National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for base year estimate

  1. Budget estimates. Fiscal year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    The U.S. Congress has determined that the safe use of nuclear materials for peaceful purposes is a legitimate and important national goal. It has entrusted the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with the primary Federal responsibility for achieving that goal. The NRC`s mission, therefore, is to regulate the Nation`s civilian use of byproduct, source, and special nuclear materials to ensure adequate protection of public health and safety, to promote the common defense and security, and to protect the environment. The NRC`s FY 1998 budget requests new budget authority of $481,300,000 to be funded by two appropriations - one is the NRC`s Salaraies and Expenses appropriation for $476,500,000, and the other is NRC`s Office of Inspector General appropriation for $4,800,000. Of the funds appropriated to the NRC`s Salaries and Expenses, $17,000,000, shall be derived from the Nuclear Waste Fund and $2,000,000 shall be derived from general funds. The proposed FY 1998 appropriation legislation would also exempt the $2,000,000 for regulatory reviews and other assistance provided to the Department of Energy from the requirement that the NRC collect 100 percent of its budget from fees. The sums appropriated to the NRC`s Salaries and Expenses and NRC`s Office of Inspector General shall be reduced by the amount of revenues received during FY 1998 from licensing fees, inspection services, and other services and collections, so as to result in a final FY 1998 appropriation for the NRC of an estimated $19,000,000 - the amount appropriated from the Nuclear Waste Fund and from general funds. Revenues derived from enforcement actions shall be deposited to miscellaneous receipts of the Treasury.

  2. Budget estimates, fiscal year 1997. Volume 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This report contains the fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal year 1997.

  3. Budget estimates, fiscal years 1994--1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This report contains the fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal years 1994 and 1995.

  4. Budget estimates fiscal year 1995: Volume 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report contains the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal year 1995. The NRC 1995 budget request is $546,497,000. This is an increase of $11,497,000 above the proposed level for FY 1994. The NRC FY 1995 budget request is 3,218 FTEs. This is a decrease of 75 FTEs below the 1994 proposed level.

  5. Budget estimates, fiscal years 1994--1995. Volume 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This report contains the fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal years 1994 and 1995.

  6. Model Year 2011 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  7. Model Year 2012 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  8. Model Year 2013 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  9. Model Year 2006 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  10. Model Year 2008 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  11. Model Year 2007 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  12. Model Year 2016 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  13. Model Year 2015 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  14. Model Year 2005 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  15. Model Year 2010 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-14

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  16. Model Year 2009 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  17. Model Year 2014 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  18. Knowledge Based Estimation of Material Release Transients

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-07-29

    KBERT is an easy to use desktop decision support tool for estimating public and in-facility worker doses and consequences of radioactive material releases in non-reactort nuclear facilities. It automatically calculates release and respirable fractions based on published handbook data, and calculates material transport concurrently with personnel evacuation simulations. Any facility layout can be modeled easily using the intuitive graphical user interface.

  19. The ARM Best Estimate Station-based Surface (ARMBESTNS) Data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Station-based Surface (ARMBESTNS) Data set Title: The ARM Best Estimate Station-based Surface (ARMBESTNS) Data set The ARM Best Estimate Station-based Surface (ARMBESTNS) data set ...

  20. Estimation of Energy Savings Resulting From the BestPractices Program, Fiscal Year 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truett, LF

    2003-09-24

    Within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has a vision of a future with clean, abundant, reliable, and affordable energy. Within EERE, the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), formerly the Office of Industrial Technologies, works in partnership with industry to increase energy efficiency, improve environmental performance, and boost productivity. The BestPractices (BP) Program, within ITP, works directly with industries to encourage energy efficiency. The purpose of the BP Program is to improve energy utilization and management practices in the industrial sector. The program targets distinct technology areas, including pumps, process heating, steam, compressed air, motors, and insulation. This targeting is accomplished with a variety of delivery channels, such as computer software, printed publications, Internet-based resources, technical training, technical assessments, and other technical assistance. A team of program evaluators from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked to evaluate the fiscal year 2002 (FY02) energy savings of the program. The ORNL assessment enumerates levels of program activity for technology areas across delivery channels. In addition, several mechanisms that target multiple technology areas--e.g., Plant-wide Assessments (PWAs), the ''Energy Matters'' newsletter, and special events--are also evaluated for their impacts. When possible, the assessment relies on published reports and the Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) database for estimates of energy savings that result from particular actions. Data were also provided by ORNL, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Project Performance Corporation (PPC), the ITP Clearinghouse at Washington State University, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Energetics Inc., and the Industrial Technologies Program Office. The estimated energy savings in FY02 resulting from activities of the BP Program are almost

  1. Output-Based Error Estimation and Adaptation for Uncertainty...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Output-Based Error Estimation and Adaptation for Uncertainty Quantification Isaac M. Asher and Krzysztof J. Fidkowski University of Michigan US National Congress on Computational...

  2. Reasons for changes in MPG estimates, model year 1978 to the present

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, P.D.; Westbrook, F.W.; Greene, D.L.; Roberts, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    In model year 1983, new car MPG declined for the first time in ten years. Accompanying this decline in MPG, the size of the average car increased, car weights and engine sized increased and diesel sales declined - all reversing their movements over the previous ten years. Using carline MPG estimates and sales figures, it is estimated that new car MPG declined 0.29 in 1983 after rising 6.70 MPG over the previous four years. Furthermore,it is estimated that actions by new car buyers would have lowered the 1983 MPG 0.40 MPG through the purchase of larger cars, cars with larger engines and fewer diesel engines if the manufacturers had not some fuel economy improvements and introduced some new high-MPG cars. A simple model of future fuel use increases as a friction of MPG levels below a specified level consistent with the CAFE standards shows that the costs of lower fuel economy will only gradually be felt, but that these costs will increase over time and persist for over a decade.

  3. CALIBRATING C-IV-BASED BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Daeseong; Woo, Jong-Hak; Shin, Jaejin [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Denney, Kelly D., E-mail: pds2001@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jjshin@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: kelly@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2013-06-20

    We present the single-epoch black hole mass estimators based on the C IV {lambda}1549 broad emission line, using the updated sample of the reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei and high-quality UV spectra. By performing multi-component spectral fitting analysis, we measure the C IV line widths (FWHM{sub C{sub IV}} and line dispersion, {sigma}{sub C{sub IV}}) and the continuum luminosity at 1350 A (L{sub 1350}) to calibrate the C-IV-based mass estimators. By comparing with the H{beta} reverberation-based masses, we provide new mass estimators with the best-fit relationships, i.e., M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.50{+-}0.07}{sigma}{sub C{sub IV}{sup 2}} and M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.52{+-}0.09} FWHM{sub C{sub IV}{sup 0.56{+-}0.48}}. The new C-IV-based mass estimators show significant mass-dependent systematic difference compared to the estimators commonly used in the literature. Using the published Sloan Digital Sky Survey QSO catalog, we show that the black hole mass of high-redshift QSOs decreases on average by {approx}0.25 dex if our recipe is adopted.

  4. Compendium of Data for the Hanford Site (Fiscal Years 2004 to 2008) Applicable to Estimation of Recharge Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, William E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2008-09-24

    This report is a compendium of recharge data collected in Fiscal Years 2004 through 2008 at various soil and surface covers found and planned in the 200 West and 200 East Areas of the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The addition of these new data to previously published recharge data will support improved estimates of recharge with respect to location and soil cover helpful to evaluations and risk assessments of radioactive and chemical wastes at this site. Also presented are evaluations of the associated uncertainties, limitations, and data gaps in the existing knowledge base for recharge at the Hanford Site.

  5. Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.

    2009-03-01

    The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

  6. BAYESIAN COMPONENT SEPARATION AND COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ESTIMATION FOR THE FIVE-YEAR WMAP TEMPERATURE DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, C.; Banday, A. J.; Jewell, J. B.; Gorski, K. M.; Huey, G.; Lawrence, C. R.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Wandelt, B. D.

    2009-11-10

    A well-tested and validated Gibbs sampling code, that performs component separation and cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectrum estimation, was applied to the WMAP five-year data. Using a simple model consisting of CMB, noise, monopoles, and dipoles, a 'per pixel' low-frequency power-law (fitting for both amplitude and spectral index), and a thermal dust template with a fixed spectral index, we found that the low-l (l < 50) CMB power spectrum is in good agreement with the published WMAP5 results. Residual monopoles and dipoles were found to be small (approx<3 muK) or negligible in the five-year data. We comprehensively tested the assumptions that were made about the foregrounds (e.g., dust spectral index, power-law spectral index prior, templates), and found that the CMB power spectrum was insensitive to these choices. We confirm the asymmetry of power between the north and south ecliptic hemispheres, which appears to be robust against foreground modeling. The map of low-frequency spectral indices indicates a steeper spectrum on average (beta = -2.97 +- 0.21) relative to those found at low (approxGHz) frequencies.

  7. WPN 00-4- Estimated 25% State Cost Share Requirement for the Weatherization Assistance Program for Program Year 2001

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    To provide estimated figures for the states to begin their planning for the enacted 25% cost share requirement for funding of the low-income Weatherization Assistance Program beginning with Program Year 2001.

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  1. Synchrophasor Measurement-Based Wind Plant Inertia Estimation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Bank, J.; Wan, Y. H.; Muljadi, E.; Corbus, D.

    2013-05-01

    The total inertia stored in all rotating masses that are connected to power systems, such as synchronous generations and induction motors, is an essential force that keeps the system stable after disturbances. To ensure bulk power system stability, there is a need to estimate the equivalent inertia available from a renewable generation plant. An equivalent inertia constant analogous to that of conventional rotating machines can be used to provide a readily understandable metric. This paper explores a method that utilizes synchrophasor measurements to estimate the equivalent inertia that a wind plant provides to the system.

  2. Estimating present climate in a warming world: a model-based approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raeisaenen, J.; Ruokolainen, L. [University of Helsinki (Finland). Division of Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysics

    2008-09-30

    Weather services base their operational definitions of 'present' climate on past observations, using a 30-year normal period such as 1961-1990 or 1971-2000. In a world with ongoing global warming, however, past data give a biased estimate of the actual present-day climate. Here we propose to correct this bias with a 'delta change' method, in which model-simulated climate changes and observed global mean temperature changes are used to extrapolate past observations forward in time, to make them representative of present or future climate conditions. In a hindcast test for the years 1991-2002, the method works well for temperature, with a clear improvement in verification statistics compared to the case in which the hindcast is formed directly from the observations for 1961-1990. However, no improvement is found for precipitation, for which the signal-to-noise ratio between expected anthropogenic changes and interannual variability is much lower than for temperature. An application of the method to the present (around the year 2007) climate suggests that, as a geographical average over land areas excluding Antarctica, 8-9 months per year and 8-9 years per decade can be expected to be warmer than the median for 1971-2000. Along with the overall warming, a substantial increase in the frequency of warm extremes at the expense of cold extremes of monthly-to-annual temperature is expected.

  3. COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION AND TEMPERATURE POWER SPECTRA ESTIMATION USING LINEAR COMBINATION OF WMAP 5 YEAR MAPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samal, Pramoda Kumar; Jain, Pankaj; Saha, Rajib; Prunet, Simon; Souradeep, Tarun

    2010-05-01

    We estimate cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization and temperature power spectra using Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 5 year foreground contaminated maps. The power spectrum is estimated by using a model-independent method, which does not utilize directly the diffuse foreground templates nor the detector noise model. The method essentially consists of two steps: (1) removal of diffuse foregrounds contamination by making linear combination of individual maps in harmonic space and (2) cross-correlation of foreground cleaned maps to minimize detector noise bias. For the temperature power spectrum we also estimate and subtract residual unresolved point source contamination in the cross-power spectrum using the point source model provided by the WMAP science team. Our TT, TE, and EE power spectra are in good agreement with the published results of the WMAP science team. We perform detailed numerical simulations to test for bias in our procedure. We find that the bias is small in almost all cases. A negative bias at low l in TT power spectrum has been pointed out in an earlier publication. We find that the bias-corrected quadrupole power (l(l + 1)C{sub l} /2{pi}) is 532 {mu}K{sup 2}, approximately 2.5 times the estimate (213.4 {mu}K{sup 2}) made by the WMAP team.

  4. Reliable clock estimation using linear weighted fusion based on pairwise broadcast synchronization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Xin Zhao, Xiangmo Hui, Fei Ma, Junyan Yang, Lan

    2014-10-06

    Clock synchronization in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) has been studied extensively in recent years and many protocols are put forward based on the point of statistical signal processing, which is an effective way to optimize accuracy. However, the accuracy derived from the statistical data can be improved mainly by sufficient packets exchange, which will consume the limited power resources greatly. In this paper, a reliable clock estimation using linear weighted fusion based on pairwise broadcast synchronization is proposed to optimize sync accuracy without expending additional sync packets. As a contribution, a linear weighted fusion scheme for multiple clock deviations is constructed with the collaborative sensing of clock timestamp. And the fusion weight is defined by the covariance of sync errors for different clock deviations. Extensive simulation results show that the proposed approach can achieve better performance in terms of sync overhead and sync accuracy.

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 YEAR 2014 Males 57 Females 25 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 3 EJEK 4 EN 04 2 NN (Engineering) ... 22, 2014 3.7% 4.9% 2.4% 24.4% 64.6% Pay Plan Males 69.5% Females 30.5% Gender AIAN M ...

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2014 Males 11 Females 2 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 2 EJEK 1 EN 04 1 NN (Engineering) 5 ... 22, 2014 15.4% 7.7% 7.7% 38.5% 30.8% Pay Plan Males 84.6% Females 15.4% Gender AIAN M ...

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    26 YEAR 2014 Males 81 Females 45 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 SL 1 EJEK 25 EN 04 26 EN 03 2 ... 0.8% 19.8% 20.6% 1.6% 18.3% 34.9% 3.2% Pay Plan Males 64.3% Females 35.7% Gender AIAN M ...

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 YEAR 2014 Males 48 Females 33 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 8 EN 04 10 EN 03 1 NN ... Sandia Field Office As of March 22, 2014 1.2% 9.9% 12.3% 1.2% 33.3% 35.8% 6.2% Pay Plan ...

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2014 Males 18 Females 10 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) ... Savannah River Field Office As of March 22, 2014 3.6% 3.6% 14.3% 42.9% 32.1% 3.6% Pay Plan ...

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2014 Males 7 Females 7 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 7 GS 15 1 GS ... 2014 7.1% 50.0% 7.1% 14.3% 14.3% 7.1% Pay Plan Males 50.0% Females 50.0% Gender AIAN M ...

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    74 YEAR 2014 Males 96 Females 78 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 8 EJEK 4 EN 04 11 EN 03 1 NN ... 4.6% 2.3% 6.3% 0.6% 19.5% 64.9% 1.7% Pay Plan Males 55.2% Females 44.8% Gender AIAN M ...

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    16 YEAR 2014 Males 72 Females 144 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 8 EJEK 1 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) ... of March 22, 2014 3.7% 0.5% 91.7% 4.2% Pay Plan Males 33.3% Females 66.7% Gender AIAN M ...

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2014 Males 18 Females 20 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 3 EJEK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) ... 2014 7.9% 2.6% 2.6% 7.9% 73.7% 5.3% Pay Plan Males 47.4% Females 52.6% Gender AIAN M ...

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 YEAR 2014 Males 162 Females 81 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 26 EJEK 3 EN 05 7 NN ... 2014 10.7% 1.2% 2.9% 31.7% 44.4% 9.1% Pay Plan Males 66.7% Females 33.3% Gender AIAN M ...

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2014 Males 61 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 8 EN 04 22 NN (Engineering) ... Los Alamos Field Office As of March 22, 2014 1.2% 9.4% 25.9% 27.1% 32.9% 3.5% Pay Plan ...

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    89 YEAR 2014 Males 98 Females 91 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 14 EX 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 EN ... 0.5% 2.1% 0.5% 16.9% 68.8% 1.1% 0.5% Pay Plan Males 51.9% Females 48.1% Gender AIAN M ...

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    93 YEAR 2014 Males 50 Females 43 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 EJEK 3 NN (Engineering) 13 NQ (Prof... March 22, 2014 3.2% 14.0% 79.6% 3.2% Pay Plan Males 53.8% Females 46.2% Gender AIAN M ...

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    563 YEAR 2014 Males 517 Females 46 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 2 EJEK 2 EN 04 1 NN ... 0.4% 0.4% 0.2% 2.0% 38.7% 0.4% 58.1% Pay Plan Males 91.8% Females 8.2% Gender AIAN M ...

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    446 YEAR 2014 Males 1626 Females 820 YEAR 2014 SES 97 EX 2 ED 1 SL1 EJEK 84 EN 05 38 EN 04 162 EN 03 18 NN (Engineering) 427 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 1216 NU (TechAdmin Support) 66 ...

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2012 Males 149 Females 115 YEAR 2012 SES 17 EX 1 EJEK 7 EN 05 2 EN 04 9 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 56 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 165 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 GS 13 1 YEAR 2012 American...

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2014 Males 61 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 8 EN 04 22 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 28 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 2 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 3 African American Male (AA M) 0 African American Female (AA F) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 3 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 13 Hispanic Female (H F) 10 White Male (W M) 43 White Female (W F) 11

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    26 YEAR 2014 Males 81 Females 45 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 SL 1 EJ/EK 25 EN 04 26 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 44 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 4 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 7 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 4 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 1 Hispanic Male (H M) 6 Hispanic Female (H F) 6 White Male (W M) 68 White

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 YEAR 2014 Males 48 Females 33 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 8 EN 04 10 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 29 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 5 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 3 African American Male (AA M) 0 African American Female (AA F) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 12 Hispanic Female (H F) 12 White Male (W M) 34 White Female

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2014 Males 18 Females 10 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 4 African American Female (AA F) 4 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 1 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 13 White Female (W F) 5

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    25 Females 10 YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 13 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 1 African American Female (AA F) 3 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 24 White Female (W F) 6 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Kansas City

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 22 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 27 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 2 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 5 African American Female (AA F) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 21 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 5 Hispanic Female (H F) 3 White Male (W M) 26 White Female (W F) 16

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 Females 25 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJ/EK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 25 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 25 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 1 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 1 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 3 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 6 Hispanic Female (H F) 6 White Male (W M) 46 White Female (W F) 13

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 22 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 15 ... 4.8% 3.6% 26.5% 9.6% 18.1% 32.5% 3.6% Pay Plan Males 71.1% Females 28.9% Gender AIAN M ...

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 Females 25 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 25 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 ... 3.6% 1.2% 30.1% 1.2% 30.1% 30.1% 2.4% Pay Plan Males 69.9% Females 30.1% Gender AIAN M ...

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    17 Females 18 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 3 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin ... of March 22, 2014 2.9% 8.6% 85.7% 2.9% Pay Plan Males 48.6% Females 51.4% Gender AIAN M ...

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    -9.09% YEAR 2012 2013 SES 1 1 0.00% EN 05 1 1 0.00% EN 04 11 11 0.00% NN (Engineering) 8 8 0.00% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 17 14 -17.65% NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 2...

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females 863 YEAR 2013 SES 102 EX 3 SL 1 EJEK 89 EN 05 41 EN 04 170 EN 03 18 NN (Engineering) 448 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 1249 NU (TechAdmin Support) 76 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 321...

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females 942 YEAR 2012 SES 108 EX 4 SL 1 EJEK 96 EN 05 45 EN 04 196 EN 03 20 NN (Engineering) 452 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 1291 NU (TechAdmin Support) 106 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 335...

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EN 05 0 1 100.00% EN 04 4 4 0.00% NN (Engineering) 13 12 -7.69% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 9 -30.77% NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 1...

  15. Year

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . U.S. Coal Production, 2010 - 2016 (thousand short tons) Year January - March April - June July - September October - December Total 2010 265,702 264,982 277,505 276,180 1,084,368 2011 273,478 264,291 275,006 282,853 1,095,628 2012 266,865 241,047 258,956 249,591 1,016,458 2013 244,867 243,211 257,595 239,169 984,842 2014 245,271 245,844 255,377 253,557 1,000,049 2015 240,299 212,452 236,990 207,237 896,977 2016 173,028 160,515 - - 333,543 - = No data reported. Note: Total may not equal sum of

  16. Estimating Methods

    Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Based on the project's scope, the purpose of the estimate, and the availability of estimating resources, the estimator can choose one or a combination of techniques when estimating an activity or project. Estimating methods, estimating indirect and direct costs, and other estimating considerations are discussed in this chapter.

  17. The ARM Best Estimate Station-based Surface (ARMBESTNS) Data set (Dataset)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | Data Explorer Station-based Surface (ARMBESTNS) Data set Title: The ARM Best Estimate Station-based Surface (ARMBESTNS) Data set The ARM Best Estimate Station-based Surface (ARMBESTNS) data set merges together key surface measurements from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) sites. It is a twin data product of the ARM Best Estimate 2-dimensional Gridded Surface (ARMBE2DGRID) data set. Unlike the 2DGRID data set, the STNS data are reported at the original site locations and show the original

  18. Cellulose triacetate based novel optical sensor for uranium estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, J.M.; Pathak, P.N.; Pandey, A.K.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2008-07-01

    A cellulose triacetate (CTA) based optode has been developed by immobilizing tricapryl-methyl ammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) as the extractant and 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5- diethyl-aminophenol (Br-PADAP) as the chromophore. The optode changes color (from yellow to magenta) due to uranium uptake in bicarbonate medium ({approx}10{sup -4} M) at pH 7-8 in the presence of triethanolamine (TEA) buffer. The detection limit of the optode film (dimension: 3 cm x 1 cm) was determined to be {approx}0.3 {mu}g/mL for a 15 mL pure uranium sample at pH 7-8 (in TEA buffer). The effects of experimental parameters have been evaluated in terms of maximum uptake of U(VI), minimum response time, and reproducibility and stability of the Br-PADAP-U(VI ) complex formed in the optode matrix. The applicability of the optimized optode has been examined in the effluent samples obtained during magnesium diuranate precipitation step following the TBP purification cycle. (authors)

  19. Biochemical Control With Radiotherapy Improves Overall Survival in Intermediate and High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Who Have an Estimated 10-Year Overall Survival of >90%

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbert, Christopher; Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott; Morris, W. James; Joffres, Michel; Khaira, Mandip; Kwan, Winkle; Moiseenko, Vitali; Pickles, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To identify subgroups of patients with carcinoma of the prostate treated with radical radiotherapy that have improved overall survival when disease is biochemically controlled. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 1,060 prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy was divided into nine subgroups based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk category and estimated 10-year overall survival (eOS 10y) derived from the age adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index. Patients with and without biochemical control were compared with respect to overall survival. Actuarial estimates of overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used for analysis of overall survival. Results: Median follow-up was 125 months (range, 51-176 months). Only the subgroups with high or intermediate risk disease and an eOS 10y of >90% had a statistically significantly improved overall survival when prostate cancer was biochemically controlled. In all other groups, biochemical control made no significant difference to overall survival. In the subgroup with high-risk disease and eOS 10y >90%, actuarial overall survival was 86.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 78.5%-94.1%) and 62.1% (95% CI 52.9%-71.3%) for patients with biochemical control and biochemical relapse respectively (p = 0.002). In the intermediate risk group with eOS >90%, actuarial overall survival was 95.3% (95% CI 89.0%-100%) and 79.8% (95% CI 68.0%-91.6%) for biochemically controlled and biochemically relapsed patients (p = 0.033). On multivariate analysis, National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = 0.005), biochemical control (p = 0.033) and eOS 10y (p < 0.001) were statistically significant. Conclusion: Biochemical control translates into improved overall survival in patients with high or intermediate risk disease and an estimated 10-year overall survival of >90%.

  20. Projection-Based linear constrained estimation and fusion over long-haul links

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Nageswara S

    2016-01-01

    We study estimation and fusion with linear dynamics in long-haul sensor networks, wherein a number of sensors are remotely deployed over a large geographical area for performing tasks such as target tracking, and a remote fusion center serves to combine the information provided by these sensors in order to improve the overall tracking accuracy. In reality, the motion of a dynamic target might be subject to certain constraints, for instance, those defined by a road network. We explore the accuracy performance of projection-based constrained estimation and fusion methods that is affected by information loss over the long-haul links. We use an example to compare the tracking errors under various implementations of centralized and distributed projection-based estimation and fusion methods and demonstrate the effectiveness of using projection-based methods in these settings.

  1. Projection-Based Linear Constrained Estimation and Fusion over Long-Haul Links

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Nageswara S

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study estimation and fusion with linear dynamics in long-haul sensor networks, wherein a number of sensors are remotely deployed over a large geographical area for performing tasks such as target tracking, and a remote fusion center serves to combine the information provided by these sensors in order to improve the overall tracking accuracy. In reality, the motion of a dynamic target might be subject to certain constraints, for instance, those defined by a road network. We explore the accuracy performance of projection-based constrained estimation and fusion methods that is affected by information loss over the long-haul links. We use a tracking example to compare the tracking errors under various implementations of centralized and distributed projection-based estimation and fusion methods.

  2. The ARM Best Estimate Station-based Surface (ARMBESTNS) Data set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi,Tang; Xie,Shaocheng

    2015-08-06

    The ARM Best Estimate Station-based Surface (ARMBESTNS) data set merges together key surface measurements from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) sites. It is a twin data product of the ARM Best Estimate 2-dimensional Gridded Surface (ARMBE2DGRID) data set. Unlike the 2DGRID data set, the STNS data are reported at the original site locations and show the original information, except for the interpolation over time. Therefore, users have the flexibility to process the data with the approach more suitable for their applications.

  3. Advanced digital PWR plant protection system based on optimal estimation theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tylee, J.L.

    1981-04-01

    An advanced plant protection system for the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor plant is described and evaluated. The system, based on a Kalman filter estimator, is capable of providing on-line estimates of such critical variables as fuel and cladding temperature, departure from nucleate boiling ratio, and maximum linear heat generation rate. The Kalman filter equations are presented, as is a description of the LOFT plant dynamic model inherent in the filter. Simulation results demonstrate the performance of the advanced system.

  4. Rainflow Algorithm-Based Lifetime Estimation of Power Semiconductors in Utility Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GopiReddy, Lakshmi Reddy; Tolbert, Leon M.; Ozpineci, Burak; Pinto, Joao O. P.

    2015-07-15

    Rainflow algorithms are one of the popular counting methods used in fatigue and failure analysis in conjunction with semiconductor lifetime estimation models. However, the rain-flow algorithm used in power semiconductor reliability does not consider the time-dependent mean temperature calculation. The equivalent temperature calculation proposed by Nagode et al. is applied to semiconductor lifetime estimation in this paper. A month-long arc furnace load profile is used as a test profile to estimate temperatures in insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) in a STATCOM for reactive compensation of load. In conclusion, the degradation in the life of the IGBT power device is predicted based on time-dependent temperature calculation.

  5. Reconnaissance Estimates of Recharge Based on an Elevation-dependent Chloride Mass-balance Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles E. Russell; Tim Minor

    2002-08-31

    Significant uncertainty is associated with efforts to quantity recharge in arid regions such as southern Nevada. However, accurate estimates of groundwater recharge are necessary to understanding the long-term sustainability of groundwater resources and predictions of groundwater flow rates and directions. Currently, the most widely accepted method for estimating recharge in southern Nevada is the Maxey and Eakin method. This method has been applied to most basins within Nevada and has been independently verified as a reconnaissance-level estimate of recharge through several studies. Recharge estimates derived from the Maxey and Eakin and other recharge methodologies ultimately based upon measures or estimates of groundwater discharge (outflow methods) should be augmented by a tracer-based aquifer-response method. The objective of this study was to improve an existing aquifer-response method that was based on the chloride mass-balance approach. Improvements were designed to incorporate spatial variability within recharge areas (rather than recharge as a lumped parameter), develop a more defendable lower limit of recharge, and differentiate local recharge from recharge emanating as interbasin flux. Seventeen springs, located in the Sheep Range, Spring Mountains, and on the Nevada Test Site were sampled during the course of this study and their discharge was measured. The chloride and bromide concentrations of the springs were determined. Discharge and chloride concentrations from these springs were compared to estimates provided by previously published reports. A literature search yielded previously published estimates of chloride flux to the land surface. {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios and discharge rates of the three largest springs in the Amargosa Springs discharge area were compiled from various sources. This information was utilized to determine an effective chloride concentration for recharging precipitation and its associated uncertainty via Monte Carlo simulations

  6. Critical analysis of the Hanford spent nuclear fuel project activity based cost estimate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, R.N.

    1998-09-29

    In 1997, the SNFP developed a baseline change request (BCR) and submitted it to DOE-RL for approval. The schedule was formally evaluated to have a 19% probability of success [Williams, 1998]. In December 1997, DOE-RL Manager John Wagoner approved the BCR contingent upon a subsequent independent review of the new baseline. The SNFP took several actions during the first quarter of 1998 to prepare for the independent review. The project developed the Estimating Requirements and Implementation Guide [DESH, 1998] and trained cost account managers (CAMS) and other personnel involved in the estimating process in activity-based cost (ABC) estimating techniques. The SNFP then applied ABC estimating techniques to develop the basis for the December Baseline (DB) and documented that basis in Basis of Estimate (BOE) books. These BOEs were provided to DOE in April 1998. DOE commissioned Professional Analysis, Inc. (PAI) to perform a critical analysis (CA) of the DB. PAI`s review formally began on April 13. PAI performed the CA, provided three sets of findings to the SNFP contractor, and initiated reconciliation meetings. During the course of PAI`s review, DOE directed the SNFP to develop a new baseline with a higher probability of success. The contractor transmitted the new baseline, which is referred to as the High Probability Baseline (HPB), to DOE on April 15, 1998 [Williams, 1998]. The HPB was estimated to approach a 90% confidence level on the start of fuel movement [Williams, 1998]. This high probability resulted in an increased cost and a schedule extension. To implement the new baseline, the contractor initiated 26 BCRs with supporting BOES. PAI`s scope was revised on April 28 to add reviewing the HPB and the associated BCRs and BOES.

