission has recommended that, for purposes of planning for each state`s facility, the siting agency for the state should use projected volumes and characteristics of the LLW generated in its own state. In 1987 Connecticut enacted legislation that assigns major responsibilities for developing a LLW disposal facility in Connecticut to the Connecticut Hazardous Waste Management Service (CHWMS). The CHWMS is required to: prepare and revise, as necessary, a LLW Management Plan for the state; select a site for a LLW disposal facility; select a disposal technology to be used at the site; select a firm to obtain the necessary approvals for the facility and to develop and operate it; and serve as the custodial agency for the facility. This paper discusses progress in developing a facility.

  17. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Shore Road Project- Old Greenwich, Connecticut

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This case study describes the builder Murphy Brothers' first DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Old Greenwich, CT.

  18. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas Input Supplemental Fuels (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  19. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","na1350_sct_2a.xls"

  20. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Injections All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1996 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  1. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals All Operators (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1996 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  2. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  3. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third Evaluation Report and Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The prototype fuel cell bus was manufactured by Van Hool and ISE Corp. and features an electric hybrid drive system with a UTC Power PureMotion 120 Fuel Cell Power System and ZEBRA batteries for energy storage. The fuel cell bus started operation in April 2007, and evaluation results through October 2009 are provided in this report.

  4. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third Evaluation Report and Appendices

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The prototype fuel cell bus was manufactured by Van Hool and ISE Corp. and features an electric hybrid drive system with a UTC Power PureMotion 120 Fuel Cell Power System and ZEBRA batteries for energy storage. The fuel cell bus started operation in April 2007, and evaluation results through October 2009 are provided in this report.

  5. Connecticut launches nation’s first statewide Home Energy Score Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Connecticut recently launched a statewide residential energy labeling program that will make energy efficiency labels ubiquitous across the state. Using the Energy Department’s Home Energy Score, EnergizeCT’s Home Energy Solutions program will provide an energy efficiency score and recommend efficiency improvements to residents across the state. Similar to a vehicle’s miles-per-gallon rating, the Home Energy Score helps homeowners and homebuyers determine a home’s expected energy use. It also provides recommendations for improving energy efficiency.

  6. Best Practices Case Study: Nelson Construction, Hamilton Way, Farmingon, CT

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-03

    Building America's research team lead Building Science Corporation helped Nelson Construction achieve HERS scores of 53 and 54 on ten homes in Farmington, Connecticut.

  7. ContaCt

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ContaCt The nuclear and materials science research ca- pabilities at LANSCE are operated as a DOE-des- ignated user facility in service to the nation. We provide neutron and proton beams as well as instrumentation and sample environments for basic, applied, industry, and defense-related re- search in nuclear physics and materials science. A yearly call invites proposals for beam time for experiments from other national laboratories, academia, and industry users. Proprietary and nonproprietary

  8. ORNL/luSA-85/6 Health and Safety Research Division PRELIMINARY RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF TEE FORMER HAVENS PLANT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    luSA-85/6 Health and Safety Research Division PRELIMINARY RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF TEE FORMER HAVENS PLANT OF TEE BRIDGEPORT BRASS COMPANY, BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT May 1985 Work performed as part of the RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY ACCIVITIES PROGRAM OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 operated by MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. for the U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract No. DE-AC05-840R21400 \ .-l__--.-- -- PRELIMINARY RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE FORMER HAVENS PLAEJT OF THE

  9. CT Offshore | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: CT Offshore Place: Otterup, Denmark Zip: 5450 Sector: Wind energy Product: Denmark-based consultancy which provides assistance for project...

  10. CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR PORTIONS OF THE ABB COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE IN WINDSOR, CONNECTICUT DURING THE FALL OF 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Wade C. Adams

    2011-12-09

    From the mid-1950s until mid-2000, the Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) site in Windsor, Connecticut (Figure A-1) was involved in the research, development, engineering, production, and servicing of nuclear fuels, systems, and services. The site is currently undergoing decommissioning that will lead to license termination and unrestricted release in accordance with the requirements of the License Termination Rule in 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E. Asea Brown Boveri Incorporated (ABB) has been decommissioning the CE site since 2001.

  11. Siemens Corporate Technology CT | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Corporate Technology CT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Siemens Corporate Technology (CT) Place: Erlangan, Germany Sector: Solar Product: R&D lab for Siemens AG. Currently...

  12. Evidence for old crust in the provenance of the Trap Falls Formation, southwestern Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, D.K.; Sevigny, J.H.; Bock, B.; Hanson, G.N.; McLennan, S.M. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    The Trap Fall Formation is a multiply deformed, amphibolite facies metasedimentary sequence in southwestern Connecticut. It contains interlayered pelitic schists and lesser quartzites, and may represent turbidites. The major element compositions of 3 schists are compatible with a shale protolith. Their aluminous nature (CIA = 68--70) suggests a weathering history in the source, but may in part be a result of metamorphic processes. High SiO[sub 2] (85--91%) and Zr (305--370 ppm) concentrations in the quartzites are consistent with a significant component of recycled sediment in the source. A single abraded detrital zircon from a quartzite gives a concordant U-Pb age of 1,009 [plus minus] 6 Ma and suggests a source in Grenville-aged crust. E[sub Nd] at 450 Ma of [minus] 9.2 for one schist sample is also consistent with older crust. REE patterns for 2 pelitic schists and a quartzite (Fig.) are parallel to PAAS (post-Archean average shale). Thus the authors suggest that recycled sediment derived from older cratonic sources dominates the source for the Trap Falls Formation. Models for the tectonic setting of deposition should be consistent with these observations.

  13. Performance House: A Cold Climate Challenge Home, Old Greenwich, Connecticut (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    By working with builder partners on test homes, researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program can vet whole-house building strategies and avoid potential unintended consequences of implementing untested solution packages on a production scale. To support this research, Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) partnered with Preferred Builders Inc. on a high-performance test home in Old Greenwich, Connecticut. The philosophy and science behind the 2,700 ft2 "Performance House" was based on the premise that homes should be safe, healthy, comfortable, durable, efficient, and adaptable to the needs of homeowners. The technologies and strategies used in the "Performance House" were best practices rather than cutting edge, with a focus on simplicity in construction, maintenance, and operation. Achieving 30% source energy savings compared with a home built to the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code in the cold climate zone requires that nearly all components and systems be optimized. Careful planning and design are critical. The end result was a DOE Challenge Home that achieved a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index Score of 20 (43 without photovoltaics [PV]).

  14. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3035ct3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3035ct3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10/28/2016 9:35:04 PM" "Back to

  15. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Monthly","8/2016" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3035ct3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3035ct3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10/28/2016 9:35:04 PM" "Back

  16. CT Investment Partners LLP | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    CT Investment Partners LLP Jump to: navigation, search Name: CT Investment Partners LLP Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: WC2A 2AZ Sector: Carbon Product: Venture capital arm of...

  17. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Shore Road Project - Old Greenwich, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This case study describes a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Old Greenwich, CT, that scored HERS 40 without PV and HERS 27 with PV. This 4,100 ft2 custom home has 13-inch ICF basement walls and 11-inch ICF above-grade walls with a closed-cell spray foam-insulated roof deck, and a continuously running ERV. The house has a dual-fuel heat pump, an instantaneous condensing water heater, and 4.5-kW solar shingles.

  18. National incinerator testing and evaluation program: The environmental characterization of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) Combustion Technology, Mid-Connecticut Facility, Hartford, Connecticut. Final report, June 1987-March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Finklestein, A.; Klicius, R.D.

    1994-12-01

    The report gives results of an environmental characterization of refuse-derived (RDF) semi-suspension burning technology at a facility in Hartford, Connecticut, that represents state-of-the-art technology, including a spray dryer/fabric filter flue-gas cleaning (FGC) system for each unit. Results were obtained for a variety of steam production rates, combustion conditions, flue gas temperatures, and acid gas removal efficiencies. All incoming wastes and residue streams were weighed, sampled, and analyzed. Key combustor and FGC system operating variables were monitored on a real time basis. A wide range of analyses for acid gases, trace organics, and heavy metals was carried out on gas emissions and all ash residue discharges.

  19. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Singer Village - A Cold Climate Zero Energy Ready Home, Derby, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    After progressively incorporating ENERGY STAR for Homes Versions 1, 2, and 3 into its standard practices over the years, builder Brookside Development was seeking to build an even more sustainable product that would further increase energy efficiency, while also addressing indoor air quality, water conservation, renewable-ready, and resiliency. These objectives align with the framework of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home program, which builds upon the comprehensive building science requirements of ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 and proven Building America innovations and best practices. To meet this goal, Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings partnered with Brookside Development to design and construct the first zero energy ready home in a development of seven new homes on the old Singer Estate in Derby, Connecticut.

  20. Dual energy CT for attenuation correction with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the energy dependent noise and bias properties of monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisitions. These monoenergetic images can be used to estimate attenuation coefficients at energies suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This is becoming more relevant with the increased use of quantitative imaging by PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners. There are, however, potential variations in the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images as a function of energy. Methods: The authors used analytic approximations and simulations to estimate the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images of water-filled cylinders with different shapes and the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom from 40 to 520 keV, the range of SPECT and PET energies. The dual-kVp spectra were based on the GE Lightspeed VCT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp with added filtration of 0.5 mm Cu. The authors evaluated strategies of noise suppression with sinogram smoothing and dose minimization with reduction of tube currents at the two kVp settings. The authors compared the impact of DECT-based attenuation correction with single-kVp CT-based attenuation correction on PET quantitation for the NCAT phantom for soft tissue and high-Z materials of bone and iodine contrast enhancement. Results: Both analytic calculations and simulations displayed the expected minimum noise value for a synthesized monoenergetic image at an energy between the mean energies of the two spectra. In addition the authors found that the normalized coefficient of variation in the synthesized attenuation map increased with energy but reached a plateau near 160 keV, and then remained constant with increasing energy up to 511 keV and beyond. The bias was minimal, as the linear attenuation coefficients of the synthesized monoenergetic images were within 2.4% of the known true values across the entire energy range

  1. Dual energy CT for attenuation correction with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the energy dependent noise and bias properties of monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisitions. These monoenergetic images can be used to estimate attenuation coefficients at energies suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This is becoming more relevant with the increased use of quantitative imaging by PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners. There are, however, potential variations in the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images as a function of energy. Methods: The authors used analytic approximations and simulations to estimate the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images of water-filled cylinders with different shapes and the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom from 40 to 520 keV, the range of SPECT and PET energies. The dual-kVp spectra were based on the GE Lightspeed VCT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp with added filtration of 0.5 mm Cu. The authors evaluated strategies of noise suppression with sinogram smoothing and dose minimization with reduction of tube currents at the two kVp settings. The authors compared the impact of DECT-based attenuation correction with single-kVp CT-based attenuation correction on PET quantitation for the NCAT phantom for soft tissue and high-Z materials of bone and iodine contrast enhancement. Results: Both analytic calculations and simulations displayed the expected minimum noise value for a synthesized monoenergetic image at an energy between the mean energies of the two spectra. In addition the authors found that the normalized coefficient of variation in the synthesized attenuation map increased with energy but reached a plateau near 160 keV, and then remained constant with increasing energy up to 511 keV and beyond. The bias was minimal, as the linear attenuation coefficients of the synthesized monoenergetic images were within 2.4% of the known true values across the entire energy range

  2. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: The Performance House: A Cold Climate Challenge Home, Old Greenwich, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    By working with builder partners on test homes, researchers from the U.S. Department of Energys Building America program can vet whole-house building strategies and avoid potential unintended consequences of implementing untested solution packages on a production scale. To support this research, Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) partnered with Preferred Builders Inc. on a high-performance test home in Old Greenwich, Connecticut. The philosophy and science behind the 2,700 ft2 Performance House was based on the premise that homes should be safe, healthy, comfortable, durable, efficient, and adaptable to the needs of homeowners. The technologies and strategies used in the Performance House were best practices rather than cutting edge, with a focus on simplicity in construction, maintenance, and operation. Achieving 30% source energy savings compared with a home built to the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code in the cold climate zone requires that nearly all components and systems be optimized. Careful planning and design are critical. The end result was a DOE Challenge Home that achieved a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index Score of 20 (43 without photovoltaics [PV]).

  3. Predix and Robots in CT Systems | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Robots and Predix make Beijing's CT factory brilliant Guoshuang Cai 2015.04.16 GE Healthcare's Beijing plant is one of the largest factories producing computed tomography (CT) ...

  4. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    DE-FE0026093 Fuel Cell Energy Danbury, CT Sonata - Bethel, CT; University of Connecticut - Storrs, CT; Versa - Littleton, CO and Calgary, Alberta, Canada FESCCAESD Joseph M...

  5. City of Bridgeport Utilities, Nebraska | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Power Place: Nebraska Phone Number: (308) 262-1623 Website: www.cityofbport.comindex.php? Twitter: @cityofbport Outage Hotline: (308) 262-1623 References: EIA Form EIA-861...

  6. Bridgeport, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.1553457, -75.9693622 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type"...

  7. ORNL/RASA-85/4

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    RASA-85/4 c Health and Safety Research Division FOLLOW-UP SURVEY OF BRIDGEPORT BRASS COMPANY SEYMOUR, CONNE(XIC!UT May 1985 Work performed as part of the RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY ACTIVITIES PROGRAM OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 operated by MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract No. DE-AC05-840R21400 ORNL/RASA-85/4 Health and Safety Research Division FOLLOW-UP SURVEY OF BRIDGEPORT BRASS COMPANY SEYMOUR, CONNECTICUT W. D.

  8. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Annual",2015 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3045ct3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3045ct3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10/28/2016 9:35:49 PM" "Back to

  9. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Monthly","8/2016" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n3045ct3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3045ct3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10/28/2016 9:35:49 PM" "Back

  10. Beryllium Vender Screening Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Corporation of America (all locations); Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) (all locations); Connecticut Aircraft Nuclear Engine Laboratory (Middletown, CT); ...

  11. Comparison of CT and MR-CT Fusion for Prostate Post-Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Maletz, Kristina L.; Ennis, Ronald D.; Ostenson, Jason; Pevsner, Alexander; Kagen, Alexander; Wernick, Iddo

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The use of T2 MR for postimplant dosimetry (PID) after prostate brachytherapy allows more anatomically accurate and precise contouring but does not readily permit seed identification. We developed a reproducible technique for performing MR-CT fusion and compared the resulting dosimetry to standard CT-based PID. Methods and Materials: CT and T1-weighted MR images for 45 patients were fused and aligned based on seed distribution. The T2-weighted MR image was then fused to the aligned T1. Reproducibility of the fusion technique was tested by inter- and intraobserver variability for 13 patients. Dosimetry was computed for the prostate as a whole and for the prostate divided into anterior and posterior sectors of the base, mid-prostate, and apex. Results: Inter- and intraobserver variability for the fusion technique showed less than 1% variation in D90. MR-CT fusion D90 and CT D90 were nearly equivalent for the whole prostate, but differed depending on the identification of superior extent of the base (p = 0.007) and on MR/CT prostate volume ratio (p = 0.03). Sector analysis showed a decrease in MR-CT fusion D90 in the anterior base (ratio 0.93 {+-}0.25, p < 0.05) and an increase in MR-CT fusion D90 in the apex (p < 0.05). The volume of extraprostatic tissue encompassed by the V100 is greater on MR than CT. Factors associated with this difference are the MR/CT volume ratio (p < 0.001) and the difference in identification of the inferior extent of the apex (p = 0.03). Conclusions: We developed a reproducible MR-CT fusion technique that allows MR-based dosimetry. Comparing the resulting postimplant dosimetry with standard CT dosimetry shows several differences, including adequacy of coverage of the base and conformity of the dosimetry around the apex. Given the advantage of MR-based tissue definition, further study of MR-based dosimetry is warranted.

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Brass Co - CT 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CT.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based upon the limited scope of activities at the site CT.01-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: ...

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sperry Products Inc - CT...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CT.07-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited scope of activities performed at the site CT.07-2 Radioactive Materials ...

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Cyanamid Co - CT...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    see Documents Related to American Cyanamid Co CT.13-1 - DOE MemorandumChecklist; D. Levine to File; Subject: Elimination Recommendation; June 15, 1987 CT.13-2 - DOE Letter; J....

  15. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"06301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2015,"06301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2015,"0630...

  16. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Millstone

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...vnd.ms-excel" 3,"1,233","9,336",86.4,"PWR","applicationvnd.ms-excel","applicationvnd.ms-excel" ,"2,103","16,750",90.9 "Data for 2010" "PWR Pressurized Light Water Reactor."

  17. Connecticut Natural Gas Summary

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Citygate 3.09 3.20 3.85 4.58 4.69 4.20 1989-2016 Residential 11.74 12.87 15.03 19.19 21.75 24.07 1989-2016 Commercial 7.93 9.37 9.87 11.82 11.16 11.75 1989-2016 Industrial 5.84 6.84 6.58 6.05 6.19 6.17 2001-2016 Electric Power 4.63 2.74 2.39 2.33 3.13 3.09 2002-2016 Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Delivered to Consumers 21,834 21,380 17,303 14,434 NA NA 2001-2016 Residential 5,562 4,229 2,385 1,365

  18. Connecticut Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Commercial 9.55 8.48 8.40 9.20 10.24 8.60 1967-2015 Industrial 9.60 9.16 8.83 6.85 8.07 6.35 1997-2015 Vehicle Fuel 16.31 18.59 13.70 1992-2012 Electric Power 5.70 5.09 3.99 6.23 ...

