National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for atlas type term

  1. ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS Basics The basics of ATLAS computing at PDSF Read More » Data Transfer DQ2 is the ATLAS data management and transfer tool. Read More » File Systems ATLAS has space on 4 elizas: 35TB on /eliza1, 35TB on /eliza2, 12TB on /eliza4 and 142TB on /eliza18. Read More » Running on Carver ATLAS software is obtained via cvmfs which is installed on PDSF nodes. There is presently no cvmfs installation available on Carver so it is not possible to run ATLAS jobs on Carver at this time. However, the

  2. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Floorplan ATLAS Floorplan

  3. Estimating the releasable source term for Type B packages

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B.L.; Carlson, R.W.; Osgood, N.

    1995-11-01

    The release rate criteria for Type B packages designed to transport radioactive materials is given in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 71). Before the maximum allowable volumetric leakage rate that corresponds to the regulatory release rate can be calculated, estimation of the releasable source term activity density (concentration of releasable radioactive material) is required. This work provides methods for estimating the releasable source term for packages holding various contents types. The contents types considered include: (1) radioactive liquids; (2) radioactive gases; (3) radioactive powders and dispersible solids; (4) non-dispersible radioactive solids and (5) irradiated nuclear fuel rods. The numbers given, especially as related to the source term for packages transporting irradiated fuel rods, are preliminary and are subject to change upon development of improved methods and/or upon review of additional experimental data.

  4. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    The ATLAS Program Advisory Committee (PAC) Since ATLAS is a National User Facility and available for experiments to anyone in the world, all experiments to be performed at ATLAS must be reviewed and approved by the ATLAS PAC. The PAC consists of 5-7 internationally recognized nuclear physicists, most of whom come from outside Argonne. The PAC members are appointed by the Scientific Director of ATLAS and typically serve for a term of two years. The PAC normally meets twice per year. At roughly

  5. Search for type-III seesaw heavy leptons in pp collisions at s=8 TeVwith the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-08-03

    A search for the pair production of heavy leptons (N⁰,L±) predicted by the type-III seesaw theory formulated to explain the origin of small neutrino masses is presented. The decay channels N⁰→W±l∓ (ℓ=e,μ,τ) and L±→W±ν (ν=νe,νμ,ντ) are considered. The analysis is performed using the final state that contains two leptons (electrons or muons), two jets from a hadronically decaying W boson and large missing transverse momentum. The data used in the measurement correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb⁻¹ of pp collisions at s√=8 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No evidence of heavy lepton pair productionmore » is observed. Heavy leptons with masses below 325–540 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level, depending on the theoretical scenario considered.« less

  6. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Training Requirements Experimental Equipment Safety Data Management Users Group ATLAS Users Workshop 2009 25 Years of ATLAS Gretina Workshop ATLAS Users Workshop 2014 ATLAS...

  7. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Schedule CARIBU Schedule ATLAS Future CARIBU Future Scheduling Considerations ATLAS Archive CARIBU Archive ATLAS Schedules Beamtime at ATLAS is normally scheduled in two-month...

  8. Estimating Source Terms for Diverse Spent Nuclear Fuel Types

    SciTech Connect

    Brett Carlsen; Layne Pincock

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program is responsible for developing a defensible methodology for determining the radionuclide inventory for the DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to be dispositioned at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. SNF owned by DOE includes diverse fuels from various experimental, research, and production reactors. These fuels currently reside at several DOE sites, universities, and foreign research reactor sites. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these fuels will require radiological source terms as inputs to safety analyses that support design and licensing of the necessary equipment and facilities. This paper summarizes the methodology developed for estimating radionuclide inventories associated with DOE-owned SNF. The results will support development of design and administrative controls to manage radiological risks and may later be used to demonstrate conformance with repository acceptance criteria.

  9. High Statistics Study of Nearby Type 1a Supernovae. QUEST Camera Short Term

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Maintenance: Final Technical Report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect High Statistics Study of Nearby Type 1a Supernovae. QUEST Camera Short Term Maintenance: Final Technical Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High Statistics Study of Nearby Type 1a Supernovae. QUEST Camera Short Term Maintenance: Final Technical Report The Quest Camera was installed at the Palomar Obervatory in California. The camera was used to carry out a survey of low redshift Type 1a supernovae.The

  10. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Years of ATLAS First Circulation Agenda Registration Attendees Presentations Photos of the Meeting Photos of History The ATLAS Research at ATLAS Dear Friend, This is the second...