  7. MM-Estimator and Adjusted Super Smoother based Simultaneous Prediction Confedenc

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-07-19

    A Novel Application of Regression Analysis (MM-Estimator) with Simultaneous Prediction Confidence Intervals are proposed to detect up- or down-regulated genes, which are outliers in scatter plots based on log-transformed red (Cy5 fluorescent dye) versus green (Cy3 fluorescent Dye) intensities. Advantages of the application: 1) Robust and Resistant MM-Estimator is a Reliable Method to Build Linear Regression In the presence of Outliers, 2) Exploratory Data Analysis Tools (Boxplots, Averaged Shifted Histograms, Quantile-Quantile Normal Plots and Scattermore » Plots) are Unsed to Test Visually underlying assumptions of linearity and Contaminated Normality in Microarray data), 3) Simultaneous prediction confidence intervals (SPCIs) Guarantee a desired confidence level across the whole range of the data points used for the scatter plots. Results of the outlier detection procedure is a set of significantly differentially expressed genes extracted from the employed microarray data set. A scatter plot smoother (super smoother or locally weighted regression) is used to quantify heteroscendasticity is residual variance (Commonly takes place in lower and higher intensity areas). The set of differentially expressed genes is quantified using interval estimates for P-values as a probabilistic measure of being outlier by chance. Monte Carlo simultations are used to adjust super smoother-based SPCIs.her.« less

  8. What are the Starting Points? Evaluating Base-Year Assumptions in the Asian Modeling Exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Waldhoff, Stephanie; Clarke, Leon E.; Fujimori, Shinichiro

    2012-12-01

    A common feature of model inter-comparison efforts is that the base year numbers for important parameters such as population and GDP can differ substantially across models. This paper explores the sources and implications of this variation in Asian countries across the models participating in the Asian Modeling Exercise (AME). Because the models do not all have a common base year, each team was required to provide data for 2005 for comparison purposes. This paper compares the year 2005 information for different models, noting the degree of variation in important parameters, including population, GDP, primary energy, electricity, and CO2 emissions. It then explores the difference in these key parameters across different sources of base-year information. The analysis confirms that the sources provide different values for many key parameters. This variation across data sources and additional reasons why models might provide different base-year numbers, including differences in regional definitions, differences in model base year, and differences in GDP transformation methodologies, are then discussed in the context of the AME scenarios. Finally, the paper explores the implications of base-year variation on long-term model results.

  9. Evaluation of Clear Sky Models for Satellite-Based Irradiance Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.

    2013-12-01

    This report describes an intercomparison of three popular broadband clear sky solar irradiance model results with measured data, as well as satellite-based model clear sky results compared to measured clear sky data. The authors conclude that one of the popular clear sky models (the Bird clear sky model developed by Richard Bird and Roland Hulstrom) could serve as a more accurate replacement for current satellite-model clear sky estimations. Additionally, the analysis of the model results with respect to model input parameters indicates that rather than climatological, annual, or monthly mean input data, higher-time-resolution input parameters improve the general clear sky model performance.

  10. A BIM-based system for demolition and renovation waste estimation and planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Jack C.P., E-mail: cejcheng@ust.hk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong); Ma, Lauren Y.H., E-mail: yingzi@ust.hk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ? We developed a waste estimation system leveraging the BIM technology. ? The system can calculate waste disposal charging fee and pick-up truck demand. ? We presented an example scenario demonstrating this system. ? Automatic, time-saving and wide applicability are the features of the system. - Abstract: Due to the rising worldwide awareness of green environment, both government and contractors have to consider effective construction and demolition (C and D) waste management practices. The last two decades have witnessed the growing importance of demolition and renovation (D and R) works and the growing amount of D and R waste disposed to landfills every day, especially in developed cities like Hong Kong. Quantitative waste prediction is crucial for waste management. It can enable contractors to pinpoint critical waste generation processes and to plan waste control strategies. In addition, waste estimation could also facilitate some government waste management policies, such as the waste disposal charging scheme in Hong Kong. Currently, tools that can accurately and conveniently estimate the amount of waste from construction, renovation, and demolition projects are lacking. In the light of this research gap, this paper presents a building information modeling (BIM) based system that we have developed for estimation and planning of D and R waste. BIM allows multi-disciplinary information to be superimposed within one digital building model. Our system can extract material and volume information through the BIM model and integrate the information for detailed waste estimation and planning. Waste recycling and reuse are also considered in our system. Extracted material information can be provided to recyclers before demolition or renovation to make recycling stage more cooperative and more efficient. Pick-up truck requirements and waste disposal charging fee for different waste facilities will also be predicted through our system. The results could

  11. Waste Estimates for a Future Recycling Plant in the US Based Upon AREVA Operating Experience - 13206

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foare, Genevieve; Meze, Florian; Bader, Sven; McGee, Don; Murray, Paul; Prud'homme, Pascal

    2013-07-01

    Estimates of process and secondary wastes produced by a recycling plant built in the U.S., which is composed of a used nuclear fuel (UNF) reprocessing facility and a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility, are performed as part of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored study [1]. In this study, a set of common inputs, assumptions, and constraints were identified to allow for comparison of these wastes between different industrial teams. AREVA produced a model of a reprocessing facility, an associated fuel fabrication facility, and waste treatment facilities to develop the results for this study. These facilities were divided into a number of discrete functional areas for which inlet and outlet flow streams were clearly identified to allow for an accurate determination of the radionuclide balance throughout the facility and the waste streams. AREVA relied primarily on its decades of experience and feedback from its La Hague (reprocessing) and MELOX (MOX fuel fabrication) commercial operating facilities in France to support this assessment. However, to perform these estimates for a U.S. facility with different regulatory requirements and to take advantage of some technological advancements, such as in the potential treatment of off-gases, some deviations from this experience were necessary. A summary of AREVA's approach and results for the recycling of 800 metric tonnes of initial heavy metal (MTIHM) of LWR UNF per year into MOX fuel under the assumptions and constraints identified for this DOE study are presented. (authors)

  12. Geothermal resource base of the world: a revision of the Electric Power Research Institute's estimate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, M.J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Gambill, D.T.

    1981-04-01

    Review of the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) method for calculating the geothermal resource base of a country shows that modifications are needed for several of the assumptions used in the calculation. These modifications include: (1) separating geothermal belts into volcanic types with a geothermal gradient of 50{sup 0}C/km and complex types in which 80% of the area has a temperature gradient of 30{sup 0}C/km and 20% has a gradient of 45{sup 0}C/km, (2) using the actual mean annual temperature of a country rather than an assumed 15{sup 0}C average ambient temperature, and (3) making separate calculations for the resource stored in water/brine and that stored in rock. Comparison of this method (Revised EPRI) for calculating a geothermal resource base with other resource base estimates made from a heat flow map of Europe indicates that the technique yields reasonable values. The calculated geothermal resource bases, stored in water and rock to a depth of 5 km, for each country in the world are given. Approximately five times as much energy is stored in rock as is stored in water.

  13. Precipitation Estimate Using NEXRAD Ground-Based Radar Images: Validation, Calibration and Spatial Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong

    2012-12-17

    Precipitation is an important input variable for hydrologic and ecological modeling and analysis. Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) can provide precipitation products that cover most of the continental United States with a high resolution display of approximately 4 × 4 km2. Two major issues concerning the applications of NEXRAD data are (1) lack of a NEXRAD geo-processing and geo-referencing program and (2) bias correction of NEXRAD estimates. In this chapter, a geographic information system (GIS) based software that can automatically support processing of NEXRAD data for hydrologic and ecological models is presented. Some geostatistical approaches to calibrating NEXRAD data using rain gauge data are introduced, and two case studies on evaluating accuracy of NEXRAD Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) and calibrating MPE with rain-gauge data are presented. The first case study examines the performance of MPE in mountainous region versus south plains and cold season versus warm season, as well as the effect of sub-grid variability and temporal scale on NEXRAD performance. From the results of the first case study, performance of MPE was found to be influenced by complex terrain, frozen precipitation, sub-grid variability, and temporal scale. Overall, the assessment of MPE indicates the importance of removing bias of the MPE precipitation product before its application, especially in the complex mountainous region. The second case study examines the performance of three MPE calibration methods using rain gauge observations in the Little River Experimental Watershed in Georgia. The comparison results show that no one method can perform better than the others in terms of all evaluation coefficients and for all time steps. For practical estimation of precipitation distribution, implementation of multiple methods to predict spatial precipitation is suggested.

  14. Lung motion estimation using dynamic point shifting: An innovative model based on a robust point matching algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, Jianbing; Yang, Xuan Li, Yan-Ran; Chen, Guoliang

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Image-guided radiotherapy is an advanced 4D radiotherapy technique that has been developed in recent years. However, respiratory motion causes significant uncertainties in image-guided radiotherapy procedures. To address these issues, an innovative lung motion estimation model based on a robust point matching is proposed in this paper. Methods: An innovative robust point matching algorithm using dynamic point shifting is proposed to estimate patient-specific lung motion during free breathing from 4D computed tomography data. The correspondence of the landmark points is determined from the Euclidean distance between the landmark points and the similarity between the local images that are centered at points at the same time. To ensure that the points in the source image correspond to the points in the target image during other phases, the virtual target points are first created and shifted based on the similarity between the local image centered at the source point and the local image centered at the virtual target point. Second, the target points are shifted by the constrained inverse function mapping the target points to the virtual target points. The source point set and shifted target point set are used to estimate the transformation function between the source image and target image. Results: The performances of the authors’ method are evaluated on two publicly available DIR-lab and POPI-model lung datasets. For computing target registration errors on 750 landmark points in six phases of the DIR-lab dataset and 37 landmark points in ten phases of the POPI-model dataset, the mean and standard deviation by the authors’ method are 1.11 and 1.11 mm, but they are 2.33 and 2.32 mm without considering image intensity, and 1.17 and 1.19 mm with sliding conditions. For the two phases of maximum inhalation and maximum exhalation in the DIR-lab dataset with 300 landmark points of each case, the mean and standard deviation of target registration errors on the

  15. Development of the town data base: Estimates of exposure rates and times of fallout arrival near the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, C.B.; McArthur, R.D.; Hutchinson, S.W.

    1994-09-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project, the time of fallout arrival and the H+12 exposure rate were estimated for populated locations in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah that were affected by fallout from one or more nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Estimates of exposure rate were derived from measured values recorded before and after each test by fallout monitors in the field. The estimate for a given location was obtained by retrieving from a data base all measurements made in the vicinity, decay-correcting them to H+12, and calculating an average. Estimates were also derived from maps produced after most events that show isopleths of exposure rate and time of fallout arrival. Both sets of isopleths on these maps were digitized, and kriging was used to interpolate values at the nodes of a 10-km grid covering the pattern. The values at any location within the grid were then estimated from the values at the surrounding grid nodes. Estimates of dispersion (standard deviation) were also calculated. The Town Data Base contains the estimates for all combinations of location and nuclear event for which the estimated mean H+12 exposure rate was greater than three times background. A listing of the data base is included as an appendix. The information was used by other project task groups to estimate the radiation dose that off-site populations and individuals may have received as a result of exposure to fallout from Nevada nuclear tests.

  16. Moment-Based Probability Modeling and Extreme Response Estimation, The FITS Routine Version 1.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANUEL,LANCE; KASHEF,TINA; WINTERSTEIN,STEVEN R.

    1999-11-01

    This report documents the use of the FITS routine, which provides automated fits of various analytical, commonly used probability models from input data. It is intended to complement the previously distributed FITTING routine documented in RMS Report 14 (Winterstein et al., 1994), which implements relatively complex four-moment distribution models whose parameters are fit with numerical optimization routines. Although these four-moment fits can be quite useful and faithful to the observed data, their complexity can make them difficult to automate within standard fitting algorithms. In contrast, FITS provides more robust (lower moment) fits of simpler, more conventional distribution forms. For each database of interest, the routine estimates the distribution of annual maximum response based on the data values and the duration, T, over which they were recorded. To focus on the upper tails of interest, the user can also supply an arbitrary lower-bound threshold, {chi}{sub low}, above which a shifted distribution model--exponential or Weibull--is fit.

  17. Enhancing adaptive sparse grid approximations and improving refinement strategies using adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Jakeman, J. D.; Wildey, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for adaptive sparse grid approximations of quantities of interest computed from discretized partial differential equations. We use adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates of the interpolation error in the sparse grid to enhance the sparse grid approximation and to drive adaptivity. We show that utilizing these error estimates provides significantly more accurate functional values for random samples of the sparse grid approximation. We also demonstrate that alternative refinement strategies based upon a posteriori error estimates can lead to further increases in accuracy in the approximation over traditional hierarchical surplus based strategies. Throughout this papermore » we also provide and test a framework for balancing the physical discretization error with the stochastic interpolation error of the enhanced sparse grid approximation.« less

  18. Enhancing adaptive sparse grid approximations and improving refinement strategies using adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakeman, J.D. Wildey, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for adaptive sparse grid approximations of quantities of interest computed from discretized partial differential equations. We use adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates of the physical discretization error and the interpolation error in the sparse grid to enhance the sparse grid approximation and to drive adaptivity of the sparse grid. Utilizing these error estimates provides significantly more accurate functional values for random samples of the sparse grid approximation. We also demonstrate that alternative refinement strategies based upon a posteriori error estimates can lead to further increases in accuracy in the approximation over traditional hierarchical surplus based strategies. Throughout this paper we also provide and test a framework for balancing the physical discretization error with the stochastic interpolation error of the enhanced sparse grid approximation.

  19. Remote sensing-based estimation of annual soil respiration at two contrasting forest sites

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Gu, Lianhong; Huang, Ni; Black, T. Andrew; Wang, Li; Niu, Zheng

    2015-11-23

    Soil respiration (Rs), an important component of the global carbon cycle, can be estimated using remotely sensed data, but the accuracy of this technique has not been thoroughly investigated. In this article, we proposed a methodology for the remote estimation of annual Rs at two contrasting FLUXNET forest sites (a deciduous broadleaf forest and an evergreen needleleaf forest).

  20. Analysis of In-Use Fuel Economy Shortfall Based on Voluntarily Reported MPG Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L; Goeltz, Rick; Hopson, Dr Janet L; Tworek, Elzbieta

    2007-01-01

    The usefulness of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) passenger car and light truck fuel economy estimates has been the subject of debate for the past three decades. For the labels on new vehicles and the fuel economy information given to the public, the EPA adjusts dynamometer test results downward by 10% for the city cycle and 22% for the highway cycle to better reflect real world driving conditions. These adjustment factors were developed in 1984 and their continued validity has repeatedly been questioned. In March of 2005 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and EPA's fuel economy information website, www.fueleconomy.gov, began allowing users to voluntarily share fuel economy estimates. This paper presents an initial statistical analysis of more than 3,000 estimates submitted by website users. The analysis suggests two potentially important results: (1) adjusted, combined EPA fuel economy estimates appear to be approximately unbiased estimators of the average fuel economy consumers will experience in actual driving, and (2) the EPA estimates are highly imprecise predictors of any given individual's in-use fuel economy, an approximate 95% confidence interval being +/-7 MPG. These results imply that what is needed is not less biased adjustment factors for the EPA estimates but rather more precise methods of predicting the fuel economy individual consumers will achieve in their own driving.

  1. Remote sensing-based estimation of annual soil respiration at two contrasting forest sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Lianhong; Huang, Ni; Black, T. Andrew; Wang, Li; Niu, Zheng

    2015-11-23

    Soil respiration (Rs), an important component of the global carbon cycle, can be estimated using remotely sensed data, but the accuracy of this technique has not been thoroughly investigated. In this article, we proposed a methodology for the remote estimation of annual Rs at two contrasting FLUXNET forest sites (a deciduous broadleaf forest and an evergreen needleleaf forest).

  2. A class of error estimators based on interpolating the finite element solutions for reaction-diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, T.; Wang, H.

    1995-12-31

    The swift improvement of computational capabilities enables us to apply finite element methods to simulate more and more problems arising from various applications. A fundamental question associated with finite element simulations is their accuracy. In other words, before we can make any decisions based on the numerical solutions, we must be sure that they are acceptable in the sense that their errors are within the given tolerances. Various estimators have been developed to assess the accuracy of finite element solutions, and they can be classified basically into two types: a priori error estimates and a posteriori error estimates. While a priori error estimates can give us asymptotic convergence rates of numerical solutions in terms of the grid size before the computations, they depend on certain Sobolev norms of the true solutions which are not known, in general. Therefore, it is difficult, if not impossible, to use a priori estimates directly to decide whether a numerical solution is acceptable or a finer partition (and so a new numerical solution) is needed. In contrast, a posteriori error estimates depends only on the numerical solutions, and they usually give computable quantities about the accuracy of the numerical solutions.

  3. Estimates of Refrigerator Loads in Public Housing Based on Metered Consumption Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, JD; Pratt, RG

    1998-09-11

    The New York Power Authority (NYPA), the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA), and the U.S. Departments of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Energy (DOE) have joined in a project to replace refrigerators in New York City public housing with new, highly energy-efficient models. This project laid the ground work for the Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) and DOE to enable housing authorities throughout the United States to bulk-purchase energy-efficient appliances. DOE helped develop and plan the program through the ENERGY STAR@ Partnerships program conducted by its Pacific Nofiwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL was subsequently asked to conduct the savings evahations for 1996 and 1997. PNNL designed the metering protocol and occupant survey, supplied and calibrated the metering equipment, and managed and analyzed the data. The 1996 metering study of refrigerator energy usage in New York City public housing (Pratt and Miller 1997) established the need and justification for a regression-model-based approach to an energy savings estimate. The need originated in logistical difficulties associated with sampling the population and pen?orming a stratified analysis. Commonly, refrigerators[a) with high representation in the population were missed in the sampling schedule, leaving significant holes in the sample and difficulties for the stratified anrdysis. The just{jfcation was found in the fact that strata (distinct groups of identical refrigerators) were not statistically distinct in terms of their label ratio (ratio of metered consumption to label rating). This finding suggested a general regression model could be used to represent the consumption of all refrigerators in the population. In 1996 a simple two-coefficient regression model, a function of only the refrigerator label rating, was developed and used to represent the existing population of refrigerators. A key concept used in the 1997 study grew from findings in a small number of apartments

  4. Dynamic State Estimation and Parameter Calibration of DFIG based on Ensemble Kalman Filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Rui; Huang, Zhenyu; Wang, Shaobu; Diao, Ruisheng; Meng, Da

    2015-07-30

    With the growing interest in the application of wind energy, doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) plays an essential role in the industry nowadays. To deal with the increasing stochastic variations introduced by intermittent wind resource and responsive loads, dynamic state estimation (DSE) are introduced in any power system associated with DFIGs. However, sometimes this dynamic analysis canould not work because the parameters of DFIGs are not accurate enough. To solve the problem, an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) method is proposed for the state estimation and parameter calibration tasks. In this paper, a DFIG is modeled and implemented with the EnKF method. Sensitivity analysis is demonstrated regarding the measurement noise, initial state errors and parameter errors. The results indicate this EnKF method has a robust performance on the state estimation and parameter calibration of DFIGs.

  5. Rainflow Algorithm-Based Lifetime Estimation of Power Semiconductors in Utility Applications

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    GopiReddy, Lakshmi Reddy; Tolbert, Leon M.; Ozpineci, Burak; Pinto, Joao O. P.

    2015-07-15

    Rainflow algorithms are one of the popular counting methods used in fatigue and failure analysis in conjunction with semiconductor lifetime estimation models. However, the rain-flow algorithm used in power semiconductor reliability does not consider the time-dependent mean temperature calculation. The equivalent temperature calculation proposed by Nagode et al. is applied to semiconductor lifetime estimation in this paper. A month-long arc furnace load profile is used as a test profile to estimate temperatures in insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) in a STATCOM for reactive compensation of load. In conclusion, the degradation in the life of the IGBT power device is predicted basedmore » on time-dependent temperature calculation.« less

  6. Shielding and activity estimator for template-based nuclide identification methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Karl Einar

    2013-04-09

    According to one embodiment, a method for estimating an activity of one or more radio-nuclides includes receiving one or more templates, the one or more templates corresponding to one or more radio-nuclides which contribute to a probable solution, receiving one or more weighting factors, each weighting factor representing a contribution of one radio-nuclide to the probable solution, computing an effective areal density for each of the one more radio-nuclides, computing an effective atomic number (Z) for each of the one more radio-nuclides, computing an effective metric for each of the one or more radio-nuclides, and computing an estimated activity for each of the one or more radio-nuclides. In other embodiments, computer program products, systems, and other methods are presented for estimating an activity of one or more radio-nuclides.

  7. Linear Accelerator-Based Radiosurgery Alone for Arteriovenous Malformation: More Than 12 Years of Observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuo, Takayuki Kamada, Kensaku; Izumo, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Nagata, Izumi

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although radiosurgery is an accepted treatment method for intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), its long-term therapeutic effects have not been sufficiently evaluated, and many reports of long-term observations are from gamma-knife facilities. Furthermore, there are few reported results of treatment using only linear accelerator (LINAC)-based radiosurgery (LBRS). Methods and Materials: Over a period of more than 12 years, we followed the long-term results of LBRS treatment performed in 51 AVM patients. Results: The actuarial obliteration rates, after a single radiosurgery session, at 3, 5, 10, and 15 years were 46.9%, 54.0%, 64.4%, and 68.0%, respectively; when subsequent radiosurgeries were included, the rates were 46.9%, 61.3%, 74.2%, and 90.3%, respectively. Obliteration rates were significantly related to target volumes ≥4 cm{sup 3}, marginal doses ≥12 Gy, Spetzler-Martin grades (1 vs other), and AVM scores ≥1.5; multivariate analyses revealed a significant difference for target volumes ≥4 cm{sup 3}. The postprocedural actuarial symptomatic radiation injury rates, after a single radiation surgery session, at 5, 10, and 15 years were 12.3%, 16.8%, and 19.1%, respectively. Volumes ≥4 cm{sup 3}, location (lobular or other), AVM scores ≥1.5, and the number of radiosurgery were related to radiation injury incidence; multivariate analyses revealed significant differences associated with volumes ≥4 cm{sup 3} and location (lobular or other). Conclusions: Positive results can be obtained with LBRS when performed with a target volume ≤4 cm{sup 3}, an AVM score ≤1.5, and ≥12 Gy radiation. Bleeding and radiation injuries may appear even 10 years after treatment, necessitating long-term observation.

  8. GPU Acceleration of Mean Free Path Based Kernel Density Estimators for Monte Carlo Neutronics Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, TImothy P.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Martin, William R.; Brown, Forrest B.

    2015-11-19

    Kernel Density Estimators (KDEs) are a non-parametric density estimation technique that has recently been applied to Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations. Kernel density estimators are an alternative to histogram tallies for obtaining global solutions in Monte Carlo tallies. With KDEs, a single event, either a collision or particle track, can contribute to the score at multiple tally points with the uncertainty at those points being independent of the desired resolution of the solution. Thus, KDEs show potential for obtaining estimates of a global solution with reduced variance when compared to a histogram. Previously, KDEs have been applied to neutronics for one-group reactor physics problems and fixed source shielding applications. However, little work was done to obtain reaction rates using KDEs. This paper introduces a new form of the MFP KDE that is capable of handling general geometries. Furthermore, extending the MFP KDE to 2-D problems in continuous energy introduces inaccuracies to the solution. An ad-hoc solution to these inaccuracies is introduced that produces errors smaller than 4% at material interfaces.

  9. Model-based PSF and MTF estimation and validation from skeletal clinical CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakdel, Amirreza; Mainprize, James G.; Robert, Normand; Fialkov, Jeffery; Whyne, Cari M.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: A method was developed to correct for systematic errors in estimating the thickness of thin bones due to image blurring in CT images using bone interfaces to estimate the point-spread-function (PSF). This study validates the accuracy of the PSFs estimated using said method from various clinical CT images featuring cortical bones. Methods: Gaussian PSFs, characterized by a different extent in the z (scan) direction than in the x and y directions were obtained using our method from 11 clinical CT scans of a cadaveric craniofacial skeleton. These PSFs were estimated for multiple combinations of scanning parameters and reconstruction methods. The actual PSF for each scan setting was measured using the slanted-slit technique within the image slice plane and the longitudinal axis. The Gaussian PSF and the corresponding modulation transfer function (MTF) are compared against the actual PSF and MTF for validation. Results: The differences (errors) between the actual and estimated full-width half-max (FWHM) of the PSFs were 0.09 0.05 and 0.14 0.11 mm for the xy and z axes, respectively. The overall errors in the predicted frequencies measured at 75%, 50%, 25%, 10%, and 5% MTF levels were 0.06 0.07 and 0.06 0.04 cycles/mm for the xy and z axes, respectively. The accuracy of the estimates was dependent on whether they were reconstructed with a standard kernel (Toshiba's FC68, mean error of 0.06 0.05 mm, MTF mean error 0.02 0.02 cycles/mm) or a high resolution bone kernel (Toshiba's FC81, PSF FWHM error 0.12 0.03 mm, MTF mean error 0.09 0.08 cycles/mm). Conclusions: The method is accurate in 3D for an image reconstructed using a standard reconstruction kernel, which conforms to the Gaussian PSF assumption but less accurate when using a high resolution bone kernel. The method is a practical and self-contained means of estimating the PSF in clinical CT images featuring cortical bones, without the need phantoms or any prior knowledge about the scanner

  10. A procedure for the estimation of the numerical uncertainty of CFD calculations based on grid refinement studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eça, L.; Hoekstra, M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper offers a procedure for the estimation of the numerical uncertainty of any integral or local flow quantity as a result of a fluid flow computation; the procedure requires solutions on systematically refined grids. The error is estimated with power series expansions as a function of the typical cell size. These expansions, of which four types are used, are fitted to the data in the least-squares sense. The selection of the best error estimate is based on the standard deviation of the fits. The error estimate is converted into an uncertainty with a safety factor that depends on the observed order of grid convergence and on the standard deviation of the fit. For well-behaved data sets, i.e. monotonic convergence with the expected observed order of grid convergence and no scatter in the data, the method reduces to the well known Grid Convergence Index. Examples of application of the procedure are included. - Highlights: • Estimation of the numerical uncertainty of any integral or local flow quantity. • Least squares fits to power series expansions to handle noisy data. • Excellent results obtained for manufactured solutions. • Consistent results obtained for practical CFD calculations. • Reduces to the well known Grid Convergence Index for well-behaved data sets.

  11. ESTIMATING PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS OF QUASARS VIA THE k-NEAREST NEIGHBOR APPROACH BASED ON LARGE SURVEY DATABASES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Yanxia; Ma He; Peng Nanbo; Zhao Yongheng; Wu Xuebing

    2013-08-01

    We apply one of the lazy learning methods, the k-nearest neighbor (kNN) algorithm, to estimate the photometric redshifts of quasars based on various data sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; the SDSS sample, the SDSS-UKIDSS sample, the SDSS-WISE sample, and the SDSS-UKIDSS-WISE sample). The influence of the k value and different input patterns on the performance of kNN is discussed. kNN performs best when k is different with a special input pattern for a special data set. The best result belongs to the SDSS-UKIDSS-WISE sample. The experimental results generally show that the more information from more bands, the better performance of photometric redshift estimation with kNN. The results also demonstrate that kNN using multiband data can effectively solve the catastrophic failure of photometric redshift estimation, which is met by many machine learning methods. Compared with the performance of various other methods of estimating the photometric redshifts of quasars, kNN based on KD-Tree shows superiority, exhibiting the best accuracy.

  12. Should Women Younger Than 40 Years of Age With Invasive Breast Cancer Have a Mastectomy?: 15-Year Outcomes in a Population-Based Cohort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Jeffrey Q.; Truong, Pauline T.; Olivotto, Ivo A.; Olson, Robert; Coulombe, Genevieve; Keyes, Mira; Weir, Lorna; Gelmon, Karen; Bernstein, Vanessa; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Optimal local management for young women with early-stage breast cancer remains controversial. This study examined 15-year outcomes among women younger than 40 years treated with breast-conserving surgery plus whole-breast radiation therapy (BCT) compared with those treated with modified radical mastectomy (MRM). Methods and Materials: Women aged 20 to 39 years with early-stage breast cancer diagnosed between 1989 and 2003 were identified in a population-based database. Primary outcomes of breast cancer–specific survival (BCSS), overall survival (OS) and secondary outcomes of local relapse–free survival (LRFS), locoregional relapse–free survival (LRRFS), and distant relapse–free survival (DRFS) were calculated using Kaplan-Meier methods and compared between BCT and MRM cohorts using log-rank tests. A planned subgroup analysis was performed on patients considered “ideal” for BCT (ie, T1N0, negative margins and no extensive ductal carcinoma in situ) and in whom local therapy may have the largest impact on survival because of low systemic risk. Results: 965 patients were identified; 616 had BCT and 349 had MRM. The median follow-up time was 14.4 years (range, 8.4-23.3 years). Overall, 15-year rates of BCSS (76.0% vs 74.1%, P=.62), OS (74.2% vs 73.0%, P=.75), LRFS (85.4% vs 86.5%, P=.95), LRRFS (82.2% vs 81.6%, P=.61), and DRFS (74.4% vs 71.6%, P=.40) were similar between the BCT and MRM cohorts. In the “ideal” for BCT subgroup, there were 219 BCT and 67 MRM patients with a median follow-up time of 15.5 years. The 15-year BCSS (86.1% vs 82.9%, P=.57), OS (82.6% vs 82.9%, P=.89), LRFS (86.2% vs 84.2%, P=.50), LRRFS (83.1% vs 78.3%, P=.24), and DRFS (84.8% vs 79.1%, P=.17) were similar in the BCT and MRM cohorts. Conclusions: This population-based analysis with long-term follow-up confirmed that women younger than 40 years treated with BCT had similar 15-year outcomes compared with MRM. Young age alone is not a contraindication to BCT.

  13. SU-E-J-01: 3D Fluoroscopic Image Estimation From Patient-Specific 4DCBCT-Based Motion Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhou, S; Hurwitz, M; Lewis, J; Mishra, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: 3D motion modeling derived from 4DCT images, taken days or weeks before treatment, cannot reliably represent patient anatomy on the day of treatment. We develop a method to generate motion models based on 4DCBCT acquired at the time of treatment, and apply the model to estimate 3D time-varying images (referred to as 3D fluoroscopic images). Methods: Motion models are derived through deformable registration between each 4DCBCT phase, and principal component analysis (PCA) on the resulting displacement vector fields. 3D fluoroscopic images are estimated based on cone-beam projections simulating kV treatment imaging. PCA coefficients are optimized iteratively through comparison of these cone-beam projections and projections estimated based on the motion model. Digital phantoms reproducing ten patient motion trajectories, and a physical phantom with regular and irregular motion derived from measured patient trajectories, are used to evaluate the method in terms of tumor localization, and the global voxel intensity difference compared to ground truth. Results: Experiments included: 1) assuming no anatomic or positioning changes between 4DCT and treatment time; and 2) simulating positioning and tumor baseline shifts at the time of treatment compared to 4DCT acquisition. 4DCBCT were reconstructed from the anatomy as seen at treatment time. In case 1) the tumor localization error and the intensity differences in ten patient were smaller using 4DCT-based motion model, possible due to superior image quality. In case 2) the tumor localization error and intensity differences were 2.85 and 0.15 respectively, using 4DCT-based motion models, and 1.17 and 0.10 using 4DCBCT-based models. 4DCBCT performed better due to its ability to reproduce daily anatomical changes. Conclusion: The study showed an advantage of 4DCBCT-based motion models in the context of 3D fluoroscopic images estimation. Positioning and tumor baseline shift uncertainties were mitigated by the 4DCBCT-based

  14. Measuring long-run automobile fuel demand: Separate estimations of vehicle stock, mean intensity and distance driven per car per year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johansson, O.; Schipper, L.