  19. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 34043,,6255,4461 34074,,4043,3038 34104,,1947,1583 34135,,1274,1161 34165,,1040,1122 ...836,987,1723,1623,3,10500 40405,13482,1004,1947,1632,3,8895 40436,12628,951,1787,1591,3,82...

  20. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Prices"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Date:","04292016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngprisumdcusctm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavngngprisumdcusctm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy ...

  1. Connecticut Natural Gas Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Pipeline and Distribution Use Price 1967-2005 Citygate Price 6.58 5.92 5.12 5.42 5.61 4.07 1984-2015 Residential Price 14.93 13.83 14.17 13.32 14.13 12.50 1967-2015 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 97.3 96.8 96.7 95.3 95.9 96.3 1989-2015 Commercial Price 9.55 8.48 8.40 9.20 10.24 8.60 1967-2015 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 65.4 65.4 65.1 57.9 67.2 76.2 1990-2015 Industrial Price 9.60 9.16 8.83

  2. Connecticut Natural Gas Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History Citygate Price 3.09 3.20 3.85 4.58 4.69 4.20 1989-2016 Residential Price 11.74 12.87 15.03 19.19 21.75 24.07 1989-2016 Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices 96.4 96.2 95.4 95.3 96.0 95.6 2002-2016 Commercial Price 7.93 9.37 9.87 11.82 11.16 11.75 1989-2016 Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices 79.9 75.9 72.9 70.8 NA NA 1989-2016 Industrial Price 5.84 6.84 6.58 6.05 6.19 6.17 2001-2016 Percentage

  3. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Millstone

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Millstone" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 2,869,"7,415",97.4,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" 3,"1,233","9,336",86.4,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  4. Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative {sup 99m}Tc SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (μ) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (σ ∼ 200–400 HU) resulted in low μ-maps noise (σ ∼ 1%–3%). Noise levels greater than ∼10% in 140 keV μ-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ∼15% in {sup 99m}Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 4 μGy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected μ values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in μ. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ∼100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in μ{sub 140} {sub keV} on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ∼10% into the reconstructed {sup 99m}Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because

  5. Chest wall invasion by lung cancer: limitations of CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Pennes, D.R.; Glazer, G.M.; Wimbish, K.J.; Gross, B.H.; Long, R.W.; Orringer, M.B.

    1985-03-01

    Thirty-three patients with peripheral pulmonary malignancies contiguous with a pleural surface were evaluated for chest wall invasion by computed tomography (CT). CT criteria included pleural thickening adjacent to the tumor, encroachment on or increased density of the extrapleural fat, asymmetry of the extrapleural soft tissues adjacent to the tumor, apparent mass invading the chest wall, and rib destruction. The CT scans were classified as positive, negative, or equivocal for invasion, and a decision matrix was constructed comparing CT results with pathologic data. CT scanning has low accuracy in assessing chest wall invasion in patients with peripheral lung cancers.

  6. Building America Case Study: Retrofitting a 1960s Split-Level, Cold-Climate Home, Westport, Connecticut (Fact Sheet), Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Retrofitting a 1960s Split-Level Cold-Climate Home Westport, Connecticut PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Existing home Type: Single-family, split-level Partners: General Contractor: Preferred Builders, preferredbuilders.biz Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, carb-swa.com Size: 1,712 ft 2 Date Completed: 1960 Climate Zone: Cold (5A) PERFORMANCE DATA HERS Index: Pre-retrofit = 114 Post-retrofit: * With PV = 26 * Without PV = 56 Validated annual energy cost savings: * With PV = $4,032

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wesleyan University - CT...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to the limited scope of activities performed CT.12-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive ...

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New England Lime Co - CT...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Elimination Recommendation; May 13, 1987 CT.10-2 - NELCO Letter; J. Pozzi to W. Moore (US AEC); Subject: Description of work associated with magnesium recovery from...

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Torrington Co - CT 09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to TORRINGTON CO. CT.09-1 - DOE MemorandumChecklist; D. Levine to File; Subject: Elimination Recommendation; May 14...

  10. Ozone contactor hydraulic considerations in meeting CT disinfection...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optimization of ozone dose and contact time for CT calculations was performed in the pilot ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Ozone: Science and Engineering (The Journal of the ...

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New Canaan Site - CT 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NEW CANAAN SITE (CT.08) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New Canaan , ...

  12. SU-E-T-70: Commissioning a Multislice CT Scanner for X-Ray CT Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, H; Hilts, M; Jirasek, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To commission a multislice computed tomography (CT) scanner for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD). Methods: Commissioning was performed for a 16-slice CT scanner using images acquired through a 1L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine for comparison purposes. The variability in CT number associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background image subtraction technique. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by comparing image noise and uniformity to that of the single slice machine. The consistency in CT number across slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also evaluated. Finally, the variability in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load was measured for the multislice scanner and compared to the tube load effects observed on the single slice machine. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in CT number across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image quality for the multislice machine was found to be comparable to that of the single slice scanner. Further study showed CT number was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thickness examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to imaging a large volume using a single slice scanner. Conclusion: A multislice CT scanner has been commissioning for CT PGD, allowing images of an entire dose distribution to be acquired in a matter of minutes. Funding support provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering

  13. Explosive Detection in Aviation Applications Using CT

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H E; Crawford, C R

    2011-02-15

    CT scanners are deployed world-wide to detect explosives in checked and carry-on baggage. Though very similar to single- and dual-energy multi-slice CT scanners used today in medical imaging, some recently developed explosives detection scanners employ multiple sources and detector arrays to eliminate mechanical rotation of a gantry, photon counting detectors for spectral imaging, and limited number of views to reduce cost. For each bag scanned, the resulting reconstructed images are first processed by automated threat recognition algorithms to screen for explosives and other threats. Human operators review the images only when these automated algorithms report the presence of possible threats. The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has requirements for future scanners that include dealing with a larger number of threats, higher probability of detection, lower false alarm rates and lower operating costs. One tactic that DHS is pursuing to achieve these requirements is to augment the capabilities of the established security vendors with third-party algorithm developers. A third-party in this context refers to academics and companies other than the established vendors. DHS is particularly interested in exploring the model that has been used very successfully by the medical imaging industry, in which university researchers develop algorithms that are eventually deployed in commercial medical imaging equipment. The purpose of this paper is to discuss opportunities for third-parties to develop advanced reconstruction and threat detection algorithms.

  14. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Custom Home, New Fairfield, CT

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in west Connecticut that scored HERS 39 without solar PV. The 3,000-square-foot two-story home has R-33 double-walls, R-72 flat roof with closed-cell foam and blown cellulose, an ERV, and LED lighting.

  15. American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Sector Biomass Facility Type...

  16. MicroCT: Semi-Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI

    SciTech Connect

    Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

    2011-09-22

    This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to R and D work - for production applications, use [4].

  17. MicroCT: Automated Analysis of CT Reconstructed Data of Home Made Explosive Materials Using the Matlab MicroCT Analysis GUI

    SciTech Connect

    Seetho, I M; Brown, W D; Kallman, J S; Martz, H E; White, W T

    2011-09-22

    This Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) provides the specific procedural steps for analyzing reconstructed CT images obtained under the IDD Standard Operating Procedures for data acquisition [1] and MicroCT image reconstruction [2], per the IDD Quality Assurance Plan for MicroCT Scanning [3]. Although intended to apply primarily to MicroCT data acquired in the HEAFCAT Facility at LLNL, these procedures may also be applied to data acquired at Tyndall from the YXLON cabinet and at TSL from the HEXCAT system. This SOP also provides the procedural steps for preparing the tables and graphs to be used in the reporting of analytical results. This SOP applies to production work - for R and D there are two other semi-automated methods as given in [4, 5].

  18. Spectra of clinical CT scanners using a portable Compton spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Duisterwinkel, H. A.; Abbema, J. K. van; Kawachimaru, R.; Paganini, L.; Graaf, E. R. van der; Brandenburg, S.; Goethem, M. J. van

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Spectral information of the output of x-ray tubes in (dual source) computer tomography (CT) scanners can be used to improve the conversion of CT numbers to proton stopping power and can be used to advantage in CT scanner quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to design, validate, and apply a compact portable Compton spectrometer that was constructed to accurately measure x-ray spectra of CT scanners. Methods: In the design of the Compton spectrometer, the shielding materials were carefully chosen and positioned to reduce background by x-ray fluorescence from the materials used. The spectrum of Compton scattered x-rays alters from the original source spectrum due to various physical processes. Reconstruction of the original x-ray spectrum from the Compton scattered spectrum is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the processes involved. This reconstruction is validated by comparing directly and indirectly measured spectra of a mobile x-ray tube. The Compton spectrometer is assessed in a clinical setting by measuring x-ray spectra at various tube voltages of three different medical CT scanner x-ray tubes. Results: The directly and indirectly measured spectra are in good agreement (their ratio being 0.99) thereby validating the reconstruction method. The measured spectra of the medical CT scanners are consistent with theoretical spectra and spectra obtained from the x-ray tube manufacturer. Conclusions: A Compton spectrometer has been successfully designed, constructed, validated, and applied in the measurement of x-ray spectra of CT scanners. These measurements show that our compact Compton spectrometer can be rapidly set-up using the alignment lasers of the CT scanner, thereby enabling its use in commissioning, troubleshooting, and, e.g., annual performance check-ups of CT scanners.

  19. Cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, W.W.M.; Solti-Bohman, L.G.; Brackmann, D.E.; Gruskin, P.

    1984-12-01

    Cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex is a readily recognizable and treatable entity that is more common than previously realized. Cholesterol granuloma grows slowly in the petrous apex as a mass lesion until it produces hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, and facial twitching. Twelve cases of cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex are illustrated; ten of these analyzed in detail, especially with respect to CT findings. A sharply and smoothly marginated expansile lesion in the petrous apex, isodense with plain and nonenhancing on CT, is in all probability a cholesterol granuloma. Preoperative recognition by CT is important for planning proper treatment.

  20. BAIC CT T SK Holdings JV | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    JV Place: Beijing Municipality, China Product: China-based JV to manufacture and sell electric cars. References: BAIC, CT&T & SK Holdings JV1 This article is a stub. You can...

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Metals Selling Corp - CT...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to METALS SELLING CORP. CT.0-01-1 - DOE MemorandumChecklist D. Levine to File; Subject - Elimination Recommendation; December 19, 198...

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fenn Machinery Co - CT 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mayor R. Mortemsem; Subject: Information regarding Fenn Mfg. Site; December 2, 1994 CT.11-3 - US AEC Letter; R. Smith to D. Sturges; Subject: Uranium Fabrication; November 8, 195

  3. CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots Simulations Run at NERSC Show How Seismic Waves Travel Through Mantle September 2, 2015 Robert Sanders, rlsanders@berkeley.edu, (510) 643-6998 NERSC PI: Barbara Romanowicz Lead Institution: University of California, Berkeley Project Title: Imaging and Calibration of Mantle Structure at Global and Regional Scales Using Full-Waveform Seismic Tomography NERSC Resources Used:

  4. TH-C-BRD-06: A Novel MRI Based CT Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation in the Presence of Severe CT Artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Park, P; Schreibmann, E; Fox, T; Roper, J; Elder, E; Tejani, M; Crocker, I; Curran, W; Dhabaan, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Severe CT artifacts can impair our ability to accurately calculate proton range thereby resulting in a clinically unacceptable treatment plan. In this work, we investigated a novel CT artifact correction method based on a coregistered MRI and investigated its ability to estimate CT HU and proton range in the presence of severe CT artifacts. Methods: The proposed method corrects corrupted CT data using a coregistered MRI to guide the mapping of CT values from a nearby artifact-free region. First patient MRI and CT images were registered using 3D deformable image registration software based on B-spline and mutual information. The CT slice with severe artifacts was selected as well as a nearby slice free of artifacts (e.g. 1cm away from the artifact). The two sets of paired MRI and CT images at different slice locations were further registered by applying 2D deformable image registration. Based on the artifact free paired MRI and CT images, a comprehensive geospatial analysis was performed to predict the correct CT HU of the CT image with severe artifact. For a proof of concept, a known artifact was introduced that changed the ground truth CT HU value up to 30% and up to 5cm error in proton range. The ability of the proposed method to recover the ground truth was quantified using a selected head and neck case. Results: A significant improvement in image quality was observed visually. Our proof of concept study showed that 90% of area that had 30% errors in CT HU was corrected to 3% of its ground truth value. Furthermore, the maximum proton range error up to 5cm was reduced to 4mm error. Conclusion: MRI based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation for patients with severe CT artifacts.

  5. CT reconstruction techniques for improved accuracy of lung CT airway measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, A.; Ranallo, F. N.; Judy, P. F.; Gierada, D. S.; Fain, S. B.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of constrained reconstruction techniques on quantitative CT (qCT) of the lung parenchyma and airways for low x-ray radiation dose. Methods: Measurement of small airways with qCT remains a challenge, especially for low x-ray dose protocols. Images of the COPDGene quality assurance phantom (CTP698, The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) were obtained using a GE discovery CT750 HD scanner for helical scans at x-ray radiation dose-equivalents ranging from 1 to 4.12 mSv (12100 mA s currenttime product). Other parameters were 40 mm collimation, 0.984 pitch, 0.5 s rotation, and 0.625 mm thickness. The phantom was sandwiched between 7.5 cm thick water attenuating phantoms for a total length of 20 cm to better simulate the scatter conditions of patient scans. Image data sets were reconstructed using STANDARD (STD), DETAIL, BONE, and EDGE algorithms for filtered back projection (FBP), 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and Veo reconstructions. Reduced (half) display field of view (DFOV) was used to increase sampling across airway phantom structures. Inner diameter (ID), wall area percent (WA%), and wall thickness (WT) measurements of eight airway mimicking tubes in the phantom, including a 2.5 mm ID (42.6 WA%, 0.4 mm WT), 3 mm ID (49.0 WA%, 0.6 mm WT), and 6 mm ID (49.0 WA%, 1.2 mm WT) were performed with Airway Inspector (Surgical Planning Laboratory, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston, MA) using the phase congruency edge detection method. The average of individual measures at five central slices of the phantom was taken to reduce measurement error. Results: WA% measures were greatly overestimated while IDs were underestimated for the smaller airways, especially for reconstructions at full DFOV (36 cm) using the STD kernel, due to poor sampling and spatial resolution (0.7 mm pixel size). Despite low radiation dose, the ID of the 6 mm ID airway was consistently measured accurately for all methods other than STD FBP

  6. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Nelson Construction, Farmington, CT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Nelson Construction partnered with Building America research team Building Science Corporation to design and test 10 high-performance homes in Farmington, Connecticut. Completed after the housing downturn in April 2009, all homes sold within 2 months of being listed at selling prices starting at $649,000. The team designed a building enclosure with superior thermal and air boundaries that exceed 2012 IECC requirements. This included R-13 foam- sheathed walls filled with R-19 cellulose, R-50

  7. Interior micro-CT with an offset detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Kriti Sen; Gong, Hao; Ghasemalizadeh, Omid; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Ge

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The size of field-of-view (FOV) of a microcomputed tomography (CT) system can be increased by offsetting the detector. The increased FOV is beneficial in many applications. All prior investigations, however, have been focused to the case in which the increased FOV after offset-detector acquisition can cover the transaxial extent of an object fully. Here, the authors studied a new problem where the FOV of a micro-CT system, although increased after offset-detector acquisition, still covers an interior region-of-interest (ROI) within the object. Methods: An interior-ROI-oriented micro-CT scan with an offset detector poses a difficult reconstruction problem, which is caused by both detector offset and projection truncation. Using the projection completion techniques, the authors first extended three previous reconstruction methods from offset-detector micro-CT to offset-detector interior micro-CT. The authors then proposed a novel method which combines two of the extended methods using a frequency split technique. The authors tested the four methods with phantom simulations at 9.4%, 18.8%, 28.2%, and 37.6% detector offset. The authors also applied these methods to physical phantom datasets acquired at the same amounts of detector offset from a customized micro-CT system. Results: When the detector offset was small, all reconstruction methods showed good image quality. At large detector offset, the three extended methods gave either visible shading artifacts or high deviation of pixel value, while the authors’ proposed method demonstrated no visible artifacts and minimal deviation of pixel value in both the numerical simulations and physical experiments. Conclusions: For an interior micro-CT with an offset detector, the three extended reconstruction methods can perform well at a small detector offset but show strong artifacts at a large detector offset. When the detector offset is large, the authors’ proposed reconstruction method can outperform the three

  8. Characterization of the nanoDot OSLD dosimeter in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Scarboro, Sarah B.; Cody, Dianna; Followill, David; Court, Laurence; Stingo, Francesco C.; Kry, Stephen F.; Alvarez, Paola; Zhang, Di; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The extensive use of computed tomography (CT) in diagnostic procedures is accompanied by a growing need for more accurate and patient-specific dosimetry techniques. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) offer a potential solution for patient-specific CT point-based surface dosimetry by measuring air kerma. The purpose of this work was to characterize the OSLD nanoDot for CT dosimetry, quantifying necessary correction factors, and evaluating the uncertainty of these factors. Methods: A characterization of the Landauer OSL nanoDot (Landauer, Inc., Greenwood, IL) was conducted using both measurements and theoretical approaches in a CT environment. The effects of signal depletion, signal fading, dose linearity, and angular dependence were characterized through direct measurement for CT energies (80–140 kV) and delivered doses ranging from ∼5 to >1000 mGy. Energy dependence as a function of scan parameters was evaluated using two independent approaches: direct measurement and a theoretical approach based on Burlin cavity theory and Monte Carlo simulated spectra. This beam-quality dependence was evaluated for a range of CT scanning parameters. Results: Correction factors for the dosimeter response in terms of signal fading, dose linearity, and angular dependence were found to be small for most measurement conditions (<3%). The relative uncertainty was determined for each factor and reported at the two-sigma level. Differences in irradiation geometry (rotational versus static) resulted in a difference in dosimeter signal of 3% on average. Beam quality varied with scan parameters and necessitated the largest correction factor, ranging from 0.80 to 1.15 relative to a calibration performed in air using a 120 kV beam. Good agreement was found between the theoretical and measurement approaches. Conclusions: Correction factors for the measurement of air kerma were generally small for CT dosimetry, although angular effects, and particularly effects due

  9. A comparison of MR and CT in suspected sacroiliitis

    SciTech Connect

    Wittram, C.; Whitehouse, G.H.; Williams, J.W.; Bucknall, R.C.