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - ATLAS_upgrade_physics_program

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Guy Savard Argonne National Laboratory and University of Chicago Science with the ATLAS Efficiency and Intensity Upgrade ATLAS Users Meeting August 8-9 2009 2 G. Savard 2009 ATLAS S&T Review May 18-19, 2009 Outline Evolving landscape for low-energy nuclear physics Self-assessment of ATLAS present and near future program Process followed to evaluate near and longer term physics program needs and role in community Option proposed - Physics - Machine - Instrumentation 3 G. Savard 2009 ATLAS

  12. Carbon Storage Atlas - Fifth Edition (Atlas V) (2015)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Storage Atlas - Fifth Edition (Atlas V) (2015) Atlas V Complete Document [PDF-73.1MB] Carbon Storage Atlas - Fifth Edition (Atlas V) (2015) The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is proud to release the fifth edition of the Carbon Storage Atlas (Atlas V). Production of Atlas V is the result of collaboration among carbon storage experts from local, State, and Federal agencies, as well as industry and academia. Atlas V provides a coordinated

  13. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    AGFA AIRIS.pdf CHICO2 DGS.pdf FMA GODDESS GRETINA HELIOS PhoswichWall TapeStation ATLAS Strategic Plan (2009) ATLAS Strategic Plan (2014) Registered Participants ATLAS USERS...

  14. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Recommended Vacuum Equipment This is the only vacuum equipment supported by the ATLAS Control System Cryo Pump Heater Blanket Temp/Controller 1 Temp/Controller 2 8200 Compressor 9600 Compressor Cryo Torr Interface Gate Valves All-Metal Hand Valves Foreline Valves Vac Gauge Modular Vac Gauge Controller Hand Valves Turbo Pumps (Ceramic) Turbo Pumps (MagLev) Turbo Pumps (Hybrid) Fore Pump (Scroll) Getter Pump Download Spreadsheet Category Manufacturer Model/Type Order Info Supplier Details Cryo

  15. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrical Safety Considerations at ATLAS For onsite emergencies, call 911 on the internal ... Argonne and ATLAS have very specific requirements concerning working on or near electrical ...

  16. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety General Radiation Electrical Experiment Safety at ATLAS The Management and Staff at ATLAS and Argonne National Laboratory are fully dedicated to integrating safety into all ...

  17. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 ATLAS Users Meeting: May 15-16, 2014 Dear Colleagues, The ATLAS accelerator complex at Argonne National Laboratory is restarting operation after an extended shutdown to...

  18. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    General Safety Considerations at ATLAS For onsite emergencies, call 911 on the internal phones (or 252-1911 on cell phones) Important general safety topics: ATLAS requires that...

  19. Long-term in vitro, cell-type-specific genome-wide reprogramming of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hakelien, Anne-Mari; Gaustad, Kristine G.; Taranger, Christel K.; Skalhegg, Bjorn S.; Kuentziger, Thomas; Collas, Philippe . E-mail: philippe.collas@medisin.uio.no

    2005-09-10

    We demonstrate a cell extract-based, genome-wide and heritable reprogramming of gene expression in vitro. Kidney epithelial 293T cells have previously been shown to take on T cell properties following a brief treatment with an extract of Jurkat T cells. We show here that 293T cells exposed for 1 h to a Jurkat cell extract undergo genome-wide, target cell-type-specific and long-lasting transcriptional changes. Microarray analyses indicate that on any given week after extract treatment, {approx}2500 genes are upregulated >3-fold, of which {approx}900 are also expressed in Jurkat cells. Concomitantly, {approx}1500 genes are downregulated or repressed, of which {approx}500 are also downregulated in Jurkat cells. Gene expression changes persist for over 30 passages ({approx}80 population doublings) in culture. Target cell-type specificity of these changes is shown by the lack of activation or repression of Jurkat-specific genes by extracts of 293T cells or carcinoma cells. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirms the long-term transcriptional activation of genes involved in key T cell functions. Additionally, growth of cells in suspended aggregates, expression of CD3 and CD28 T cell surface markers, and interleukin-2 secretion by 293T cells treated with extract of adult peripheral blood T cells illustrate a functional nuclear reprogramming. Therefore, target cell-type-specific and heritable changes in gene expression, and alterations in cell function, can be promoted by extracts derived from transformed cells as well as from adult primary cells.