    1995-12-31

    We estimate long-run car fuel demand by separately estimating vehicle stock, mean fuel intensity, and distance driven (per car) as functions of income, fuel price, and other variables, on the basis of a new data set from 9 OECD countries. The major part of the estimated long-run price elasticity of fuel use seem to arise from changes in mean car intensity (fuel consumption per kilometer driven), while the biggest part of the estimated long-run income elasticity seem to arise from changes through the size of the vehicle stock. A taxation variable that reflects all taxes on car ownership and use, except fuel tax, is also found to be significant However, the effects of this variable, in the form of reduced fuel consumption per total amount of tax paid, are found to be much smaller compared to the effects of a fuel tax on fuel use.

  15. U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Methodology The U.S. uranium ore reserves reported by EIA for specific MFC categories represent the sums of quantities estimated to occur in known deposits on properties where data about the ore grade, configuration, and depth indicate that the quantities estimated could be recovered at or less than the stated costs given current mining and milling technology and regulations. The reserves estimates for year-end (delete: December 31, 2008), are based on historical data for uranium properties

  16. A wedge-based approach to estimating health co-benefits of climate change mitigation activities in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balbus, John M.; Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Chari, Ramya; Millstein, Dev; Ebi, Kristie L.

    2015-02-01

    While it has been recognized that actions reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions can have significant positive and negative impacts on human health through reductions in ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations, these impacts are rarely taken into account when analyzing specific policies. This study presents a new framework for estimating the change in health outcomes resulting from implementation of specific carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction activities, allowing comparison of different sectors and options for climate mitigation activities. Our estimates suggest that in the year 2020, the reductions in adverse health outcomes from lessened exposure to PM2.5 would yield economic benefits in the range of $6 to $14 billion (in 2008 USD), depending on the specific activity. This equates to between $40 and $93 per metric ton of CO2 in health benefits. Specific climate interventions will vary in the health co-benefits they provide as well as in potential harms that may result from their implementation. Rigorous assessment of these health impacts is essential for guiding policy decisions as efforts to reduce GHG emissions increase in scope and intensity.

  17. The Role of Mathematical Methods in Efficiency Calibration and Uncertainty Estimation in Gamma Based Non-Destructive Assay - 12311

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkataraman, R.; Nakazawa, D.

    2012-07-01

    Mathematical methods are being increasingly employed in the efficiency calibration of gamma based systems for non-destructive assay (NDA) of radioactive waste and for the estimation of the Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU). Recently, ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) released a standard guide for use of modeling passive gamma measurements. This is a testimony to the common use and increasing acceptance of mathematical techniques in the calibration and characterization of NDA systems. Mathematical methods offer flexibility and cost savings in terms of rapidly incorporating calibrations for multiple container types, geometries, and matrix types in a new waste assay system or a system that may already be operational. Mathematical methods are also useful in modeling heterogeneous matrices and non-uniform activity distributions. In compliance with good practice, if a computational method is used in waste assay (or in any other radiological application), it must be validated or benchmarked using representative measurements. In this paper, applications involving mathematical methods in gamma based NDA systems are discussed with several examples. The application examples are from NDA systems that were recently calibrated and performance tested. Measurement based verification results are presented. Mathematical methods play an important role in the efficiency calibration of gamma based NDA systems. This is especially true when the measurement program involves a wide variety of complex item geometries and matrix combinations for which the development of physical standards may be impractical. Mathematical methods offer a cost effective means to perform TMU campaigns. Good practice demands that all mathematical estimates be benchmarked and validated using representative sets of measurements. (authors)

  18. Estimating Impacts of Diesel Fuel Reformulation with Vector-based Blending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    2003-01-23

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model has been used to study the refining cost, investment, and operating impacts of specifications for reformulated diesel fuel (RFD) produced in refineries of the U.S. Midwest in summer of year 2010. The study evaluates different diesel fuel reformulation investment pathways. The study also determines whether there are refinery economic benefits for producing an emissions reduction RFD (with flexibility for individual property values) compared to a vehicle performance RFD (with inflexible recipe values for individual properties). Results show that refining costs are lower with early notice of requirements for RFD. While advanced desulfurization technologies (with low hydrogen consumption and little effect on cetane quality and aromatics content) reduce the cost of ultra low sulfur diesel fuel, these technologies contribute to the increased costs of a delayed notice investment pathway compared to an early notice investment pathway for diesel fuel reformulation. With challenging RFD specifications, there is little refining benefit from producing emissions reduction RFD compared to vehicle performance RFD. As specifications become tighter, processing becomes more difficult, blendstock choices become more limited, and refinery benefits vanish for emissions reduction relative to vehicle performance specifications. Conversely, the emissions reduction specifications show increasing refinery benefits over vehicle performance specifications as specifications are relaxed, and alternative processing routes and blendstocks become available. In sensitivity cases, the refinery model is also used to examine the impact of RFD specifications on the economics of using Canadian synthetic crude oil. There is a sizeable increase in synthetic crude demand as ultra low sulfur diesel fuel displaces low sulfur diesel fuel, but this demand increase would be reversed by requirements for diesel fuel reformulation.

  19. Adjusting lidar-derived digital terrain models in coastal marshes based on estimated aboveground biomass density

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Medeiros, Stephen; Hagen, Scott; Weishampel, John; Angelo, James

    2015-03-25

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from airborne lidar are traditionally unreliable in coastal salt marshes due to the inability of the laser to penetrate the dense grasses and reach the underlying soil. To that end, we present a novel processing methodology that uses ASTER Band 2 (visible red), an interferometric SAR (IfSAR) digital surface model, and lidar-derived canopy height to classify biomass density using both a three-class scheme (high, medium and low) and a two-class scheme (high and low). Elevation adjustments associated with these classes using both median and quartile approaches were applied to adjust lidar-derived elevation values closer tomore » true bare earth elevation. The performance of the method was tested on 229 elevation points in the lower Apalachicola River Marsh. The two-class quartile-based adjusted DEM produced the best results, reducing the RMS error in elevation from 0.65 m to 0.40 m, a 38% improvement. The raw mean errors for the lidar DEM and the adjusted DEM were 0.61 ± 0.24 m and 0.32 ± 0.24 m, respectively, thereby reducing the high bias by approximately 49%.« less

  20. Adjusting lidar-derived digital terrain models in coastal marshes based on estimated aboveground biomass density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medeiros, Stephen; Hagen, Scott; Weishampel, John; Angelo, James

    2015-03-25

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from airborne lidar are traditionally unreliable in coastal salt marshes due to the inability of the laser to penetrate the dense grasses and reach the underlying soil. To that end, we present a novel processing methodology that uses ASTER Band 2 (visible red), an interferometric SAR (IfSAR) digital surface model, and lidar-derived canopy height to classify biomass density using both a three-class scheme (high, medium and low) and a two-class scheme (high and low). Elevation adjustments associated with these classes using both median and quartile approaches were applied to adjust lidar-derived elevation values closer to true bare earth elevation. The performance of the method was tested on 229 elevation points in the lower Apalachicola River Marsh. The two-class quartile-based adjusted DEM produced the best results, reducing the RMS error in elevation from 0.65 m to 0.40 m, a 38% improvement. The raw mean errors for the lidar DEM and the adjusted DEM were 0.61 ± 0.24 m and 0.32 ± 0.24 m, respectively, thereby reducing the high bias by approximately 49%.

  1. Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    There could be as much as 5,700 years of carbon dioxide storage potential available in geologic formations in the United States and portions of Canada, according to the latest edition of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Carbon Sequestration Atlas (Atlas III).

  2. Plant Uptake of Organic Pollutants from Soil: A Critical Review ofBioconcentration Estimates Based on Modelsand Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Maddalena, Randy L.

    2007-01-01

    The role of terrestrial vegetation in transferring chemicals from soil and air into specific plant tissues (stems, leaves, roots, etc.) is still not well characterized. We provide here a critical review of plant-to-soil bioconcentration ratio (BCR) estimates based on models and experimental data. This review includes the conceptual and theoretical formulations of the bioconcentration ratio, constructing and calibrating empirical and mathematical algorithms to describe this ratio and the experimental data used to quantify BCRs and calibrate the model performance. We first evaluate the theoretical basis for the BCR concept and BCR models and consider how lack of knowledge and data limits reliability and consistency of BCR estimates. We next consider alternate modeling strategies for BCR. A key focus of this evaluation is the relative contributions to overall uncertainty from model uncertainty versus variability in the experimental data used to develop and test the models. As a case study, we consider a single chemical, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), and focus on variability of bioconcentration measurements obtained from 81 experiments with different plant species, different plant tissues, different experimental conditions, and different methods for reporting concentrations in the soil and plant tissues. We use these observations to evaluate both the magnitude of experimental variability in plant bioconcentration and compare this to model uncertainty. Among these 81 measurements, the variation of the plant/soil BCR has a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 3.5 and a coefficient of variability (CV-ratio of arithmetic standard deviation to mean) of 1.7. These variations are significant but low relative to model uncertainties--which have an estimated GSD of 10 with a corresponding CV of 14.

  3. Experimental data base for estimating the consequences from a hypothetical sabotage attack on a spent fuel shipping cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandoval, R.P.; Luna, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a program conducted at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Department of Energy to provide an experimental data base for estimating the radiological health effects that could result from the sabotage of a light water reactor spent fuel shipping cask. The primary objectives of the program were limited to: (1) evaluating the effectiveness of selected high energy devices (HED) in breaching full-scale spent fuel shipping casks, (2) quantifying and characterizing relevant aerosol and radiological properties of the released fuel, and (3) using the resulting experimental data to evaluate the radiological health effects resulting from a hypothetical attack on a spent fuel shipping cask in a densely populated urban area. 3 refs.

  4. The Application of Traits-Based Assessment Approaches to Estimate the Effects of Hydroelectric Turbine Passage on Fish Populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F; Schweizer, Peter E

    2012-04-01

    One of the most important environmental issues facing the hydropower industry is the adverse impact of hydroelectric projects on downstream fish passage. Fish that migrate long distances as part of their life cycle include not only important diadromous species (such as salmon, shads, and eels) but also strictly freshwater species. The hydropower reservoirs that downstream-moving fish encounter differ greatly from free-flowing rivers. Many of the environmental changes that occur in a reservoir (altered water temperature and transparency, decreased flow velocities, increased predation) can reduce survival. Upon reaching the dam, downstream-migrating fish may suffer increased mortality as they pass through the turbines, spillways and other bypasses, or turbulent tailraces. Downstream from the dam, insufficient environmental flow releases may slow downstream fish passage rates or decrease survival. There is a need to refine our understanding of the relative importance of causative factors that contribute to turbine passage mortality (e.g., strike, pressure changes, turbulence) so that turbine design efforts can focus on mitigating the most damaging components. Further, present knowledge of the effectiveness of turbine improvements is based on studies of only a few species (mainly salmon and American shad). These data may not be representative of turbine passage effects for the hundreds of other fish species that are susceptible to downstream passage at hydroelectric projects. For example, there are over 900 species of fish in the United States. In Brazil there are an estimated 3,000 freshwater fish species, of which 30% are believed to be migratory (Viana et al. 2011). Worldwide, there are some 14,000 freshwater fish species (Magurran 2009), of which significant numbers are susceptible to hydropower impacts. By comparison, in a compilation of fish entrainment and turbine survival studies from over 100 hydroelectric projects in the United States, Winchell et al. (2000

  5. Commute trip reduction in Washington: Base year worksite characteristics and programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodds, D.

    1995-02-01

    Employers in Washington`s eight most populous counties are engaged in an effort to reduce their employees` use of single occupant automobiles for commuting. This report documents the status of those employers at the beginning of the Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) program as a basis for evaluating the impacts of the program. The first section provides a brief exploration of the Washington CTR Law and a history of the first steps in its implementation. The second section presents a summary of the characteristics of the worksites affected by the law. The CTR Law calls for reductions in single occupant vehicle (SOV) commuting and in vehicle miles traveled (VMT). The third section of this report presents baseline measurements of SOV and VMT and goals for reducing them. The fourth section provides summary information on the first year of programs employers planned to implement. The final section very briefly outlines actions the Commute Trip Reduction law calls for between 1995 and 1999.

  6. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    HPSS Yearly Network Traffic HPSS Yearly Network Traffic Yearly Summary of I/O Traffic Between Storage and Network Destinations These bar charts show the total transfer traffic for each year between storage and network destinations (systems within and outside of NERSC). Traffic for the current year is an estimate derived by scaling the known months traffic up to 12 months. The years shown are calendar years. The first graph shows the overall growth in network traffic to storage over the years.

  7. VARIATION IN EROSION/DEPOSITION RATES OVER THE LAST FIFTTY YEARS ON ALLUVIAL FAN SURFACES OF L. PLEISTOCENE-MID HOLOCENE AGE, ESTIMATIONS USING 137CS SOIL PROFILE DATA, AMARGOSA VALLEY, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Harrington; R. Kelly; K.T. Ebert

    2005-08-26

    Variations in erosion and deposition for the last fifty years (based on estimates from 137Cs profiles) on surfaces (Late Pleistocene to Late Holocene in age) making up the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan south of Yucca Mountain, is a function of surface age and of desert pavement development or absence. For purposes of comparing erosion and deposition, the surfaces can be examined as three groups: (1) Late Pleistocene surfaces possess areas of desert pavement development with thin Av or sandy A horizons, formed by the trapping capabilities of the pavements. These zones of deposition are complemented by coppice dune formation on similar parts of the surface. Areas on the surface where no pavement development has occurred are erosional in nature with 0.0 +/- 0.0 cm to 1.5 +/- 0.5 cm of erosion occurring primarily by winds blowing across the surface. Overall these surfaces may show either a small net depositional gain or small erosional loss. (2) Early Holocene surfaces have no well-developed desert pavements, but may have residual gravel deposits in small areas on the surfaces. These surfaces show the most consistent erosional surface areas on which it ranges from 1.0 +/-.01 cm to 2.0+/- .01 cm. Fewer depositional forms are found on this age of surface so there is probably a net loss of 1.5 cm across these surfaces. (3) The Late Holocene surfaces show the greatest variability in erosion and deposition. Overbank deposition during floods cover many edges of these surfaces and coppice dune formation also creates depositional features. Erosion rates are highly variable and range from 0.0 +/- 0.0 to a maximum of 2.0+/-.01. Erosion occurs because of the lack of protection of the surface. However, the common areas of deposition probably result in the surface having a small net depositional gain across these surfaces. Thus, the interchannel surfaces of the Fortymile Wash fan show a variety of erosional styles as well as areas of deposition. The fan, therefore, is a dynamic

  8. Real-time global flood estimation using satellite-based precipitation and a coupled land surface and routing model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Huan; Adler, Robert F.; Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George J.; Li, Hongyi; Wang, JianJian

    2014-03-01

    A widely used land surface model, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, is coupled with a newly developed hierarchical dominant river tracing-based runoff-routing model to form the Dominant river tracing-Routing Integrated with VIC Environment (DRIVE) model, which serves as the new core of the real-time Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS). The GFMS uses real-time satellite-based precipitation to derive flood monitoring parameters for the latitude band 50°N–50°S at relatively high spatial (~12 km) and temporal (3 hourly) resolution. Examples of model results for recent flood events are computed using the real-time GFMS (http://flood.umd.edu). To evaluate the accuracy of the new GFMS, the DRIVE model is run retrospectively for 15 years using both research-quality and real-time satellite precipitation products. Evaluation results are slightly better for the research-quality input and significantly better for longer duration events (3 day events versus 1 day events). Basins with fewer dams tend to provide lower false alarm ratios. For events longer than three days in areas with few dams, the probability of detection is ~0.9 and the false alarm ratio is ~0.6. In general, these statistical results are better than those of the previous system. Streamflow was evaluated at 1121 river gauges across the quasi-global domain. Validation using real-time precipitation across the tropics (30°S–30°N) gives positive daily Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficients for 107 out of 375 (28%) stations with a mean of 0.19 and 51% of the same gauges at monthly scale with a mean of 0.33. Finally, there were poorer results in higher latitudes, probably due to larger errors in the satellite precipitation input.

  9. Reservoir Temperature Estimator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-12-08

    The Reservoir Temperature Estimator (RTEst) is a program that can be used to estimate deep geothermal reservoir temperature and chemical parameters such as CO2 fugacity based on the water chemistry of shallower, cooler reservoir fluids. This code uses the plugin features provided in The Geochemist’s Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2011) and interfaces with the model-independent parameter estimation code Pest (Doherty, 2005) to provide for optimization of the estimated parameters based on the minimization of themore » weighted sum of squares of a set of saturation indexes from a user-provided mineral assemblage.« less

  10. Weldon Spring historical dose estimate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meshkov, N.; Benioff, P.; Wang, J.; Yuan, Y.

    1986-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the estimated radiation doses that individuals in five nearby population groups and the general population in the surrounding area may have received as a consequence of activities at a uranium processing plant in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The study is retrospective and encompasses plant operations (1957-1966), cleanup (1967-1969), and maintenance (1969-1982). The dose estimates for members of the nearby population groups are as follows. Of the three periods considered, the largest doses to the general population in the surrounding area would have occurred during the plant operations period (1957-1966). Dose estimates for the cleanup (1967-1969) and maintenance (1969-1982) periods are negligible in comparison. Based on the monitoring data, if there was a person residing continually in a dwelling 1.2 km (0.75 mi) north of the plant, this person is estimated to have received an average of about 96 mrem/yr (ranging from 50 to 160 mrem/yr) above background during plant operations, whereas the dose to a nearby resident during later years is estimated to have been about 0.4 mrem/yr during cleanup and about 0.2 mrem/yr during the maintenance period. These values may be compared with the background dose in Missouri of 120 mrem/yr.

  11. How to make x-ray simulation software working on WWW : a simple recipe based on seven years of experience.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanov, S.; Biosciences Division

    2004-01-01

    Attaching WWW interfaces to scientific software opens new opportunities to researchers by making their results available to wide scientific community in a way complimentary to publication. We have shown that this task may be much easier than many used to think: the amount of additional code is small, the Common Gateway Interface (CGI) can be written in any language, not necessarily PERL, and the software can be interfaced on any operating system it was originally written and does not have to be ported to UNIX. This paper provides some useful recipes resulted from seven years of author's experience in developing and maintaining highly successful X-ray Web server project. All these solutions are based on free public domain software (Apache, GnuPlot, and InfoZip) and applicable for multiple computer platforms. Some practical examples are provided.

  12. ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2005 and 2006 through 2010 " ,"(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid" ,,,"Contiguous U.S." ,,,,,,"FRCC",,,"MRO",,,"NPCC",,,"RFC",,,"SERC",,,"SPP",,,"ERCOT",,,"WECC" " ",,,"Net Internal Demand

  13. ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Summer Historic and Projected Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2006 and 2007 through 2011 " " ","(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid" ,,,"Contiguous U.S."

  14. ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    March 2009" ,"Next Update: October 2009" ,"Table 4. Summer Historic and Projected Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2007 and 2008 through 2012 " " ","(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid"

  15. ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Summer Historic and Projected Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2008 and 2009 through 2013 " " ","(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid" ,,,"Contiguous U.S." ,,,,,,"FRCC",,,"MRO

  16. Retrievals of Cloud Fraction and Cloud Albedo from Surface-based Shortwave Radiation Measurements: A Comparison of 16 Year Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Yu; Liu, Yangang; Long, Charles N.; Min, Qilong

    2014-07-27

    Ground-based radiation measurements have been widely conducted to gain information on clouds and the surface radiation budget; here several different techniques for retrieving cloud fraction (Long2006, Min2008 and XL2013) and cloud albedo (Min2008, Liu2011 and XL2013) from ground-based shortwave broadband and spectral radiation measurements are examined, and sixteen years of retrievals collected at the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are compared. The comparison shows overall good agreement between the retrievals of both cloud fraction and cloud albedo, with noted differences however. The Long2006 and Min2008 cloud fractions are greater on average than the XL2013 values. Compared to Min2008 and Liu2011, the XL2013 retrieval of cloud albedo tends to be greater for thin clouds but smaller for thick clouds, with the differences decreasing with increasing cloud fraction. Further analysis reveals that the approaches that retrieve cloud fraction and cloud albedo separately may suffer from mutual contamination of errors in retrieved cloud fraction and cloud albedo. Potential influences of cloud absorption, land-surface albedo, cloud structure, and measurement instruments are explored.

  17. U.S. Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) U.S. Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  18. Year 2000 awareness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, C.

    1997-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the challenges business face with the year 2000 software problem. Estimates, roadmaps, virtual factory software, current awareness, and world wide web references are given.

  19. Electrochemical state and internal variables estimation using a reduced-order physics-based model of a lithium-ion cell and an extended Kalman filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stetzel, KD; Aldrich, LL; Trimboli, MS; Plett, GL

    2015-03-15

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating the present value of electrochemical internal variables in a lithium-ion cell in real time, using readily available measurements of cell voltage, current, and temperature. The variables that can be estimated include any desired set of reaction flux and solid and electrolyte potentials and concentrations at any set of one-dimensional spatial locations, in addition to more standard quantities such as state of charge. The method uses an extended Kalman filter along with a one-dimensional physics-based reduced-order model of cell dynamics. Simulations show excellent and robust predictions having dependable error bounds for most internal variables. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 and 2004 through 2008 " ,"(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid" ,,,"Contiguous U.S." ,,,,,,"ECAR",,,"FRCC",,,"MAAC",,,"MAIN",,,"MAPP/MRO",,,"NPCC",,,"SERC",,,"SPP",,,"ERCOT",,,"WECC" "

  1. ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 and 2005 through 2009 " ,"(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid" ,,,"Contiguous U.S." ,,,,,,"ECAR",,,"FRCC",,,"MAAC",,,"MAIN",,,"MAPP/MRO",,,"NPCC",,,"SERC",,,"SPP",,,"ERCOT",,,"WECC" "

  2. How Well Can We Estimate Areal-Averaged Spectral Surface Albedo from Ground-Based Transmission in an Atlantic Coastal Area?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Riihimaki, Laura D.; Marinovici, Maria C.

    2015-10-15

    Areal-averaged albedos are particularly difficult to measure in coastal regions, because the surface is not homogenous, consisting of a sharp demarcation between land and water. With this difficulty in mind, we evaluate a simple retrieval of areal-averaged surface albedo using ground-based measurements of atmospheric transmission alone under fully overcast conditions. To illustrate the performance of our retrieval, we find the areal-averaged albedo using measurements from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) at five wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673, and 870 nm). These MFRSR data are collected at a coastal site in Graciosa Island, Azores supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The areal-averaged albedos obtained from the MFRSR are compared with collocated and coincident Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) white-sky albedo at four nominal wavelengths (470, 560, 670 and 860 nm). These comparisons are made during a 19-month period (June 2009 - December 2010). We also calculate composite-based spectral values of surface albedo by a weighted-average approach using estimated fractions of major surface types observed in an area surrounding this coastal site. Taken as a whole, these three methods of finding albedo show spectral and temporal similarities, and suggest that our simple, transmission-based technique holds promise, but with estimated errors of about ±0.03. Additional work is needed to reduce this uncertainty in areas with inhomogeneous surfaces.

  3. Rapid estimation of 4DCT motion-artifact severity based on 1D breathing-surrogate periodicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Guang Caraveo, Marshall; Wei, Jie; Rimner, Andreas; Wu, Abraham J.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Yorke, Ellen

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Motion artifacts are common in patient four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images, leading to an ill-defined tumor volume with large variations for radiotherapy treatment and a poor foundation with low imaging fidelity for studying respiratory motion. The authors developed a method to estimate 4DCT image quality by establishing a correlation between the severity of motion artifacts in 4DCT images and the periodicity of the corresponding 1D respiratory waveform (1DRW) used for phase binning in 4DCT reconstruction. Methods: Discrete Fourier transformation (DFT) was applied to analyze 1DRW periodicity. The breathing periodicity index (BPI) was defined as the sum of the largest five Fourier coefficients, ranging from 0 to 1. Distortional motion artifacts (excluding blurring) of cine-scan 4DCT at the junctions of adjacent couch positions around the diaphragm were classified in three categories: incomplete, overlapping, and duplicate anatomies. To quantify these artifacts, discontinuity of the diaphragm at the junctions was measured in distance and averaged along six directions in three orthogonal views. Artifacts per junction (APJ) across the entire diaphragm were calculated in each breathing phase and phase-averaged APJ{sup }, defined as motion-artifact severity (MAS), was obtained for each patient. To make MAS independent of patient-specific motion amplitude, two new MAS quantities were defined: MAS{sup D} is normalized to the maximum diaphragmatic displacement and MAS{sup V} is normalized to the mean diaphragmatic velocity (the breathing period was obtained from DFT analysis of 1DRW). Twenty-six patients free-breathing 4DCT images and corresponding 1DRW data were studied. Results: Higher APJ values were found around midventilation and full inhalation while the lowest APJ values were around full exhalation. The distribution of MAS is close to Poisson distribution with a mean of 2.2 mm. The BPI among the 26 patients was calculated with a value

  4. SU-E-T-388: Estimating the Radioactivity Inventory of a Cyclotron Based Pencil Beam Proton Therapy Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langen, K; Chen, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Parts of the cyclotron and energy degrader are incidentally activated by protons lost during the acceleration and transport of protons for radiation therapy. An understanding of the radioactive material inventory is needed when regulatory requirements are assessed. Methods: First, the tumor dose and volume is used to determine the required energy deposition. For spot scanning, the tumor length along the beam path determines the number of required energy layers. For each energy layer the energy deposition per proton can be calculated from the residual proton range within the tumor. Assuming a typical layer weighting, an effective energy deposition per proton can then be calculated. The total number of required protons and the number of protons per energy layer can then be calculated. For each energy layer, proton losses in the energy degrader are calculated separately since its transmission efficiency, and hence the amount of protons lost, is energy dependent. The degrader efficiency also determines the number of protons requested from the cyclotron. The cyclotron extraction efficiency allows a calculation of the proton losses within the cyclotron. The saturation activity induced in the cyclotron and the degrader is equal to the production rate R for isotopes whose half-life is shorter that the projected cyclotron life time. R can be calculated from the proton loss rate and published production cross sections. Results: About 1/3 of the saturation activity is produced in the cyclotron and 2/3 in the energy degrader. For a projected case mix and a patient load of 1100 fractions per week at 1.8 Gy per fraction a combined activity of 180 mCi was estimated at saturation. Conclusion: Calculations were used to support to application of a radioactive materials license for the possession of 200 mCi of activity for isotopes with atomic numbers ranging from 1-83.

  5. SU-E-J-63: Estimating the Effects of Respiratory Motion On Dose Heterogeneity for ITV-Based Treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, C; Lewis, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the relationship between the amount of dose heterogeneity in a treatment plan that uses an internal target volume (ITV) to account for respiratory motion and the true amount of heterogeneity in the dose delivered to the tumor contained within that ITV. Methods: We develop a convolution-based framework for calculating dose delivered to a tumor moving inside an ITV according to a common sinusoid-based breathing model including asymmetry. We model the planned ITV dose distribution as a centrally peaked analytic function approximating the profile of clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy treatments. Expressions for the minimum and maximum dose received by the tumor are derived and evaluated for a range of clinically relevant parameters. Results of the model are validated with phantom measurements using an ion chamber array. Results: An analytic expression is presented for the maximum and minimum doses received by the tumor relative to the planned ITV dose. The tumor dose heterogeneity depends solely on the ratio of tumor size to ITV size, the peak dose in the planned ITV dose distribution, and the respiratory asymmetry parameter. Under the assumptions of this model, using a typical breathing asymmetry parameter and a dose distribution with a fixed size ITV covered by the 100% line and with a 130% hotspot, the maximum dose to the tumor varies between 113%130%, and the minimum dose varies between 100%116% depending on the amount of tumor motion. Conclusion: This modeling exercise demonstrates the interplay between motion and dose heterogeneity. Tumors that exhibit large amounts of respiratory motion relative to their size will receive a more homogeneous dose and a larger minimum dose than would be inferred from the ITV dose distribution. This effect is not captured in current clinical treatment planning methods unless 4D dose calculation techniques are used. This work was partially supported by a Varian Medical Systems research grant.

  6. Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner Than Estimated Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner Than Estimated This document from the U.S. ...

  7. Property:EstimatedTimeMedian | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    week,w,Week,Weeks,W,WEEK,WEEKS 12 months,month,m,Month,Months,M,MONTH,MONTHS 1 years,year,y,Year,Years,Y,YEAR,YEARS Pages using the property "EstimatedTimeMedian" Showing 25 pages...

  8. Property:EstimatedTimeLow | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    week,w,Week,Weeks,W,WEEK,WEEKS 12 months,month,m,Month,Months,M,MONTH,MONTHS 1 years,year,y,Year,Years,Y,YEAR,YEARS Pages using the property "EstimatedTimeLow" Showing 25 pages...

  9. Property:EstimatedTimeHigh | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    week,w,Week,Weeks,W,WEEK,WEEKS 12 months,month,m,Month,Months,M,MONTH,MONTHS 1 years,year,y,Year,Years,Y,YEAR,YEARS Pages using the property "EstimatedTimeHigh" Showing 25 pages...

  10. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-02: Can Pre-Treatment 4DCT-Based Motion Margins Estimates Be Trusted for Proton Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seco, J; Koybasi, O; Mishra, P; James, S St.; Lewis, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy motion margins are generated using pre-treatment 4DCT data. The purpose of this study is to assess if pre-treatment 4DCT is sufficient in proton therapy to provide accurate estimate of motion margins. A dosimetric assessment is performed comparing pre-treatment margins with daily-customized margins. Methods: Gold fiducial markers implanted in lung tumors of patients were used to track the tumor. A spherical tumor of diameter 20 mm is inserted into a realistic digital respiratory phantom, where the tumor motion is based on real patient lung tumor trajectories recorded over multiple days. Using Day 1 patient data, 100 ITVs were generated with 1 s interval between consecutive scan start times. Each ITV was made up by the union of 10 tumor positions obtained from 6 s scan time. Two ITV volumes were chosen for treatment planning: ITVmean-? and ITVmean+?. The delivered dose was computed on i) 10 phases forming the planning ITV (10-phase - simulating dose calculation based on 4DCT) and ii) 50 phantoms produced from 100 s of data from any other day with tumor positions sampled every 2 s (dynamic - simulating the dose that would actually be delivered). Results: For similar breathing patterns between Day 1 and any other Day N(>1), the 95% volume coverage (D95) for dynamic case was 8.13% lower than the 10-phase case for ITVmean+?. For breathing patterns that were very different between Day 1 and any other Day N(>1), this difference was as high as 24.5% for ITVmean-?. Conclusion: Proton treatment planning based on pre-treatment 4DCT can lead to under-dosage of the tumor and over-dosage of the surrounding tissues, because of inadequate estimate of the range of motion of the tumor. This is due to the shift of the Bragg peak compared to photon therapy in which the tumor is surrounded by an electron bath.