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study to compare the MR and CT images of patients with suspected sacroilitis and to establish the optimal MR sequences to demonstrate the changes of sacroilitis was conducted. Thirty-nine patients and nine controls were imaged in the axial plane, with SE T1-, T2-weighted fast spin echo (T2), T1 with fat suppression (T1WFS), and fast short T inversion recovery (fast STIR) sequences on a 1.5 T system. The sacroiliac joints of all patients were imaged with CT. The images were evaluated by two independent radiologists. Following the blinded reading, direct comparison of T1 and T1WFS, T2, and fast STIR of the CT positive group was made to determine the optimal MR sequences. The sensitivity and specificity of MR images for the detection of cortical erosions and subchondral sclerosis when compared to CT images were 100 and 94.3%, respectively; interobserver variation was low (k = 0.80). T1WFS and fast STIR images were superior to-T1 and T2 images, respectively, in demonstrating the changes of sacroilitis. MRI (T1WFS and fast STIR) can replace CT in cases with a strong clinical suspicion of sacroilitis and equivocal or normal plain radiographs. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Realistic simulation of reduced-dose CT with noise modeling and sinogram synthesis using DICOM CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Won Kim, Chang; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Reducing the patient dose while maintaining the diagnostic image quality during CT exams is the subject of a growing number of studies, in which simulations of reduced-dose CT with patient data have been used as an effective technique when exploring the potential of various dose reduction techniques. Difficulties in accessing raw sinogram data, however, have restricted the use of this technique to a limited number of institutions. Here, we present a novel reduced-dose CT simulation technique which provides realistic low-dose images without the requirement of raw sinogram data. Methods: Two key characteristics of CT systems, the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) and the algorithmic modulation transfer function (MTF), were measured for various combinations of object attenuation and tube currents by analyzing the noise power spectrum (NPS) of CT images obtained with a set of phantoms. Those measurements were used to develop a comprehensive CT noise model covering the reduced x-ray photon flux, object attenuation, system noise, and bow-tie filter, which was then employed to generate a simulated noise sinogram for the reduced-dose condition with the use of a synthetic sinogram generated from a reference CT image. The simulated noise sinogram was filtered with the algorithmic MTF and back-projected to create a noise CT image, which was then added to the reference CT image, finally providing a simulated reduced-dose CT image. The simulation performance was evaluated in terms of the degree of NPS similarity, the noise magnitude, the bow-tie filter effect, and the streak noise pattern at photon starvation sites with the set of phantom images. Results: The simulation results showed good agreement with actual low-dose CT images in terms of their visual appearance and in a quantitative evaluation test. The magnitude and shape of the NPS curves of the simulated low-dose images agreed well with those of real low-dose images, showing discrepancies of less than +/?3.2% in

  11. PET/CT-guided Interventions: Personnel Radiation Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, E. Ronan Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Hsu, Meier; Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures.MethodsIn this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound).ResultsThe median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0-0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0-0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06).ConclusionThe operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient.

  12. Evolution of spatial resolution in breast CT at UC Davis

    SciTech Connect

    Gazi, Peymon M.; Yang, Kai; Burkett, George W.; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi; Anthony Seibert, J.; Boone, John M.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) technology for the purpose of breast cancer screening has been a focus of research at UC Davis since the late 1990s. Previous studies have shown that improvement in spatial resolution characteristics of this modality correlates with greater microcalcification detection, a factor considered a potential limitation of bCT. The aim of this study is to improve spatial resolution as characterized by the modulation transfer function (MTF) via changes in the scanner hardware components and operational schema. Methods: Four prototypes of pendant-geometry, cone-beam breast CT scanners were designed and developed spanning three generations of design evolution. To improve the system MTF in each bCT generation, modifications were made to the imaging components (x-ray tube and flat-panel detector), system geometry (source-to-isocenter and detector distance), and image acquisition parameters (technique factors, number of projections, system synchronization scheme, and gantry rotational speed). Results: Characterization of different generations of bCT systems shows these modifications resulted in a 188% improvement of the limiting MTF properties from the first to second generation and an additional 110% from the second to third. The intrinsic resolution degradation in the azimuthal direction observed in the first generation was corrected by changing the acquisition from continuous to pulsed x-ray acquisition. Utilizing a high resolution detector in the third generation, along with modifications made in system geometry and scan protocol, resulted in a 125% improvement in limiting resolution. An additional 39% improvement was obtained by changing the detector binning mode from 2 × 2 to 1 × 1. Conclusions: These results underscore the advancement in spatial resolution characteristics of breast CT technology. The combined use of a pulsed x-ray system, higher resolution flat-panel detector and changing the scanner geometry and image

  13. Connecticut Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    - - - - - - 1986-2016 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel (Refiner Sales) NA W W W W W 1984-2016 Kerosene (Refiner Sales) - - - - - - 1984-2016 No. 1 Distillate (Refiner Sales) - - - - - - ...

  14. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - All Fuels

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    derived from fossil fuels, non-biogenic municipal solid waste, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, tire-derived fuel, and miscellaneous technologies." ...

  15. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - All Fuels

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010" "Primary energy source","Summer capacity (mw)","Share of State total (percent)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State total (percent)" "Nuclear","2,103",25.4,"16,750",50.2 "Coal",564,6.8,"2,604",7.8 "Hydro and Pumped Storage",151,1.8,400,1.2 "Natural

  16. Solar Home in Glastonbury, Connecticut

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This photograph features a building with a 2.52-kilowatt residential grid-tied solar photovoltaic (PV) electric system. The system generates clean electricity and feeds any excess into the local...

  17. bectso-ct121 | netl.doe.gov

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Demonstration of Innovative Applications of Technology for the CT-121 FGD Process - Project Brief [PDF-265KB] Southern Company Services, Newnan, GA PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Demonstration of Innovative Applications of Technology for the CT-121 FGD Process, Final Report (Jan 1997) Volume 1, Executive Summary [PDF-4.6MB] Volume 2, Operation [PDF-32.8MB] Volume 2 Appendices [PDF-6.3MB] Volume 3, Equipment Vol 3a, Materials and Maintenance [PDF-34.6MB] Vol 3b, Instrumentation and Control

  18. Can nontriggered thoracic CT be used for coronary artery calcium scoring? A phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xueqian; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Groen, Jaap M.; Bock, Geertruida H. de; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Jong, Pim A. de; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Coronary artery calcium score, traditionally based on electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered computed tomography (CT), predicts cardiovascular risk. However, nontriggered CT is extensively utilized. The study-purpose is to evaluate the in vitro agreement in coronary calcium score between nontriggered thoracic CT and ECG-triggered cardiac CT.Methods: Three artificial coronary arteries containing calcifications of different densities (high, medium, and low), and sizes (large, medium, and small), were studied in a moving cardiac phantom. Two 64-detector CT systems were used. The phantom moved at 0–90 mm/s in nontriggered low-dose CT as index test, and at 0–30 mm/s in ECG-triggered CT as reference. Differences in calcium scores between nontriggered and ECG-triggered CT were analyzed by t-test and 95% confidence interval. The sensitivity to detect calcification was calculated as the percentage of positive calcium scores.Results: Overall, calcium scores in nontriggered CT were not significantly different to those in ECG-triggered CT (p > 0.05). Calcium scores in nontriggered CT were within the 95% confidence interval of calcium scores in ECG-triggered CT, except predominantly at higher velocities (≥50 mm/s) for the high-density and large-size calcifications. The sensitivity for a nonzero calcium score was 100% for large calcifications, but 46%± 11% for small calcifications in nontriggered CT.Conclusions: When performing multiple measurements, good agreement in positive calcium scores is found between nontriggered thoracic and ECG-triggered cardiac CT. Agreement decreases with increasing coronary velocity. From this phantom study, it can be concluded that a high calcium score can be detected by nontriggered CT, and thus, that nontriggered CT likely can identify individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, a zero calcium score in nontriggered CT does not reliably exclude coronary calcification.

  19. Automatic CT simulation optimization for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hua Chen, Hsin-Chen; Tan, Jun; Gay, Hiram; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa; Yu, Lifeng; Anastasio, Mark A.; Low, Daniel A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: In radiation therapy, x-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation protocol specifications should be driven by the treatment planning requirements in lieu of duplicating diagnostic CT screening protocols. The purpose of this study was to develop a general strategy that allows for automatically, prospectively, and objectively determining the optimal patient-specific CT simulation protocols based on radiation-therapy goals, namely, maintenance of contouring quality and integrity while minimizing patient CT simulation dose. Methods: The authors proposed a general prediction strategy that provides automatic optimal CT simulation protocol selection as a function of patient size and treatment planning task. The optimal protocol is the one that delivers the minimum dose required to provide a CT simulation scan that yields accurate contours. Accurate treatment plans depend on accurate contours in order to conform the dose to actual tumor and normal organ positions. An image quality index, defined to characterize how simulation scan quality affects contour delineation, was developed and used to benchmark the contouring accuracy and treatment plan quality within the predication strategy. A clinical workflow was developed to select the optimal CT simulation protocols incorporating patient size, target delineation, and radiation dose efficiency. An experimental study using an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom with added-bolus layers was used to demonstrate how the proposed prediction strategy could be implemented and how the optimal CT simulation protocols could be selected for prostate cancer patients based on patient size and treatment planning task. Clinical IMRT prostate treatment plans for seven CT scans with varied image quality indices were separately optimized and compared to verify the trace of target and organ dosimetry coverage. Results: Based on the phantom study, the optimal image quality index for accurate manual prostate contouring was 4.4. The optimal tube

  20. Percutaneous Bone Biopsies: Comparison between Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT and CT-Scan Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Tselikas, Lambros Joskin, Julien; Roquet, Florian; Farouil, Geoffroy; Dreuil, Serge; Hakimé, Antoine Teriitehau, Christophe; Auperin, Anne; Baere, Thierry de Deschamps, Frederic

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to compare the accuracy of targeting and the radiation dose of bone biopsies performed either under fluoroscopic guidance using a cone-beam CT with real-time 3D image fusion software (FP-CBCT-guidance) or under conventional computed tomography guidance (CT-guidance).MethodsSixty-eight consecutive patients with a bone lesion were prospectively included. The bone biopsies were scheduled under FP-CBCT-guidance or under CT-guidance according to operating room availability. Thirty-four patients underwent a bone biopsy under FP-CBCT and 34 under CT-guidance. We prospectively compared the two guidance modalities for their technical success, accuracy, puncture time, and pathological success rate. Patient and physician radiation doses also were compared.ResultsAll biopsies were technically successful, with both guidance modalities. Accuracy was significantly better using FP-CBCT-guidance (3 and 5 mm respectively: p = 0.003). There was no significant difference in puncture time (32 and 31 min respectively, p = 0.51) nor in pathological results (88 and 88 % of pathological success respectively, p = 1). Patient radiation doses were significantly lower with FP-CBCT (45 vs. 136 mSv, p < 0.0001). The percentage of operators who received a dose higher than 0.001 mSv (dosimeter detection dose threshold) was lower with FP-CBCT than CT-guidance (27 vs. 59 %, p = 0.01).ConclusionsFP-CBCT-guidance for bone biopsy is accurate and reduces patient and operator radiation doses compared with CT-guidance.

  1. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofeng Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian; Mao, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  2. Test of 3D CT reconstructions by EM + TV algorithm from undersampled data

    SciTech Connect

    Evseev, Ivan; Ahmann, Francielle; Silva, Hamilton P. da

    2013-05-06

    Computerized tomography (CT) plays an important role in medical imaging for diagnosis and therapy. However, CT imaging is connected with ionization radiation exposure of patients. Therefore, the dose reduction is an essential issue in CT. In 2011, the Expectation Maximization and Total Variation Based Model for CT Reconstruction (EM+TV) was proposed. This method can reconstruct a better image using less CT projections in comparison with the usual filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Thus, it could significantly reduce the overall dose of radiation in CT. This work reports the results of an independent numerical simulation for cone beam CT geometry with alternative virtual phantoms. As in the original report, the 3D CT images of 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 virtual phantoms were reconstructed. It was not possible to implement phantoms with lager dimensions because of the slowness of code execution even by the CORE i7 CPU.

  3. New England Energy Management Inc | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: New England Energy Management Inc Address: 5 Shelter Rock Road Place: Danbury, Connecticut Zip: 06810 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area...

  4. LiquidPiston Inc | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Connecticut Zip: 06002 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Efficiency Product: New combustion engine technology to drastically improve efficiency Website:...

  5. Distributed Energy Systems Corp | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Distributed Energy Systems Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Distributed Energy Systems Corp Place: Wallingford, Connecticut Zip: CT 06492 Product: The former holding company...

  6. Sunlight Solar Energy | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sunlight Solar Energy Address: 4 Oxford Road Place: Milford, Connecticut Zip: 06460 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Solar...

  7. MissionPoint Capital Partners | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    MissionPoint Capital Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name: MissionPoint Capital Partners Place: Norwalk, Connecticut Zip: CT 06854 Product: Private Investment company...

  8. Levco Energy | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ave. Place: Norwalk, Connecticut Zip: 06851 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.levcoenergy.com Coordinates:...

  9. Poulsen Hybrid, LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    6 Waterview Drive Place: Shelton, Connecticut Zip: 06615 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Vehicles Product: Poulsen Hybrid Year Founded: 2007 Phone Number:...

  10. United Technologies Corp | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    United Technologies Corp Place: Hartford, Connecticut Zip: CT 06101 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: UTC is a global technology corporation with activities in aerospace,...

  11. Avalence LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Place: Milford, Connecticut Zip: 06460 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Hydrogen Product: Hydrogen generating equipment Website: www.avalence.com Coordinates:...

  12. Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program (Electric and Gas)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energize CT offers low interest loans for commercial and industrial customers for investments in energy efficiency improvements. Electric customers of Connecticut Light & Power, United...

  13. Poster — Thur Eve — 06: Dose assessment of cone beam CT imaging protocols as part of SPECT/CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkopi, E; Ross, AA

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To assess radiation dose from the cone beam CT (CBCT) component of SPECT/CT studies and to compare with other CT examinations performed in our institution. Methods: We used an anthropomorphic chest phantom and the 6 cc ion chamber to measure entrance breast dose for several CBCT and diagnostic CT acquisition protocols. The CBCT effective dose was calculated with ImPACT software; the CT effective dose was evaluated from the DLP value and conversion factor, dependent on the anatomic region. The RADAR medical procedure radiation dose calculator was used to assess the nuclear medicine component of exam dose. Results: The entrance dose to the breast measured with the anthropomorphic phantom was 0.48 mGy and 9.41 mGy for cardiac and chest CBCT scans; and 4.59 mGy for diagnostic thoracic CT. The effective doses were 0.2 mSv, 3.2 mSv and 2.8 mSv respectively. For a small patient represented by the anthropomorphic phantom, the dose from the diagnostic CT was lower than from the CBCT scan, as a result of the exposure reduction options available on modern CT scanners. The CBCT protocols used the same fixed scanning techniques. The diagnostic CT dose based on the patient data was 35% higher than the phantom dose. For most SPECT/CT studies the dose from the CBCT component was comparable with the dose from the radiopharmaceutical. Conclusions: The patient radiation dose from the cone beam CT scan can be higher than that from a diagnostic CT and should be taken into consideration in evaluating total SPECT/CT patient dose.

  14. Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    (NMR) Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Resources with Additional Information Computed Tomography (CT) Scanner CT Scanner - Courtesy Stanford University Department of Energy Resources Engineering Computed tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) have been used to resolve industrial problems, for materials characterizations, and to provide non-destructive evaluations for discovering flaws in parts before their use, resulting in

  15. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Guy; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation.

  16. A rapid noninvasive characterization of CT x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Randazzo, Matt; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to generate spatially varying half value layers (HVLs) that can be used to construct virtual equivalent source models of computed tomography (CT) x-ray sources for use in Monte Carlo CT dose computations. Methods: To measure the spatially varying HVLs, the authors combined a cylindrical HVL measurement technique with the characterization of bowtie filter relative attenuation (COBRA) geometry. An apparatus given the name “HVL Jig” was fabricated to accurately position a real-time dosimeter off-isocenter while surrounded by concentric cylindrical aluminum filters (CAFs). In this geometry, each projection of the rotating x-ray tube is filtered by an identical amount of high-purity (type 1100 H-14) aluminum while the stationary radiation dose probe records an air kerma rate versus time waveform. The CAFs were progressively nested to acquire exposure data at increasing filtrations to calculate the HVL. Using this dose waveform and known setup geometry, each timestamp was related to its corresponding fan angle. Data were acquired using axial CT protocols (i.e., rotating tube and stationary patient table) at energies of 80, 100, and 120 kVp on a single CT scanner. These measurements were validated against the more laborious conventional step-and-shoot approach (stationary x-ray tube). Results: At each energy, HVL data points from the COBRA-cylinder technique were fit to a trendline and compared with the conventional approach. The average relative difference in HVL between the two techniques was 1.3%. There was a systematic overestimation in HVL due to scatter contamination. Conclusions: The described method is a novel, rapid, accurate, and noninvasive approach that allows one to acquire the spatially varying fluence and HVL data using a single experimental setup in a minimum of three scans. These measurements can be used to characterize the CT beam in terms of the angle-dependent fluence and energy spectra along the bowtie filter

  17. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 06: Canada's National Computed Tomography (CT) Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Wardlaw, GM; Martel, N; Blackler, W; Asselin, J-F

    2014-08-15

    The value of computed tomography (CT) in medical imaging is reflected in its' increased use and availability since the early 1990's; however, given CT's relatively larger exposures (vs. planar x-ray) greater care must be taken to ensure that CT procedures are optimised in terms of providing the smallest dose possible while maintaining sufficient diagnostic image quality. The development of CT Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) supports this process. DRLs have been suggested/supported by international/national bodies since the early 1990's and widely adopted elsewhere, but not on a national basis in Canada. Essentially, CT DRLs provide guidance on what is considered good practice for common CT exams, but require a representative sample of CT examination data to make any recommendations. Canada's National CT Survey project, in collaboration with provincial/territorial authorities, has collected a large national sample of CT practice data for 7 common examinations (with associated clinical indications) of both adult and pediatric patients. Following completion of data entry into a common database, a survey summary report and recommendations will be made on CT DRLs from this data. It is hoped that these can then be used by local regions to promote CT practice optimisation and support any dose reduction initiatives.

  18. In-patient to isocenter KERMA ratios in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.; Lavallee, Robert L.; Roskopf, Marsha L.; Scalzetti, Ernest M.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To estimate in-patient KERMA for specific organs in computed tomography (CT) scanning using ratios to isocenter free-in-air KERMA obtained using a Rando phantom.Method: A CT scan of an anthropomorphic phantom results in an air KERMA K at a selected phantom location and air kerma K{sub CT} at the CT scanner isocenter when the scan is repeated in the absence of the phantom. The authors define the KERMA ratio (R{sub K}) as K/ K{sub CT}, which were experimentally determined in a Male Rando Phantom using lithium fluoride chips (TLD-100). R{sub K} values were obtained for a total of 400 individual point locations, as well as for 25 individual organs of interest in CT dosimetry. CT examinations of Rando were performed on a GE LightSpeed Ultra scanner operated at 80 kV, 120 kV, and 140 kV, as well as a Siemens Sensation 16 operated at 120 kV. Results: At 120 kV, median R{sub K} values for the GE and Siemens scanners were 0.60 and 0.64, respectively. The 10th percentile R{sub K} values ranged from 0.34 at 80 kV to 0.54 at 140 kV, and the 90th percentile R{sub K} values ranged from 0.64 at 80 kV to 0.78 at 140 kV. The average R{sub K} for the 25 Rando organs at 120 kV was 0.61 {+-} 0.08. Average R{sub K} values in the head, chest, and abdomen showed little variation. Relative to R{sub K} values in the head, chest, and abdomen obtained at 120 kV, R{sub K} values were about 12% lower in the pelvis and about 58% higher in the cervical spine region. Average R{sub K} values were about 6% higher on the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner than the GE LightSpeed Ultra. Reducing the x-ray tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV resulted in an average reduction in R{sub K} value of 34%, whereas increasing the x-ray tube voltage to 140 kV increased the average R{sub K} value by 9%. Conclusions: In-patient to isocenter relative KERMA values in Rando phantom can be used to estimate organ doses in similar sized adults undergoing CT examinations from easily measured air KERMA values at the

  19. Utilizing a simple CT dosimetry phantom for the comprehension of the operational characteristics of CT AEC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tsalafoutas, Ioannis A.; Varsamidis, Athanasios; Thalassinou, Stella; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of the nested polymethylacrylate (PMMA) phantom (which is available in many CT facilities for CTDI measurements), as a tool for the presentation and comparison of the ways that two different CT automatic exposure control (AEC) systems respond to a phantom when various scan parameters and AEC protocols are modified.Methods: By offsetting the two phantom's components (the head phantom and the body ring) half-way along their longitudinal axis, a phantom with three sections of different x-ray attenuation was created. Scan projection radiographs (SPRs) and helical scans of the three-section phantom were performed on a Toshiba Aquilion 64 and a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanners, with different scan parameter selections [scan direction, pitch factor, slice thickness, and reconstruction interval (ST/RI), AEC protocol, and tube potential used for the SPRs]. The dose length product (DLP) values of each scan were recorded and the tube current (mA) values of the reconstructed CT images were plotted against the respective Z-axis positions on the phantom. Furthermore, measurements of the noise levels at the center of each phantom section were performed to assess the impact of mA modulation on image quality.Results: The mA modulation patterns of the two CT scanners were very dissimilar. The mA variations were more pronounced for Aquilion 64, where changes in any of the aforementioned scan parameters affected both the mA modulations curves and DLP values. However, the noise levels were affected only by changes in pitch, ST/RI, and AEC protocol selections. For Brilliance 64, changes in pitch affected the mA modulation curves but not the DLP values, whereas only AEC protocol and SPR tube potential selection variations affected both the mA modulation curves and DLP values. The noise levels increased for smaller ST/RI, larger weight category AEC protocol, and larger SPR tube potential selection.Conclusions: The nested PMMA dosimetry phantom can be

  20. TU-F-18A-09: CT Number Stability Across Patient Sizes Using Virtual-Monoenergetic Dual-Energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Michalak, G; Grimes, J; Fletcher, J; McCollough, C; Halaweish, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Virtual-monoenergetic imaging uses dual-energy CT data to synthesize images corresponding to a single photon energy, thereby reducing beam-hardening artifacts. This work evaluated the ability of a commercial virtual-monoenergetic algorithm to achieve stable CT numbers across patient sizes. Methods: Test objects containing a range of iodine and calcium hydroxyapatite concentrations were placed inside 8 torso-shaped water phantoms, ranging in lateral width from 15 to 50 cm, and scanned on a dual-source CT system (Siemens Somatom Force). Single-energy scans were acquired from 70-150 kV in 10 kV increments; dual-energy scans were acquired using 4 energy pairs (low energy: 70, 80, 90, and 100 kV; high energy: 150 kV + 0.6 mm Sn). CTDIvol was matched for all single- and dual-energy scans for a given phantom size. All scans used 128×0.6 mm collimation and were reconstructed with 1-mm thickness at 0.8-mm increment and a medium smooth body kernel. Monoenergetic images were generated using commercial software (syngo Via Dual Energy, VA30). Iodine contrast was calculated as the difference in mean iodine and water CT numbers from respective regions-of-interest in 10 consecutive images. Results: CT numbers remained stable as phantom width varied from 15 to 50 cm for all dual-energy data sets (except for at 50 cm using 70/150Sn due to photon starvation effects). Relative to the 15 cm phantom, iodine contrast was within 5.2% of the 70 keV value for phantom sizes up to 45 cm. At 90/150Sn, photon starvation did not occur at 50 cm, and iodine contrast in the 50-cm phantom was within 1.4% of the 15-cm phantom. Conclusion: Monoenergetic imaging, as implemented in the evaluated commercial system, eliminated the variation in CT numbers due to patient size, and may provide more accurate data for quantitative tasks, including radiation therapy treatment planning. Siemens Healthcare.

  1. Upright cone beam CT imaging using the onboard imager

    SciTech Connect

    Fave, Xenia Martin, Rachael; Yang, Jinzhong; Balter, Peter; Court, Laurence; Carvalho, Luis; Pan, Tinsu

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Many patients could benefit from being treated in an upright position. The objectives of this study were to determine whether cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could be used to acquire upright images for treatment planning and to demonstrate whether reconstruction of upright images maintained accurate geometry and Hounsfield units (HUs). Methods: A TrueBeam linac was programmed in developer mode to take upright CBCT images. The gantry head was positioned at 0°, and the couch was rotated to 270°. The x-ray source and detector arms were extended to their lateral positions. The x-ray source and gantry remained stationary as fluoroscopic projections were taken and the couch was rotated from 270° to 90°. The x-ray tube current was normalized to deposit the same dose (measured using a calibrated Farmer ion chamber) as that received during a clinical helical CT scan to the center of a cylindrical, polyethylene phantom. To extend the field of view, two couch rotation scans were taken with the detector offset 15 cm superiorly and then 15 cm inferiorly. The images from these two scans were stitched together before reconstruction. Upright reconstructions were compared to reconstructions from simulation CT scans of the same phantoms. Two methods were investigated for correcting the HUs, including direct calibration and mapping the values from a simulation CT. Results: Overall geometry, spatial linearity, and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright reconstructions. Some artifacts were created and HU accuracy was compromised; however, these limitations could be removed by mapping the HUs from a simulation CT to the upright reconstruction for treatment planning. Conclusions: The feasibility of using the TrueBeam linac to take upright CBCT images was demonstrated. This technique is straightforward to implement and could be of enormous benefit to patients with thoracic tumors or those who find a supine position difficult to endure.

  2. ANL CT Reconstruction Algorithm for Utilizing Digital X-ray

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2004-05-01

    Reconstructs X-ray computed tomographic images from large data sets known as 16-bit binary sinograms when using a massively parallelized computer architecture such as a Beowuif cluster by parallelizing the X-ray CT reconstruction routine. The algorithm uses the concept of generation of an image from carefully obtained multiple 1-D or 2-D X-ray projections. The individual projections are filtered using a digital Fast Fourier Transform. The literature refers to this as filtered back projection.

  3. Oxygen transport properties estimation by DSMC-CT simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Domenico; Frezzotti, Aldo; Ghiroldi, Gian Pietro

    2014-12-09

    Coupling DSMC simulations with classical trajectories calculations is emerging as a powerful tool to improve predictive capabilities of computational rarefied gas dynamics. The considerable increase of computational effort outlined in the early application of the method (Koura,1997) can be compensated by running simulations on massively parallel computers. In particular, GPU acceleration has been found quite effective in reducing computing time (Ferrigni,2012; Norman et al.,2013) of DSMC-CT simulations. The aim of the present work is to study rarefied Oxygen flows by modeling binary collisions through an accurate potential energy surface, obtained by molecular beams scattering (Aquilanti, et al.,1999). The accuracy of the method is assessed by calculating molecular Oxygen shear viscosity and heat conductivity following three different DSMC-CT simulation methods. In the first one, transport properties are obtained from DSMC-CT simulations of spontaneous fluctuation of an equilibrium state (Bruno et al, Phys. Fluids, 23, 093104, 2011). In the second method, the collision trajectory calculation is incorporated in a Monte Carlo integration procedure to evaluate the Taxman’s expressions for the transport properties of polyatomic gases (Taxman,1959). In the third, non-equilibrium zero and one-dimensional rarefied gas dynamic simulations are adopted and the transport properties are computed from the non-equilibrium fluxes of momentum and energy. The three methods provide close values of the transport properties, their estimated statistical error not exceeding 3%. The experimental values are slightly underestimated, the percentage deviation being, again, few percent.

  4. The relevance of MRI for patient modeling in head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: A comparison of CT and CT-MRI based tissue segmentation on simulated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaart, René F. Paulides, Margarethus M.; Fortunati, Valerio; Walsum, Theo van; Veenland, Jifke F.; Lugt, Aad van der

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, head and neck (H and N) hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) is solely based on computed tomography (CT) images. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior soft-tissue contrast over CT. The purpose of the authors’ study is to investigate the relevance of using MRI in addition to CT for patient modeling in H and N HTP. Methods: CT and MRI scans were acquired for 11 patients in an immobilization mask. Three observers manually segmented on CT, MRI T1 weighted (MRI-T1w), and MRI T2 weighted (MRI-T2w) images the following thermo-sensitive tissues: cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, myelum, sclera, lens, vitreous humor, and the optical nerve. For these tissues that are used for patient modeling in H and N HTP, the interobserver variation of manual tissue segmentation in CT and MRI was quantified with the mean surface distance (MSD). Next, the authors compared the impact of CT and CT and MRI based patient models on the predicted temperatures. For each tissue, the modality was selected that led to the lowest observer variation and inserted this in the combined CT and MRI based patient model (CT and MRI), after a deformable image registration. In addition, a patient model with a detailed segmentation of brain tissues (including white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) was created (CT and MRI{sub db}). To quantify the relevance of MRI based segmentation for H and N HTP, the authors compared the predicted maximum temperatures in the segmented tissues (T{sub max}) and the corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR) of the patient models based on (1) CT, (2) CT and MRI, and (3) CT and MRI{sub db}. Results: In MRI, a similar or reduced interobserver variation was found compared to CT (maximum of median MSD in CT: 0.93 mm, MRI-T1w: 0.72 mm, MRI-T2w: 0.66 mm). Only for the optical nerve the interobserver variation is significantly lower in CT compared to MRI (median MSD in CT: 0.58 mm, MRI-T1w: 1.27 mm, MRI-T2w: 1.40 mm

  5. I L S-V I I I J* I LI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    L - S-V I I I J* I LI 11. LI L - OAK RlDGE NATBONAL LABORATORY <;> "J :-: ,rj _ .- ORNLnM- 12225 I: ?, .,I Radiological Survey Results at the Former Bridgeport Brass Company Facility Seymour, Connecticut R. D. Foley R. F . Carrier c MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTERlS, INC. - FOR TRE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY / l- _I. _ --..--.- This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Cffice of Scientific and

  6. Building America Case Study: Retrofitting a 1960s Split-Level, Cold-Climate Home, Westport, Connecticut; Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    ??National programs such as Home Performance with ENERGY STAR(R) and numerous other utility air sealing programs have brought awareness to homeowners of the benefits of energy efficiency retrofits. Yet, these programs tend to focus on the low-hanging fruit: air-sealing the thermal envelope and ductwork where accessible, switch to efficient lighting, and low-flow fixtures. At the other end of the spectrum, deep-energy retrofit programs are also being encouraged by various utilities across the country. While deep energy retrofits typically seek 50% energy savings, they are often quite costly and most applicable to gut-rehab projects. A significant potential for lowering energy usage in existing homes lies between the low hanging fruit and deep energy retrofit approaches - retrofits that save approximately 30% in energy over the existing conditions. A key is to be non-intrusive with the efficiency measures so the retrofit projects can be accomplished in occupied homes. This cold climate retrofit project involved the design and optimization of a home in Connecticut that sought to improve energy savings by at least 30% (excluding solar PV) over the existing home's performance. This report documents the successful implementation of a cost-effective solution package that achieved performance greater than 30% over the pre-retrofit - what worked, what did not, and what improvements could be made. Confirmation of successfully achieving 30% source energy savings over the pre-existing conditions was confirmed through energy modeling and comparison of the utility bills pre- and post- retrofit.

  7. Spectrotemporal CT data acquisition and reconstruction at low dose

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Darin P.; Badea, Cristian T.; Lee, Chang-Lung; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: X-ray computed tomography (CT) is widely used, both clinically and preclinically, for fast, high-resolution anatomic imaging; however, compelling opportunities exist to expand its use in functional imaging applications. For instance, spectral information combined with nanoparticle contrast agents enables quantification of tissue perfusion levels, while temporal information details cardiac and respiratory dynamics. The authors propose and demonstrate a projection acquisition and reconstruction strategy for 5D CT (3D + dual energy + time) which recovers spectral and temporal information without substantially increasing radiation dose or sampling time relative to anatomic imaging protocols. Methods: The authors approach the 5D reconstruction problem within the framework of low-rank and sparse matrix decomposition. Unlike previous work on rank-sparsity constrained CT reconstruction, the authors establish an explicit rank-sparse signal model to describe the spectral and temporal dimensions. The spectral dimension is represented as a well-sampled time and energy averaged image plus regularly undersampled principal components describing the spectral contrast. The temporal dimension is represented as the same time and energy averaged reconstruction plus contiguous, spatially sparse, and irregularly sampled temporal contrast images. Using a nonlinear, image domain filtration approach, the authors refer to as rank-sparse kernel regression, the authors transfer image structure from the well-sampled time and energy averaged reconstruction to the spectral and temporal contrast images. This regularization strategy strictly constrains the reconstruction problem while approximately separating the temporal and spectral dimensions. Separability results in a highly compressed representation for the 5D data in which projections are shared between the temporal and spectral reconstruction subproblems, enabling substantial undersampling. The authors solved the 5D reconstruction

  8. Ultralow dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric PET CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Samuel L.; Shulkin, Barry L.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To develop ultralow dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultralow doses (10–35 mA s). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for 11 tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% volume computed tomography dose index (0.39/3.64; mGy) from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUV{sub bw}) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the nondose reduced CTAC image for 90% dose reduction. No change in SUV{sub bw}, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols was found down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62% and 86% (3.2/8.3–0.9/6.2). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from predose-reduced patient images. Conclusions: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CT dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for colocalization of hybrid CT anatomy and PET radioisotope uptake.