  11. A Pilot Evaluation of a 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Scheme Based on Simultaneous Motion Estimation and Image Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dang, Jun; Gu, Xuejun; Pan, Tinsu; Wang, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a 4-dimensional (4-D) cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) reconstruction scheme based on simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) through patient studies. Methods and Materials: The SMEIR algorithm contains 2 alternating steps: (1) motion-compensated CBCT reconstruction using projections from all phases to reconstruct a reference phase 4D-CBCT by explicitly considering the motion models between each different phase and (2) estimation of motion models directly from projections by matching the measured projections to the forward projection of the deformed reference phase 4D-CBCT. Four lung cancer patients were scanned for 4 to 6 minutes to obtain approximately 2000 projections for each patient. To evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm on a conventional 1-minute CBCT scan, the number of projections at each phase was reduced by a factor of 5, 8, or 10 for each patient. Then, 4D-CBCTs were reconstructed from the down-sampled projections using Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, total variation (TV) minimization, prior image constrained compressive sensing (PICCS), and SMEIR. Using the 4D-CBCT reconstructed from the fully sampled projections as a reference, the relative error (RE) of reconstructed images, root mean square error (RMSE), and maximum error (MaxE) of estimated tumor positions were analyzed to quantify the performance of the SMEIR algorithm. Results: The SMEIR algorithm can achieve results consistent with the reference 4D-CBCT reconstructed with many more projections per phase. With an average of 30 to 40 projections per phase, the MaxE in tumor position detection is less than 1 mm in SMEIR for all 4 patients. Conclusion: The results from a limited number of patients show that SMEIR is a promising tool for high-quality 4D-CBCT reconstruction and tumor motion modeling.

  12. New York Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Lease Condensate Estimated Production

  13. MO-E-17A-08: Attenuation-Based Size Adjusted, Scanner-Independent Organ Dose Estimates for Head CT Exams: TG 204 for Head CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillan, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M; Zankl, M; DeMarco, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM Task Group 204 described size specific dose estimates (SSDE) for body scans. The purpose of this work is to use a similar approach to develop patient-specific, scanner-independent organ dose estimates for head CT exams using an attenuation-based size metric. Methods: For eight patient models from the GSF family of voxelized phantoms, dose to brain and lens of the eye was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations of contiguous axial scans for 64-slice MDCT scanners from four major manufacturers. Organ doses were normalized by scannerspecific 16 cm CTDIvol values and averaged across all scanners to obtain scanner-independent CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients for each patient model. Head size was measured at the first slice superior to the eyes; patient perimeter and effective diameter (ED) were measured directly from the GSF data. Because the GSF models use organ identification codes instead of Hounsfield units, water equivalent diameter (WED) was estimated indirectly. Using the image data from 42 patients ranging from 2 weeks old to adult, the perimeter, ED and WED size metrics were obtained and correlations between each metric were established. Applying these correlations to the GSF perimeter and ED measurements, WED was calculated for each model. The relationship between the various patient size metrics and CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients was then described. Results: The analysis of patient images demonstrated the correlation between WED and ED across a wide range of patient sizes. When applied to the GSF patient models, an exponential relationship between CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients and the WED size metric was observed with correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.77 for the brain and lens of the eye, respectively. Conclusion: Strong correlation exists between CTDIvol normalized brain dose and WED. For the lens of the eye, a lower correlation is observed, primarily due to surface dose variations. Funding

  14. Cost Estimating, Analysis, and Standardization

    Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1984-11-02

    To establish policy and responsibilities for: (a) developing and reviewing project cost estimates; (b) preparing independent cost estimates and analysis; (c) standardizing cost estimating procedures; and (d) improving overall cost estimating and analytical techniques, cost data bases, cost and economic escalation models, and cost estimating systems. Cancels DOE O 5700.2B, dated 8-5-1983; DOE O 5700.8, dated 5-27-1981; and HQ 1130.1A, dated 12-30-1981. Canceled by DOE O 5700.2D, dated 6-12-1992

  15. Supplemental report on cost estimates'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-04-29

    The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have completed an analysis of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 budget request for its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) program. The results were presented to an interagency review group (IAG) of senior-Administration officials for their consideration in the budget process. This analysis included evaluations of the underlying legal requirements and cost estimates on which the ERWM budget request was based. The major conclusions are contained in a separate report entitled, ''Interagency Review of the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program.'' This Corps supplemental report provides greater detail on the cost analysis.

  16. Parametric Hazard Function Estimation.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-09-13

    Version 00 Phaze performs statistical inference calculations on a hazard function (also called a failure rate or intensity function) based on reported failure times of components that are repaired and restored to service. Three parametric models are allowed: the exponential, linear, and Weibull hazard models. The inference includes estimation (maximum likelihood estimators and confidence regions) of the parameters and of the hazard function itself, testing of hypotheses such as increasing failure rate, and checking ofmore » the model assumptions.« less

  17. Estimation of the electron density and radiative energy losses in a calcium plasma source based on an electron cyclotron resonance discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potanin, E. P. Ustinov, A. L.

    2013-06-15

    The parameters of a calcium plasma source based on an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge were calculated. The analysis was performed as applied to an ion cyclotron resonance system designed for separation of calcium isotopes. The plasma electrons in the source were heated by gyrotron microwave radiation in the zone of the inhomogeneous magnetic field. It was assumed that, in such a combined trap, the energy of the extraordinary microwave propagating from the high-field side was initially transferred to a small group of resonance electrons. As a result, two electron components with different transverse temperatures-the hot resonance component and the cold nonresonance component-were created in the plasma. The longitudinal temperatures of both components were assumed to be equal. The entire discharge space was divided into a narrow ECR zone, where resonance electrons acquired transverse energy, and the region of the discharge itself, where the gas was ionized. The transverse energy of resonance electrons was calculated by solving the equations for electron motion in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. Using the law of energy conservation and the balance condition for the number of hot electrons entering the discharge zone and cooled due to ionization and elastic collisions, the density of hot electrons was estimated and the dependence of the longitudinal temperature T{sub e Parallel-To} of the main (cold) electron component on the energy fraction {beta} lost for radiation was obtained.

  18. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 40 -4.76% YEAR 2013 2014 Males 37 35 -5.41% Females 5 5 0% YEAR 2013 2014 SES 2 2 0% EJEK 5 4 -20.00% EN 05 5 7 40.00% EN 04 6 6 0% EN 03 1 1 0% NN...

  19. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    79 67 -15.19% YEAR 2013 2014 Males 44 34 -22.73% Females 35 33 -5.71% YEAR 2013 2014 SES 6 4 -33.33% EJEK 1 1 0% EN 05 9 8 -11.11% EN 04 6 5 -16.67% NN...

  20. Year Modules

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Annual photovoltaic module shipments, 2005-2015 (peak kilowatts) Year Modules 2005 204,996 ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63B, 'Annual Photovoltaic Cell...

  1. Field Lysimeter Investigations - test results: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program: Test results for fiscal years 1994-1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rodgers, R.D.; Hilton, L.D.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (1) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (2) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (3) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (4) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the final 2 (10 total) years of data acquisition from operation of the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s {open_quotes}Technical Position on Waste Form{close_quotes} are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period. At the end of the tenth year, the experiment was closed down. Examination of soil and waste forms is planned to be conducted next and will be reported later.

  2. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females 839 788 -6.08% YEAR 2013 2014 SES 104 90 -13.46% EX 2 4 100% SL1 0 -100% EJEK 88 73 -17.05% EN 05 40 41 2.50% EN 04 169 157 -7.10% EN ...

  3. Utah Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Based Production (Million Barrels) Utah Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 3 3 2010's 3 3 4 3 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Lease Condensate Estimated Production Utah Lease

  4. Field lysimeter investigations - test results. Low-level waste data base development program: Test results for fiscal years 1986, 1987, 1988, and 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Findlay, M.W.; Davis, E.C.; Jastrow, J.D.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Hilton, L.D.

    1995-05-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (a) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the first 4 years of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both Portland type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s {open_quotes}Technical Position on Waste Form{close_quotes} are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period.

  5. Field Lysimeter Investigations -- Test results. Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program: Test results for fiscal years 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993; Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Brey, R.R.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Hilton, L.D.; Jastrow, J.D.; Wickliff Hicks, D.S.; Sanford, W.E.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1995-12-01

    The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (a) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the second 4 years of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type 1--2 cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form`` are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period.

  6. State Energy Production Estimates

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Production Estimates 1960 Through 2014 2014 Summary Tables U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Production 1 Table P1. Energy Production Estimates in ...

  7. Automated Estimating System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-04-15

    AES6.1 is a PC software package developed to aid in the preparation and reporting of cost estimates. AES6.1 provides an easy means for entering and updating the detailed cost, schedule information, project work breakdown structure, and escalation information contained in a typical project cost estimate through the use of menus and formatted input screens. AES6.1 combines this information to calculate both unescalated and escalated cost for a project which can be reported at varying levelsmore » of detail. Following are the major modifications to AES6.0f: Contingency update was modified to provide greater flexibility for user updates, Schedule Update was modified to provide user ability to schedule Bills of Material at the WBS/Participant/Cost Code level, Schedule Plot was modified to graphically show schedule by WBS/Participant/Cost Code, All Fiscal Year reporting has been modified to use the new schedule format, The Schedule 1-B-7, Cost Schedule, and the WBS/Participant reprorts were modified to determine Phase of Work from the B/M Cost Code, Utility program was modified to allow selection by cost code and update cost code in the Global Schedule update, Generic summary and line item download were added to the utility program, and an option was added to all reports which allows the user to indicate where overhead is to be reported (bottom line or in body of report)« less

  8. Cost Estimation Package

    Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter focuses on the components (or elements) of the cost estimation package and their documentation.

  9. New Methodology for Estimating Fuel Economy by Vehicle Class

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, Shih-Miao; Dabbs, Kathryn; Hwang, Ho-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Office of Highway Policy Information to develop a new methodology to generate annual estimates of average fuel efficiency and number of motor vehicles registered by vehicle class for Table VM-1 of the Highway Statistics annual publication. This paper describes the new methodology developed under this effort and compares the results of the existing manual method and the new systematic approach. The methodology developed under this study takes a two-step approach. First, the preliminary fuel efficiency rates are estimated based on vehicle stock models for different classes of vehicles. Then, a reconciliation model is used to adjust the initial fuel consumption rates from the vehicle stock models and match the VMT information for each vehicle class and the reported total fuel consumption. This reconciliation model utilizes a systematic approach that produces documentable and reproducible results. The basic framework utilizes a mathematical programming formulation to minimize the deviations between the fuel economy estimates published in the previous year s Highway Statistics and the results from the vehicle stock models, subject to the constraint that fuel consumptions for different vehicle classes must sum to the total fuel consumption estimate published in Table MF-21 of the current year Highway Statistics. The results generated from this new approach provide a smoother time series for the fuel economies by vehicle class. It also utilizes the most up-to-date and best available data with sound econometric models to generate MPG estimates by vehicle class.

  10. Fuel Cell System for Transportation -- 2005 Cost Estimate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, D.

    2006-10-01

    Independent review report of the methodology used by TIAX to estimate the cost of producing PEM fuel cells using 2005 cell stack technology. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Manager asked the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to commission an independent review of the 2005 TIAX cost analysis for fuel cell production. The NREL Systems Integrator is responsible for conducting independent reviews of progress toward meeting the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) technical targets. An important technical target of the Program is the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell cost in terms of dollars per kilowatt ($/kW). The Program's Multi-Year Program Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan established $125/kW as the 2005 technical target. Over the last several years, the Program has contracted with TIAX, LLC (TIAX) to produce estimates of the high volume cost of PEM fuel cell production for transportation use. Since no manufacturer is yet producing PEM fuel cells in the quantities needed for an initial hydrogen-based transportation economy, these estimates are necessary for DOE to gauge progress toward meeting its targets. For a PEM fuel cell system configuration developed by Argonne National Laboratory, TIAX estimated the total cost to be $108/kW, based on assumptions of 500,000 units per year produced with 2005 cell stack technology, vertical integration of cell stack manufacturing, and balance-of-plant (BOP) components purchased from a supplier network. Furthermore, TIAX conducted a Monte Carlo analysis by varying ten key parameters over a wide range of values and estimated with 98% certainty that the mean PEM fuel cell system cost would be below DOE's 2005 target of $125/kW. NREL commissioned DJW TECHNOLOGY, LLC to form an Independent Review Team (the Team) of industry fuel cell experts and to evaluate the cost estimation process and the results reported by TIAX. The results of this

  11. ,"Projected Monthly Base","Year","Contiguous U.S.","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ","Table 3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, " ,"1996 through 2004 and Projected 2005 through 2006 " ,"(Megawatts and 2004 Base Year)" ,"Projected Monthly Base","Year","Contiguous U.S.","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid"

  12. Statistical Evaluation of Travel Time Estimation Based on Data from Freeze-Branded Chinook Salmon on the Snake River, 1982-1990.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven G.; Skalski, J.R.; Giorgi, Albert E.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to assess the strengths and limitations of existing freeze brand recapture data in describing the migratory dynamics of juvenile salmonids in the mainstream, impounded sections of the Snake and Columbia Rivers. With the increased concern over the threatened status of spring and summer chinook salmon in the Snake River drainage, we used representative stocks for these races as our study populations. However, statistical considerations resultant from these analyses apply to other species and drainages as well. This report describes analyses we conducted using information derived from freeze-branded groups. We examined both index production groups released from hatcheries upstream from Lower Granite Dam (1982--1990) and freeze-branded groups used as controls in smolt transportation evaluations conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (1986, 1989). The scope of our analysis was limited to describing travel time estimates and derived relationships, as well as reach survival estimates through the mainstem Snake River from Lower Granite to McNary Dam.

  13. Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 52 69 117 1980's 68 94 102 121 134 123 116 128 162 136 1990's 160 140 139 138 141 113 132 129 131 130 2000's 117 114 133 165 155 181 176 183 211 273 2010's 591 1,248 2,241 3,283 4,197 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  14. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 88 121 154 1980's 170 196 198 159 181 151 165 178 181 155 1990's 141 143 109 111 82 91 88 93 79 79 2000's 78 94 98 94 93 86 83 100 110 100 2010's 87 75 64 61 54 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  15. Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 49 44 47 1980's 61 86 45 49 46 49 42 42 60 43 1990's 48 48 52 50 49 51 52 55 51 41 2000's 67 73 77 86 95 100 117 112 114 113 2010's 93 75 65 62 58 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015

  16. Louisiana - South Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Louisiana - South Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 48 2010's 47 47 47 47 46 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring

  17. Louisiana Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Louisiana Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 68 2010's 66 68 70 71 69 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease

  18. Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 9 2010's 9 10 11 11 10 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  19. Louisiana State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 407 188 200 196 195 1990's 145 127 117 137 144 152 177 161 128 117 2000's 127 158 122 126 99 68 83 86 95 83 2010's 74 49 84 66 52 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  20. Lower 48 States Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Lower 48 States Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,719 2010's 1,796 1,859 2,195 2,543 3,018 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring

  1. Michigan Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Michigan Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 6 2010's 6 6 7 7 8 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate

  2. Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 96 1980's 111 94 81 69 81 69 68 68 76 85 1990's 76 114 110 111 115 130 179 192 215 208 2000's 300 218 218 195 194 198 183 170 145 151 2010's 151 137 130 120 112 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  3. Miscellaneous States Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Miscellaneous States Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 2010's 2 2 3 3 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus

  4. Miscellaneous States Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 11 12 11 1980's 18 15 7 8 7 11 6 7 10 7 1990's 7 7 6 10 10 11 6 3 3 3 2000's 6 5 7 12 8 18 10 14 20 30 2010's 16 24 14 12 11 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  5. Mississippi Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Mississippi Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 24 2010's 24 24 28 24 25 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease

  6. Montana Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Montana Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 29 2010's 25 24 27 30 30 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease

  7. Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 42 1980's 51 74 36 39 38 41 31 32 47 36 1990's 40 42 46 44 43 45 47 51 46 35 2000's 62 67 70 79 86 86 100 92 88 80 2010's 70 57 45 39 35 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  8. Nebraska Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Nebraska Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 2010's 2 3 3 3 3 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate

  9. New Mexico - East Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) New Mexico - East Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 58 2010's 63 70 83 98 117 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil

  10. New Mexico - East Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 604 553 596 1980's 515 531 498 424 439 429 325 382 359 396 1990's 392 424 437 456 466 418 432 418 427 491 2000's 447 518 526 507 516 522 480 462 459 454 2010's 392 377 404 447 464 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  11. New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) New Mexico - West Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 2010's 2 2 3 4 7 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus

  12. New Mexico - West Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 523 546 553 1980's 549 555 444 375 417 414 303 346 372 364 1990's 495 589 706 881 896 979 991 1,129 1,022 1,048 2000's 1,061 1,018 998 908 1,011 971 946 887 890 896 2010's 828 793 765 708 710 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  13. Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 24 42 46 1980's 64 85 1990's 104 146 256 281 391 360 373 376 394 376 2000's 359 345 365 350 327 300 287 274 257 254 2010's 223 218 214 175 176 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  14. Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 206 216 228 1980's 213 235 261 273 324 312 324 349 400 401 1990's 339 353 414 393 423 396 446 475 513 459 2000's 506 461 460 478 478 469 408 388 354 358 2010's 317 327 299 285 304 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  15. Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 109 120 100 1980's 117 121 158 206 188 175 123 129 159 166 1990's 164 173 204 188 186 182 200 189 170 163 2000's 154 160 157 166 170 174 188 269 456 698 2010's 951 1,079 1,151 1,140 1,142 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  16. California Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) California Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 301 313 347 1980's 294 372 345 335 306 1990's 293 308 285 252 244 216 217 212 246 266 2000's 282 336 291 265 247 268 255 253 237 239 2010's 243 311 200 188 176 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  17. Alabama Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Alabama Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 7 2010's 7 8 10 10 9 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate

  18. Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 44 1980's 63 85 1990's 104 147 254 276 385 354 367 372 391 380 2000's 365 345 365 347 325 298 286 273 262 256 2010's 225 218 204 174 167 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  19. Alaska Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Alaska Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 210 2010's 195 206 191 186 182 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease

  20. Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 176 1980's 161 181 188 193 189 200 179 179 184 192 1990's 158 184 219 184 201 195 211 207 204 202 2000's 198 213 200 204 206 213 192 164 149 136 2010's 145 152 129 108 101 - = No Data

  1. Arkansas Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Arkansas Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 6 2010's 5 6 6 4 6 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate

  2. Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 91 1980's 90 94 150 196 178 173 119 124 154 161 1990's 152 152 180 167 167 160 178 173 157 159 2000's 150 157 153 161 166 171 183 265 454 694 2010's 948 1,074 1,143 1,132 1,133 - = No Data

  3. California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 18 2010's 18 20 22 23 23 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date:

  4. California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 29 28 28 1980's 27 31 34 34 28 28 26 24 23 23 1990's 23 20 20 17 16 14 13 17 12 8 2000's 10 12 11 11 10 18 9 12 11 12 2010's 12 11 11 12 13 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  5. California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 30 22 23 1980's 19 22 13 16 26 22 17 17 15 15 1990's 10 11 10 9 9 8 10 10 9 9 2000's 8 9 9 10 10 9 8 8 6 7 2010's 6 6 6 6 7 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  6. California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 235 252 285 1980's 238 310 290 307 342 323 313 292 286 259 1990's 252 270 245 219 213 188 186 178 217 237 2000's 256 307 264 238 220 234 232 227 217 214 2010's 220 289 178 165 150 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  7. California Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) California Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 208 2010's 198 196 198 199 203 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease

  8. California Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) California Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 22 2010's 19 22 15 20 20 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  9. California Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 4 4 5 1980's 5 53 46 37 36 1990's 41 47 48 45 47 47 49 37 37 37 2000's 46 44 46 47 47 33 37 40 36 37 2010's 28 31 22 21 20 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  10. California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 160 1980's 152 180 151 144 115 1990's 117 140 131 107 98 98 81 65 51 47 2000's 80 94 88 87 77 85 88 101 88 80 2010's 69 64 59 46 42 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  11. California State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) California State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 14 2010's 13 12 13 14 14 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring

  12. California State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 7 11 11 1980's 10 16 12 11 9 1990's 8 7 10 7 6 6 8 7 8 12 2000's 8 8 7 6 7 7 6 6 3 6 2010's 5 5 5 5 6 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  13. Colorado Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Colorado Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 30 2010's 33 41 52 70 102 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease

  14. Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 62 58 54 1980's 61 79 87 68 76 73 60 60 40 64 1990's 71 81 111 165 184 165 180 177 216 220 2000's 226 288 286 278 282 308 349 365 417 447 2010's 432 449 478 456 433 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  15. Wyoming Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Wyoming Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 51 2010's 53 55 57 64 75 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease

  16. New Mexico Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) New Mexico Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 60 2010's 65 72 86 102 124 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease

  17. New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New York Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 11 1980's 10 11 9 12 18 18 27 23 19 22 1990's 18 19 22 22 21 16 21 18 16 15 2000's 14 28 35 35 44 51 49 44 46 35 2010's 35 30 26 22 19 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  18. North Dakota Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) North Dakota Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 84 2010's 114 152 251 314 394 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil

  19. Ohio Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Ohio Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 4 2010's 5 4 5 7 14 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate

  20. Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 32 1980's 26 19 19 30 51 51 47 45 69 62 1990's 83 77 68 67 79 67 57 48 42 52 2000's 48 48 60 62 63 61 63 63 70 69 2010's 65 68 65 144 486 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  1. Oklahoma Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Oklahoma Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 63 2010's 63 79 85 113 132 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease

  2. Pennsylvania Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Pennsylvania Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 2010's 3 3 5 6 7 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease

  3. Texas - RRC District 1 Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 1 Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 10 2010's 15 44 112 192 263 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring

  4. Texas - RRC District 1 Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 1 Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 119 110 124 1980's 112 139 100 87 94 114 116 130 161 206 1990's 161 159 141 112 97 89 86 105 113 107 2000's 86 104 98 100 120 128 109 92 85 82 2010's 113 218 422 678 854 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  5. Texas - RRC District 10 Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 10 Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 16 2010's 22 30 40 43 40 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  6. Texas - RRC District 10 Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 10 Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,033 948 896 1980's 854 808 734 621 587 549 489 471 515 515 1990's 492 472 509 470 500 455 457 387 418 408 2000's 386 373 337 338 375 398 450 482 574 553 2010's 569 650 698 686 632 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld

  7. Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 10 2010's 15 46 107 170 234 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date:

  8. Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 396 349 413 1980's 366 404 374 343 320 328 341 349 318 291 1990's 254 244 246 232 224 189 190 214 219 306 2000's 361 322 288 282 296 305 323 301 310 259 2010's 237 306 430 534 673 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  9. Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 40 2010's 44 40 42 48 60 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  10. Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 3 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,063 1,003 955 1980's 865 796 782 740 752 673 639 569 533 517 1990's 474 470 502 532 600 701 856 886 781 813 2000's 883 741 588 576 582 558 532 512 505 509 2010's 508 409 350 317 321 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  11. Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 14 2010's 15 17 21 23 25 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016

  12. Texas - RRC District 5 Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 5 Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 3 2010's 3 4 5 6 6 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude

  13. Texas - RRC District 6 Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 6 Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 18 2010's 18 18 19 19 20 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  14. Texas - RRC District 6 Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 6 Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 252 275 321 1980's 352 365 381 341 402 396 415 395 416 453 1990's 534 522 532 619 596 620 583 599 594 591 2000's 575 644 624 642 683 752 774 896 983 1,004 2010's 1,017 1,079 1,124 1,057 1,002 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  15. Texas - RRC District 8 Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 8 Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 121 2010's 158 156 205 228 283 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring

  16. Texas - RRC District 8 Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8 Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,401 1,265 1,214 1980's 1,159 1,008 832 713 643 646 619 633 734 654 1990's 663 691 693 660 688 631 583 572 541 559 2000's 547 533 524 484 493 464 480 538 541 545 2010's 549 470 564 662 767 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  17. Texas - RRC District 9 Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 9 Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 15 2010's 17 21 22 21 21 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  18. Texas - RRC District 9 Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 9 Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 108 130 108 1980's 99 119 149 122 130 141 128 112 117 107 1990's 106 104 99 104 100 103 104 106 101 104 2000's 144 185 258 332 412 361 407 519 650 687 2010's 733 613 611 603 616 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  19. Texas Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 401 2010's 460 534 742 931 1,160 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease

  20. Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1 2010's 1 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus

  1. Texas State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 282 222 134 110 116 103 1990's 108 110 74 86 73 62 72 77 59 63 2000's 60 65 67 67 65 60 32 33 50 40 2010's 27 21 22 14 10 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015

  2. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 48 52 49 1980's 60 52 44 38 54 53 56 58 60 65 1990's 62 78 61 66 64 67 58 79 63 59 2000's 67 73 79 78 83 85 66 80 93 108 2010's 96 101 83 81 70 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  3. Utah Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Utah Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 23 2010's 25 27 31 36 43 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate

  4. Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 29 1980's 37 58 65 49 59 59 46 36 30 41 1990's 42 49 77 137 160 151 166 169 204 208 2000's 218 276 275 266 268 286 323 340 393 423 2010's 405 413 441 414 374 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  5. Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6 4 8 15 15 19 18 18 1990's 7 12 25 36 51 52 55 46 61 66 2000's 71 78 75 82 72 70 102 109 126 178 2010's 172 156 153 142 145 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W

  6. West Virginia Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) West Virginia Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1 2010's 1 2 3 7 9 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease

  7. Florida Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Florida Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1 2010's 2 2 3 2 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate

  8. Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 7 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  9. Illinois Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Illinois Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 5 2010's 4 4 4 3 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate

  10. Indiana Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Indiana Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1 2010's 1 1 1 1 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate

  11. Kansas Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Kansas Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 40 2010's 41 41 43 46 48 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate

  12. Kansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 755 1980's 647 602 439 374 455 509 465 441 551 553 1990's 525 597 610 675 697 702 730 647 577 520 2000's 519 460 495 446 396 396 365 377 368 346 2010's 316 294 273 266 253 - = No Data

  13. Kentucky Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Kentucky Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 2010's 1 1 1 1 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate

  14. Kentucky Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 52 1980's 61 53 46 40 55 53 56 58 60 65 1990's 63 80 63 68 65 69 60 81 65 60 2000's 69 77 83 80 87 88 70 84 97 113 2010's 102 107 88 87 74 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  15. Louisiana - North Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Louisiana - North Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 11 2010's 10 11 12 13 13 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil

  16. Louisiana - North Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - North Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 317 344 335 1980's 338 402 336 335 362 311 334 316 353 362 1990's 381 366 334 327 328 343 387 424 400 377 2000's 384 390 395 401 453 498 552 553 685 992 2010's 1,721 2,563 2,614 1,899 1,561 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  17. Check Estimates and Independent Costs

    Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Check estimates and independent cost estimates (ICEs) are tools that can be used to validate a cost estimate. Estimate validation entails an objective review of the estimate to ensure that estimate criteria and requirements have been met and well documented, defensible estimate has been developed. This chapter describes check estimates and their procedures and various types of independent cost estimates.

  18. Ohio Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Lease Condensate Estimated Production Ohio Lease Condensate Proved Reserves, Reserve

  19. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production (Million Barrels) Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Lease Condensate Estimated Production Pennsylvania Lease Condensate Proved Reserves,

  20. State Energy Production Estimates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Energy Production Estimates 1960 Through 2012 2012 Summary Tables Table P1. Energy Production Estimates in Physical Units, 2012 Alabama 19,455 215,710 9,525 0 Alaska 2,052 351,259...

  1. Types of Cost Estimates

    Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    The chapter describes the estimates required on government-managed projects for both general construction and environmental management.

  2. The Federal Highway Administration Gasohol Consumption Estimation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, HL

    2003-08-28

    The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is responsible for estimating the portion of Federal highway funds attributable to each State. The process involves use of State-reported data (gallons) and a set of estimation models when accurate State data is unavailable. To ensure that the distribution of funds is equitable, FHWA periodically reviews the estimation models. Estimation of the use of gasohol is difficult because of State differences in the definition of gasohol, inability of many States to separate and report gasohol usage from other fuel types, changes in fuel composition in nonattainment areas to address concerns over the use of certain fuel additives, and the lack of a valid State-level surrogate data set for gasohol use. Under the sponsorship of FHWA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the regression-based gasohol estimation model that has been in use for several years. Based on an analytical assessment of that model and an extensive review of potential data sets, ORNL developed an improved rule-based model. The new model uses data from Internal Revenue Service, Energy Information Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, ORNL, and FHWA sources. The model basically consists of three parts: (1) development of a controlled total of national gasohol usage, (2) determination of reliable State gasohol consumption data, and (3) estimation of gasohol usage for all other States. The new model will be employed for the 2004 attribution process. FHWA is currently soliciting comments and inputs from interested parties. Relevant data, as identified, will be pursued and refinements will be made by the research team if warranted.

  3. Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner Than

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Estimated | Department of Energy Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner Than Estimated Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner Than Estimated This document from the U.S. EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs is part of the Case Study Series, and explains how "Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner than Estimated." Pesticide Program Case Study (332.21 KB) More Documents & Publications Introduction to the Value of

  4. Hydrogen Station Cost Estimates: Comparing Hydrogen Station Cost Calculator Results with other Recent Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Penev, M.

    2013-09-01

    This report compares hydrogen station cost estimates conveyed by expert stakeholders through the Hydrogen Station Cost Calculation (HSCC) to a select number of other cost estimates. These other cost estimates include projections based upon cost models and costs associated with recently funded stations.

  5. Estimation of benchmark dose as the threshold levels of urinary cadmium, based on excretion of total protein, {beta} {sub 2}-microglobulin, and N-acetyl-{beta}-D-glucosaminidase in cadmium nonpolluted regions in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Etsuko . E-mail: ekoba@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Suwazono, Yasushi; Uetani, Mirei; Inaba, Takeya; Oishi, Mitsuhiro; Kido, Teruhiko; Nishijo, Muneko; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Nogawa, Koji

    2006-07-15

    Previously, we investigated the association between urinary cadmium (Cd) concentration and indicators of renal dysfunction, including total protein, {beta} {sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta} {sub 2}-MG), and N-acetyl-{beta}-D-glucosaminidase (NAG). In 2778 inhabitants {>=}50 years of age (1114 men, 1664 women) in three different Cd nonpolluted areas in Japan, we showed that a dose-response relationship existed between renal effects and Cd exposure in the general environment without any known Cd pollution. However, we could not estimate the threshold levels of urinary Cd at that time. In the present study, we estimated the threshold levels of urinary Cd as the benchmark dose low (BMDL) using the benchmark dose (BMD) approach. Urinary Cd excretion was divided into 10 categories, and an abnormality rate was calculated for each. Cut-off values for urinary substances were defined as corresponding to the 84% and 95% upper limit values of the target population who have not smoked. Then we calculated the BMD and BMDL using a log-logistic model. The values of BMD and BMDL for all urinary substances could be calculated. The BMDL for the 84% cut-off value of {beta} {sub 2}-MG, setting an abnormal value at 5%, was 2.4 {mu}g/g creatinine (cr) in men and 3.3 {mu}g/g cr in women. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the threshold level of urinary Cd could be estimated in people living in the general environment without any known Cd-pollution in Japan, and the value was inferred to be almost the same as that in Belgium, Sweden, and China.

  6. NERSC Celebrates 40 Years at the Forefront

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Celebrates 40 Years of Supercomputing NERSC Celebrates 40 Years at the Forefront DOE supercomputing facility has been supporting broad-based scientific research since 1974 ...

  7. Methodology for Monthly Crude Oil Production Estimates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Methodology for Monthly Crude Oil Production Estimates 1 Methodology for Monthly Crude Oil Production Estimates Executive summary The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) relies on data from state and other federal agencies and does not currently collect survey data directly from crude oil producers. Summarizing the estimation process in terms of percent of U.S. production: * 20% is based on state agency data, including North Dakota and

  8. Estimation of the relationship between remotely sensed anthropogenic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Anthropogenic heat discharge was estimated based on a remote sensing-based surface energy balance model, which was parameterized using land ...

  9. Estimating Specialty Costs

    Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

  10. Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-09-01

    Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.

  11. Estimation of placental and lactational transfer and tissue distribution of atrazine and its main metabolites in rodent dams, fetuses, and neonates with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Wang, Ran; Ross, Matthew K.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2013-11-15

    Atrazine (ATR) is a widely used chlorotriazine herbicide, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, and a potential developmental toxicant. To quantitatively evaluate placental/lactational transfer and fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry of ATR and its major metabolites, physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed for rat dams, fetuses and neonates. These models were calibrated using pharmacokinetic data from rat dams repeatedly exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR followed by model evaluation against other available rat data. Model simulations corresponded well to the majority of available experimental data and suggest that: (1) the fetus is exposed to both ATR and its major metabolite didealkylatrazine (DACT) at levels similar to maternal plasma levels, (2) the neonate is exposed mostly to DACT at levels two-thirds lower than maternal plasma or fetal levels, while lactational exposure to ATR is minimal, and (3) gestational carryover of DACT greatly affects its neonatal dosimetry up until mid-lactation. To test the model's cross-species extrapolation capability, a pharmacokinetic study was conducted with pregnant C57BL/6 mice exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR from gestational day 12 to 18. By using mouse-specific parameters, the model predictions fitted well with the measured data, including placental ATR/DACT levels. However, fetal concentrations of DACT were overestimated by the model (10-fold). This overestimation suggests that only around 10% of the DACT that reaches the fetus is tissue-bound. These rodent models could be used in fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry predictions to help design/interpret early life toxicity/pharmacokinetic studies with ATR and as a foundation for scaling to humans. - Highlights: We developed PBPK models for atrazine in rat dams, fetuses, and neonates. We conducted pharmacokinetic (PK) study with atrazine in pregnant mice. Model predictions were in good agreement with experimental rat and mouse PK data. The

  12. How EIA Estimates Natural Gas Production

    Reports and Publications

    2004-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes estimates monthly and annually of the production of natural gas in the United States. The estimates are based on data EIA collects from gas producing states and data collected by the U. S. Minerals Management Service (MMS) in the Department of Interior. The states and MMS collect this information from producers of natural gas for various reasons, most often for revenue purposes. Because the information is not sufficiently complete or timely for inclusion in EIA's Natural Gas Monthly (NGM), EIA has developed estimation methodologies to generate monthly production estimates that are described in this document.

  13. FY 2000 Buildings Energy Savings Estimates under Uncertainty: Developing Approaches for Incorporating Risk into Buildings Program Energy Efficiency Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Dave M.

    2002-11-18

    This report is one of two that re-examines the forecasted impact of individual programs currently within the Buildings Technology Program (BT) and the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program (WIP) that appeared in the FY2000 Presidential Budget request. This report develops potential methods for allowing inherent risk to be captured in the program benefits analysis. Note that the FY2000 budget request was originally analyzed under the former Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS), where BT and WIP were previously combined. Throughout the document, reference will be made to the predecessor of the BT and WIP programs, BTS, as FY2000 reflected that organization. A companion report outlines the effects of re-estimating the FY 2000 budget request based on overlaying program data from subsequent years, essentially revised out-year forecasts. That report shows that year-to-year long-term projections of primary energy savings can vary widely as models improve and programs change. Those point estimates are not influenced by uncertainty or risk. This report develops potential methods for allowing inherent risk to affect the benefits analysis via Monte Carlo simulation.

  14. 2007 Estimated International Energy Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-10

    An energy flow chart or 'atlas' for 136 countries has been constructed from data maintained by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and estimates of energy use patterns for the year 2007. Approximately 490 exajoules (460 quadrillion BTU) of primary energy are used in aggregate by these countries each year. While the basic structure of the energy system is consistent from country to country, patterns of resource use and consumption vary. Energy can be visualized as it flows from resources (i.e. coal, petroleum, natural gas) through transformations such as electricity generation to end uses (i.e. residential, commercial, industrial, transportation). These flow patterns are visualized in this atlas of 136 country-level energy flow charts.

  15. Historical estimates of external gamma exposure and collective external gamma exposure from testing at the Nevada Test Site. I. Test series through HARDTACK II, 1958

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Church, B.W.

    1985-12-01

    In 1959, the Test Manager's Committee to Establish Fallout Doses calculated estimated external gamma exposure at populated locations based upon measurements of external gamma-exposure rate. Using these calculations and estimates of population, we have tabulated the collective estimated external gamma exposures for communities within established fallout patterns. The total collective estimated external gamma exposure is 85,000 person-R. The greatest collective exposures occurred in three general areas: Saint George, Utah; Ely, Nevada; and Las Vegas, Nevada. Three events, HARRY (May 19, 1953), BEE (March 22, 1955), and SMOKY (August 31, 1957), accounted for over half of the total collective estimated external gamma exposure. The bases of the calculational models for external gamma exposure of ''infinite exposure,'' ''estimated exposure,'' and ''one year effective biological exposure'' are explained. 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Cost Estimating Guide

    Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-09

    This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates. No cancellations.

  17. Cost Estimating Guide

    Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-09

    This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates.

  18. Cost Estimating Guide

    Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    The objective of this Guide is to improve the quality of cost estimates and further strengthen the DOE program/project management system. The original 25 separate chapters and three appendices have been combined to create a single document.

  19. Derived Annual Estimates

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    74-1988 For Methodology Concerning the Derived Estimates Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat and Power by Industry Group, 1974-1988 Total Energy *** Electricity...

  20. Ten Thousand Years of Solitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benford, G. California Univ., Irvine, CA . Dept. of Physics); Kirkwood, C.W. Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ . Coll. of Business Administration); Harry, O. ); Pasqualetti, M.J. Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ )

    1991-03-01

    This report documents the authors work as an expert team advising the US Department of Energy on modes of inadvertent intrusion over the next 10,000 years into the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) nuclear waste repository. Credible types of potential future accidental intrusion into the WIPP are estimated as a basis for creating warning markers to prevent inadvertent intrusion. A six-step process is used to structure possible scenarios for such intrusion, and it is concluded that the probability of inadvertent intrusion into the WIPP repository over the next ten thousand years lies between one and twenty-five percent. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Independent Cost Estimate (ICE)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Independent Cost Estimate (ICE). On August 8-12, the Office of Project Management Oversight and Assessments (PM) will conduct an ICE on the NNSA Albuquerque Complex Project (NACP) at Albuquerque, NM. This estimate will support the Critical Decision (CD) for establishing the performance baseline and approval to start construction (CD-2/3). This project is at CD-1, with a total project cost range of $183M to $251M.

  2. HSRL mass estimate based on CALIPSO

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    NASA B-200 King Air ARCTASISDAC Operations and Science Richard Ferrare, Chris Hostetler, ... hours science *5 flights coordinated with NASA DC-8 *3 flights coordinated with NASA P-3 ...

  3. HSRL mass estimate based on CALIPSO

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    NASA B-200 King Air ARCTAS/ISDAC Operations and Science Richard Ferrare, Chris Hostetler, John Hair, Anthony Cook, David Harper, Mike Obland, Ray Rogers, Sharon Burton, Matt Shupe, Dave Turner, Connor Flynn B200/HSRL Deployment During ARCTAS (Spring)  Independently measures aerosol/cloud extinction and backscatter profiles at 532 nm  Includes - Backscatter channels at 1064 nm - Polarization sensitivity at 532 and 1064 nm  Profile Measurement capabilities - Extensive measurements *

  4. HSRL mass estimate based on CALIPSO

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    OBSERVATIONS FROM THE NASA LANGLEY AIRBORNE HIGH SPECTRAL RESOLUTION LIDAR AND PLANS FOR ACTIVE-PASSIVE AEROSOL-CLOUD RETRIEVALS Chris A. Hostetler, Richard A. Ferrare, John W. Hair, Raymond R. Rogers, Mike Obland, Sharon P. Burton, Wenying Su, Anthony L. Cook, David B. Harper NASA HQ Science Mission Directorate Radiation Sciences Program Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) NASA CALIPSO Project Sponsors Department of Energy Atmospheric Science Program Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

  5. Methodology for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates

    Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report

    Methodology for EIA Weekly Underground Natural Gas Storage Estimates Latest Update: November 16, 2015 This report consists of the following sections: Survey and Survey Processing - a description of the survey and an overview of the program Sampling - a description of the selection process used to identify companies in the survey Estimation - how the regional estimates are prepared from the collected data Computing the Five-year Averages, Maxima, Minima, and Year-Ago Values for the Weekly Natural

  6. Urinary arsenic profiles and the risks of cancer mortality: A population-based 20-year follow-up study in arseniasis-endemic areas in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Chi-Jung; Huang, Ya-Li; Huang, Yung-Kai; Wu, Meei-Maan; Chen, Shu-Yuan; Hsueh, Yu-Mei; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2013-04-15

    Few studies investigated the association between chronic arsenic exposure and the mortality of cancers by estimating individual urinary arsenic methylation profiles. Therefore, we compared with the general population in Taiwan to calculate the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) in arseniasis-endemic area of Taiwan from 1996 to 2010 and evaluated the dose-response relationships between environmental arsenic exposure indices or urinary arsenic profiles and the mortality of cause-specific cancer. A cohort of 1563 residents was conducted and collected their urine sample and information regarding arsenic exposure from a questionnaire. All-cause death was identified using the National Death Registry of Taiwan. Urinary arsenic profiles were measured using high performance liquid chromatography–hydride generator–atomic absorption spectrometry. We used Cox proportional hazard models to evaluate the mortality risks. In results, 193 all-site cancer deaths, and 29, 71, 43 deaths respectively for liver, lung and bladder cancers were ascertained. The SMRs were significantly high in arseniasis-endemic areas for liver, lung, and bladder cancers. People with high urinary InAs% or low DMA% or low secondary methylation index (SMI) were the most likely to suffer bladder cancer after adjusting other risk factors. Even stopping exposure to arsenic from the artesian well water, the mortality rates of the residents were higher than general population. Finally, urinary InAs%, DMA% and SMI could be the potential biomarkers to predict the mortality risk of bladder cancer. -- Highlights: ► The SMRs were significantly high in arseniasis-endemic areas for liver, lung, and bladder cancers. ► People with high urinary InAs% were the most likely to suffer bladder cancer. ► People with low DMA% or low SMI were the most likely to suffer bladder cancer.

  7. HPSS Yearly Network Traffic

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    HPSS Yearly Network Traffic HPSS Yearly Network Traffic Yearly Summary of IO Traffic Between Storage and Network Destinations These bar charts show the total transfer traffic for...

  8. Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Barbose, G.; Bird, L.; Weaver, S.; Flores-Espino, F.; Kuskova-Burns, K.; Wiser, R.

    2014-05-01

    Most renewable portfolio standards (RPS) have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS costs and benefits is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. This study provides an overview of methods used to estimate RPS compliance costs and benefits, based on available data and estimates issued by utilities and regulators. Over the 2010-2012 period, average incremental RPS compliance costs in the United States were equivalent to 0.8% of retail electricity rates, although substantial variation exists around this average, both from year-to-year and across states. The methods used by utilities and regulators to estimate incremental compliance costs vary considerably from state to state and a number of states are currently engaged in processes to refine and standardize their approaches to RPS cost calculation. The report finds that state assessments of RPS benefits have most commonly attempted to quantitatively assess avoided emissions and human health benefits, economic development impacts, and wholesale electricity price savings. Compared to the summary of RPS costs, the summary of RPS benefits is more limited, as relatively few states have undertaken detailed benefits estimates, and then only for a few types of potential policy impacts. In some cases, the same impacts may be captured in the assessment of incremental costs. For these reasons, and because methodologies and level of rigor vary widely, direct comparisons between the estimates of benefits and costs are challenging.

  9. State energy data report 1992: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This is a report of energy consumption by state for the years 1960 to 1992. The report contains summaries of energy consumption for the US and by state, consumption by source, comparisons to other energy use reports, consumption by energy use sector, and describes the estimation methodologies used in the preparation of the report. Some years are not listed specifically although they are included in the summary of data.

  10. Strategies and Lessons-Learned for the Successful Alignment of Contract Cost with the Contract Budget Base (CBB) within the First Year of Contract Award - 13154

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullis, Jay; Rueter, Ken

    2013-07-01

    In order to provide a sound basis and foundation for integrated Project and Contract change management, it is imperative to ensure the alignment of the Negotiated Contract Costs (NCC) with the Contract Budget Base (CBB), where CBB is defined as the Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB) plus Management Reserve (MR). The achievement of this alignment assures customer and contractor agreement on scope, requirements, quantities, schedule and cost, which facilitates the identification of change conditions and ultimate agreement on the value of changes to the NCC and the CBB. Delays in contract/CBB true up/reconciliation can negatively effect measurement of project progress, limiting owner understanding of liability, and may result in increased contract disagreements and potential claims. The Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OR-EM) and URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) achieved alignment of the NCC with the CBB within 10 months of UCOR taking over work on the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) cleanup contract by: 1. Managing as a discrete project; 2. Establishing expectations and setting tone of interactions; 3. Using personnel experienced with Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR); 4. Partnering; 5. Establishing ombudsmen. (authors)

  11. Forecast of contracting and subcontracting opportunities. Fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    This forecast of prime and subcontracting opportunities with the U.S. Department of Energy and its MAO contractors and environmental restoration and waste management contractors, is the Department`s best estimate of small, small disadvantaged and women-owned small business procurement opportunities for fiscal year 1996. The information contained in the forecast is published in accordance with Public Law 100-656. It is not an invitation for bids, a request for proposals, or a commitment by DOE to purchase products or services. Each procurement opportunity is based on the best information available at the time of publication and may be revised or cancelled.

  12. ARM - Lesson Plans: Estimating Local Sea Level

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimating Local Sea Level Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Estimating Local Sea Level Objective The objective is to train students' skills in observing the local environment based upon the sea level variations. Materials Each student or group of students will

  13. Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 5,567 5,151 4,620 4,517 4,590 4,568 1990's 4,478 4,480 4,545 4,645 4,775 4,724 4,889 4,942 4,855 4,897 2000's 5,072 5,138 5,038 5,166 5,318 5,424 5,608 6,263 7,009 7,017 2010's 6,974 7,139 7,570 7,607 7,877 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  14. Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,482 1,741 1,625 1,691 1,687 1990's 1,596 1,527 1,494 1,457 1,453 1,403 1,521 1,496 1,403 1,421 2000's 1,443 1,479 1,338 1,280 1,322 1,206 1,309 1,257 1,319 1,544 2010's 2,189 2,985 3,057 2,344 1,960 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  15. Louisiana - South Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,367 2,203 2,005 1980's 1,860 1,673 1,472 1,293 1,327 1,243 1,219 1,109 1,142 1,130 1990's 1,070 1,034 1,043 993 981 908 957 911 875 927 2000's 932 931 821 753 770 640 674 618 539 469 2010's 394 373 359 379 347 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  16. Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,254 1,464 1,404 1,525 1,522 1990's 1,464 1,412 1,358 1,375 1,363 1,346 1,459 1,386 1,285 1,323 2000's 1,348 1,379 1,283 1,227 1,283 1,167 1,282 1,230 1,246 1,462 2010's 2,107 2,909 2,974

  17. Lower 48 States Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 18,637 18,589 19,029 1980's 18,486 18,502 17,245 15,515 16,869 15,673 15,286 15,765 16,270 16,582 1990's 16,894 16,849 17,009 17,396 17,899 17,570 18,415 18,736 18,207 18,469 2000's 18,713 19,318 18,893 18,947 18,690 17,989 18,137 19,078 20,169 21,236 2010's 21,922 23,228

  18. Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 174 167 156 1980's 163 165 196 156 171 166 188 159 188 220 1990's 229 282 320 387 447 514 540 562 676 719 2000's 759 882 964 1,142 1,050 1,104 1,174 1,326 1,441 1,524 2010's 1,590 1,694 1,681 1,527 1,561 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  19. Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 315 329 355 1980's 416 423 391 414 484 433 402 456 510 591 1990's 583 639 714 713 780 806 782 891 838 1,213 2000's 1,070 1,286 1,388 1,456 1,524 1,642 1,695 1,825 2,026 2,233 2010's 2,218 2,088 2,001 1,992 1,718 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  20. Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 295 1980's 352 354 334 346 400 381 325 385 411 510 1990's 485 544 619 683 747 740 720 854 793 1,173 2000's 1,050 1,275 1,375 1,458 1,537 1,648 1,714 1,828 2,066 2,288 2010's 2,271 2,151 2,051

  1. New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 961 1980's 896 925 802 677 724 700 499 607 608 649 1990's 794 879 1,027 1,212 1,220 1,242 1,272 1,423 1,339 1,421 2000's 1,400 1,415 1,397 1,284 1,397 1,383 1,332 1,264 1,274 1,264 2010's

  2. Oklahoma Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,354 1980's 1,296 1,425 1,381 1,321 1,517 1,432 1,394 1,558 1,682 1,792 1990's 1,874 1,855 1,767 1,663 1,636 1,506 1,538 1,532 1,506 1,278 2000's 1,412 1,420 1,442 1,501 1,520 1,570 1,604

  3. Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,319 1,188 1,208 1980's 1,117 1,053 969 926 1,065 1,044 1,169 1,158 1,089 1,117 1990's 1,075 1,114 1,124 1,213 1,226 1,264 1,263 1,292 1,323 1,236 2000's 1,289 1,395 1,398 1,381 1,295 1,232 1,157 1,172 1,156 1,013 2010's 893 886 926 819

  4. Texas - RRC District 5 Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 5 Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 83 89 153 1980's 125 139 129 131 164 167 165 171 162 156 1990's 160 170 171 175 185 167 187 210 224 219 2000's 303 335 377 457 490 650 783 1,130 1,521 1,718 2010's 1,771 1,904 1,752 1,582 1,412 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W

  5. Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,672 4,265 3,877 3,860 3,966 3,954 1990's 3,928 3,879 3,917 4,161 4,296 4,284 4,466 4,525 4,396 4,438 2000's 4,577 4,776 4,727 4,815 4,992 5,146 5,370 6,029 6,729 6,716 2010's 6,641 6,748

  6. Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 132 1980's 143 143 173 135 153 148 166 131 163 199 1990's 208 243 271 303 378 436 494 533 647 687 2000's 725 834 914 1,085 995 1,048 1,115 1,260 1,370 1,458 2010's 1,546 1,625 1,563 1,372

  7. Estimating Terrorist Risk with Possibility Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.L. Darby

    2004-11-30

    This report summarizes techniques that use possibility theory to estimate the risk of terrorist acts. These techniques were developed under the sponsorship of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as part of the National Infrastructure Simulation Analysis Center (NISAC) project. The techniques have been used to estimate the risk of various terrorist scenarios to support NISAC analyses during 2004. The techniques are based on the Logic Evolved Decision (LED) methodology developed over the past few years by Terry Bott and Steve Eisenhawer at LANL. [LED] The LED methodology involves the use of fuzzy sets, possibility theory, and approximate reasoning. LED captures the uncertainty due to vagueness and imprecision that is inherent in the fidelity of the information available for terrorist acts; probability theory cannot capture these uncertainties. This report does not address the philosophy supporting the development of nonprobabilistic approaches, and it does not discuss possibility theory in detail. The references provide a detailed discussion of these subjects. [Shafer] [Klir and Yuan] [Dubois and Prade] Suffice to say that these approaches were developed to address types of uncertainty that cannot be addressed by a probability measure. An earlier report discussed in detail the problems with using a probability measure to evaluate terrorist risk. [Darby Methodology]. Two related techniques are discussed in this report: (1) a numerical technique, and (2) a linguistic technique. The numerical technique uses traditional possibility theory applied to crisp sets, while the linguistic technique applies possibility theory to fuzzy sets. Both of these techniques as applied to terrorist risk for NISAC applications are implemented in software called PossibleRisk. The techniques implemented in PossibleRisk were developed specifically for use in estimating terrorist risk for the NISAC program. The LEDTools code can be used to perform the same linguistic evaluation as

  8. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-05-15

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 deg. K between 20 and 50 deg. C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  9. Environmental Releases for Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DYEKMAN, D L

    2002-08-01

    This report fulfills the annual reporting requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. The report contains tabular data summaries on air emissions and liquid effluents released to the environment as well as nonroutine releases during calendar year (CY) 2001. These releases, bearing radioactive and hazardous substances, were from Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI), CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG), and Fluor Hanford (FH) managed facilities and activities. These data were obtained from direct sampling and analysis and from estimates based upon approved release factors. This report further serves as a supplemental resource to the Hanford Site Environmental Report (HSER PNNL-13910), published by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. HSER includes a yearly accounting of the impacts on the surrounding populace and environment from major activities at the Hanford Site. HSER also summarizes the regulatory compliance status of the Hanford Site. Tables ES-1 through ES-5 display comprehensive data summaries of CY2001 air emission and liquid effluent releases. The data displayed in these tables compiles the following: Radionuclide air emissions; Nonradioactive air emissions; Radionuclides in liquid effluents discharged to ground; Total volumes and flow rates of radioactive liquid effluents discharged to ground; and Radionuclides discharged to the Columbia River.

  10. Motor vehicle MPG and market shares report. MPG and market share data system, model year 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, P.S.; Roberts, G.F.

    1984-02-01

    Estimates of final model year 1983 new car and new light truck MPG are provided. ORNL has modified the procedure for calculating new car MPG. The new procedure takes into account the sales mix of engine size, engine type (gasoline or diesel), and transmission type within a nameplate (car line). For example, the new ORNL method takes into account that over 60 percent of the Chevettes in 1983 were the gasoline version (98 CID engine displacement) with a 3-speed automatic transmission. Also, the three diesel model types accounted for only about 1 percent of the Chevette sales. This new method estimated the Chevette MPG for 1983 to be 33.2, nearly 5 MPG lower than the estimate based on the old method. Since this report contains revised new car MPG estimates for every year, the fuel economy estimates in this report are not comparable to those in any previous ORNL report. The estimates of new light truck MPG have not been revised, however.

  11. Use of Cost Estimating Relationships

    Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Cost Estimating Relationships (CERs) are an important tool in an estimator's kit, and in many cases, they are the only tool. Thus, it is important to understand their limitations and characteristics. This chapter discusses considerations of which the estimator must be aware so the Cost Estimating Relationships can be properly used.

  12. Letter report: Population estimates by age, sex and race for 10-county study area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pittenger, D B

    1992-02-01

    The Hanford Environmental Does Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation doses that people could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. To identify groups that may have received doses, population estimates containing age, race, and sex detail for ten counties in Washington and Oregon for the years 1940 to 1980 were prepared by the Demographics Laboratory under a subcontract with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A data base of population information was developed from census reports and published and unpublished collections from the Washington State Office of Financial Management and Center for Population Research. Three estimation methods were then explored: the cohort-component model, cohort interpolation, and age-group interpolation. The estimates generated through cohort and age-group interpolation are considered adequate for initial use in the HEDR Project. Results are presented in two forms: (1) county populations by sex and single year of age and (2) county populations by sex and race for age groupings. These results are made available to the HEDR Project for further refinement into population estimates by county census divisions.

  13. Fiscal year 1999 Battelle performance evaluation and fee agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVIS, T.L.

    1998-10-22

    Fiscal Year 1999 represents the third fill year utilizing a results-oriented, performance-based evaluation for the Contractor's operations and management of the DOE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (here after referred to as the Laboratory). However, this is the first year that the Contractor's fee is totally performance-based utilizing the same Critical Outcomes. This document describes the critical outcomes, objectives, performance indicators, expected levels of performance, and the basis for the evaluation of the Contractor's performance for the period October 1, 1998 through September 30, 1999, as required by Clauses entitled ''Use of Objective Standards of Performance, Self Assessment and Performance Evaluation'' and ''Performance Measures Review'' of the Contract DE-ACO6-76RL01830. Furthermore, it documents the distribution of the total available performance-based fee and the methodology set for determining the amount of fee earned by the Contractor as stipulated within the causes entitled ''Estimated Cost and Annual Fee,'' ''Total Available Fee'' and ''Allowable Costs and Fee.'' In partnership with the Contractor and other key customers, the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters (HQ) and Richland Operations Office (RL) has defined four critical outcomes that serve as the core for the Contractor's performance-based evaluation and fee determination. The Contractor also utilizes these outcomes as a basis for overall management of the Laboratory.

  14. A method for estimating direct normal solar irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janjai, Serm

    2010-09-15

    In order to investigate a potential use of concentrating solar power technologies and select an optimum site for these technologies, it is necessary to obtain information on the geographical distribution of direct normal solar irradiation over an area of interest. In this work, we have developed a method for estimating direct normal irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment. The method starts with the estimation of global irradiation on a horizontal surface from MTSAT-1R satellite data and other ground-based ancillary data. Then a satellite-based diffuse fraction model was developed and used to estimate the diffuse component of the satellite-derived global irradiation. Based on this estimated global and diffuse irradiation and the solar radiation incident angle, the direct normal irradiation was finally calculated. To evaluate its performance, the method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation at seven pyrheliometer stations in Thailand. It was found that values of monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation from the measurements and those estimated from the proposed method are in reasonable agreement, with a root mean square difference of 16% and a mean bias of -1.6%, with respect to mean measured values. After the validation, this method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation over Thailand by using MTSAT-1R satellite data for the period from June 2005 to December 2008. Results from the calculation were displayed as hourly and yearly irradiation maps. These maps reveal that the direct normal irradiation in Thailand was strongly affected by the tropical monsoons and local topography of the country. (author)

  15. A simple method to estimate interwell autocorrelation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pizarro, J.O.S.; Lake, L.W.

    1997-08-01

    The estimation of autocorrelation in the lateral or interwell direction is important when performing reservoir characterization studies using stochastic modeling. This paper presents a new method to estimate the interwell autocorrelation based on parameters, such as the vertical range and the variance, that can be estimated with commonly available data. We used synthetic fields that were generated from stochastic simulations to provide data to construct the estimation charts. These charts relate the ratio of areal to vertical variance and the autocorrelation range (expressed variously) in two directions. Three different semivariogram models were considered: spherical, exponential and truncated fractal. The overall procedure is demonstrated using field data. We find that the approach gives the most self-consistent results when it is applied to previously identified facies. Moreover, the autocorrelation trends follow the depositional pattern of the reservoir, which gives confidence in the validity of the approach.

  16. Adjoint Error Estimation for Linear Advection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connors, J M; Banks, J W; Hittinger, J A; Woodward, C S

    2011-03-30

    An a posteriori error formula is described when a statistical measurement of the solution to a hyperbolic conservation law in 1D is estimated by finite volume approximations. This is accomplished using adjoint error estimation. In contrast to previously studied methods, the adjoint problem is divorced from the finite volume method used to approximate the forward solution variables. An exact error formula and computable error estimate are derived based on an abstractly defined approximation of the adjoint solution. This framework allows the error to be computed to an arbitrary accuracy given a sufficiently well resolved approximation of the adjoint solution. The accuracy of the computable error estimate provably satisfies an a priori error bound for sufficiently smooth solutions of the forward and adjoint problems. The theory does not currently account for discontinuities. Computational examples are provided that show support of the theory for smooth solutions. The application to problems with discontinuities is also investigated computationally.

  17. Texas - RRC District 7B Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 7B Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 10 2010's 10 11 11 11 12 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  18. Texas - RRC District 7B Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7B Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 98 100 129 1980's 132 118 113 123 121 114 102 106 103 78 1990's 80 68 68 65 65 58 69 67 60 64 2000's 55 51 59 57 51 65 90 139 187 171 2010's 149 196 265 228 181 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  19. Texas - RRC District 7C Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 7C Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 32 2010's 34 40 50 63 88 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  20. Texas - RRC District 7C Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 7C Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 261 259 243 1980's 256 234 261 228 254 248 238 242 259 290 1990's 301 285 285 309 334 321 370 372 356 327 2000's 296 315 327 350 348 349 369 346 342 328 2010's 315 293 309 328 424 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  1. Texas - RRC District 8A Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Texas - RRC District 8A Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 111 2010's 108 107 108 107 108 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring

  2. Texas - RRC District 8A Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 8A Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 164 146 121 1980's 129 102 105 105 83 89 65 71 67 81 1990's 70 71 101 68 87 64 69 55 66 100 2000's 87 75 93 100 108 102 102 103 105 108 2010's 93 94 97 99 103 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  3. U.S. Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) U.S. Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 599 2010's 590 504 474 489 547 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring

  4. 70 years after Trinity

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    70 years after Trinity 70 years after Trinity Though the world has seen many changes since Trinity, one thing has remained constant: Los Alamos remains essential to our nation's ...

  5. Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Landscapting Water Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Estimating Unmetered Landscaping Water Use July 2010 i Summary Executive Order 13514 requires Federal agencies to develop a baseline for industrial, landscaping, and agricultural water use in fiscal year 2010. Measuring actual water use through flow meters is the best method to develop this baseline. But there are instances where Federal sites do not meter these applications, so developing a baseline will be problematic. Therefore the intent of this document is to assist Federal agencies in the

  6. Tank waste remediation system multi-year work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP) documents the detailed total Program baseline and was constructed to guide Program execution. The TWRS MYWP is one of two elements that comprise the TWRS Program Management Plan. The TWRS MYWP fulfills the Hanford Site Management System requirement for a Multi-Year Program Plan and a Fiscal-Year Work Plan. The MYWP addresses program vision, mission, objectives, strategy, functions and requirements, risks, decisions, assumptions, constraints, structure, logic, schedule, resource requirements, and waste generation and disposition. Sections 1 through 6, Section 8, and the appendixes provide program-wide information. Section 7 includes a subsection for each of the nine program elements that comprise the TWRS Program. The foundation of any program baseline is base planning data (e.g., defendable product definition, logic, schedules, cost estimates, and bases of estimates). The TWRS Program continues to improve base data. As data improve, so will program element planning, integration between program elements, integration outside of the TWRS Program, and the overall quality of the TWRS MYWP. The MYWP establishes the TWRS baseline objectives to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The TWRS Program will complete the baseline mission in 2040 and will incur costs totalling approximately 40 billion dollars. The summary strategy is to meet the above objectives by using a robust systems engineering effort, placing the highest possible priority on safety and environmental protection; encouraging {open_quotes}out sourcing{close_quotes} of the work to the extent practical; and managing significant but limited resources to move toward final disposition of tank wastes, while openly communicating with all interested stakeholders.