  9. Automated matching and segmentation of lymphoma on serial CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Jiayong; Zhao Binsheng; Curran, Sean; Zelenetz, Andrew; Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    2007-01-15

    In patients with lymphoma, identification and quantification of the tumor extent on serial CT examinations is critical for assessing tumor response to therapy. In this paper, we present a computer method to automatically match and segment lymphomas in follow-up CT images. The method requires that target lymph nodes in baseline CT images be known. A fast, approximate alignment technique along the x, y, and axial directions is developed to provide a good initial condition for the subsequent fast free form deformation (FFD) registration of the baseline and the follow-up images. As a result of the registration, the deformed lymph node contours from the baseline images are used to automatically determine internal and external markers for the marker-controlled watershed segmentation performed in the follow-up images. We applied this automated registration and segmentation method retrospectively to 29 lymph nodes in 9 lymphoma patients treated in a clinical trial at our cancer center. A radiologist independently delineated all lymph nodes on all slices in the follow-up images and his manual contours served as the ''gold standard'' for evaluation of the method. Preliminary results showed that 26/29 (89.7%) lymph nodes were correctly matched; i.e., there was a geometrical overlap between the deformed lymph node from the baseline and its corresponding mass in the follow-up images. Of the matched 26 lymph nodes, 22 (84.6%) were successfully segmented; for these 22 lymph nodes, several metrics were calculated to quantify the method's performance. Among them, the average distance and the Hausdorff distance between the contours generated by the computer and those generated by the radiologist were 0.9 mm (stdev. 0.4 mm) and 3.9 mm (stdev. 2.1 mm), respectively.

  10. Semiautomatic segmentation of liver metastases on volumetric CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Jiayong; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and quantification of liver metastases on CT images are critical to surgery/radiation treatment planning and therapy response assessment. To date, there are no reliable methods to perform such segmentation automatically. In this work, the authors present a method for semiautomatic delineation of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced volumetric CT images. Methods: The first step is to manually place a seed region-of-interest (ROI) in the lesion on an image. This ROI will (1) serve as an internal marker and (2) assist in automatically identifying an external marker. With these two markers, lesion contour on the image can be accurately delineated using traditional watershed transformation. Density information will then be extracted from the segmented 2D lesion and help determine the 3D connected object that is a candidate of the lesion volume. The authors have developed a robust strategy to automatically determine internal and external markers for marker-controlled watershed segmentation. By manually placing a seed region-of-interest in the lesion to be delineated on a reference image, the method can automatically determine dual threshold values to approximately separate the lesion from its surrounding structures and refine the thresholds from the segmented lesion for the accurate segmentation of the lesion volume. This method was applied to 69 liver metastases (1.1–10.3 cm in diameter) from a total of 15 patients. An independent radiologist manually delineated all lesions and the resultant lesion volumes served as the “gold standard” for validation of the method’s accuracy. Results: The algorithm received a median overlap, overestimation ratio, and underestimation ratio of 82.3%, 6.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, and a median average boundary distance of 1.2 mm. Conclusions: Preliminary results have shown that volumes of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced CT images can be accurately estimated by a semiautomatic segmentation

  11. CT Scans of Cores Metadata, Barrow, Alaska 2015

    DOE Data Explorer

    Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich

    2015-03-11

    Individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, throughout 2013 and 2014. Cores were drilled along different transects to sample polygonal features (i.e. the trough, center and rim of high, transitional and low center polygons). Most cores were drilled around 1 meter in depth and a few deep cores were drilled around 3 meters in depth. Three-dimensional images of the frozen cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. TIFF files can be uploaded to ImageJ (an open-source imaging software) to examine soil structure and densities within each core.

  12. Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cancer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Semi-automatic delineation using weighted CT-MRI registered images for radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer Purpose: ...

  13. Shear induced permeability test: Stripa Granite X-ray CT files and explanation

    DOE Data Explorer

    Tim Kneafsey

    2014-01-21

    This folder contains X-ray CT images and an explanation related to the shear induced permeability testing of Stripa granite

  14. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Danbury, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Danbury, CT, that scored HERS 35 without PV. This 2-story, 1,650-ft2 cabin built by a custom home builder for his own family meets Passive House Standards with 5.5-in. of foil-faced polysiocyanurate foam boards lining the outside walls, R-55 of rigid EPS foam under the slab,

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Derby, CT |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Brookside Development, Derby, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Derby, CT DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Derby, CT Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Derby, CT, that achieves a HERS score of 45 without PV or HERS 26 with PV. The production home is one of a development of 7 two-story, 4,000+-ft2 certified homes that have 2x4 walls filled with 1.5 in. closed-cell spray foam, 2-in. fiberglass batt,

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pratt and Whitney Corp Canel...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Name: None Location: Middletown , Connecticut CT.04-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 CT.04-2 Site Operations: High temperature materials research and reactor experimentation in the 1960s. ...

  17. Simultaneous CT and SPECT tomography using CZT detectors

    DOEpatents

    Paulus, Michael J.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Simpson, Michael L.; Britton, Jr., Charles L.

    2002-01-01

    A method for simultaneous transmission x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) comprises the steps of: injecting a subject with a tracer compound tagged with a .gamma.-ray emitting nuclide; directing an x-ray source toward the subject; rotating the x-ray source around the subject; emitting x-rays during the rotating step; rotating a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) two-sided detector on an opposite side of the subject from the source; simultaneously detecting the position and energy of each pulsed x-ray and each emitted .gamma.-ray captured by the CZT detector; recording data for each position and each energy of each the captured x-ray and .gamma.-ray; and, creating CT and SPECT images from the recorded data. The transmitted energy levels of the x-rays lower are biased lower than energy levels of the .gamma.-rays. The x-ray source is operated in a continuous mode. The method can be implemented at ambient temperatures.

  18. Quant-CT: Segmenting and Quantifying Computed Tomography

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2011-10-01

    Quant-CT is currently a plugin to ImageJ, designed as a Java-class that provides control mechanism for the user to choose volumes of interest within porous material, followed by the selection of image subsamples for automated tuning of parameters for filters and classifiers, and finally measurement of material geometry, porosity, and visualization. Denoising is mandatory before any image interpretation, and we implemented a new 3D java code that performs bilateral filtering of data. Segmentation of themore » dense material is essential before any quantifications about geological sample structure, and we invented new schemes to deal with over segmentation when using statistical region merging algorithm to pull out grains that compose imaged material. It make uses of ImageJ API and other standard and thirty-party APIs. Quant-CT conception started in 2011 under Scidac-e sponsor, and details of the first prototype were documented in publications below. While it is used right now for microtomography images, it can potentially be used by anybody with 3D image data obtained by experiment or produced by simulation.« less

  19. Incorporating multislice imaging into x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, H.; Hilts, M.; Jirasek, A.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate multislice computed tomography (CT) scanning for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD) and to establish a baseline assessment of image noise and uniformity in an unirradiated gel dosimeter. Methods: A 16-slice CT scanner was used to acquire images through a 1 L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine. The variability in CT number (N{sub CT}) associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background subtraction artifact removal technique for CT PGD. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by evaluating image noise and uniformity. The agreement in N{sub CT} for slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also examined. Further study was performed to assess the effects of increasing x-ray tube load on the constancy of measured N{sub CT} and overall scan time. In all cases, results were compared to the single slice machine. Finally, images were collected throughout the volume of an unirradiated gel dosimeter to quantify image noise and uniformity before radiation is delivered. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in N{sub CT} observed across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image noise was higher for the multislice system compared to the single slice scanner, but overall image quality was comparable between the two systems. Further study showed N{sub CT} was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thicknesses examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in N{sub CT} due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to

  20. SU-E-J-148: Tools for Development of 4D Proton CT

    SciTech Connect

    Dou, T; Ramos-Mendez, J; Piersimoni, P; Giacometti, V; Penfold, S; Censor, Y; Faddegon, B; Low, D; Schulte, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop tools for performing 4D proton computed tomography (CT). Methods: A suitable patient with a tumor in the right lower lobe was selected from a set of 4D CT scans. The volumetric CT images formed the basis for calculating the parameters of a breathing model that allows reconstruction of a static reference CT and CT images in each breathing phase. The images were imported into the TOPAS Monte Carlo simulation platform for simulating an experimental proton CT scan with 45 projections spaced by 4 degree intervals. Each projection acquired data for 2 seconds followed by a gantry rotation for 2 seconds without acquisition. The scan covered 180 degrees with individual protons passing through a 9-cm slab of the patient’s lung covering the moving tumor. An initial proton energy sufficient for penetrating the patient from all directions was determined. Performing the proton CT simulation, TOPAS provided output of the proton energy and coordinates registered in two planes before and after the patient, respectively. The set of projection data was then used with an iterative reconstruction algorithm to generate a volumetric proton CT image set of the static reference image and the image obtained under breathing motion, respectively. Results: An initial proton energy of 230 MeV was found to be sufficient, while for an initial energy of 200 MeV a substantial number of protons did not penetrate the patient. The reconstruction of the static reference image set provided sufficient detail for treatment planning. Conclusion: We have developed tools to perform studies of proton CT in the presence of lung motion based on the TOPAS simulation toolkit. This will allow to optimize 4D reconstruction algorithms by synchronizing the acquired proton CT data with a breathing signal and utilizing a breathing model obtained prior to the proton CT scan. This research has been supported by the National Institute Of Biomedical Imaging And Bioengineering of the National

  1. TH-C-18A-08: A Management Tool for CT Dose Monitoring, Analysis, and Protocol Review

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Chan, F; Newman, B; Larson, D; Leung, A; Fleischmann, D; Molvin, L; Marsh, D; Zorich, C; Phillips, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a customizable tool for enterprise-wide managing of CT protocols and analyzing radiation dose information of CT exams for a variety of quality control applications Methods: All clinical CT protocols implemented on the 11 CT scanners at our institution were extracted in digital format. The original protocols had been preset by our CT management team. A commercial CT dose tracking software (DoseWatch,GE healthcare,WI) was used to collect exam information (exam date, patient age etc.), scanning parameters, and radiation doses for all CT exams. We developed a Matlab-based program (MathWorks,MA) with graphic user interface which allows to analyze the scanning protocols with the actual dose estimates, and compare the data to national (ACR,AAPM) and internal reference values for CT quality control. Results: The CT protocol review portion of our tool allows the user to look up the scanning and image reconstruction parameters of any protocol on any of the installed CT systems among about 120 protocols per scanner. In the dose analysis tool, dose information of all CT exams (from 05/2013 to 02/2014) was stratified on a protocol level, and within a protocol down to series level, i.e. each individual exposure event. This allows numerical and graphical review of dose information of any combination of scanner models, protocols and series. The key functions of the tool include: statistics of CTDI, DLP and SSDE, dose monitoring using user-set CTDI/DLP/SSDE thresholds, look-up of any CT exam dose data, and CT protocol review. Conclusion: our inhouse CT management tool provides radiologists, technologists and administration a first-hand near real-time enterprise-wide knowledge on CT dose levels of different exam types. Medical physicists use this tool to manage CT protocols, compare and optimize dose levels across different scanner models. It provides technologists feedback on CT scanning operation, and knowledge on important dose baselines and thresholds.

  2. Five Years of Cyclotron Radioisotope Production Experiences at the First PET-CT in Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Colmenter, L.; Coelho, D.; Esteves, L. M.; Ruiz, N.; Morales, L.; Lugo, I.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Liendo, J. A.; Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Castillo, J.

    2007-10-26

    Five years operation of a compact cyclotron installed at PET-CT facility in Caracas, Venezuela is given. Production rate of {sup 18}F labeled FDG, operation and radiation monitoring experience are included. We conclude that {sup 18}FDG CT-PET is the most effective technique for patient diagnosis.

  3. Vision 20/20: Simultaneous CT-MRI — Next chapter of multimodality imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ge Xi, Yan; Gjesteby, Lars; Getzin, Matthew; Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang; Vannier, Michael

    2015-10-15

    Multimodality imaging systems such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and MRI-PET are widely available, but a simultaneous CT-MRI instrument has not been developed. Synergies between independent modalities, e.g., CT, MRI, and PET/SPECT can be realized with image registration, but such postprocessing suffers from registration errors that can be avoided with synchronized data acquisition. The clinical potential of simultaneous CT-MRI is significant, especially in cardiovascular and oncologic applications where studies of the vulnerable plaque, response to cancer therapy, and kinetic and dynamic mechanisms of targeted agents are limited by current imaging technologies. The rationale, feasibility, and realization of simultaneous CT-MRI are described in this perspective paper. The enabling technologies include interior tomography, unique gantry designs, open magnet and RF sequences, and source and detector adaptation. Based on the experience with PET-CT, PET-MRI, and MRI-LINAC instrumentation where hardware innovation and performance optimization were instrumental to construct commercial systems, the authors provide top-level concepts for simultaneous CT-MRI to meet clinical requirements and new challenges. Simultaneous CT-MRI fills a major gap of modality coupling and represents a key step toward the so-called “omnitomography” defined as the integration of all relevant imaging modalities for systems biology and precision medicine.

  4. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena Xing, Lei; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm{sup 2} CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R{sup 2} > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a

  5. SU-E-I-73: Clinical Evaluation of CT Image Reconstructed Using Interior Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J; Ge, G; Winkler, M; Cong, W; Wang, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation dose reduction has been a long standing challenge in CT imaging of obese patients. Recent advances in interior tomography (reconstruction of an interior region of interest (ROI) from line integrals associated with only paths through the ROI) promise to achieve significant radiation dose reduction without compromising image quality. This study is to investigate the application of this technique in CT imaging through evaluating imaging quality reconstructed from patient data. Methods: Projection data were directly obtained from patients who had CT examinations in a Dual Source CT scanner (DSCT). Two detectors in a DSCT acquired projection data simultaneously. One detector provided projection data for full field of view (FOV, 50 cm) while another detectors provided truncated projection data for a FOV of 26 cm. Full FOV CT images were reconstructed using both filtered back projection and iterative algorithm; while interior tomography algorithm was implemented to reconstruct ROI images. For comparison reason, FBP was also used to reconstruct ROI images. Reconstructed CT images were evaluated by radiologists and compared with images from CT scanner. Results: The results show that the reconstructed ROI image was in excellent agreement with the truth inside the ROI, obtained from images from CT scanner, and the detailed features in the ROI were quantitatively accurate. Radiologists evaluation shows that CT images reconstructed with interior tomography met diagnosis requirements. Radiation dose may be reduced up to 50% using interior tomography, depending on patient size. Conclusion: This study shows that interior tomography can be readily employed in CT imaging for radiation dose reduction. It may be especially useful in imaging obese patients, whose subcutaneous tissue is less clinically relevant but may significantly increase radiation dose.

  6. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Versus CT in Lung Ablation Procedure: Which is Faster?

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi Battistuzzi, Jean-Benoit Catena, Vittorio; Grasso, Rosario Francesco Zobel, Bruno Beomonte; Schena, Emiliano; Buy, Xavier Palussiere, Jean

    2015-10-15

    AimTo compare cone-beam CT (CBCT) versus computed tomography (CT) guidance in terms of time needed to target and place the radiofrequency ablation (RFA) electrode on lung tumours.Materials and MethodsPatients at our institution who received CBCT- or CT-guided RFA for primary or metastatic lung tumours were retrospectively included. Time required to target and place the RFA electrode within the lesion was registered and compared across the two groups. Lesions were stratified into three groups according to their size (<10, 10–20, >20 mm). Occurrences of electrode repositioning, repositioning time, RFA complications, and local recurrence after RFA were also reported.ResultsForty tumours (22 under CT, 18 under CBCT guidance) were treated in 27 patients (19 male, 8 female, median age 67.25 ± 9.13 years). Thirty RFA sessions (16 under CBCT and 14 under CT guidance) were performed. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that CBCT was faster than CT to target and place the electrode within the tumour independently from its size (β = −9.45, t = −3.09, p = 0.004). Electrode repositioning was required in 10/22 (45.4 %) tumours under CT guidance and 5/18 (27.8 %) tumours under CBCT guidance. Pneumothoraces occurred in 6/14 (42.8 %) sessions under CT guidance and in 6/16 (37.5 %) sessions under CBCT guidance. Two recurrences were noted for tumours receiving CBCT-guided RFA (2/17, 11.7 %) and three after CT-guided RFA (3/19, 15.8 %).ConclusionCBCT with live 3D needle guidance is a useful technique for percutaneous lung ablation. Despite lesion size, CBCT allows faster lung RFA than CT.