  7. Secretary Moniz's First Year

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    We're looking back at some of the biggest moments from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's first year in office.

  8. TRENDS IN ESTIMATED MIXING DEPTH DAILY MAXIMUMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, R; Amy DuPont, A; Robert Kurzeja, R; Matt Parker, M

    2007-11-12

    Mixing depth is an important quantity in the determination of air pollution concentrations. Fireweather forecasts depend strongly on estimates of the mixing depth as a means of determining the altitude and dilution (ventilation rates) of smoke plumes. The Savannah River United States Forest Service (USFS) routinely conducts prescribed fires at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a heavily wooded Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southwest South Carolina. For many years, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided forecasts of weather conditions in support of the fire program, including an estimated mixing depth using potential temperature and turbulence change with height at a given location. This paper examines trends in the average estimated mixing depth daily maximum at the SRS over an extended period of time (4.75 years) derived from numerical atmospheric simulations using two versions of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). This allows for differences to be seen between the model versions, as well as trends on a multi-year time frame. In addition, comparisons of predicted mixing depth for individual days in which special balloon soundings were released are also discussed.

  9. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the ... Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for ...

  10. Estimated recharge rates at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fayer, M.J.; Walters, T.B.

    1995-02-01

    The Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitors the distribution of contaminants in ground water at the Hanford Site for the U.S. Department of Energy. A subtask called {open_quotes}Water Budget at Hanford{close_quotes} was initiated in FY 1994. The objective of this subtask was to produce a defensible map of estimated recharge rates across the Hanford Site. Methods that have been used to estimate recharge rates at the Hanford Site include measurements (of drainage, water contents, and tracers) and computer modeling. For the simulations of 12 soil-vegetation combinations, the annual rates varied from 0.05 mm/yr for the Ephrata sandy loam with bunchgrass to 85.2 mm/yr for the same soil without vegetation. Water content data from the Grass Site in the 300 Area indicated that annual rates varied from 3.0 to 143.5 mm/yr during an 8-year period. The annual volume of estimated recharge was calculated to be 8.47 {times} 10{sup 9} L for the potential future Hanford Site (i.e., the portion of the current Site bounded by Highway 240 and the Columbia River). This total volume is similar to earlier estimates of natural recharge and is 2 to 10x higher than estimates of runoff and ground-water flow from higher elevations. Not only is the volume of natural recharge significant in comparison to other ground-water inputs, the distribution of estimated recharge is highly skewed to the disturbed sandy soils (i.e., the 200 Areas, where most contaminants originate). The lack of good estimates of the means and variances of the supporting data (i.e., the soil map, the vegetation/land use map, the model parameters) translates into large uncertainties in the recharge estimates. When combined, the significant quantity of estimated recharge, its high sensitivity to disturbance, and the unquantified uncertainty of the data and model parameters suggest that the defensibility of the recharge estimates should be improved.

  11. Estimating Annual Precipitation in the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

    2000-05-15

    Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Previous attempts to create precipitation-elevation functions in western Nevada have been difficult and result in large uncertainty. In the WRD data analysis, the effect of geographic scale on the precipitation-elevation function was overlooked. This contributed to an erroneous Maxey-Eakin recharge estimate.

  12. 2013 Year in Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    3 Year in Review i 2013 YIR May 2014 Year-in-Review: 2013 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy DOE / 2013 Year in Review ii 2013 YIR For Further Information This report was prepared by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under the direction of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary, and William Bryan, Deputy Assistant Secretary. Specific

  13. Fiscal Year Ended

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2014 Report to Congress July 2016 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | July 2016 Report on Uncosted Balances for Fiscal Year Ended 2014| Page iii Executive Summary As required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Public Law 102-486), the Department of Energy is submitting a Report on Uncosted Balances for Fiscal Year Ended 2014. This report presents the results of the Department's annual analysis of uncosted obligation

  14. Estimating Air Chemical Emissions from Research Activities Using Stack Measurement Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Duchsherer, Cheryl J.; Woodruff, Rodger K.; Larson, Timothy V.

    2013-02-15

    Current methods of estimating air emissions from research and development (R&D) activities use a wide range of release fractions or emission factors with bases ranging from empirical to semi-empirical. Although considered conservative, the uncertainties and confidence levels of the existing methods have not been reported. Chemical emissions were estimated from sampling data taken from four research facilities over ten years. The approach was to use a Monte Carlo technique to create distributions of annual emission estimates for target compounds detected in source test samples. Distributions were created for each year and building sampled for compounds with sufficient detection frequency to qualify for the analysis. The results using the Monte Carlo technique without applying a filter to remove negative emission values showed almost all distributions spanning zero, and forty percent of the distributions having a negative mean. This indicates that emissions are so low as to be indistinguishable from building background. Application of a filter to allow only positive values in the distribution provided a more realistic value for emissions and increased the distribution mean by an average of sixteen percent. Release fractions were calculated by dividing the emission estimates by a building chemical inventory quantity. Two variations were used for this quantity: chemical usage, and chemical usage plus one-half standing inventory. Filters were applied so that only release fraction values from zero to one were included in the resulting distributions. Release fractions had a wide range among chemicals and among data sets for different buildings and/or years for a given chemical. Regressions of release fractions to molecular weight and vapor pressure showed weak correlations. Similarly, regressions of mean emissions to chemical usage, chemical inventory, molecular weight and vapor pressure also gave weak correlations. These results highlight the difficulties in estimating

  15. Montana Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Lease Condensate Estimated Production Montana Lease Condensate

  16. Florida Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Lease Condensate Estimated Production Florida Lease Condensate

  17. Kentucky Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Barrels) Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Lease Condensate Estimated Production Kentucky Lease Condensate

  18. Yearly Energy Costs for Buildings

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1991-03-20

    COSTSAFR3.0 generates a set of compliance forms which will be attached to housing Requests for Proposals (RFPs) issued by Departments or Agencies of the Federal Government. The compliance forms provide a uniform method for estimating the total yearly energy cost for each proposal. COSTSAFR3.0 analyzes specific housing projects at a given site, using alternative fuel types, and considering alternative housing types. The program is designed around the concept of minimizing overall costs through energy conservationmore » design, including first cost and future utility costs, and estabilishes a standard design to which proposed housing designs are compared. It provides a point table for each housing type that can be used to determine whether a proposed design meets the standard and how a design can be modified to meet the standard.« less

  19. Final Year Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubsch, Tristan

    2013-06-20

    In the last years of this eighteen-year grant project, the research efforts have focused mostly on the study of off-shell representations of supersymmetry, both on the worldline and on the world- sheet, i.e., both in supersymmetric quantum mechanics and in supersymmetric field theory in 1+1-dimensional spacetime.

  20. Table 3.4 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Dollars 1 per Million Btu) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Natural Gas 2 Petroleum Retail Electricity ...

  1. Cost estimate for a proposed GDF Suez LNG testing program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Brady, Patrick Dennis; Jernigan, Dann A.; Luketa, Anay Josephine; Nissen, Mark R.; Lopez, Carlos; Vermillion, Nancy; Hightower, Marion Michael

    2014-02-01

    At the request of GDF Suez, a Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost estimate was prepared for the design, construction, testing, and data analysis for an experimental series of large-scale (Liquefied Natural Gas) LNG spills on land and water that would result in the largest pool fires and vapor dispersion events ever conducted. Due to the expected cost of this large, multi-year program, the authors utilized Sandia's structured cost estimating methodology. This methodology insures that the efforts identified can be performed for the cost proposed at a plus or minus 30 percent confidence. The scale of the LNG spill, fire, and vapor dispersion tests proposed by GDF could produce hazard distances and testing safety issues that need to be fully explored. Based on our evaluations, Sandia can utilize much of our existing fire testing infrastructure for the large fire tests and some small dispersion tests (with some modifications) in Albuquerque, but we propose to develop a new dispersion testing site at our remote test area in Nevada because of the large hazard distances. While this might impact some testing logistics, the safety aspects warrant this approach. In addition, we have included a proposal to study cryogenic liquid spills on water and subsequent vaporization in the presence of waves. Sandia is working with DOE on applications that provide infrastructure pertinent to wave production. We present an approach to conduct repeatable wave/spill interaction testing that could utilize such infrastructure.

  2. The ARM Best Estimate 2-dimensional Gridded Surface (Dataset) | Data

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Explorer 2-dimensional Gridded Surface Title: The ARM Best Estimate 2-dimensional Gridded Surface The ARM Best Estimate 2-dimensional Gridded Surface (ARMBE2DGRID) data set merges together key surface measurements at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) sites and interpolates the data to a regular 2D grid to facilitate data application. Data from the original site locations can be found in the ARM Best Estimate Station-based Surface (ARMBESTNS) data set. Authors: Xie,Shaocheng ; Qi, Tang

  3. Battery Calendar Life Estimator Manual Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon P. Christophersen; Ira Bloom; Ed Thomas; Vince Battaglia

    2012-10-01

    The Battery Life Estimator (BLE) Manual has been prepared to assist developers in their efforts to estimate the calendar life of advanced batteries for automotive applications. Testing requirements and procedures are defined by the various manuals previously published under the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC). The purpose of this manual is to describe and standardize a method for estimating calendar life based on statistical models and degradation data acquired from typical USABC battery testing.

  4. Battery Life Estimator Manual Linear Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon P. Christophersen; Ira Bloom; Ed Thomas; Vince Battaglia

    2009-08-01

    The Battery Life Estimator (BLE) Manual has been prepared to assist developers in their efforts to estimate the calendar life of advanced batteries for automotive applications. Testing requirements and procedures are defined by the various manuals previously published under the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC). The purpose of this manual is to describe and standardize a method for estimating calendar life based on statistical models and degradation data acquired from typical USABC battery testing.

  5. Robust and intelligent bearing estimation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Claassen, John P.

    2000-01-01

    A method of bearing estimation comprising quadrature digital filtering of event observations, constructing a plurality of observation matrices each centered on a time-frequency interval, determining for each observation matrix a parameter such as degree of polarization, linearity of particle motion, degree of dyadicy, or signal-to-noise ratio, choosing observation matrices most likely to produce a set of best available bearing estimates, and estimating a bearing for each observation matrix of the chosen set.

  6. Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-05-04

    The Cloud Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool (SEET) is a user driven Graphical User Interface (GUI) that estimates cloud supercooled liquid water (SLW) content in terms of vertical column and total mass from Moderate resolution Imaging Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool Spectroradiometer (MODIS) spatially derived cloud products and realistic vertical cloud parameterizations that are user defined. It also contains functions for post-processing of the resulting data in tabular and graphical form.

  7. Allocation Year Rollover process

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Allocatio Year Rollover process Allocation Year Rollover process December 23, 2013 by Francesca Verdier Allocation Year 2013 (AY13) ends at 23:59:59 on Monday, January 13, 2014. AY14 runs from Tuesday, January 14, 2014 through Monday, January 12, 2015. The major features of the rollover are: charging acroess the AY boundary: All batch jobs will continue running during the rollover. Time accrued before midnight will be charged to AY13 repos; time accrued after midnight will be charged to AY14

  8. The ARM Best Estimate 2-dimensional Gridded Surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie,Shaocheng; Qi, Tang

    2015-06-15

    The ARM Best Estimate 2-dimensional Gridded Surface (ARMBE2DGRID) data set merges together key surface measurements at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) sites and interpolates the data to a regular 2D grid to facilitate data application. Data from the original site locations can be found in the ARM Best Estimate Station-based Surface (ARMBESTNS) data set.

  9. Sensitivity of health risk estimates to air quality adjustment procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, R.G.

    1997-06-30

    This letter is a summary of risk results associated with exposure estimates using two-parameter Weibull and quadratic air quality adjustment procedures (AQAPs). New exposure estimates were developed for children and child-occurrences, six urban areas, and five alternative air quality scenarios. In all cases, the Weibull and quadratic results are compared to previous results, which are based on a proportional AQAP.

  10. Concurrent signal combining and channel estimation in digital communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Mason, John J.

    2011-08-30

    In the reception of digital information transmitted on a communication channel, a characteristic exhibited by the communication channel during transmission of the digital information is estimated based on a communication signal that represents the digital information and has been received via the communication channel. Concurrently with the estimating, the communication signal is used to decide what digital information was transmitted.

  11. The ARM Best Estimate 2-dimensional Gridded Surface

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Xie,Shaocheng; Qi, Tang

    The ARM Best Estimate 2-dimensional Gridded Surface (ARMBE2DGRID) data set merges together key surface measurements at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) sites and interpolates the data to a regular 2D grid to facilitate data application. Data from the original site locations can be found in the ARM Best Estimate Station-based Surface (ARMBESTNS) data set.

  12. Welcome Year in Review

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Training Meeting Orlando, Florida-May 23-25, 2006 Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy & the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Welcome & Year In Review Peter Dessaules...

  13. Derived Annual Estimates of Manufacturing Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    > Derived Annual Estimates - Executive Summary Derived Annual Estimates of Manufacturing Energy Consumption, 1974-1988 Figure showing Derived Estimates Executive Summary This...

  14. Weldon Spring Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    This Weldon Spring Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1995 has been prepared to provide information about the public safety and environmental protection programs conducted by the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The Weldon Spring site is located in southern St. Charles County, Missouri, approximately 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The site consists of two main areas, the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant and raffinate pits and the Weldon Spring Quarry. The chemical plant, raffinate pits, and quarry are located on Missouri State Route 94, southwest of U.S. Route 40/61. The objectives of the Site Environmental Report are to present a summary of data from the environmental monitoring program, to characterize trends and environmental conditions at the site, and to confirm compliance with environmental and health protection standards and requirements. The report also presents the status of remedial activities and the results of monitoring these activities to assess their impacts on the public and environment. This report includes monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological sampling activities. These data include estimates of dose to the public from the Weldon Spring site, estimates of effluent releases, and trends in groundwater contaminant levels. Additionally, applicable compliance requirements, quality assurance programs, and special studies conducted in 1995 to support environmental protection programs are discussed. Dose estimates presented in this report are based on hypothetical exposure scenarios for public use of areas near the site. In addition, release estimates have been calculated on the basis of 1995 National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and air monitoring data. Effluent discharges from the site under routine NPDES and National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) monitoring were below permitted levels.

  15. Weldon Spring Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    This report for Calendar Year 1994 has been prepared to provide information about the public safety and environmental protection programs conducted by the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The Weldon Spring site is located in southern St. Charles County, Missouri, approximately 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The site consists of two main areas, the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant and raffinate pits and the Weldon Spring Quarry. The chemical plant, raffinate pits, and quarry are located on Missouri State Route 94, southwest of US Route 40/61. The objectives of the Site Environmental Report are to present a summary of data from the environmental monitoring program, to characterize trends and environmental conditions at the site, and to confirm compliance with environmental and health protection standards and requirements. The report also presents the status of remedial activities and the results of monitoring these activities to assess their impacts on the public and environment. This report includes monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological sampling activities. These data include estimates of dose to the public from the Weldon Spring site, estimates of effluent releases, and trends in groundwater contaminant levels. Additionally, applicable compliance requirements, quality assurance programs, and special studies conducted in 1994 to support environmental protection programs are discussed. Dose estimates presented in this report are based on hypothetical exposure scenarios of public use of areas near the site. In addition, release estimates have been calculated on the basis of 1994 National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and air monitoring data. Effluent discharges from the site under routine NPDES and National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) monitoring were below permitted levels.

  16. Examples of Cost Estimation Packages

    Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Estimates can be performed in a variety of ways. Some of these are for projects for an undefined scope, a conventional construction project, or where there is a level of effort required to complete the work. Examples of cost estimation packages for these types of projects are described in this appendix.

  17. Quantity Estimation Of The Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorana, Agim; Malkaj, Partizan; Muda, Valbona

    2007-04-23

    In this paper we present some considerations about quantity estimations, regarding the range of interaction and the conservations laws in various types of interactions. Our estimations are done under classical and quantum point of view and have to do with the interaction's carriers, the radius, the influence range and the intensity of interactions.

  18. Generalized REGression Package for Nonlinear Parameter Estimation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-05-15

    GREG computes modal (maximum-posterior-density) and interval estimates of the parameters in a user-provided Fortran subroutine MODEL, using a user-provided vector OBS of single-response observations or matrix OBS of multiresponse observations. GREG can also select the optimal next experiment from a menu of simulated candidates, so as to minimize the volume of the parametric inference region based on the resulting augmented data set.

  19. Low-Temperature Hydrothermal Resource Potential Estimate

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Katherine Young

    2016-06-30

    Compilation of data (spreadsheet and shapefiles) for several low-temperature resource types, including isolated springs and wells, delineated area convection systems, sedimentary basins and coastal plains sedimentary systems. For each system, we include estimates of the accessible resource base, mean extractable resource and beneficial heat. Data compiled from USGS and other sources. The paper (submitted to GRC 2016) describing the methodology and analysis is also included.

  20. Communications circuit including a linear quadratic estimator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, Dennis D.

    2015-07-07

    A circuit includes a linear quadratic estimator (LQE) configured to receive a plurality of measurements a signal. The LQE is configured to weight the measurements based on their respective uncertainties to produce weighted averages. The circuit further includes a controller coupled to the LQE and configured to selectively adjust at least one data link parameter associated with a communication channel in response to receiving the weighted averages.

  1. Letter report: Population estimates by age, sex and race for 10-county study area. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pittenger, D.B.

    1992-02-01

    The Hanford Environmental Does Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation doses that people could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. To identify groups that may have received doses, population estimates containing age, race, and sex detail for ten counties in Washington and Oregon for the years 1940 to 1980 were prepared by the Demographics Laboratory under a subcontract with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A data base of population information was developed from census reports and published and unpublished collections from the Washington State Office of Financial Management and Center for Population Research. Three estimation methods were then explored: the cohort-component model, cohort interpolation, and age-group interpolation. The estimates generated through cohort and age-group interpolation are considered adequate for initial use in the HEDR Project. Results are presented in two forms: (1) county populations by sex and single year of age and (2) county populations by sex and race for age groupings. These results are made available to the HEDR Project for further refinement into population estimates by county census divisions.

  2. Estimates of the gene frequency of BRCA1 and its contribution to breast and ovarian cancer incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, D.; Easton, D.F.; Peto, J.

    1995-12-01

    The majority of multiple-case families that segregate both breast and ovarian cancer in a dominant fashion are due to mutations in the BRCA1 gene on chromosome 17q. In this paper, we have combined penetrance estimates for BRCA1 with the results of two population-based genetic epidemiological studies to estimate the gene frequency of BRCA1. On the assumption that the excess risk of ovarian cancer in first degree relatives of breast cancer patients and the breast cancer excess in relatives of ovarian cancer patients are both entirely accounted for by BRCA1, we estimate that the BRCA1 gene frequency is 0.0006 (95% confidence interval [0.0002-0.001]) and that the proportion of breast cancer cases in the general population due to BRCA1 is 5.3% below age 40 years, 2.2% between ages 40 and 49 years, and 1.1% between ages 50 and 70 years. The corresponding estimates for ovarian cancer are 5.7%, 4.6%, and 2.1%, respectively. Our results suggest that the majority of breast cancer families with less than four cases and no ovarian cancer are not due to rare highly penetrant genes such as BRCA1 but are more likely to be due either to chance or to more common genes of lower penetrance. 22 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Wyoming Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Wyoming Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  4. North Dakota Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) North Dakota Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  5. Kansas Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Kansas Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  6. Estimates of particulate mass in multi-canister overpacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SLOUGHTER, J.P.

    1999-02-25

    High, best estimate, and low values are developed for particulate inventories within MCO baskets that have been loaded with freshly cleaned fuel assemblies and scrap. These per-basket estimates are then applied to all anticipated MCO payload configurations to identify which configurations are bounding for each type of particulate. Finally the resulting bounding and nominal values for residual particulates are combined with corresponding values [from other documents] for particulate that may be generated by corrosion of exposed uranium after the fuel has been cleaned. The resulting rounded nominal estimate for a typical MCO after 40 years of storage is 8 kg. The estimate for a bounding total particulate case MCO is that it may contain up to 64 kg of particulate after 40 years of storage.

  7. Estimates of Particulate Mass in Multi Canister Overpacks (MCO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SLOUGHTER, J.P.

    2000-02-16

    High, best estimate, and low values are developed for particulate inventories within MCO baskets that have been loaded with freshly cleaned fuel assemblies and scrap. These per-basket estimates are then applied to all anticipated MCO payload configurations to identify which configurations are bounding for each type of particulate. Finally the resulting bounding and nominal values for residual particulates are combined with corresponding values [from other documents] for particulates that may be generated by corrosion of exposed uranium after the fuel has been cleaned. The resulting rounded nominal estimate for a typical MCO after 40 years of storage is 8 kg. The estimate for a bounding total particulate case MCO is that it may contain up to 64 kg of particulate after 40 years of storage.

  8. Emissions Tool Estimates the Impact of Emissions on Smart Grid...

    Energy Savers

    The free, web-based calculator aims to estimate the impact of NOx, SO2 and CO2 emissions on smart grid infrastructure investments, taking into account specific context and project ...

  9. GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide: Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process, from the first step of defining the estimate's purpose to the last step of updating the estimate to reflect actual costs and changes.

  10. Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Landscaping Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate

    2010-07-28

    The document lays-out step by step instructions to estimate landscaping water using two alternative approaches: evapotranspiration method and irrigation audit method. The evapotranspiration method option calculates the amount of water needed to maintain a healthy turf or landscaped area for a given location based on the amount of water transpired and evaporated from the plants. The evapotranspiration method offers a relatively easy “one-stop-shop” for Federal agencies to develop an initial estimate of annual landscape water use. The document presents annual irrigation factors for 36 cities across the U.S. that represents the gallons of irrigation required per square foot for distinct landscape types. By following the steps outlined in the document, the reader can choose a location that is a close match their location and landscape type to provide a rough estimate of annual irrigation needs without the need to research specific data on their site. The second option presented in the document is the irrigation audit method, which is the physical measurement of water applied to landscaped areas through irrigation equipment. Steps to perform an irrigation audit are outlined in the document, which follow the Recommended Audit Guidelines produced by the Irrigation Association.[5] An irrigation audit requires some knowledge on the specific procedures to accurately estimate how much water is being consumed by the irrigation equipment.

  11. Module: Estimating Historical Emissions from Deforestation |...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Website: www.leafasia.orgtoolstechnical-guidance-series-estimating-historical Cost: Free Language: English Module: Estimating Historical Emissions from Deforestation Screenshot...

  12. YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2004-11-01

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from

  13. NERSC Celebrates 40 Years at the Forefront

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Celebrates 40 Years of Supercomputing NERSC Celebrates 40 Years at the Forefront DOE supercomputing facility has been supporting broad-based scientific research since 1974 January 29, 2014 Contact: Kathy Kincade, KKincade@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2124 horstsimon2013 Horst Simon This year, the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is celebrating yet another milestone: its 40th anniversary. Since its founding in 1974, NERSC has become the primary

  14. Estimating pixel variances in the scenes of staring sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simonson, Katherine M. (Cedar Crest, NM); Ma, Tian J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-24

    A technique for detecting changes in a scene perceived by a staring sensor is disclosed. The technique includes acquiring a reference image frame and a current image frame of a scene with the staring sensor. A raw difference frame is generated based upon differences between the reference image frame and the current image frame. Pixel error estimates are generated for each pixel in the raw difference frame based at least in part upon spatial error estimates related to spatial intensity gradients in the scene. The pixel error estimates are used to mitigate effects of camera jitter in the scene between the current image frame and the reference image frame.

  15. Weekly Coal Production Estimation Methodology

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Weekly Coal Production Estimation Methodology Step 1 (Estimate total amount of weekly U.S. coal production) U.S. coal production for the current week is estimated using a ratio estimation from the given equation below; ̂ () = () × × { + ( - )} (1) ℎ ̂ () =

  16. Estimate Radiological Dose for Animals

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-12-18

    Estimate Radiological dose for animals in ecological environment using open literature values for parameters such as body weight, plant and soil ingestion rate, rad. halflife, absorbed energy, biological halflife, gamma energy per decay, soil-to-plant transfer factor, ...etc

  17. Estimates of Green potentials. Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danchenko, V I

    2003-02-28

    Optimal Cartan-type covers by hyperbolic discs of carriers of Green {alpha}-potentials are obtained in a simply connected domain in the complex plane and estimates of the potentials outside the carriers are presented. These results are applied to problems on the separation of singularities of analytic and harmonic functions. For instance, uniform and integral estimates in terms of Green capacities of components of meromorphic functions are obtained.

  18. Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,691 1,667 1,592 1980's 1,526 1,700 1,636 1,544 1,778 1,686 1,658 1,813 1,896 1,983 1990's 2,058 1,983 1,895 1,770 1,721 1,562 1,580 1,555 1,544 1,308 2000's 1,473 1,481 1,518 1,554 1,563 1,587 1,601 1,659 1,775 1,790 2010's 1,703 1,697 1,763 1,890 2,123 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  19. Cost estimates for near-term depolyment of advanced traffic management systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, S.S.; Chin, S.M.

    1993-02-15

    The objective of this study is to provide cost est engineering, design, installation, operation and maintenance of Advanced Traffic Management Systems (ATMS) in the largest 75 metropolitan areas in the United States. This report gives estimates for deployment costs for ATMS in the next five years, subject to the qualifications and caveats set out in following paragraphs. The report considers infrastructure components required to realize fully a functional ATMS over each of two highway networks (as discussed in the Section describing our general assumptions) under each of the four architectures identified in the MITRE Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems (IVHS) Architecture studies. The architectures are summarized in this report in Table 2. Estimates are given for eight combinations of highway networks and architectures. We estimate that it will cost between $8.5 Billion (minimal network) and $26 Billion (augmented network) to proceed immediately with deployment of ATMS in the largest 75 metropolitan areas. Costs are given in 1992 dollars, and are not adjusted for future inflation. Our estimates are based partially on completed project costs, which have been adjusted to 1992 dollars. We assume that a particular architecture will be chosen; projected costs are broken by architecture.

  20. Estimating Traveler Populations at Airport and Cruise Terminals for Population Distribution and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jochem, Warren C; Sims, Kelly M; Bright, Eddie A; Urban, Marie L; Rose, Amy N; Coleman, Phil R; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, uses of high-resolution population distribution databases are increasing steadily for environmental, socioeconomic, public health, and disaster-related research and operations. With the development of daytime population distribution, temporal resolution of such databases has been improved. However, the lack of incorporation of transitional population, namely business and leisure travelers, leaves a significant population unaccounted for within the critical infrastructure networks, such as at transportation hubs. This paper presents two general methodologies for estimating passenger populations in airport and cruise port terminals at a high temporal resolution which can be incorporated into existing population distribution models. The methodologies are geographically scalable and are based on, and demonstrate how, two different transportation hubs with disparate temporal population dynamics can be modeled utilizing publicly available databases including novel data sources of flight activity from the Internet which are updated in near-real time. The airport population estimation model shows great potential for rapid implementation for a large collection of airports on a national scale, and the results suggest reasonable accuracy in the estimated passenger traffic. By incorporating population dynamics at high temporal resolutions into population distribution models, we hope to improve the estimates of populations exposed to or at risk to disasters, thereby improving emergency planning and response, and leading to more informed policy decisions.

  1. Spatially resolved estimation of ozone-related mortality in the United States under two representative concentration pathways (RCPs) and their uncertainty

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Kim, Young-Min; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Johnson, Brent A.; Huang, Cheng; Liu, Yang

    2014-11-16

    We report that the spatial pattern of the uncertainty in air pollution-related health impacts due to climate change has rarely been studied due to the lack of high-resolution model simulations, especially under the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs), the latest greenhouse gas emission pathways. We estimated future tropospheric ozone (O3) and related excess mortality and evaluated the associated uncertainties in the continental United States under RCPs. Based on dynamically downscaled climate model simulations, we calculated changes in O3 level at 12 km resolution between the future (2057 and 2059) and base years (2001–2004) under a low-to-medium emission scenario (RCP4.5) and amore » fossil fuel intensive emission scenario (RCP8.5). We then estimated the excess mortality attributable to changes in O3. Finally, we analyzed the sensitivity of the excess mortality estimates to the input variables and the uncertainty in the excess mortality estimation using Monte Carlo simulations. O3-related premature deaths in the continental U.S. were estimated to be 1312 deaths/year under RCP8.5 (95 % confidence interval (CI): 427 to 2198) and ₋2118 deaths/year under RCP4.5 (95 % CI: ₋3021 to ₋1216), when allowing for climate change and emissions reduction. The uncertainty of O3-related excess mortality estimates was mainly caused by RCP emissions pathways. Finally, excess mortality estimates attributable to the combined effect of climate and emission changes on O3 as well as the associated uncertainties vary substantially in space and so do the most influential input variables. Spatially resolved data is crucial to develop effective community level mitigation and adaptation policy.« less

  2. Wind Farms through the Years

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Data provided by the EIA. The number of homes powered is estimated through conversion factors provided by the EIA.