  7. Investigation of statistical iterative reconstruction for dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Makeev, Andrey; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Dedicated breast CT has great potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. Statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) in dedicated breast CT is a promising alternative to traditional filtered backprojection (FBP). One of the difficulties in using SIR is the presence of free parameters in the algorithm that control the appearance of the resulting image. These parameters require tuning in order to achieve high quality reconstructions. In this study, the authors investigated the penalized maximum likelihood (PML) method with two commonly used types of roughness penalty functions: hyperbolic potential and anisotropic total variation (TV) norm. Reconstructed images were compared with images obtained using standard FBP. Optimal parameters for PML with the hyperbolic prior are reported for the task of detecting microcalcifications embedded in breast tissue.Methods: Computer simulations were used to acquire projections in a half-cone beam geometry. The modeled setup describes a realistic breast CT benchtop system, with an x-ray spectra produced by a point source and an a-Si, CsI:Tl flat-panel detector. A voxelized anthropomorphic breast phantom with 280 ?m microcalcification spheres embedded in it was used to model attenuation properties of the uncompressed woman's breast in a pendant position. The reconstruction of 3D images was performed using the separable paraboloidal surrogates algorithm with ordered subsets. Task performance was assessed with the ideal observer detectability index to determine optimal PML parameters.Results: The authors' findings suggest that there is a preferred range of values of the roughness penalty weight and the edge preservation threshold in the penalized objective function with the hyperbolic potential, which resulted in low noise images with high contrast microcalcifications preserved. In terms of numerical observer detectability index, the PML method with optimal parameters yielded substantially improved

  8. Monitoring internal organ motion with continuous wave radar in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Pfanner, Florian; Maier, Joscha; Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To avoid motion artifacts in medical imaging or to minimize the exposure of healthy tissues in radiation therapy, medical devices are often synchronized with the patient's respiratory motion. Today's respiratory motion monitors require additional effort to prepare the patients, e.g., mounting a motion belt or placing an optical reflector on the patient's breast. Furthermore, they are not able to measure internal organ motion without implanting markers. An interesting alternative to assess the patient's organ motion is continuous wave radar. The aim of this work is to design, implement, and evaluate such a radar system focusing on application in CT.Methods: The authors designed a radar system operating in the 860 MHz band to monitor the patient motion. In the intended application of the radar system, the antennas are located close to the patient's body inside the table of a CT system. One receive and four transmitting antennas are used to avoid the requirement of exact patient positioning. The radar waves propagate into the patient's body and are reflected at tissue boundaries, for example at the borderline between muscle and adipose tissue, or at the boundaries of organs. At present, the authors focus on the detection of respiratory motion. The radar system consists of the hardware mentioned above as well as of dedicated signal processing software to extract the desired information from the radar signal. The system was evaluated using simulations and measurements. To simulate the radar system, a simulation model based on radar and wave field equations was designed and 4D respiratory-gated CT data sets were used as input. The simulated radar signals and the measured data were processed in the same way. The radar system hardware and the signal processing algorithms were tested with data from ten volunteers. As a reference, the respiratory motion signal was recorded using a breast belt simultaneously with the radar measurements.Results: Concerning the

  9. Segmentation-free empirical beam hardening correction for CT

    SciTech Connect

    Schller, Sren; Sawall, Stefan; Stannigel, Kai; Hlsbusch, Markus; Ulrici, Johannes; Hell, Erich; Kachelrie, Marc

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The polychromatic nature of the x-ray beams and their effects on the reconstructed image are often disregarded during standard image reconstruction. This leads to cupping and beam hardening artifacts inside the reconstructed volume. To correct for a general cupping, methods like water precorrection exist. They correct the hardening of the spectrum during the penetration of the measured object only for the major tissue class. In contrast, more complex artifacts like streaks between dense objects need other techniques of correction. If using only the information of one single energy scan, there are two types of corrections. The first one is a physical approach. Thereby, artifacts can be reproduced and corrected within the original reconstruction by using assumptions in a polychromatic forward projector. These assumptions could be the used spectrum, the detector response, the physical attenuation and scatter properties of the intersected materials. A second method is an empirical approach, which does not rely on much prior knowledge. This so-called empirical beam hardening correction (EBHC) and the previously mentioned physical-based technique are both relying on a segmentation of the present tissues inside the patient. The difficulty thereby is that beam hardening by itself, scatter, and other effects, which diminish the image quality also disturb the correct tissue classification and thereby reduce the accuracy of the two known classes of correction techniques. The herein proposed method works similar to the empirical beam hardening correction but does not require a tissue segmentation and therefore shows improvements on image data, which are highly degraded by noise and artifacts. Furthermore, the new algorithm is designed in a way that no additional calibration or parameter fitting is needed. Methods: To overcome the segmentation of tissues, the authors propose a histogram deformation of their primary reconstructed CT image. This step is essential for the

  10. SU-E-J-43: Deformed Planning CT as An Electron Density Substitute for Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, K; Godley, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To confirm that deforming the planning CT to the daily Cone-Beam CTs (CBCT) can provide suitable electron density for adaptive planning. We quantify the dosimetric difference between plans calculated on deformed planning CTs (DPCT) and daily CT-on-rails images (CTOR). CTOR is used as a test of the method as CTOR already contains accurate electron density to compare against. Methods: Five prostate only IMRT patients, each with five CTOR images, were selected and re-planned on Panther (Prowess Inc.) with a uniform 5 mm PTV expansion, prescribed 78 Gy. The planning CT was deformed to match each CTOR using ABAS (Elekta Inc.). Contours were drawn on the CTOR, and copied to the DPCT. The original treatment plan was copied to both the CTOR and DPCT, keeping the center of the prostate as the isocenter. The plans were then calculated using the collapsed cone heterogeneous dose engine of Prowess and typical DVH planning parameters used to compare them. Results: Each DPCT was visually compared to its CTOR with no differences observed. The agreement of the copied CTOR contours with the DPCT anatomy further demonstrated the deformation accuracy. The plans calculated using CTOR and DPCT were compared. Over the 25 plan pairs, the average difference between them for prostate D100, D98 and D95 were 0.5%, 0.2%, and 0.2%; PTV D98, D95 and mean dose: 0.3%, 0.2% and 0.3%; bladder V70, V60 and mean dose: 1.1%, 0.7%, and 0.2%; and rectum mean dose: 0.3%. (D100 is the dose covering 100% of the target; V70 is the volume of the organ receiving 70 Gy). Conclusion: We observe negligible difference between the dose calculated on the DPCT and the CTOR, implying that deformed planning CTs are a suitable substitute for electron density. The method can now be applied to CBCTs. Research version of Panther provided by Prowess Inc. Research version of ABAS provided by Elekta Inc.

  11. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor

    2014-11-07

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  12. Designation of Sites for Remedial Action - Metal Hydrides, Beverly,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    T: Designation of Sites for Remedial Action - Metal Hydrides, Beverly, MA; Bridgeport Brass, Adrian, MI and Seymour, Chicago, IL CT; National Guard Armory, 0: Joe LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office Based on the attached radiological survey data (Attachments 1 through 3) and an appropriate authority review, the following properties are being authorized for remedial action. It should be noted that the attached survey data are for designation purposes only and that Bechtel National, Inc.

  13. Grji'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Grji' cd ,-ytE,tes Government w. / -/ I-i' -- -' - ,:' d--z, L, -. m Deparlment of Energy REPLY TO NE-20 ATTN OF. SUGJECT: Designation of Sites for Remedial Action - Metal Hydrides, Beverly, MA; Bridgeport Brass, Adrian, MI and Seymour, Chicago, IL CT; National Guard Amory, TO. Joe LaGrone, Macager Oak Ridge Operations Office 6ased on the attached radiological survey data (Attachments 1 through 3) and an appropriate authority review, the following properties are being authorized for remedial

  14. SU-E-J-242: Volume-Dependence of Quantitative Imaging Features From CT and CE-CT Images of NSCLC

    SciTech Connect

    Fave, X; Fried, D; Zhang, L; Yang, J; Balter, P; Followill, D; Gomez, D; Jones, A; Stingo, F; Court, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine whether tumor volume plays a significant role in the values obtained for texture features when they are extracted from computed tomography (CT) images of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We also sought to identify whether features can be reliably measured at all volumes or if a minimum volume threshold should be recommended. Methods: Eleven features were measured on 40 CT and 32 contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) patient images for this study. Features were selected for their prognostic/diagnostic value in previous publications. Direct correlations between these textures and volume were evaluated using the Spearman correlation coefficient. Any texture that the Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare the variation above and below a volume cutoff. Four different volume thresholds (5, 10, 15, and 20 cm{sup 3}) were tested. Results: Four textures were found to be significantly correlated with volume in both the CT and CE-CT images. These were busyness, coarseness, gray-level nonuniformity, and run-length nonuniformity with correlation coefficients of 0.92, −0.96, 0.94, and 0.98 for the CT images and 0.95, −0.97, 0.98, and 0.98 for the CE-CT images. After volume normalization, the correlation coefficients decreased substantially. For the data obtained from the CT images, the results of the Wilcoxon rank-sum test were significant when volume thresholds of 5–15 cm3 were used. No volume threshold was shown to be significant for the CE-CT data. Conclusion: Equations for four features that have been used in several published studies were found to be volume-dependent. Future studies should consider implementing normalization factors or removing these features entirely to prevent this potential source of redundancy or bias. This work was supported in part by National Cancer Institute grant R03CA178495-01. Xenia Fave is a recipient of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Graduate Fellowship.

  15. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting

    SciTech Connect

    Kumarasiri, Akila Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Kim, Jinkoo

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H and N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Ten H and N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3–4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. Results: All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm{sup 3}. Organs with volumes <3 cm{sup 3} and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼0.5–0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm{sup 3}), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was “clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours

  16. Evaluation of radiation dose and image quality of CT scan for whole-body pediatric PET/CT: A phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Liu, Shu-Hsin; Mok, Greta S. P.; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to tailor the CT imaging protocols for pediatric patients undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations with appropriate attention to radiation exposure while maintaining adequate image quality for anatomic delineation of PET findings and attenuation correction of PET emission data. Methods: The measurements were made by using three anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children with tube voltages of 80, 100, and 120 kVp, tube currents of 10, 40, 80, and 120 mA, and exposure time of 0.5 s at 1.75:1 pitch. Radiation dose estimates were derived from the dose-length product and were used to calculate risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer. The influence of image noise on image contrast and attenuation map for CT scans were evaluated based on Pearson's correlation coefficient and covariance, respectively. Multiple linear regression methods were used to investigate the effects of patient age, tube voltage, and tube current on radiation-induced cancer risk and image noise for CT scans. Results: The effective dose obtained using three anthropomorphic phantoms and 12 combinations of kVp and mA ranged from 0.09 to 4.08 mSv. Based on our results, CT scans acquired with 80 kVp/60 mA, 80 kVp/80 mA, and 100 kVp/60 mA could be performed on 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children, respectively, to minimize cancer risk due to CT scans while maintaining the accuracy of attenuation map and CT image contrast. The effective doses of the proposed protocols for 1-, 5- and 10-year-old children were 0.65, 0.86, and 1.065 mSv, respectively. Conclusions: Low-dose pediatric CT protocols were proposed to balance the tradeoff between radiation-induced cancer risk and image quality for patients ranging in age from 1 to 10 years old undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations.

  17. Iterative image-domain decomposition for dual-energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Tianye; Dong, Xue; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) imaging plays an important role in advanced imaging applications due to its capability of material decomposition. Direct decomposition via matrix inversion suffers from significant degradation of image signal-to-noise ratios, which reduces clinical values of DECT. Existing denoising algorithms achieve suboptimal performance since they suppress image noise either before or after the decomposition and do not fully explore the noise statistical properties of the decomposition process. In this work, the authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for noise suppression in DECT, using the full variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated in the form of least-square estimation with smoothness regularization. Based on the design principles of a best linear unbiased estimator, the authors include the inverse of the estimated variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-square term. The regularization term enforces the image smoothness by calculating the square sum of neighboring pixel value differences. To retain the boundary sharpness of the decomposed images, the authors detect the edges in the CT images before decomposition. These edge pixels have small weights in the calculation of the regularization term. Distinct from the existing denoising algorithms applied on the images before or after decomposition, the method has an iterative process for noise suppression, with decomposition performed in each iteration. The authors implement the proposed algorithm using a standard conjugate gradient algorithm. The method performance is evaluated using an evaluation phantom (Catphan600) and an anthropomorphic head phantom. The results are compared with those generated using direct matrix inversion with no noise suppression, a denoising method applied on the decomposed images, and an existing algorithm with similar formulation as the

  18. TH-E-17A-01: Internal Respiratory Surrogate for 4D CT Using Fourier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    E-17A-01: Internal Respiratory Surrogate for 4D CT Using Fourier Transform and Anatomical Features Citation Details In-Document Search Title: TH-E-17A-01: Internal Respiratory...

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, Danbury, CT

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Danbury, CT, that scored HERS 35 without PV. This 2-story, 1,650-ft2 cabin built by a custom home builder for his own family meets Passive House...

  20. Frequency and patterns of abnormality detected by iodine-123 amine emission CT after cerebral infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Brott, T.G.; Gelfand, M.J.; Williams, C.C.; Spilker, J.A.; Hertzberg, V.S.

    1986-03-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed in 31 patients with cerebral infarction and 13 who had had transient ischemic attacks, using iodine-123-labeled N,N,N'-trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxyl-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)-1,3-propanediamin e (I-123-HIPDM) as the radiopharmaceutical. SPECT scans were compared with computed tomographic (CT) scans. SPECT was as sensitive as CT in detecting cerebral infarction (94% vs. 84%). The abnormalities were larger on the SPECT scans than on the CT scans in 19 cases, equal in seven, and smaller in five (SPECT abnormalities greater than or equal to CT abnormalities in 86% of cases). Fifteen of 30 patients with hemispheric infarction had decreased perfusion (decreased uptake of I-123-HIPDM) to the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the cerebral hemisphere involved by the infarction (crossed cerebellar diaschisis). Nine of these 15 patients had major motor deficits, while only one of the 15 without crossed cerebellar diaschisis had a major motor deficit.

  1. Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999).

  2. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  3. OSTI Website Features Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Website Features Non-medical Uses of Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Back to the OSTI News Listing for 2008 From fruit juice screening to coal cleaning processes, Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) are being put to use for non-medical research. The radiographic inspection methods are currently featured at the DOE R&D

  4. The effects of mapping CT images to Monte Carlo materials on GEANT4 proton simulation accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Samuel; McAuley, Grant; Slater, James; Wroe, Andrew

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations of radiation therapy require conversion from Hounsfield units (HU) in CT images to an exact tissue composition and density. The number of discrete densities (or density bins) used in this mapping affects the simulation accuracy, execution time, and memory usage in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo code. The relationship between the number of density bins and CT noise was examined in general for all simulations that use HU conversion to density. Additionally, the effect of this on simulation accuracy was examined for proton radiation. Methods: Relative uncertainty from CT noise was compared with uncertainty from density binning to determine an upper limit on the number of density bins required in the presence of CT noise. Error propagation analysis was also performed on continuously slowing down approximation range calculations to determine the proton range uncertainty caused by density binning. These results were verified with Monte Carlo simulations. Results: In the presence of even modest CT noise (5 HU or 0.5%) 450 density bins were found to only cause a 5% increase in the density uncertainty (i.e., 95% of density uncertainty from CT noise, 5% from binning). Larger numbers of density bins are not required as CT noise will prevent increased density accuracy; this applies across all types of Monte Carlo simulations. Examining uncertainty in proton range, only 127 density bins are required for a proton range error of <0.1 mm in most tissue and <0.5 mm in low density tissue (e.g., lung). Conclusions: By considering CT noise and actual range uncertainty, the number of required density bins can be restricted to a very modest 127 depending on the application. Reducing the number of density bins provides large memory and execution time savings in GEANT4 and other Monte Carlo packages.

  5. SU-E-P-46: Clinical Acceptance Testing and Implementation of a Portable CT Unit

    SciTech Connect

    LaFrance, M; Marsh, S; Hicks, R; O’Donnell-Moran, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Planning for the first installation in New England of a new portable CT unit to be used in the Operating Room required the integration of many departments including Surgery, Neurosurgery, Information Services, Clinical Engineering, Radiology and Medical Physics/Radiation Safety. Acceptance testing and the quality assurance procedures were designed to optimize image quality and patient and personnel radiation exposure. Methods: The vendor’s protocols were tested using the CT Dosimetry phantoms. The system displayed the CTDIw instead of the CTDIvol while testing the unit. Radiation exposure was compared to existing CT scanners from installed CT units throughout the facility. Brainlab measures all 4 periphery slots on the CT Dosimetry phantom. The ACR measures only the superior slot for the periphery measurement. A comprehensive radiation survey was also performed for several locations. Results: The CTDIvol measurements were comparable for the following studies: brain, C-Spine, and sinuses. However, the mobile CT measurements were slightly higher than other CT units but within acceptable tolerance if measured using the ACR method.Based on scatter measurements, it was determined if any personnel were to stay in the OR Suite during image acquisition that the appropriate lead apron and thyroid shields had to be worn.In addition, to reduce unnecessary scatter, there were two mobile 6 foot wide shields (1/16″ lead equivalent) available to protect personnel in the room and adjacent areas. Conclusion: Intraoperative CT provides the physician new opportunities for evaluation of the progression of surgical resections and device placement at the cost of increasing the amount of trained personnel required to perform this procedure. It also brings with it challenges to keep the radiation exposure to the patients and staff within reasonable limits.

  6. Objective assessment of image quality and dose reduction in CT iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Vaishnav, J. Y. Jung, W. C.; Popescu, L. M.; Zeng, R.; Myers, K. J.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms have the potential to reduce radiation dose in CT diagnostic imaging. As these algorithms become available on the market, a standardizable method of quantifying the dose reduction that a particular IR method can achieve would be valuable. Such a method would assist manufacturers in making promotional claims about dose reduction, buyers in comparing different devices, physicists in independently validating the claims, and the United States Food and Drug Administration in regulating the labeling of CT devices. However, the nonlinear nature of commercially available IR algorithms poses challenges to objectively assessing image quality, a necessary step in establishing the amount of dose reduction that a given IR algorithm can achieve without compromising that image quality. This review paper seeks to consolidate information relevant to objectively assessing the quality of CT IR images, and thereby measuring the level of dose reduction that a given IR algorithm can achieve. Methods: The authors discuss task-based methods for assessing the quality of CT IR images and evaluating dose reduction. Results: The authors explain and review recent literature on signal detection and localization tasks in CT IR image quality assessment, the design of an appropriate phantom for these tasks, possible choices of observers (including human and model observers), and methods of evaluating observer performance. Conclusions: Standardizing the measurement of dose reduction is a problem of broad interest to the CT community and to public health. A necessary step in the process is the objective assessment of CT image quality, for which various task-based methods may be suitable. This paper attempts to consolidate recent literature that is relevant to the development and implementation of task-based methods for the assessment of CT IR image quality.

  7. Evaluation of the OSC-TV iterative reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam optical CT

    SciTech Connect

    Matenine, Dmitri Mascolo-Fortin, Julia; Goussard, Yves

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The present work evaluates an iterative reconstruction approach, namely, the ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm with regularization via total variation (TV) minimization in the field of cone-beam optical computed tomography (optical CT). One of the uses of optical CT is gel-based 3D dosimetry for radiation therapy, where it is employed to map dose distributions in radiosensitive gels. Model-based iterative reconstruction may improve optical CT image quality and contribute to a wider use of optical CT in clinical gel dosimetry. Methods: This algorithm was evaluated using experimental data acquired by a cone-beam optical CT system, as well as complementary numerical simulations. A fast GPU implementation of OSC-TV was used to achieve reconstruction times comparable to those of conventional filtered backprojection. Images obtained via OSC-TV were compared with the corresponding filtered backprojections. Spatial resolution and uniformity phantoms were scanned and respective reconstructions were subject to evaluation of the modulation transfer function, image uniformity, and accuracy. The artifacts due to refraction and total signal loss from opaque objects were also studied. Results: The cone-beam optical CT data reconstructions showed that OSC-TV outperforms filtered backprojection in terms of image quality, thanks to a model-based simulation of the photon attenuation process. It was shown to significantly improve the image spatial resolution and reduce image noise. The accuracy of the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients remained similar to that obtained via filtered backprojection. Certain image artifacts due to opaque objects were reduced. Nevertheless, the common artifact due to the gel container walls could not be eliminated. Conclusions: The use of iterative reconstruction improves cone-beam optical CT image quality in many ways. The comparisons between OSC-TV and filtered backprojection presented in this paper demonstrate that OSC-TV can

  8. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-04-29

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ{sup 2} value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ{sup 2} value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  9. SU-C-9A-06: The Impact of CT Image Used for Attenuation Correction in 4D-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Y; Bowsher, J; Yan, S; Cai, J; Das, S; Yin, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the appropriateness of using 3D non-gated CT image for attenuation correction (AC) in a 4D-PET (gated PET) imaging protocol used in radiotherapy treatment planning simulation. Methods: The 4D-PET imaging protocol in a Siemens PET/CT simulator (Biograph mCT, Siemens Medical Solutions, Hoffman Estates, IL) was evaluated. CIRS Dynamic Thorax Phantom (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA) with a moving glass sphere (8 mL) in the middle of its thorax portion was used in the experiments. The glass was filled with {sup 18}F-FDG and was in a longitudinal motion derived from a real patient breathing pattern. Varian RPM system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was used for respiratory gating. Both phase-gating and amplitude-gating methods were tested. The clinical imaging protocol was modified to use three different CT images for AC in 4D-PET reconstruction: first is to use a single-phase CT image to mimic actual clinical protocol (single-CT-PET); second is to use the average intensity projection CT (AveIP-CT) derived from 4D-CT scanning (AveIP-CT-PET); third is to use 4D-CT image to do the phase-matched AC (phase-matching- PET). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) and volume of the moving target (glass sphere) with threshold of 40% SUVmax were calculated for comparison between 4D-PET images derived with different AC methods. Results: The SUVmax varied 7.3%±6.9% over the breathing cycle in single-CT-PET, compared to 2.5%±2.8% in AveIP-CT-PET and 1.3%±1.2% in phasematching PET. The SUVmax in single-CT-PET differed by up to 15% from those in phase-matching-PET. The target volumes measured from single- CT-PET images also presented variations up to 10% among different phases of 4D PET in both phase-gating and amplitude-gating experiments. Conclusion: Attenuation correction using non-gated CT in 4D-PET imaging is not optimal process for quantitative analysis. Clinical 4D-PET imaging protocols should consider phase-matched 4D-CT image if available to achieve better accuracy.

  10. MO-E-17A-03: Monte Carlo CT Dose Calculation: A Comparison Between Experiment and Simulation Using ARCHER-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T; Du, X; Su, L; Gao, Y; Ji, W; Xu, X; Zhang, D; Shi, J; Liu, B; Kalra, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the CT doses derived from the experiments and GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, using a human cadaver and ATOM phantom. Methods: The cadaver of an 88-year old male and the ATOM phantom were scanned by a GE LightSpeed Pro 16 MDCT. For the cadaver study, the Thimble chambers (Model 105?0.6CT and 106?0.6CT) were used to measure the absorbed dose in different deep and superficial organs. Whole-body scans were first performed to construct a complete image database for MC simulations. Abdomen/pelvis helical scans were then conducted using 120/100 kVps, 300 mAs and a pitch factor of 1.375:1. For the ATOM phantom study, the OSL dosimeters were used and helical scans were performed using 120 kVp and x, y, z tube current modulation (TCM). For the MC simulations, sufficient particles were run in both cases such that the statistical errors of the results by ARCHER-CT were limited to 1%. Results: For the human cadaver scan, the doses to the stomach, liver, colon, left kidney, pancreas and urinary bladder were compared. The difference between experiments and simulations was within 19% for the 120 kVp and 25% for the 100 kVp. For the ATOM phantom scan, the doses to the lung, thyroid, esophagus, heart, stomach, liver, spleen, kidneys and thymus were compared. The difference was 39.2% for the esophagus, and within 16% for all other organs. Conclusion: In this study the experimental and simulated CT doses were compared. Their difference is primarily attributed to the systematic errors of the MC simulations, including the accuracy of the bowtie filter modeling, and the algorithm to generate voxelized phantom from DICOM images. The experimental error is considered small and may arise from the dosimeters. R01 grant (R01EB015478) from National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

  11. A minimum spanning forest based classification method for dedicated breast CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, Robert; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Fei, Baowei

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To develop and test an automated algorithm to classify different types of tissue in dedicated breast CT images. Methods: Images of a single breast of five different patients were acquired with a dedicated breast CT clinical prototype. The breast CT images were processed by a multiscale bilateral filter to reduce noise while keeping edge information and were corrected to overcome cupping artifacts. As skin and glandular tissue have similar CT values on breast CT images, morphologic processing is used to identify the skin based on its position information. A support vector machine (SVM) is trained and the resulting model used to create a pixelwise classification map of fat and glandular tissue. By combining the results of the skin mask with the SVM results, the breast tissue is classified as skin, fat, and glandular tissue. This map is then used to identify markers for a minimum spanning forest that is grown to segment the image using spatial and intensity information. To evaluate the authors’ classification method, they use DICE overlap ratios to compare the results of the automated classification to those obtained by manual segmentation on five patient images. Results: Comparison between the automatic and the manual segmentation shows that the minimum spanning forest based classification method was able to successfully classify dedicated breast CT image with average DICE ratios of 96.9%, 89.8%, and 89.5% for fat, glandular, and skin tissue, respectively. Conclusions: A 2D minimum spanning forest based classification method was proposed and evaluated for classifying the fat, skin, and glandular tissue in dedicated breast CT images. The classification method can be used for dense breast tissue quantification, radiation dose assessment, and other applications in breast imaging.

  12. Terramuggus, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6350991,"lon":-72.4703638,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  13. Connecticut Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 26,177 26,437 29,048 1970's 31,187 31,878 32,879 30,261 33,417 32,143 32,310 31,069 31,800 ...

  14. Connecticut's 4th congressional district: Energy Resources |...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Inc formerly Solar Works Inc Clean Diesel Technologies Clean Diesel Technologies Inc International Plasma Sales Group IPSG Levco Energy MissionPoint Capital Partners Natural...

  15. PEPCO Energy Services (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Phone Number: 1-877-737-2662 Website: www.pepco.com Twitter: @PepcoConnect Facebook: https:www.facebook.comPepcoConnect Outage Hotline: 1-877-737-2662 References: EIA...

  16. Darien, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    FE Clean Energy Group References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  17. Bethel, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Apollo Solar Energy Inc References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division population dataset (All States, all geography) Retrieved from "http:...

  18. Fairfield County, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Sales Group IPSG Levco Energy MissionPoint Capital Partners Natural State Research, Inc. New England Energy Management Inc Noble Americas NuPower LLC Ocenergy Opel International...

  19. Connecticut State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fully executed programmatic agreement between DOE, State Energy Office and State Historic Preservation Office.

  20. ,"Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Natural Gas Consumed",1,"Monthly","122015","01152013" ,"Release Date:","02292016" ,"Next Release Date:","03312016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngconsheatdcusctm.xls" ...

  1. Energy Incentive Programs, Connecticut | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    ... What utility energy efficiency programs are available to me? Please see the previous section. What load managementdemand response options are available to me? The Independent ...

  2. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    - - Hydro Conventional 122 1.5 Solar - - Wind - - WoodWood Waste - - MSWLandfill Gas ... - - Hydro Conventional 391 1.2 Solar - - Wind - - WoodWood Waste s * MSW Biogenic...

  3. Connecticut Municipal Electric Energy Cooperative | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    NPCC Yes ISO NE Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it....

  4. Connecticut's Health Impact Study Rapidly Increasing Weatherization...

    Energy Saver

    Center Donna Hawkins Technology Transfer Specialist, Weatherization Assistance Program Floris Weston Project Officer, Weatherization Assistance Program KEY FACTS The Energy ...

  5. Connecticut Clean Cities Future Fuels Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  6. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-","-" "WoodWood Waste",9,2,2,1,"s" "MSW BiogenicLandfill Gas",755,728,732,758,739 "Other ...

  7. Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    MWh Coal Power 2,453,497 MWh Gas Power 9,678,195 MWh Petroleum Power 288,349 MWh Nuclear Power 16,657,387 MWh Other 712,522 MWh Total Energy Production 31,172,260 MWh...

  8. Geothermal Switch Pays Off For Connecticut Business

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Faced with the lagging interest in water wells, Anthony and founder Tony Mahan decided to change the direction of the company and began focusing on geothermal energy.

  9. Connecticut Light & Power Co | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    56,845.785 316,477.296 100,488 5,482.981 32,672.55 3,389 219,627.211 1,137,141.772 1,132,833 2009-02 173,849.326 881,765.122 1,023,687 61,841.633 334,033.47 105,212 6,602.679...

  10. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    " Hydro Conventional",122,1.5 " Solar","-","-" " Wind","-","-" " WoodWood ... " Hydro Conventional",391,1.2 " Solar","-","-" " Wind","-","-" " WoodWood ...

  11. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Conventional",122,1.5 " Solar","-","-" " Wind","-","-" " WoodWood Waste","-","-" " MSW... Conventional",391,1.2 " Solar","-","-" " Wind","-","-" " WoodWood Waste","s","*" " MSW ...

  12. Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection...

    Energy Saver

    Protection Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Funds Provided by ... Protection - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Funds Provided by ...

  13. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    34043,,6255,4461 34074,,4043,3038 34104,,1947,1583 34135,,1274,1161 34165,,1040,1122 ...836,987,1723,1623,3,10500 40405,13482,1004,1947,1632,3,8895 40436,12628,951,1787,1591,3,82...

  14. Connecticut Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 34,554 32,498 32,039 2000's 32,162 25,622 29,051 23,553 20,529 20,469 21,670 22,794 22,539...

  15. Connecticut Clean Cities Future Fuels Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  16. Connecticut Weatherization Project Improves Lives, Receives National...

    Energy Saver

    The upgrade to the facility also captured a residential energy efficiency award and is an example for other states. With support from the Energy Department's Weatherization ...

  17. Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,022 1,026 1,031 1,024 1,027 1,027 2007-2015

  18. Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History Delivered to Consumers 1,026 1,026 1,025 1,026 1,025 1,025 2013-2016

  19. Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &

  20. Connecticut Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions,

  1. Connecticut Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    490,185 494,970 504,138 513,492 522,658 531,380 1986-2015 Sales 489,380 494,065 503,241 512,110 521,460 530,309 1997-2015 Transported 805 905 897 1,382 1,198 1,071 1997-2015 Commercial Number of Consumers 54,842 55,028 55,407 55,500 56,591 57,403 1986-2015 Sales 50,132 50,170 50,312 48,976 51,613 54,165 1998-2015 Transported 4,710 4,858 5,095 6,524 4,978 3,238 1998-2015 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 741 815 764 836 905 914 1967-2015 Industrial Number of Consumers 3,063

  2. Connecticut Supplemental Supplies of Natural Gas

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Synthetic 1980-2005 Propane-Air 1980-2009

  3. Connecticut Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1994 1995 1996 View History Net Withdrawals 0 0 1973-1996 Injections 0 0 0 1973-1996 Withdrawals 0 0 0 1973-1996

  4. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of Connecticut...

    Energy Saver

    The University has already shown its commitment to this cause with three charging stations installed and active in two locations-the Motor Pool parking lot and a large car garage ...

  5. Connecticut Municipal Electric Energy Cooperative Smart Grid...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    System Customer Systems for 3,000 Customers Home Area Networks Customer Web Portal In-Home DisplaysEnergy Management Systems Programmable Communicating Thermostats Direct Load...

  6. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...302016" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570sct2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghistna1570sct2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  7. Multienergy CT acquisition and reconstruction with a stepped tube potential scan

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Le; Xing, Yuxiang

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Based on an energy-dependent property of matter, one may obtain a pseudomonochromatic attenuation map, a material composition image, an electron-density distribution, and an atomic number image using a dual- or multienergy computed tomography (CT) scan. Dual- and multienergy CT scans broaden the potential of x-ray CT imaging. The development of such systems is very useful in both medical and industrial investigations. In this paper, the authors propose a new dual- and multienergy CT system design (segmental multienergy CT, SegMECT) using an innovative scanning scheme that is conveniently implemented on a conventional single-energy CT system. The two-step-energy dual-energy CT can be regarded as a special case of SegMECT. A special reconstruction method is proposed to support SegMECT. Methods: In their SegMECT, a circular trajectory in a CT scan is angularly divided into several arcs. The x-ray source is set to a different tube voltage for each arc of the trajectory. Thus, the authors only need to make a few step changes to the x-ray energy during the scan to complete a multienergy data acquisition. With such a data set, the image reconstruction might suffer from severe limited-angle artifacts if using conventional reconstruction methods. To solve the problem, they present a new prior-image-based reconstruction technique using a total variance norm of a quotient image constraint. On the one hand, the prior extracts structural information from all of the projection data. On the other hand, the effect from a possibly imprecise intensity level of the prior can be mitigated by minimizing the total variance of a quotient image. Results: The authors present a new scheme for a SegMECT configuration and establish a reconstruction method for such a system. Both numerical simulation and a practical phantom experiment are conducted to validate the proposed reconstruction method and the effectiveness of the system design. The results demonstrate that the proposed Seg

  8. Application of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for mouse dosimetry in micro-CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Courteau, Alan; Oudot, Alexandra; Collin, Bertrand; Ranouil, Julien; Morgand, Loïc; Raguin, Olivier; Walker, Paul; Brunotte, François

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Micro-CT is considered to be a powerful tool to investigate various models of disease on anesthetized animals. In longitudinal studies, the radiation dose delivered by the micro-CT to the same animal is a major concern as it could potentially induce spurious effects in experimental results. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) are a relatively new kind of detector used in radiation dosimetry for medical applications. The aim of this work was to assess the dose delivered by the CT component of a micro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT camera during a typical whole-body mouse study, using commercially available OSLDs based on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C crystals.Methods: CTDI (computed tomography dose index) was measured in micro-CT with a properly calibrated pencil ionization chamber using a rat-like phantom (60 mm in diameter) and a mouse-like phantom (30 mm in diameter). OSLDs were checked for reproducibility and linearity in the range of doses delivered by the micro-CT. Dose measurements obtained with OSLDs were compared to those of the ionization chamber to correct for the radiation quality dependence of OSLDs in the low-kV range. Doses to tissue were then investigated in phantoms and cadavers. A 30 mm diameter phantom, specifically designed to insert OSLDs, was used to assess radiation dose over a typical whole-body mouse imaging study. Eighteen healthy female BALB/c mice weighing 27.1 ± 0.8 g (1 SD) were euthanized for small animal measurements. OLSDs were placed externally or implanted internally in nine different locations by an experienced animal technician. Five commonly used micro-CT protocols were investigated.Results: CTDI measurements were between 78.0 ± 2.1 and 110.7 ± 3.0 mGy for the rat-like phantom and between 169.3 ± 4.6 and 203.6 ± 5.5 mGy for the mouse-like phantom. On average, the displayed CTDI at the operator console was underestimated by 1.19 for the rat-like phantom and 2.36 for the mouse