  3. A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING GAS PRESSURE IN 3013 CONTAINERS USING AN ISP DATABASE QUERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friday, G; L. G. Peppers, L; D. K. Veirs, D

    2008-07-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) is responsible for the storage and surveillance of plutonium-bearing material. During storage, plutonium-bearing material has the potential to generate hydrogen gas from the radiolysis of adsorbed water. The generation of hydrogen gas is a safety concern, especially when a container is breached within a glove box during destructive evaluation. To address this issue, the DOE established a standard (DOE, 2004) that sets the criteria for the stabilization and packaging of material for up to 50 years. The DOE has now packaged most of its excess plutonium for long-term storage in compliance with this standard. As part of this process, it is desirable to know within reasonable certainty the total maximum pressure of hydrogen and other gases within the 3013 container if safety issues and compliance with the DOE standards are to be attained. The principal goal of this investigation is to document the method and query used to estimate total (i.e. hydrogen and other gases) gas pressure within a 3013 container based on the material properties and estimated moisture content contained in the ISP database. Initial attempts to estimate hydrogen gas pressure in 3013 containers was based on G-values (hydrogen gas generation per energy input) derived from small scale samples. These maximum G-values were used to calculate worst case pressures based on container material weight, assay, wattage, moisture content, container age, and container volume. This paper documents a revised hydrogen pressure calculation that incorporates new surveillance results and includes a component for gases other than hydrogen. The calculation is produced by executing a query of the ISP database. An example of manual mathematical computations from the pressure equation is compared and evaluated with results from the query. Based on the destructive evaluation of 17 containers, the estimated mean absolute pressure was significantly higher

  4. Development of surface mine cost estimating equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-26

    Cost estimating equations were developed to determine capital and operating costs for five surface coal mine models in Central Appalachia, Northern Appalachia, Mid-West, Far-West, and Campbell County, Wyoming. Engineering equations were used to estimate equipment costs for the stripping function and for the coal loading and hauling function for the base case mine and for several mines with different annual production levels and/or different overburden removal requirements. Deferred costs were then determined through application of the base case depreciation schedules, and direct labor costs were easily established once the equipment quantities (and, hence, manpower requirements) were determined. The data points were then fit with appropriate functional forms, and these were then multiplied by appropriate adjustment factors so that the resulting equations yielded the model mine costs for initial and deferred capital and annual operating cost. (The validity of this scaling process is based on the assumption that total initial and deferred capital costs are proportional to the initial and deferred costs for the primary equipment types that were considered and that annual operating cost is proportional to the direct labor costs that were determined based on primary equipment quantities.) Initial capital costs ranged from $3,910,470 in Central Appalachia to $49,296,785; deferred capital costs ranged from $3,220,000 in Central Appalachia to $30,735,000 in Campbell County, Wyoming; and annual operating costs ranged from $2,924,148 in Central Appalachia to $32,708,591 in Campbell County, Wyoming. (DMC)

  5. Estimation of landfill emission lifespan using process oriented modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ustohalova, Veronika . E-mail: veronika.ustohalova@uni-essen.de; Ricken, Tim; Widmann, Renatus

    2006-07-01

    Depending on the particular pollutants emitted, landfills may require service activities lasting from hundreds to thousands of years. Flexible tools allowing long-term predictions of emissions are of key importance to determine the nature and expected duration of maintenance and post-closure activities. A highly capable option represents predictions based on models and verified by experiments that are fast, flexible and allow for the comparison of various possible operation scenarios in order to find the most appropriate one. The intention of the presented work was to develop a experimentally verified multi-dimensional predictive model capable of quantifying and estimating processes taking place in landfill sites where coupled process description allows precise time and space resolution. This constitutive 2-dimensional model is based on the macromechanical theory of porous media (TPM) for a saturated thermo-elastic porous body. The model was used to simulate simultaneously occurring processes: organic phase transition, gas emissions, heat transport, and settlement behavior on a long time scale for municipal solid waste deposited in a landfill. The relationships between the properties (composition, pore structure) of a landfill and the conversion and multi-phase transport phenomena inside it were experimentally determined. In this paper, we present both the theoretical background of the model and the results of the simulations at one single point as well as in a vertical landfill cross section.

  6. Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

    1993-03-01

    This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

  7. GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process Step Description Associated task 1 Define estimate's purpose Determine estimate's purpose, required level of detail, and overall scope; Determine who will receive the estimate 2 Develop estimating plan Determine the cost estimating team and develop its master schedule; Determine who will do the independent cost estimate; Outline the cost estimating approach; Develop the estimate timeline 3 Define

  8. Numerical Estimation of the Spent Fuel Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindgren, Eric R.; Durbin, Samuel; Wilke, Jason; Margraf, J.; Dunn, T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Sabotage of spent nuclear fuel casks remains a concern nearly forty years after attacks against shipment casks were first analyzed and has a renewed relevance in the post-9/11 environment. A limited number of full-scale tests and supporting efforts using surrogate materials, typically depleted uranium dioxide (DUO 2 ), have been conducted in the interim to more definitively determine the source term from these postulated events. However, the validity of these large- scale results remain in question due to the lack of a defensible spent fuel ratio (SFR), defined as the amount of respirable aerosol generated by an attack on a mass of spent fuel compared to that of an otherwise identical surrogate. Previous attempts to define the SFR in the 1980's have resulted in estimates ranging from 0.42 to 12 and include suboptimal experimental techniques and data comparisons. Because of the large uncertainty surrounding the SFR, estimates of releases from security-related events may be unnecessarily conservative. Credible arguments exist that the SFR does not exceed a value of unity. A defensible determination of the SFR in this lower range would greatly reduce the calculated risk associated with the transport and storage of spent nuclear fuel in dry cask systems. In the present work, the shock physics codes CTH and ALE3D were used to simulate spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and DUO 2 targets impacted by a high-velocity jet at an ambient temperature condition. These preliminary results are used to illustrate an approach to estimate the respirable release fraction for each type of material and ultimately, an estimate of the SFR. This page intentionally blank

  9. Performance of internal covariance estimators for cosmic shear correlation functions

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Friedrich, O.; Seitz, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Gruen, D.

    2015-12-31

    Data re-sampling methods such as the delete-one jackknife are a common tool for estimating the covariance of large scale structure probes. In this paper we investigate the concepts of internal covariance estimation in the context of cosmic shear two-point statistics. We demonstrate how to use log-normal simulations of the convergence field and the corresponding shear field to carry out realistic tests of internal covariance estimators and find that most estimators such as jackknife or sub-sample covariance can reach a satisfactory compromise between bias and variance of the estimated covariance. In a forecast for the complete, 5-year DES survey we show that internally estimated covariance matrices can provide a large fraction of the true uncertainties on cosmological parameters in a 2D cosmic shear analysis. The volume inside contours of constant likelihood in themore » $$\\Omega_m$$-$$\\sigma_8$$ plane as measured with internally estimated covariance matrices is on average $$\\gtrsim 85\\%$$ of the volume derived from the true covariance matrix. The uncertainty on the parameter combination $$\\Sigma_8 \\sim \\sigma_8 \\Omega_m^{0.5}$$ derived from internally estimated covariances is $$\\sim 90\\%$$ of the true uncertainty.« less

  10. Performance of internal covariance estimators for cosmic shear correlation functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, O.; Seitz, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Gruen, D.

    2015-12-31

    Data re-sampling methods such as the delete-one jackknife are a common tool for estimating the covariance of large scale structure probes. In this paper we investigate the concepts of internal covariance estimation in the context of cosmic shear two-point statistics. We demonstrate how to use log-normal simulations of the convergence field and the corresponding shear field to carry out realistic tests of internal covariance estimators and find that most estimators such as jackknife or sub-sample covariance can reach a satisfactory compromise between bias and variance of the estimated covariance. In a forecast for the complete, 5-year DES survey we show that internally estimated covariance matrices can provide a large fraction of the true uncertainties on cosmological parameters in a 2D cosmic shear analysis. The volume inside contours of constant likelihood in the $\\Omega_m$-$\\sigma_8$ plane as measured with internally estimated covariance matrices is on average $\\gtrsim 85\\%$ of the volume derived from the true covariance matrix. The uncertainty on the parameter combination $\\Sigma_8 \\sim \\sigma_8 \\Omega_m^{0.5}$ derived from internally estimated covariances is $\\sim 90\\%$ of the true uncertainty.

  11. Actual and Estimated Energy Savings Comparison for Deep Energy Retrofits in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Giever, Elisabeth L.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2012-10-01

    Seven homes from the Pacific Northwest were selected to evaluate the differences between estimated and actual energy savings achieved from deep energy retrofits. The energy savings resulting from these retrofits were estimated, using energy modeling software, to save at least 30% on a whole-house basis. The modeled pre-retrofit energy use was trued against monthly utility bills. After the retrofits were completed, each of the homes was extensively monitored, with the exception of one home which was monitored pre-retrofit. This work is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. This work found many discrepancies between actual and estimated energy savings and identified the potential causes for the discrepancies. The differences between actual energy use and modeled energy use also suggest improvements to improve model accuracy. The difference between monthly whole-house actual and estimated energy savings ranged from 75% more energy saved than predicted by the model to 16% less energy saved for all the monitored homes. Similarly, the annual energy savings difference was between 36% and -14%, which was estimated based on existing monitored savings because an entire year of data is not available. Thus, on average, for all six monitored homes the actual energy use is consistently less than estimates, indicating home owners are saving more energy than estimated. The average estimated savings for the eight month monitoring period is 43%, compared to an estimated savings average of 31%. Though this average difference is only 12%, the range of inaccuracies found for specific end-uses is far greater and are the values used to directly estimate energy savings from specific retrofits. Specifically, the monthly post-retrofit energy use differences for specific end-uses (i.e., heating, cooling, hot water, appliances, etc.) ranged from 131% under

  12. A photographic method for estimating wear of coal tar sealcoat from parking lots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mateo Scoggins; Tom Ennis; Nathan Parker; Chris Herrington

    2009-07-01

    Coal-tar-based sealcoat has been recognized as an important source of PAHs to the environment through wear and transport via stormwater runoff. Sealcoat removal rates have not been measured or even estimated in the literature due to the complex array of physical and chemical process involved. A photographic study was conducted that incorporates all sources of wear using 10 coal tar-sealed parking lots in Austin, Texas, with sealcoat age ranging from 0 to 5 years. Randomly located photographs from each parking lot were analyzed digitally to quantify black sealed areas versus lighter colored unsealed areas at the pixel level. The results indicate that coal tar sealcoat wears off of the driving areas of parking lots at a rate of approximately 4.7% per year, and from the parking areas of the lots at a rate of approximately 1.4% per year. The overall annual loss of sealcoat was calculated at 2.4%. This results in an annual delivery to the environment of 0.51 g of PAHs per m{sup 2} of coal tar-sealed parking lot. These values provide a more robust and much higher estimate of loading of PAHs from coal tar sealcoated parking lots when compared to other available measures. 20 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Annual Fire Protection Program Summary for Calendar Year 2010 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy 0 Annual Fire Protection Program Summary for Calendar Year 2010 DOE experienced no fire-related fatalities or serious injuries during CY2010. There were 51 fire loss events (nine fewer than CY2009) reported during the period which caused an estimated $1,608,762 in property damage. Annual Fire Protection Program Summary for Calendar Year 2010 (577.47 KB) More Documents & Publications Annual Fire Protection Program Summary for Calendar Year 2011 Annual Fire Protection Program

  14. Estimates of Savings Achievable from Irrigation Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Alison; Fuchs, Heidi; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham

    2014-03-28

    This paper performs a literature review and meta-analysis of water savings from several types of advanced irrigation controllers: rain sensors (RS), weather-based irrigation controllers (WBIC), and soil moisture sensors (SMS).The purpose of this work is to derive average water savings per controller type, based to the extent possible on all available data. After a preliminary data scrubbing, we utilized a series of analytical filters to develop our best estimate of average savings. We applied filters to remove data that might bias the sample such as data self-reported by manufacturers, data resulting from studies focusing on high-water users, or data presented in a non-comparable format such as based on total household water use instead of outdoor water use. Because the resulting number of studies was too small to be statistically significant when broken down by controller type, this paper represents a survey and synthesis of available data rather than a definitive statement regarding whether the estimated water savings are representative.

  15. Response of the Los Azufres Geothermal Field to Four Years of 25 MW Wellhead Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, P.; Ortiz, J.; Miranda, G.; Gallardo, M.

    1987-01-20

    Production and chemical data have been compiled and analyzed on a six-month averaged basis for the first four years of electric energy generation with five 5-MW wellhead generators at the Los Azufres geothermal field. The data were evaluated with respect to the extent of observable thermal drawdown of the reservoir from 25 MW of generation in relation to the estimated capacity of the field of several hundred megawatts of power. The analysis updates the previous one compiled after the first two years of continuous production, at which time the results indicated that differences in reservoir temperature estimated from geochemical thermometers and wellhead production data were not statistically significant based on the number of data and the standard deviations. Analysis of the data after four years of operation were made for the larger number of data and smaller standard deviations. The results review the adequacy of the sampling frequency and the reliability of the measurements from statistical t-Test of the means of the first and second two-year periods. 3 figs., 5 tabs., 20 refs.

  16. Quick estimating for thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sastri, S.R.S.; Rao, K.K. )

    1993-08-01

    Accurate values for thermal conductivity--an important engineering property used in heat transfer calculations of liquids--are not as readily available as those for other physical properties. Therefore, it often becomes necessary to use estimated data. A new estimating method combines ease of use with an accuracy that is generally better than existing procedures. The paper discusses how to select terms and testing correlations, then gives two examples of the use of the method for calculation of the thermal conductivity of propionic acid and chlorobenzene.

  17. Kalman filter data assimilation: Targeting observations and parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellsky, Thomas Kostelich, Eric J.; Mahalov, Alex

    2014-06-15

    This paper studies the effect of targeted observations on state and parameter estimates determined with Kalman filter data assimilation (DA) techniques. We first provide an analytical result demonstrating that targeting observations within the Kalman filter for a linear model can significantly reduce state estimation error as opposed to fixed or randomly located observations. We next conduct observing system simulation experiments for a chaotic model of meteorological interest, where we demonstrate that the local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) with targeted observations based on largest ensemble variance is skillful in providing more accurate state estimates than the LETKF with randomly located observations. Additionally, we find that a hybrid ensemble Kalman filter parameter estimation method accurately updates model parameters within the targeted observation context to further improve state estimation.

  18. Derived annual estimates of manufacturing energy consumption, 1974--1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-05

    This report presents a complete series of annual estimates of purchased energy used by the manufacturing sector of the US economy, for the years 1974 to 1988. These estimates interpolate over gaps in the actual data collections, by deriving estimates for the missing years 1982--1984 and 1986--1987. For the purposes of this report, ``purchased`` energy is energy brought from offsite for use at manufacturing establishments, whether the energy is purchased from an energy vendor or procured from some other source. The actual data on purchased energy comes from two sources, the US Department of Commerce Bureau of the Census`s Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) and EIA`s Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). The ASM provides annual estimates for the years 1974 to 1981. However, in 1982 (and subsequent years) the scope of the ASM energy data was reduced to collect only electricity consumption and expenditures and total expenditures for other purchased energy. In 1985, EIA initiated the triennial MECS collecting complete energy data. The series equivalent to the ASM is referred to in the MECS as ``offsite-produced fuels.``

  19. Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Estimate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    If the customer has a ratio of estimated monthly kilowatt-hour (kWh) usage to line extension mileage that is less than or equal to 1,000, the utility must provide the comparison at no cost. If the...

  20. Another slow year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This article is a review of the petroleum activity in the Middle East. The article is accompanied by a detailed color map showing the activity in the area. Highlights of the article include the fact that Saudi Arabia's drilling and development activity has sunk to its lowest level in many years. The article also points out that discoveries are increasing production in North and South Yemen as well as in Syria. The article also highlights the fact that Qatar is beginning work on its massive North gas field in the Gulf. Also attention is paid to the effects of the Iranian and Iraq war on each other's oil and gas activities. The article also mentions the drilling activity of Dubai and Oman.

  1. Projections of motor vehicle growth, fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions for the next thirty years in China.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, D.; Wang, M.

    2000-12-12

    Since the early 1990s, China's motor vehicles have entered a period of fast growth resultant from the rapid economic expansion. As the largest developing country, the fast growth of China's motor vehicles will have tremendous effects on the world's automotive and fuel market and on global CO{sub 2} emissions. In this study, we projected Chinese vehicle stocks for different vehicle types on the provincial level. First, we reviewed the historical data of China's vehicle growth in the past 10 years and the correlations between vehicle growth and economic growth in China. Second, we investigated historical vehicle growth trends in selected developed countries over the past 50 or so years. Third, we established a vehicle growth scenario based on the historical trends in several developed nations. Fourth, we estimated fuel economy, annual mileage and other vehicle usage parameters for Chinese vehicles. Finally, we projected vehicle stocks and estimated motor fuel use and CO{sub 2} emissions in each Chinese province from 2000 to 2030. Our results show that China will continue the rapid vehicle growth, increase gasoline and diesel consumption and increased CO{sub 2} emissions in the next 30 years. We estimated that by year 2030, Chinese motor vehicle fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions could reach the current US levels.

  2. Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Florida Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Reserves Based Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  3. Estimates of State Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    November 2016 Estimates of State Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Because energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) constitutes over 80% of total emissions, the state energy- related CO2 emission levels provide a good indicator of the relative contribution of individual states to total greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) emissions estimates at the state level for energy-related CO2 are based on data contained in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). 1 The

  4. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  5. DC Microgrids Scoping Study: Estimate of Technical and Economic Benefits

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (March 2015) | Department of Energy Microgrids Scoping Study: Estimate of Technical and Economic Benefits (March 2015) DC Microgrids Scoping Study: Estimate of Technical and Economic Benefits (March 2015) Microgrid demonstrations and deployments have shown the ability of microgrids to provide higher reliability and higher power quality than utility power systems and improved energy utilization. The vast majority of these microgrids are based on AC power, but some manufacturers, power system

  6. U.S. Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 18,843 18,805 19,257 1980's 18,699 18,737 17,506 15,788 17,193 15,985 15,610 16,114 16,670 16,983 1990's 17,233 17,202 17,423 17,789 18,322 17,966 18,861 19,211 18,720 18,928 2000's 19,219 19,779 19,353 19,425 19,168 18,458 18,545 19,466 20,523 21,594 2010's 22,239 23,555 24,912 25,233 26,611 - = No

  7. U.S. Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 20,079 1980's 19,500 19,554 18,292 16,590 18,032 16,798 16,401 16,904 17,466 17,752 1990's 18,003 18,012 18,269 18,641 19,210 18,874 19,783 20,134 19,622 19,856 2000's 20,164 20,642 20,248 20,231 20,017 19,259 19,373 20,318 21,415 22,537 2010's 23,224

  8. U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 16,674 1980's 16,095 16,238 15,044 13,235 14,514 13,344 12,958 13,553 14,274 14,653 1990's 15,067 15,044 15,238 15,773 16,303 15,988 16,845 17,112 16,486 16,543 2000's 16,863 17,451 17,260

  9. U.S. Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 4,984 4,674 4,556 4,622 4,772 4,674 5,040 5,170 4,909 4,922 2000's 4,819 4,957 4,469 4,353 3,921 2,939 2,775 2,731 2,250 2,377 2010's 2,154 1,660 1,360 1,198 1,148 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  10. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 720 855 1,025 1,203 1,235 1,311 1990's 1,434 1,360 1,275 1,258 1,285 1,251 1,285 1,238 1,144 1,164 2000's 1,147 1,178 996 1,062 1,072 909 765 625 462 454 2010's 409 318 277 236 246 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  11. NREL Raises Rooftop Photovoltaic Technical Potential Estimate...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Raises Rooftop Photovoltaic Technical Potential Estimate New analysis nearly doubles ... its estimate of total U.S. technical potential for rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. ...

  12. Estimates and Recommendations for Coincidence Geometry (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Estimates and Recommendations for Coincidence Geometry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimates and Recommendations for Coincidence Geometry You are accessing a...

  13. A Methodology for Estimating Large-Customer Demand Response MarketPotential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Cappers,Peter

    2007-08-01

    Demand response (DR) is increasingly recognized as an essential ingredient to well-functioning electricity markets. DR market potential studies can answer questions about the amount of DR available in a given area and from which market segments. Several recent DR market potential studies have been conducted, most adapting techniques used to estimate energy-efficiency (EE) potential. In this scoping study, we: reviewed and categorized seven recent DR market potential studies; recommended a methodology for estimating DR market potential for large, non-residential utility customers that uses price elasticities to account for behavior and prices; compiled participation rates and elasticity values from six DR options offered to large customers in recent years, and demonstrated our recommended methodology with large customer market potential scenarios at an illustrative Northeastern utility. We observe that EE and DR have several important differences that argue for an elasticity approach for large-customer DR options that rely on customer-initiated response to prices, rather than the engineering approaches typical of EE potential studies. Base-case estimates suggest that offering DR options to large, non-residential customers results in 1-3% reductions in their class peak demand in response to prices or incentive payments of $500/MWh. Participation rates (i.e., enrollment in voluntary DR programs or acceptance of default hourly pricing) have the greatest influence on DR impacts of all factors studied, yet are the least well understood. Elasticity refinements to reflect the impact of enabling technologies and response at high prices provide more accurate market potential estimates, particularly when arc elasticities (rather than substitution elasticities) are estimated.

  14. Property:EstimatedTime | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    week,w,Week,Weeks,W,WEEK,WEEKS 12 months,month,m,Month,Months,M,MONTH,MONTHS 1 years,year,y,Year,Years,Y,YEAR,YEARS Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:...

  15. Concurrent Transfers Historical Yearly Peak

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    the graph for current year shows the data for the year-to-date peak. Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily...

  16. Planning for Years to Come

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Planning for Years to Come Planning for Years to Come LANL's Governing Policy on the Environment August 1, 2013 Water sampling tour for the Association of Experiential Education ...

  17. Projects of the year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, T.

    2007-01-15

    The Peabody Hotel, Orlando, Florida was the site of Power Engineering magazine's 2006 Projects of the Year Awards Banquet, which kicked-off the Power-Gen International conference and exhibition. The Best Coal-fired Project was awarded to Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association Inc., owner of Springenville Unit 3. This is a 400 MW pulverized coal plant in Springeville, AZ, sited with two existing coal-fired units. Designed to fire Powder River Basin coal, it has low NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction for NOx control, dry flue gas desulfurization for SO{sub 2} control and a pulse jet baghouse for particulate control. It has a seven-stage feedwater heater and condensers to ensure maximum performance. Progress Energy-Carolinas' Asheville Power Station FGD and SCR Project was awarded the 2006 coal-fired Project Honorable Mention. This plant in Skyland, NC was required to significantly reduce NOx emissions. When completed, the improvements will reduce NOx by 93% compared to 1996 levels and SO{sub 2} by 93% compared to 2001 levels. Awards for best gas-fired, nuclear, and renewable/sustainable energy projects are recorded. The Sasyadko Coal-Mine Methane Cogeneration Plant near Donezk, Ukraine, was given the 2006 Honorable Mention for Best Renewable/Sustainable Energy Project. In November 2004, Ukraine was among 14 nations to launch the Methane to Markets partnership. The award-winning plant is fuelled by methane released during coal extraction. It generates 42 MW of power. 4 photos.

  18. Weldon Spring Site environmental report for calendar year 1993. Weldon Springs Site Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1993 describes the environmental monitoring programs at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The objectives of these programs are to assess actual or potential exposure to contaminant effluents from the project area by providing public use scenarios and dose estimates, to demonstrate compliance with Federal and State permitted levels, and to summarize trends and/or changes in contaminant concentrations from environmental monitoring program. In 1993, the maximum committed dose to a hypothetical individual at the chemical plant site perimeter was 0.03 mrem (0.0003 mSv). The maximum committed dose to a hypothetical individual at the boundary of the Weldon Spring Quarry was 1.9 mrem (0.019 mSv). These scenarios assume an individual walking along the perimeter of the site-once a day at the chemical plant/raffinate pits and twice a day at the quarry-250 days per year. This hypothetical individual also consumes fish, sediment, and water from lakes and other bodies of water in the area. The collective dose, based on an effected population of 112,000 was 0.12 person-rem (0.0012 person-Sv). This calculation is based on recreational use of the August A. Busch Memorial Conservation Area and the Missouri Department of Conservation recreational trail (the Katy Trail) near the quarry. These estimates are below the U.S. Department of Energy requirement of 100 mrem (I mSv) annual committed effective dose equivalent for all exposure pathways. Results from air monitoring for the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) program indicated that the estimated dose was 0.38 mrem, which is below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard of 10 mrem per year.

  19. Background estimation in experimental spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, R.; Hanson, K. M.; Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS P940, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 ; Dose, V.; Linden, W. von der

    2000-02-01

    A general probabilistic technique for estimating background contributions to measured spectra is presented. A Bayesian model is used to capture the defining characteristics of the problem, namely, that the background is smoother than the signal. The signal is allowed to have positive and/or negative components. The background is represented in terms of a cubic spline basis. A variable degree of smoothness of the background is attained by allowing the number of knots and the knot positions to be adaptively chosen on the basis of the data. The fully Bayesian approach taken provides a natural way to handle knot adaptivity and allows uncertainties in the background to be estimated. Our technique is demonstrated on a particle induced x-ray emission spectrum from a geological sample and an Auger spectrum from iron, which contains signals with both positive and negative components. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  20. Hospital to save $71,800/year burning trash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hume, M.

    1984-01-01

    A waste-to-steam dual-fuel boiler system will save the Geisinger Medical Center in Pennsylvania $71,800 a year in avoided natural gas, trash-hauling, and incinerating costs. In operation less than a year, the system currently generates 6.3% of hospital steam for an anticipated three-year payback. A waste-heat-recovery system, with a net cost of $360,000, will pay for itself in an estimated five years. The case-history report describes how the system fits into hospital operations. (DCK)

  1. Wind Farm Growth Through the Years | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Farm Growth Through the Years Wind Farm Growth Through the Years August 6, 2013 - 8:32am Addthis 1975 Start Slow Stop Year Wind Farms Homes Powered Added Current Year 833 Wind Farms Online. Enough to Power 15 M Homes Data provided by the EIA. The number of homes powered is estimated through conversion factors provided by the EIA. Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs As we publish the 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report, we are excited

  2. Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Landscapting Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-30

    Guidance to help Federal agencies estimate unmetered landscaping water use as required by Executive Order 13514

  3. 2006 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R)Voluntary Labeling Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla; Homan,Gregory K.

    2006-03-07

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more thanthirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2005, whatwe expect in 2006, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2006 to 2015 and 2006 to 2025. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

  4. Highway vehicle MPG and market shares report: Model year 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, L.S. ); Hu, P.S. )

    1991-04-01

    This issue of Highway Vehicle MPG and Market Shares Report: Model Year 1990 reports the estimated sales-weighted fuel economies, sales, market shares, and other vehicle characteristics of new automobiles and light trucks. The estimates are made on a make and model basis (e.g., Chevrolet is a make and Corsica is a model), from model year 1976 to model year 1990. Vehicle sales data are used as weighting factors in the sales-weighted estimation procedure. Thus, the estimates represent averages of the overall new vehicle fleet, reflecting the composition of the fleet. Highlights are provided on the trends in the vehicle characteristics from one model year to the next. Analyses are also made on fuel economy changes to determine what caused the changes. The new automobile fleet experienced a fuel economy loss of 0.4 mpg from the previous model year, dropping to 27.6 mpg. This is the second consecutive decline in the fuel economy of new automobiles since model year 1983. The main reason for the fuel economy decline in automobiles was that the compact, midsize, and large size classes, which together claimed more than 75% of the new automobile market, each experienced fuel economy declines of 0.4 mpg or more. In contrast, the new light truck fleet showed an increase of 0.3 mpg from the previous year to a current mpg of 20.5. The fuel economy increase in light trucks was primarily due to the fact that the large pickup class, which represents 35.0% of the new 1990 light truck market experienced a gain of 0.7 mpg in its fuel economy. Overall, the sales-weighted fuel economy of the new light-duty vehicle fleet (automobiles and light trucks) dropped to 24.8 mpg in model year 1990, a reduction of 0.2 mpg from model year 1989. 9 refs., 29 figs., 55 tabs.

  5. Aggregate Transfers Historical Yearly Peak

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Transfers Historical Yearly Peak Aggregate Transfers Historical Yearly Peak These plots show the yearly peak days from 2000 to the present. BE CAREFUL because the graphs are autoscaling - check the scales on each axis before you compare graphs. Note that the graph for current year shows the data for the year-to-date peak. Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate

  6. Concurrent Transfers Historical Yearly Peak

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Transfers Historical Yearly Peak Concurrent Transfers Historical Yearly Peak These plots show the yearly peak days from 2000 to present. BE CAREFUL because the graphs are autoscaling - check the scales on each axis before you compare graphs. Note that the graph for current year shows the data for the year-to-date peak. Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage

  7. 60 Years of Computing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    60 Years of Computing 60 Years of Computing

  8. Verification of unfold error estimates in the unfold operator code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Biggs, F.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral unfolding is an inverse mathematical operation that attempts to obtain spectral source information from a set of response functions and data measurements. Several unfold algorithms have appeared over the past 30 years; among them is the unfold operator (UFO) code written at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition to an unfolded spectrum, the UFO code also estimates the unfold uncertainty (error) induced by estimated random uncertainties in the data. In UFO the unfold uncertainty is obtained from the error matrix. This built-in estimate has now been compared to error estimates obtained by running the code in a Monte Carlo fashion with prescribed data distributions (Gaussian deviates). In the test problem studied, data were simulated from an arbitrarily chosen blackbody spectrum (10 keV) and a set of overlapping response functions. The data were assumed to have an imprecision of 5{percent} (standard deviation). One hundred random data sets were generated. The built-in estimate of unfold uncertainty agreed with the Monte Carlo estimate to within the statistical resolution of this relatively small sample size (95{percent} confidence level). A possible 10{percent} bias between the two methods was unresolved. The Monte Carlo technique is also useful in underdetermined problems, for which the error matrix method does not apply. UFO has been applied to the diagnosis of low energy x rays emitted by Z-pinch and ion-beam driven hohlraums. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Improving Estimation Accuracy of Aggregate Queries on Data Cubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pourabbas, Elaheh; Shoshani, Arie

    2008-08-15

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of estimation of a target database from summary databases derived from a base data cube. We show that such estimates can be derived by choosing a primary database which uses a proxy database to estimate the results. This technique is common in statistics, but an important issue we are addressing is the accuracy of these estimates. Specifically, given multiple primary and multiple proxy databases, that share the same summary measure, the problem is how to select the primary and proxy databases that will generate the most accurate target database estimation possible. We propose an algorithmic approach for determining the steps to select or compute the source databases from multiple summary databases, which makes use of the principles of information entropy. We show that the source databases with the largest number of cells in common provide the more accurate estimates. We prove that this is consistent with maximizing the entropy. We provide some experimental results on the accuracy of the target database estimation in order to verify our results.

  10. Estimation of economic parameters of U.S. hydropower resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas G.; Hunt, Richard T.; Reeves, Kelly S.; Carroll, Greg R.

    2003-06-01

    Tools for estimating the cost of developing and operating and maintaining hydropower resources in the form of regression curves were developed based on historical plant data. Development costs that were addressed included: licensing, construction, and five types of environmental mitigation. It was found that the data for each type of cost correlated well with plant capacity. A tool for estimating the annual and monthly electric generation of hydropower resources was also developed. Additional tools were developed to estimate the cost of upgrading a turbine or a generator. The development and operation and maintenance cost estimating tools, and the generation estimating tool were applied to 2,155 U.S. hydropower sites representing a total potential capacity of 43,036 MW. The sites included totally undeveloped sites, dams without a hydroelectric plant, and hydroelectric plants that could be expanded to achieve greater capacity. Site characteristics and estimated costs and generation for each site were assembled in a database in Excel format that is also included within the EERE Library under the title, “Estimation of Economic Parameters of U.S. Hydropower Resources - INL Hydropower Resource Economics Database.”

  11. Temperature estimates from zircaloy oxidation kinetics and microstructures. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, C.S.