  9. Resolution enhancement of lung 4D-CT data using multiscale interphase iterative nonlocal means

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yu; Yap, Pew-Thian; Wu Guorong; Feng Qianjin; Chen Wufan; Lian Jun; Shen Dinggang

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computer tomography (4D-CT) has been widely used in lung cancer radiotherapy due to its capability in providing important tumor motion information. However, the prolonged scanning duration required by 4D-CT causes considerable increase in radiation dose. To minimize the radiation-related health risk, radiation dose is often reduced at the expense of interslice spatial resolution. However, inadequate resolution in 4D-CT causes artifacts and increases uncertainty in tumor localization, which eventually results in extra damages of healthy tissues during radiotherapy. In this paper, the authors propose a novel postprocessing algorithm to enhance the resolution of lung 4D-CT data. Methods: The authors' premise is that anatomical information missing in one phase can be recovered from the complementary information embedded in other phases. The authors employ a patch-based mechanism to propagate information across phases for the reconstruction of intermediate slices in the longitudinal direction, where resolution is normally the lowest. Specifically, the structurally matching and spatially nearby patches are combined for reconstruction of each patch. For greater sensitivity to anatomical details, the authors employ a quad-tree technique to adaptively partition the image for more fine-grained refinement. The authors further devise an iterative strategy for significant enhancement of anatomical details. Results: The authors evaluated their algorithm using a publicly available lung data that consist of 10 4D-CT cases. The authors' algorithm gives very promising results with significantly enhanced image structures and much less artifacts. Quantitative analysis shows that the authors' algorithm increases peak signal-to-noise ratio by 3-4 dB and the structural similarity index by 3%-5% when compared with the standard interpolation-based algorithms. Conclusions: The authors have developed a new algorithm to improve the resolution of 4D-CT. It outperforms

  10. SU-E-I-68: Practical Considerations On Implementation of the Image Gently Pediatric CT Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J; Adams, C; Lumby, C; Dillon, J; Woods, E; Richer, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: One limitation associated with the Image Gently pediatric CT protocols is practical implementation of the recommended manual techniques. Inconsistency as a result of different practice is a possibility among technologist. An additional concern is the added risk of data error that would result in over or underexposure. The Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) features automatically reduce radiation for children. However, they do not work efficiently for the patients of very small size and relative large size. This study aims to implement the Image Gently pediatric CT protocols in the practical setting while maintaining the use of AEC features for pediatric patients of varying size. Methods: Anthropomorphological abdomen phantoms were scanned in a CT scanner using the Image Gently pediatric protocols, the AEC technique with a fixed adult baseline, and automatic protocols with various baselines. The baselines were adjusted corresponding to patient age, weight and posterioranterior thickness to match the Image Gently pediatric CT manual techniques. CTDIvol was recorded for each examination. Image noise was measured and recorded for image quality comparison. Clinical images were evaluated by pediatric radiologists. Results: By adjusting vendor default baselines used in the automatic techniques, radiation dose and image quality can match those of the Image Gently manual techniques. In practice, this can be achieved by dividing pediatric patients into three major groups for technologist reference: infant, small child, and large child. Further division can be done but will increase the number of CT protocols. For each group, AEC can efficiently adjust acquisition techniques for children. This implementation significantly overcomes the limitation of the Image Gently manual techniques. Conclusion: Considering the effectiveness in clinical practice, Image Gently Pediatric CT protocols can be implemented in accordance with AEC techniques, with adjusted baselines, to

  11. SU-E-J-267: Change in Mean CT Intensity of Lung Tumors During Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Mahon, R; Tennyson, N; Weiss, E; Hugo, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate CT intensity change of lung tumors during radiation therapy. Methods: Repeated 4D CT images were acquired on a CT simulator during the course of therapy for 27 lung cancer patients on IRB approved protocols. All subjects received definitive radiation treatment ± chemotherapy. CT scans were completed prior to treatment, and 2–7 times during the treatment course. Primary tumor was delineated by an experienced Radiation Oncologist. Contours were thresholded between −100 HU and 200 HU to remove airways and bone. Correlations between the change in the mean tumor intensity and initial tumor intensity, SUVmax, and tumor volume change rate were investigated. Reproducibility was assessed by evaluating the variation in mean intensity over all phases in 4DCT, for a subgroup of 19 subjects. Results: Reproducibility of tumor intensity between phases as characterized by the root mean square of standard deviation across 19 subjects was 1.8 HU. Subjects had a mean initial tumor intensity of 16.5 ± 11.6 HU and an overall reduction in HU by 10.3 ± 8.5 HU. Evaluation of the changes in tumor intensity during treatment showed a decrease of 0.3 ± 0.3 HU/day for all subjects, except three. No significant correlation was found between change in HU/day and initial HU intensity (p=0.53), initial PET SUVmax (p=0.69), or initial tumor volume (p=0.70). The rate of tumor volume change was weakly correlated (R{sup 2}=0.05) with HU change (p=0.01). Conclusion: Most lung cancer subjects showed a marked trend of decreasing mean tumor CT intensity throughout radiotherapy, including early in the treatment course. Change in HU/day is not correlated with other potential early predictors for response, such as SUV and tumor volume change. This Result supports future studies to evaluate change in tumor intensity on CT as an early predictor of response.

  12. SU-E-T-416: VMAT Dose Calculations Using Cone Beam CT Images: A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Kuo, J; Daroui, P; Ramsinghani, N; Al-Ghazi, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) images have been used routinely for patient positioning throughout the treatment course. However, use of CBCT for dose calculation is still investigational. The purpose of this study is to assess the utility of CBCT images for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) plan dose calculation. Methods: A CATPHAN 504 phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) was used to compare the dosimetric and geometric accuracy between conventional CT and CBCT (in both full and half fan modes). Hounsfield units (HU) profiles at different density areas were evaluated. A C shape target that surrounds a central avoidance structure was created and a VMAT plan was generated on the CT images and copied to the CBCT phantom images. Patient studies included three brain patients, and one head and neck (H'N) patient. VMAT plans generated on the patients treatment planning CT was applied to CBCT images obtained during the first treatment. Isodose distributions and dosevolume- histograms (DVHs) were compared. Results: For the phantom study, the HU difference between CT and CBCT is within 100 (maximum 96 HU for Teflon CBCT images in full fan mode). The impact of these differences on the calculated dose distributions was clinically insignificant. In both phantom and patient studies, target DVHs based on CBCT images were in excellent agreement with those based on planning CT images. Mean, Median, near minimum (D98%), and near maximum (D2%) doses agreed within 0-2.5%. A slightly larger discrepancy is observed in the patient studies compared to that seen in the phantom study, (0-1% vs. 0 - 2.5%). Conclusion: CBCT images can be used to accurately predict dosimetric results, without any HU correction. It is feasible to use CBCT to evaluate the actual dose delivered at each fraction. The dosimetric consequences resulting from tumor response and patient geometry changes could be monitored.

  13. Bowtie filters for dedicated breast CT: Theory and computational implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Kontson, Kimberly Jennings, Robert J.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To design bowtie filters with improved properties for dedicated breast CT to improve image quality and reduce dose to the patient. Methods: The authors present three different bowtie filters designed for a cylindrical 14-cm diameter phantom with a uniform composition of 40/60 breast tissue, which vary in their design objectives and performance improvements. Bowtie design #1 is based on single material spectral matching and produces nearly uniform spectral shape for radiation incident upon the detector. Bowtie design #2 uses the idea of basis material decomposition to produce the same spectral shape and intensity at the detector, using two different materials. Bowtie design #3 eliminates the beam hardening effect in the reconstructed image by adjusting the bowtie filter thickness so that the effective attenuation coefficient for every ray is the same. All three designs are obtained using analytical computational methods and linear attenuation coefficients. Thus, the designs do not take into account the effects of scatter. The authors considered this to be a reasonable approach to the filter design problem since the use of Monte Carlo methods would have been computationally intensive. The filter profiles for a cone-angle of 0° were used for the entire length of each filter because the differences between those profiles and the correct cone-beam profiles for the cone angles in our system are very small, and the constant profiles allowed construction of the filters with the facilities available to us. For evaluation of the filters, we used Monte Carlo simulation techniques and the full cone-beam geometry. Images were generated with and without each bowtie filter to analyze the effect on dose distribution, noise uniformity, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) homogeneity. Line profiles through the reconstructed images generated from the simulated projection images were also used as validation for the filter designs. Results: Examples of the three designs are

  14. Evaluating the Influence of Wall-Roughness on Fracture Transmissivity with CT Scanning and Flow Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant; McIntyre, Dustin

    2010-01-01

    Combining CT imaging of geomaterials with computational fluid dynamics provides substantial benefits to researchers. With simulations, geometric parameters can be varied in systematic ways that are not possible in the lab. This paper details the conversion of micro-CT images of a physical fracture in Berea sandstone to several tractable finite volume meshes. By computationally varying the level of detail captured from the scans we produced several realistic fracture geometries with different degrees of wall-roughness and various geometric properties. Simulations were performed and it was noted that increasing roughness increased the resistance to fluid flow. Also, as the distance between walls was increased the mean aperture approached the effective aperture.

  15. Pilot Study to Confirm that Fat and Liver can be Distinguished by Spectroscopic Tissue Response on a Medipix-All-Resolution System-CT (MARS-CT)

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Kyra B.; Anderson, Nigel G.; Butler, Alexandra P.; Carr, James M.; Clark, Michael J.; Cook, Nick J.; Scott, Nicola J.; Butler, Philip H.; Butler, Anthony P.

    2009-07-23

    NAFLD, liver component of the 'metabolic' syndrome, has become the most common liver disease in western nations. Non-invasive imaging techniques exist, but have limitations, especially in detection and quantification of mild to moderate fatty liver. In this pilot study, we produced attenuation curves from biomedical-quality projection images of liver and fat using the MARS spectroscopic-CT scanner. Difficulties obtaining attenuation spectra after reconstruction demonstrated that standard reconstruction programs do not preserve spectral information.

  16. TU-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: CT Dose Optimization Technologies II

    SciTech Connect

    Driesser, I; Angel, E

    2014-06-15

    Partners in Solutions is an exciting new program in which AAPM partners with our vendors to present practical “hands-on” information about the equipment and software systems that we use in our clinics. The imaging topic this year is CT scanner dose optimization capabilities. Note that the sessions are being held in a special purpose room built on the Exhibit Hall Floor, to encourage further interaction with the vendors. Siemens‘ Commitment to the Right Dose in Computed Tomography Presentation Time: 11:15 - 11:45 AM Providing sustainable clinical results at highest patient safety: This is the challenge in medical imaging. Especially for Computed Tomography this means applying not simply the lowest, but the right dose for sound diagnostic imaging. Consequently, Siemens is committed to deliver the right dose in CT. In order to reduce radiation to the right dose, the first step is to provide the right dose technology. Through decades of research and development in CT imaging, Siemens CT has constantly introduced new ideas leading to a comprehensive portfolio of unique CARE technologies to deliver the right dose. For example automated kV adjustment based on patient size and the clinical question with CARE kV and three generations of iterative reconstruction. Based on the right dose technology, the next step is to actually scan at the right dose. For this, it is key to know the right dose targets for every examination. Siemens continuously involves CT experts to push developments further and outline how users can best adapt their procedures to the right dose. For users to know whether they met the right dose targets, it is therefore important to understand and monitor the actual absolute dose values. All scanners are delivered with defined default protocols which automatically use the available right dose technologies. Finally, to deliver the right dose not just in singular cases, but ideally to patients everywhere, organizations need then to manage dose across

  17. MO-E-17A-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING) - Calculating SSDE From CT Exams Using Size Data Available in the DICOM Header of CT Localizer Radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, K; Bostani, M; McNitt-Gray, M; McCollough, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of using existing data stored within the DICOM header of certain CT localizer radiographs as a patient size metric for calculating CT size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). Methods: For most Siemens CT scanners, the CT localizer radiograph (topogram) contains a private DICOM field that stores an array of numbers describing AP and LAT attenuation-based measures of patient dimension. The square root of the product of the AP and LAT size data, which provides an estimate of water-equivalent-diameter (WED), was calculated retrospectively from topogram data of 20 patients who received clinically-indicated abdomen/pelvis (n=10) and chest (n=10) scans (WED-topo). In addition, slice-by-slice water-equivalent-diameter (WED-image) and effective diameter (ED-image) values were calculated from the respective image data. Using TG-204 lookup tables, size-dependent conversion factors were determined based upon WED-topo, WED-image and ED-image values. These conversion factors were used with the reported CTDIvol to calculate slice-by-slice SSDE for each method. Averaging over all slices, a single SSDE value was determined for each patient and size metric. Patientspecific SSDE and CTDIvol values were then compared with patientspecific organ doses derived from detailed Monte Carlo simulations of fixed tube current scans. Results: For abdomen/pelvis scans, the average difference between liver dose and CTDIvol, SSDE(WED-topo), SSDE(WED-image), and SSDE(ED-image) was 18.70%, 8.17%, 6.84%, and 7.58%, respectively. For chest scans, the average difference between lung dose and CTDIvol, SSDE(WED-topo), SSDE(WED-image), and SSDE(ED-image) was 25.80%, 3.33%, 4.11%, and 7.66%, respectively. Conclusion: SSDE calculated using WED derived from data in the DICOM header of the topogram was comparable to SSDE calculated using WED and ED derived from axial images; each of these estimated organ dose to within 10% for both abdomen/pelvis and chest CT examinations

  18. SU-E-I-31: Differences Observed in Radiation Doses Across 2 Similar CT Scanners From Adult Brain-Neck CT Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K; McMillan, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the difference in radiation doses from adult Brain-Neck CT angiography (CTA) between two CT scanners. Methods: We collected CT dose index data (CTDIvol, DLP) from adult Brain-Neck CTA performed with two CT scanners (Sensation 64 (S64) and Definition AS (AS), Siemens Healthcare) performed at two of our facilities from Jan 1st to Dec 31th, 2014. X-ray dose management software (Radmetrics, Bayer Healthcare) was used to mine these data. All exams were performed with Tube Current Modulation (Care Dose 4D), tube voltage of 120 kVp, quality reference mAs of 300, beam collimation of 64*0.6 mm. The rotation time was set to 0.5 sec for S64 and 1.0 sec for AS. We also scanned an anthropomorphic skull and chest phantom under routine Brain-Neck CTA protocol with the two scanners and extracted the tube current values from the raw projection data. Results: The mean CTDIvol and DLP in Brain-Neck CTA was 72 mGy and 2554 mGy*cm for AS, which was substantially larger than the mean values of 46 mGy and 1699 mGy*cm for S64. The maximum tube current was 583 mA for most cases on the S64 while the maximum was 666 mA for AS even though the rotation time set for AS was 1.0 sec. Measurements obtained with the anthropomorphic phantom showed that the tube current reached 583 mA at the shoulder region for S64 while it reached to 666 mA for AS. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that substantially different CT doses can Result from Brain-Neck CTA protocols even when similar scanners and similar settings are used. Though both scanners have a similar maximum mA rating, differences in mA were observed through the shoulders, resulting in substantially different CTDIvol values.

  19. The feasibility of head motion tracking in helical CT: A step toward motion correction

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jung-Ha; Nuyts, Johan; Kuncic, Zdenka; Fulton, Roger

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To establish a practical and accurate motion tracking method for the development of rigid motion correction methods in helical x-ray computed tomography (CT). Methods: A commercially available optical motion tracking system provided 6 degrees of freedom pose measurements at 60 Hz. A 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 calibration matrix was determined to convert raw pose data acquired in tracker coordinates to a fixed CT coordinate system with origin at the isocenter of the scanner. Two calibration methods, absolute orientation (AO), and a new method based on image registration (IR), were compared by means of landmark analysis and correlation coefficient in phantom images coregistered using the derived motion transformations. Results: Transformations calculated using the IR-derived calibration matrix were found to be more accurate, with positional errors less than 0.5 mm (mean RMS), and highly correlated image voxel intensities. The AO-derived calibration matrix yielded larger mean RMS positional errors ( Asymptotically-Equal-To 1.0 mm), and poorer correlation coefficients. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of accurate motion tracking for retrospective motion correction in helical CT. Their new IR-based calibration method based on image registration and function minimization was simpler to perform and delivered more accurate calibration matrices. This technique is a useful tool for future work on rigid motion correction in helical CT and potentially also other imaging modalities.

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development, Derby, CT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Derby, CT, that achieves a HERS score of 45 without PV or HERS 26 with PV. The production home is one of a development of 7 two-story, 4,000+-ft2...