    1982-10-01

    This report reviews state-of-the-art capability to determine peak zircaloy fuel rod cladding temperatures following an abnormal temperature excursion in a nuclear reactor, based on postirradiation metallographic analysis of zircaloy microstructural and oxidation characteristics. Results of a comprehensive literature search are presented to evaluate the suitability of available zircaloy microstructural and oxidation data for estimating anticipated reactor fuel rod cladding temperatures. Additional oxidation experiments were conducted to evaluate low-temperature zircaloy oxidation characteristics for postirradiation estimation of cladding temperature by metallographic examination. Results of these experiments were used to calculate peak cladding temperatures of electrical heater rods and nuclear fuel rods that had been subjected to reactor temperature transients. Comparison of the calculated and measured peak cladding temperatures for these rods indicates that oxidation kinetics is a viable technique for estimating peak cladding temperatures over a broad temperature range. However, further improvement in zircaloy microstructure technology is necessary for precise estimation of peak cladding temperatures by microstructural examination.

  12. Motor vehicle MPG and market shares report: model year 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, P.S.; Holcomb, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    This issue of the publication reports the sales, market shares, estimated sales-weighted fuel economies, and other estimated sales-weighted vehicle characteristics of automobiles and light trucks for the model year 1984 and for the previous five model years. Comparisons and observations are made on the trends in these vehicles from one model year to the next. An improved methodology is used to allocate the yearly MPG changes among eight components, rather than the four reported in the previous reports. Sales of automobiles showed an increase of 16.6% from model year 1983. An even more striking increase was observed in the sales of light trucks: 30.5% from model year 1983. The 1984 model year experienced a gain of 0.23 mpg in sales-weighted automobile fuel economy. In contrast, light trucks experienced a loss of 0.59 mpg in fuel economy, from 20.50 mpg in model year 1983 to 19.91 mpg in model year 1984.

  13. Surface daytime net radiation estimation using artificial neural networks

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Shunlin; Zhang, Xiaotong; Xiao, Zhiqiang

    2014-11-11

    Net all-wave surface radiation (Rn) is one of the most important fundamental parameters in various applications. However, conventional Rn measurements are difficult to collect because of the high cost and ongoing maintenance of recording instruments. Therefore, various empirical Rn estimation models have been developed. This study presents the results of two artificial neural network (ANN) models (general regression neural networks (GRNN) and Neuroet) to estimate Rn globally from multi-source data, including remotely sensed products, surface measurements, and meteorological reanalysis products. Rn estimates provided by the two ANNs were tested against in-situ radiation measurements obtained from 251 global sites between 1991–2010more » both in global mode (all data were used to fit the models) and in conditional mode (the data were divided into four subsets and the models were fitted separately). Based on the results obtained from extensive experiments, it has been proved that the two ANNs were superior to linear-based empirical models in both global and conditional modes and that the GRNN performed better and was more stable than Neuroet. The GRNN estimates had a determination coefficient (R2) of 0.92, a root mean square error (RMSE) of 34.27 W·m–2 , and a bias of –0.61 W·m–2 in global mode based on the validation dataset. In conclusion, ANN methods are a potentially powerful tool for global Rn estimation.« less

  14. Activity Based Costing

    Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Activity Based Costing (ABC) is method for developing cost estimates in which the project is subdivided into discrete, quantifiable activities or a work unit. This chapter outlines the Activity Based Costing method and discusses applicable uses of ABC.

  15. Table 3.3 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by Source, 1970...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by Source, 1970-2010 (Dollars 1 per Million Btu) Year Primary Energy 2 Electric Power Sector 11,12 Retail Electricity 13 Total Energy 9,10,14 ...

  16. WIPP_Marks_12_Years

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Marks 12 Years of Operations CARLSBAD, N.M., March 28, 2011 - On Saturday, March 26, 2011, ... It has now been 12 years since WIPP received its first shipment of transuranic (TRU) ...

  17. 2013 Director's New Year Address

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    has in store for the ALS. An immediate answer is - a celebration - as the ALS marks its 20th year of operation. We'll spend some time this year looking back at what we've...

  18. FUZZY SUPERNOVA TEMPLATES. II. PARAMETER ESTIMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney, Steven A.; Tonry, John L. E-mail: jt@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2010-05-20

    Wide-field surveys will soon be discovering Type Ia supernovae (SNe) at rates of several thousand per year. Spectroscopic follow-up can only scratch the surface for such enormous samples, so these extensive data sets will only be useful to the extent that they can be characterized by the survey photometry alone. In a companion paper we introduced the Supernova Ontology with Fuzzy Templates (SOFT) method for analyzing SNe using direct comparison to template light curves, and demonstrated its application for photometric SN classification. In this work we extend the SOFT method to derive estimates of redshift and luminosity distance for Type Ia SNe, using light curves from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) as a validation set. Redshifts determined by SOFT using light curves alone are consistent with spectroscopic redshifts, showing an rms scatter in the residuals of rms{sub z} = 0.051. SOFT can also derive simultaneous redshift and distance estimates, yielding results that are consistent with the currently favored {Lambda}CDM cosmological model. When SOFT is given spectroscopic information for SN classification and redshift priors, the rms scatter in Hubble diagram residuals is 0.18 mag for the SDSS data and 0.28 mag for the SNLS objects. Without access to any spectroscopic information, and even without any redshift priors from host galaxy photometry, SOFT can still measure reliable redshifts and distances, with an increase in the Hubble residuals to 0.37 mag for the combined SDSS and SNLS data set. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we predict that SOFT will be able to improve constraints on time-variable dark energy models by a factor of 2-3 with each new generation of large-scale SN surveys.

  19. Cost of lead-based-paint abatement in public housing. Volume 2. Appendix C-F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    This study provides data on lead incidence and the estimated costs of abating lead hazards in public housing at several possible threshold levels of lead concentration in applied paint. The data were collected at a sample of family projects by cooperating Lead Paint Poisoning Prevention Programs using data collection forms designed for the study. National estimates are provided based on the assumption that the construction year of a dwelling or building is the only characteristic related to lead incidence. The estimates are provided for all family dwelling units, defined as those of two-bedrooms or larger; for all buildings in family projects; and for site-wide facilities in family projects.

  20. Cost of lead-based-paint abatement in public housing. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, J.E.

    1986-07-01

    This study provides data on lead incidence and the estimated costs of abating lead hazards in public housing at several possible threshold levels of lead concentration in applied paint. The data were collected at a sample of family projects by cooperating Lead Paint Poisoning Prevention Programs using data collection forms designed for the study. National estimates are provided based on the assumption that the construction year of a dwelling or building is the only characteristic related to lead incidence. The estimates are provided for all family dwelling units, defined as those of two-bedrooms or larger; for all buildings in family projects; and for site-wide facilities in family projects.

  1. Development on electromagnetic impedance function modeling and its estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutarno, D.

    2015-09-30

    Today the Electromagnetic methods such as magnetotellurics (MT) and controlled sources audio MT (CSAMT) is used in a broad variety of applications. Its usefulness in poor seismic areas and its negligible environmental impact are integral parts of effective exploration at minimum cost. As exploration was forced into more difficult areas, the importance of MT and CSAMT, in conjunction with other techniques, has tended to grow continuously. However, there are obviously important and difficult problems remaining to be solved concerning our ability to collect process and interpret MT as well as CSAMT in complex 3D structural environments. This talk aim at reviewing and discussing the recent development on MT as well as CSAMT impedance functions modeling, and also some improvements on estimation procedures for the corresponding impedance functions. In MT impedance modeling, research efforts focus on developing numerical method for computing the impedance functions of three dimensionally (3-D) earth resistivity models. On that reason, 3-D finite elements numerical modeling for the impedances is developed based on edge element method. Whereas, in the CSAMT case, the efforts were focused to accomplish the non-plane wave problem in the corresponding impedance functions. Concerning estimation of MT and CSAMT impedance functions, researches were focused on improving quality of the estimates. On that objective, non-linear regression approach based on the robust M-estimators and the Hilbert transform operating on the causal transfer functions, were used to dealing with outliers (abnormal data) which are frequently superimposed on a normal ambient MT as well as CSAMT noise fields. As validated, the proposed MT impedance modeling method gives acceptable results for standard three dimensional resistivity models. Whilst, the full solution based modeling that accommodate the non-plane wave effect for CSAMT impedances is applied for all measurement zones, including near-, transition

  2. Estimates of health risk from exposure to radioactive pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, R.E.; Nelson, N.S.; Ellett, W.H.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1981-11-01

    A dosimetric and health effects analysis has been performed for the Office of Radiation Programs of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assess potential hazards from radioactive pollutants. Contemporary dosimetric methods were used to obtain estimates of dose rates to reference organs from internal exposures due to either inhalation of contaminated air or ingestion of contaminated food, or from external exposures due to either immersion in contaminated air or proximity to contaminated ground surfaces. These dose rates were then used to estimate the number of premature cancer deaths arising from such exposures and the corresponding number of years of life lost in a cohort of 100,000 persons, all simultaneously liveborn and all going through life with the same risks of dying from competing causes. The risk of dying from a competing cause for a given year was taken to be the probability of dying from all causes as given in a recent actuarial life table for the total US population.

  3. Bayesian estimation methods in metrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, M.G.; Forbes, A.B.; Harris, P.M.

    2004-11-16

    In metrology -- the science of measurement -- a measurement result must be accompanied by a statement of its associated uncertainty. The degree of validity of a measurement result is determined by the validity of the uncertainty statement. In recognition of the importance of uncertainty evaluation, the International Standardization Organization in 1995 published the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement and the Guide has been widely adopted. The validity of uncertainty statements is tested in interlaboratory comparisons in which an artefact is measured by a number of laboratories and their measurement results compared. Since the introduction of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement, key comparisons are being undertaken to determine the degree of equivalence of laboratories for particular measurement tasks. In this paper, we discuss the possible development of the Guide to reflect Bayesian approaches and the evaluation of key comparison data using Bayesian estimation methods.

  4. Making appropriate comparisons of estimated and actual costs of reducing SO{sub 2} emissions under Title IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.E.

    1998-12-31

    A current sentiment within some parts of the environmental policy community is that market-based regulatory approaches such as emissions trading have proven so effective that actual costs will be only a small fraction of what ex ante cost estimation procedures would project. With this line of reasoning, some have dismissed available cost estimates for major proposed new regulations, such as the new PM and ozone NAAQS, as not meaningful for policy decisions. The most commonly used evidence in support of this position is the experience with SO{sub 2} reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. In Title IV, a market for emissions allowances has been used to achieve reductions in sulfur dioxides (SO{sub 2}) to ameliorate acid rain. It is commonly asserted today that the cost of achieving the SO{sub 2} emissions reductions has been only one-tenth or less of what Title IV was originally expected to cost. This paper demonstrates that, to the contrary, actual costs for SO{sub 2} reductions remain roughly in line with original estimates associated with Title IV. Erroneous conclusions about Title IV`s costs are due to inappropriate comparisons of a variety of different measures that appear to be comparable only because they are all stated in dollars per ton. Program cost estimates include the total costs of a fully-implemented regulatory program. The very low costs of Title IV that are commonly cited today are neither directly reflective of a fully implemented Title IV, (which is still many years away) nor reflective of all the costs already incurred. Further, a careful review of history finds that the initial cost estimates that many cite were never associated with Title IV. Technically speaking, people are comparing the estimated control costs for the most-costly power plant associated with earlier acid rain regulatory proposals with prices from a market that do not directly reflect total costs.

  5. Transfer Activity Historical Yearly Peak

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Historical Yearly Peak Transfer Activity Historical Yearly Peak The plots below show the yearly peak days from 2000 to the present. BE CAREFUL because the graphs are autoscaling - check the scales on each axis before you compare graphs. Note that the graph for the current year shows the data for the year-to-date peak. Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In

  6. Estimation of net primary productivity using a process-based...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Net primary productivity (NPP) modeling can help to improve the understanding of the ecosystem, and therefore, improve ecological efficiency. The boreal ecosystem productivity ...

  7. Fast, moment-based estimation methods for delay network tomography...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Lawrence, Earl Christophre 1 ; Michailidis, George 2 ; Nair, Vijayan N 2 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory U OF MICHIGAN Publication Date: ...

  8. Fast, moment-based estimation methods for delay network tomography...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Much of the previous literature deals with discrete delay distributions by discretizing ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 42; MONITORING; PROBES; ...

  9. A Physically-Based Estimate of Radiative Forcing by Anthropogenic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Ghan, Steven J. 1 ; Easter, Richard C. 1 ; Chapman, Elaine G. 1 ; Abdul-Razzak, Hayder 2 ; Zhang, Yang 1 ; Leung, Ruby 1 ; Laulainen, Nels S. 1 ; Saylor, ...

  10. Multi-Year Program Plan 2011-2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-12-01

    The Vehicle Technologies Multi-Year Program Plan, FY 2011 – 2015, outlines the scientific research and technologies developments for the five-year timeframe (beyond the FY 2010 base year) that need to be undertaken to help meet the Administration's goals for reductions in oil consumption and carbon emissions from the ground transport vehicle sector of the economy.

  11. Dynamic estimator for determining operating conditions in an internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hellstrom, Erik; Stefanopoulou, Anna; Jiang, Li; Larimore, Jacob

    2016-01-05

    Methods and systems are provided for estimating engine performance information for a combustion cycle of an internal combustion engine. Estimated performance information for a previous combustion cycle is retrieved from memory. The estimated performance information includes an estimated value of at least one engine performance variable. Actuator settings applied to engine actuators are also received. The performance information for the current combustion cycle is then estimated based, at least in part, on the estimated performance information for the previous combustion cycle and the actuator settings applied during the previous combustion cycle. The estimated performance information for the current combustion cycle is then stored to the memory to be used in estimating performance information for a subsequent combustion cycle.

  12. Development of a Novel Gas Pressurized Process-Based Technology for CO2 Capture from Post-Combustion Flue Gases Preliminary Year 1 Techno-Economic Study Results and Methodology for Gas Pressurized Stripping Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shiaoguo

    2013-03-01

    Under the DOE’s Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program, Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC (CCS) is developing a novel gas pressurized stripping (GPS) process to enable efficient post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) from coal-fired power plants. A technology and economic feasibility study is required as a deliverable in the project Statement of Project Objectives. This study analyzes a fully integrated pulverized coal power plant equipped with GPS technology for PCC, and is carried out, to the maximum extent possible, in accordance to the methodology and data provided in ATTACHMENT 3 – Basis for Technology Feasibility Study of DOE Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000403. The DOE/NETL report on “Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants, Volume 1: Bituminous Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity (Original Issue Date, May 2007), NETL Report No. DOE/NETL-2007/1281, Revision 1, August 2007” was used as the main source of reference to be followed, as per the guidelines of ATTACHMENT 3 of DE-FOA-0000403. The DOE/NETL-2007/1281 study compared the feasibility of various combinations of power plant/CO2 capture process arrangements. The report contained a comprehensive set of design basis and economic evaluation assumptions and criteria, which are used as the main reference points for the purpose of this study. Specifically, Nexant adopted the design and economic evaluation basis from Case 12 of the above-mentioned DOE/NETL report. This case corresponds to a nominal 550 MWe (net), supercritical greenfield PC plant that utilizes an advanced MEAbased absorption system for CO2 capture and compression. For this techno-economic study, CCS’ GPS process replaces the MEA-based CO2 absorption system used in the original case. The objective of this study is to assess the performance of a full-scale GPS-based PCC design that is integrated with a supercritical PC plant similar to Case 12 of the DOE/NETL report, such that it corresponds to a nominal 550 MWe

  13. State Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates

    Reports and Publications

    2016-01-01

    Energy price and expenditure estimates in dollars per million Btu and in million dollars, by state, 1970-2014.

  14. Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software

    Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter discusses a formalized methodology is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software.

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 24 White Female (W F) 6 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Kansas City Field ...

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 3 White Male (W M) 7 White Female (W F) 1 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER ...

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 2 Hispanic Male (H M) 12 Hispanic Female (H F) 7 White Male (W M) 66 White Female (W F) 22 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER ...

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EJEK 10 9 -10.00% EN 04 27 24 -11.11% NN (Engineering) 28 24 -14.29% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 29 -6.45% NU (TechAdmin Support) 4...

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SES 1 2 100.00% EJEK 2 2 0.00% EN 04 1 1 0.00% EN 03 1 0 -100.00% NN (Engineering) 12 11 -8.33% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 216 218 0.93% NU (TechAdmin Support) 2...

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2013 SES 2 2 0.00% EJEK 7 8 14.29% EN 04 11 11 0.00% EN 03 1 1 0.00% NN (Engineering) 23 24 4.35% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 35 32 -8.57% NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 2...

  1. New Methodology for Natural Gas Production Estimates

    Reports and Publications

    2010-01-01

    A new methodology is implemented with the monthly natural gas production estimates from the EIA-914 survey this month. The estimates, to be released April 29, 2010, include revisions for all of 2009. The fundamental changes in the new process include the timeliness of the historical data used for estimation and the frequency of sample updates, both of which are improved.

  2. Evaluation of Black Carbon Estimations in Global Aerosol Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, D.; Schulz, M.; Kinne, Stefan; McNaughton, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Bond, Tami C.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Clarke, A. D.; De Luca, N.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Dubovik, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Fahey, D. W.; Feichter, J.; Fillmore, D.; Freitag, S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Horowitz, L.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Klimont, Z.; Kondo, Yutaka; Krol, M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Miller, R.; Montanaro, V.; Moteki, N.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, Ja; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Sahu, L.; Sakamoto, H.; Schuster, G.; Schwarz, J. P.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Takemura, T.; Textor, C.; van Aardenne, John; Zhao, Y.

    2009-11-27

    We evaluate black carbon (BC) model predictions from the AeroCom model intercomparison project by considering the diversity among year 2000 model simulations and comparing model predictions with available measurements. These model-measurement intercomparisons include BC surface and aircraft concentrations, aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) from AERONET and OMI retrievals and BC column estimations based on AERONET. In regions other than Asia, most models are biased high compared to surface concentration measurements. However compared with (column) AAOD or BC burden retreivals, the models are generally biased low. The average ratio of model to retrieved AAOD is less than 0.7 in South American and 0.6 in African biomass burning regions; both of these regions lack surface concentration measurements. In Asia the average model to observed ratio is 0.6 for AAOD and 0.5 for BC surface concentrations. Compared with aircraft measurements over the Americas at latitudes between 0 and 50N, the average model is a factor of 10 larger than observed, and most models exceed the measured BC standard deviation in the mid to upper troposphere. At higher latitudes the average model to aircraft BC is 0.6 and underestimate the observed BC loading in the lower and middle troposphere associated with springtime Arctic haze. Low model bias for AAOD but overestimation of surface and upper atmospheric BC concentrations at lower latitudes suggests that most models are underestimating BC absorption and should improve estimates for refractive index, particle size, and optical effects of BC coating. Retrieval uncertainties and/or differences with model diagnostic treatment may also contribute to the model-measurement disparity. Largest AeroCom model diversity occurred in northern Eurasia and the remote Arctic, regions influenced by anthropogenic sources. Changing emissions, aging, removal, or optical properties within a single model generated a smaller change in model predictions than the

  3. Annual Fire Protection Program Summary for Calendar Year 2011 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy 1 Annual Fire Protection Program Summary for Calendar Year 2011 DOE experienced no fire-related fatalities or serious injuries during CY2011. There were 98 fire loss events (almost double the 51 events reported in CY2010) reported during the period that caused an estimated $64.3 million in property damage. Annual Fire Protection Program Summary for Calendar Year 2011 (549.32 KB) More Documents & Publications Annual Fire Protection Program Summary for Calendar Year 2012 Annual

  4. Distributed Dynamic State Estimator, Generator Parameter Estimation and Stability Monitoring Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meliopoulos, Sakis; Cokkinides, George; Fardanesh, Bruce; Hedrington, Clinton

    2013-12-31

    This is the final report for this project that was performed in the period: October1, 2009 to June 30, 2013. In this project, a fully distributed high-fidelity dynamic state estimator (DSE) that continuously tracks the real time dynamic model of a wide area system with update rates better than 60 times per second is achieved. The proposed technology is based on GPS-synchronized measurements but also utilizes data from all available Intelligent Electronic Devices in the system (numerical relays, digital fault recorders, digital meters, etc.). The distributed state estimator provides the real time model of the system not only the voltage phasors. The proposed system provides the infrastructure for a variety of applications and two very important applications (a) a high fidelity generating unit parameters estimation and (b) an energy function based transient stability monitoring of a wide area electric power system with predictive capability. Also the dynamic distributed state estimation results are stored (the storage scheme includes data and coincidental model) enabling an automatic reconstruction and “play back” of a system wide disturbance. This approach enables complete play back capability with fidelity equal to that of real time with the advantage of “playing back” at a user selected speed. The proposed technologies were developed and tested in the lab during the first 18 months of the project and then demonstrated on two actual systems, the USVI Water and Power Administration system and the New York Power Authority’s Blenheim-Gilboa pumped hydro plant in the last 18 months of the project. The four main thrusts of this project, mentioned above, are extremely important to the industry. The DSE with the achieved update rates (more than 60 times per second) provides a superior solution to the “grid visibility” question. The generator parameter identification method fills an important and practical need of the industry. The “energy function” based

  5. Estimating coal production peak and trends of coal imports in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bo-qiang Lin; Jiang-hua Liu

    2010-01-15

    More than 20 countries in the world have already reached a maximum capacity in their coal production (peak coal production) such as Japan, the United Kingdom and Germany. China, home to the third largest coal reserves in the world, is the world's largest coal producer and consumer, making it part of the Big Six. At present, however, China's coal production has not yet reached its peak. In this article, logistic curves and Gaussian curves are used to predict China's coal peak and the results show that it will be between the late 2020s and the early 2030s. Based on the predictions of coal production and consumption, China's net coal import could be estimated for coming years. This article also analyzes the impact of China's net coal import on the international coal market, especially the Asian market, and on China's economic development and energy security. 16 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Methodologies for estimating one-time hazardous waste generation for capacity generation for capacity assurance planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B.; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Elliot, S.; Peretz, J.; Bohm, R.; Hendrucko, B.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains descriptions of methodologies to be used to estimate the one-time generation of hazardous waste associated with five different types of remediation programs: Superfund sites, RCRA Corrective Actions, Federal Facilities, Underground Storage Tanks, and State and Private Programs. Estimates of the amount of hazardous wastes generated from these sources to be shipped off-site to commercial hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities will be made on a state by state basis for the years 1993, 1999, and 2013. In most cases, estimates will be made for the intervening years, also.

  7. Argonne National Laboratory Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, T. M.; Gomez, J. L.; Moos, L. P.

    2014-09-02

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2013. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with environmental management, sustainability efforts, environmental corrective actions, and habitat restoration. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable standards intended to protect human health and the environment. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) CAP-88 Version 3 computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  8. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.; ESH /QA Oversight

    2008-09-09

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2007. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  9. Argonne National Laboratory site enviromental report for calendar year 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.

    2009-09-02

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2008. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  10. Argonne National Laboratory Site Environmental report for calendar year 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N. W.; Davis, T. M.; Moos, L. P.

    2010-08-04

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2009. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  11. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N. W.; Kolzow, R. G.

    2005-09-02

    This report discusses the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for calendar year 2004. The status of ANL environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of ANL operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the ANL site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and ANL effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, ANL, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  12. Argonne National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N. W.; ESH /QA Oversight

    2007-09-13

    This report discusses the status and the accomplishments of the environmental protection program at Argonne National Laboratory for calendar year 2006. The status of Argonne environmental protection activities with respect to compliance with the various laws and regulations is discussed, along with the progress of environmental corrective actions and restoration projects. To evaluate the effects of Argonne operations on the environment, samples of environmental media collected on the site, at the site boundary, and off the Argonne site were analyzed and compared with applicable guidelines and standards. A variety of radionuclides were measured in air, surface water, on-site groundwater, and bottom sediment samples. In addition, chemical constituents in surface water, groundwater, and Argonne effluent water were analyzed. External penetrating radiation doses were measured, and the potential for radiation exposure to off-site population groups was estimated. Results are interpreted in terms of the origin of the radioactive and chemical substances (i.e., natural, fallout, Argonne, and other) and are compared with applicable environmental quality standards. A U.S. Department of Energy dose calculation methodology, based on International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CAP-88 Version 3 (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) computer code, was used in preparing this report.

  13. PADUCAH 2015 YEAR IN REVIEW

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    PADUCAH 2015 YEAR IN REVIEW "2015 has been a pivotal year at the Paducah Site. Now that we have successfully transitioned the gaseous diffusion plant from NRC oversight to DOE oversight and DOE has the entire site back for the first time in almost 20 years, major deactivation activities are under way to prepare the site for future decontamination and decommissioning. We are fortunate to have a highly skilled federal and contractor workforce in place to safely and successfully continue this

  14. Fiscal Year 2015 Congressional Budget

    Energy Savers

    Fiscal Year 2014 GreenBuy Award Winners Announced Fiscal Year 2014 GreenBuy Award Winners Announced March 17, 2015 - 9:22am Addthis The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security has announced the winners of the Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 GreenBuy Awards. The following sites were recognized for demonstrating leadership in sustainable acquisition: Gold Level Award Winners:Argonne National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; and National Renewable

  15. Lasers: The First Fifty Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Robert W.; Athale, Ravindra; Onural, Levent; Seka, Wolf

    2010-09-01

    This year marks the 50th anniversary of the invention of the laser. The Optical Society of America is publishing this feature issue to celebrate this auspicious birthday.

  16. Tank 241-A-105 evaporation estimate, 1970 through 1978

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, G.K.

    1991-09-01

    Tank 241-A-105 was subjected to a severe steam explosion in January 1965 that caused the metal liner on the bottom to bulge upward approximately 8 feet above its concrete foundation. Shortly after this event, radiation was detected in drywells around the tank and it was declared a leaker. Sluicing operations to remove material from the tank began in August 1968 and continued through August 1970. After sluicing was completed, a significant amount of heat generating material still remained in the tank. To keep tank temperatures below operating limits, the water level in the tank was maintained at an approximate depth of 1.5 feet. This practice was continued until January 1979 when it was believed that the contents had decayed sufficiently to discontinue the water addition and put the tank on a portable exhauster system. Recent concern has focused on what portion of this cooling water added to Tank 241-A-105 actually evaporated and how much leaked into the soil during the nine year time period. This report presents the results of a study that estimates the amount of water evaporated from Tank 241-A-105 between 1970 and 1979. The problem was completed in two parts. The first part involved development of a three dimensional heat transfer model which was used to establish the tank heat load. The results of this model were validated against thermocouple data from Tank 241-A-105. The heat removed from the tank by the ventilation air was then used as input to a second computer code, which calculated the water evaporation. Based upon these two models, the amount of water evaporated from Tank 241-A-105, between 1970 and 1979, was between 378,000 and 410,000 gallons. 9 refs., 17 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. $100 billion mistake: is the windfall revenue estimate too high

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuelson, R.J.

    1980-04-26

    An economic analysis of the Windfall Profits Tax (as proposed at the time) suggests that the estimate of a $227 billion revenue over the next decade may be as much as $100 billion too high. This judgment is based on provisions in the law allowing states to deduct severance taxes up to 15 percent on oil before federal taxes are paid and offering tax incentives for tertiary projects. The arithmetic, particularly in the case of enhanced oil recovery, illustrates how the incentives could shift more production from a 70% to a 30% tax rate than the Federal government had estimated. (DCK)

  18. BatPRO: Battery Manufacturing Cost Estimation | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    BatPRO: Battery Manufacturing Cost Estimation BatPRO models a stiff prismatic pouch-type cell battery pack with cells linked in series. BatPRO models a stiff prismatic pouch-type cell battery pack with cells linked in series. BatPRO is the user-friendly, Windows-based version of BatPaC, a software modeling tool designed for policymakers and researchers who are interested in estimating the cost of lithium-ion batteries after they have reached a mature state of development and are being

  19. A Bayesian Machine Learning Model for Estimating Building Occupancy from Open Source Data

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Stewart, Robert N.; Urban, Marie L.; Duchscherer, Samantha E.; Kaufman, Jason; Morton, April M.; Thakur, Gautam; Piburn, Jesse; Moehl, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Understanding building occupancy is critical to a wide array of applications including natural hazards loss analysis, green building technologies, and population distribution modeling. Due to the expense of directly monitoring buildings, scientists rely in addition on a wide and disparate array of ancillary and open source information including subject matter expertise, survey data, and remote sensing information. These data are fused using data harmonization methods which refer to a loose collection of formal and informal techniques for fusing data together to create viable content for building occupancy estimation. In this paper, we add to the current state of the artmore » by introducing the Population Data Tables (PDT), a Bayesian based informatics system for systematically arranging data and harmonization techniques into a consistent, transparent, knowledge learning framework that retains in the final estimation uncertainty emerging from data, expert judgment, and model parameterization. PDT probabilistically estimates ambient occupancy in units of people/1000ft2 for over 50 building types at the national and sub-national level with the goal of providing global coverage. The challenge of global coverage led to the development of an interdisciplinary geospatial informatics system tool that provides the framework for capturing, storing, and managing open source data, handling subject matter expertise, carrying out Bayesian analytics as well as visualizing and exporting occupancy estimation results. We present the PDT project, situate the work within the larger community, and report on the progress of this multi-year project.Understanding building occupancy is critical to a wide array of applications including natural hazards loss analysis, green building technologies, and population distribution modeling. Due to the expense of directly monitoring buildings, scientists rely in addition on a wide and disparate array of ancillary and open source information

  20. A Bayesian Machine Learning Model for Estimating Building Occupancy from Open Source Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Robert N.; Urban, Marie L.; Duchscherer, Samantha E.; Kaufman, Jason; Morton, April M.; Thakur, Gautam; Piburn, Jesse; Moehl, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Understanding building occupancy is critical to a wide array of applications including natural hazards loss analysis, green building technologies, and population distribution modeling. Due to the expense of directly monitoring buildings, scientists rely in addition on a wide and disparate array of ancillary and open source information including subject matter expertise, survey data, and remote sensing information. These data are fused using data harmonization methods which refer to a loose collection of formal and informal techniques for fusing data together to create viable content for building occupancy estimation. In this paper, we add to the current state of the art by introducing the Population Data Tables (PDT), a Bayesian based informatics system for systematically arranging data and harmonization techniques into a consistent, transparent, knowledge learning framework that retains in the final estimation uncertainty emerging from data, expert judgment, and model parameterization. PDT probabilistically estimates ambient occupancy in units of people/1000ft2 for over 50 building types at the national and sub-national level with the goal of providing global coverage. The challenge of global coverage led to the development of an interdisciplinary geospatial informatics system tool that provides the framework for capturing, storing, and managing open source data, handling subject matter expertise, carrying out Bayesian analytics as well as visualizing and exporting occupancy estimation results. We present the PDT project, situate the work within the larger community, and report on the progress of this multi-year project.Understanding building occupancy is critical to a wide array of applications including natural hazards loss analysis, green building technologies, and population distribution modeling. Due to the expense of directly monitoring buildings, scientists rely in addition on a wide and disparate array of ancillary and open source information including