  20. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS 25th Anniversary Celebration Presentations Summary of the History of ATLAS W. F. Henning Reminiscences 1: From Whence did ATLAS arise? J. P. Schiffer Reminiscences 2: ATLAS 25th Anniversary Celebration R. Pardo Reminiscences 3: The Argonne-Notre Dame Gamma-ray Facility U. Garg Reminiscences 4: Atom Trap at ATLAS Z. T. Lu The Impact of ATLAS on SRF Development and Applications R. E. Laxdel Technical Challenges in Low-velocity SRF Development M. Kelly Offsprings of ATLAS - the Florida State

  1. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    We are planning a symposium to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the dedication of ATLAS which took place on June 25, 1985. ATLAS was the world's first superconducting linac...

  2. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Future ATLAS Schedule Please contact Mrs. Barbara Weller (bweller@anl.gov) or go to here for your travel arrangement as far in advance of your arrival as possible. Future ATLAS...

  3. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    PAC and Proposals Call for Proposals PAC Members Proposal Info Approved Experiments ATLAS Proposal Submission A call for ATLAS Proposals is made 2-3 times per year, depending on...

  4. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS Data Management Plan This information is provided to inform users of the data management policies of ATLAS. All proposals for funding to the Office of Science require a data...

  5. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Proposed ATLAS efficiency and intensity upgrade Guy Savard and Robert V. F. Janssens June 12, 2009 The ATLAS facility is on a constant quest to improve and increase the...

  6. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Training Requirements for ATLAS Users All ATLAS Users must fulfill certain training requirements before they are allowed to have unescorted access to the ATLAS facility. These requirements are: Argonne Radiation Worker I Training ATLAS Site Specific Safety Training These training courses are computer based and will need to be completed every two years. The material covered in the training and the tests that must be completed with passing scores of 80% are available only on computers in the

  7. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    The ATLAS User Group Executive Committee The current membership of the ATLAS User Group Executive Committee is: Dan Bardayan University of Notre Dame dbardaya@nd.edu Catherine Deibel Louisiana State University deibel@lsu.edu Nicholas Scielzo (chair) Lawrence Livermore National Lab scielzo1@llnl.gov Alan Wuosmaa University of Connecticut alan.wuosmaa@uconn.edu The ATLAS User Group Charter: The ATLAS User Group shall be formed from the members of the nuclear physics, nuclear chemistry and atomic

  8. RE Atlas | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    RE Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: RE Atlas AgencyCompany Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable...

  9. Atlas Material Testing Solutions | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Atlas Material Testing Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name: Atlas Material Testing Solutions Place: Chicago, IL Zip: 60613 Website: atlas-mts.com Coordinates: 41.9529209,...

  10. Communication: Cosolvency and cononsolvency explained in terms of a Flory-Huggins type theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dudowicz, Jacek Freed, Karl F.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2015-10-07

    Standard Flory-Huggins (FH) theory is utilized to describe the enigmatic cosolvency and cononsolvency phenomena for systems of polymers dissolved in mixed solvents. In particular, phase boundaries (specifically upper critical solution temperature spinodals) are calculated for solutions of homopolymers B in pure solvents and in binary mixtures of small molecule liquids A and C. The miscibility (or immiscibility) patterns for the ternary systems are classified in terms of the FH binary interaction parameters (χ{sub αβ}) and the ratio r = ϕ{sub A}/ϕ{sub C} of the concentrations ϕ{sub A} and ϕ{sub C} of the two solvents. The trends in miscibility are compared to those observed for blends of random copolymers (A{sub x}C{sub 1−x}) with homopolymers (B) and to those deduced for A/B/C solutions of polymers B in liquid mixtures of small molecules A and C that associate into polymeric clusters (A{sub p}C{sub q}){sub i}, (i = 1, 2, …, ∞). Although the classic FH theory is able to explain cosolvency and cononsolvency phenomena, the theory does not include a consideration of the mutual association of the solvent molecules and the competitive association between the solvent molecules and the polymer. These interactions can be incorporated in refinements of the FH theory, and the present paper provides a foundation for such extensions for modeling the rich thermodynamics of polymers in mixed solvents.

  11. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment Safety Considerations at ATLAS For onsite emergencies, call 911 on the internal phones (or 252-1911 on cell phones) Equipment Safety Reviews are required whenever new...

  12. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    & Talks FirstAnnouncement SecondAnnouncement Registration Form Registered Participants ATLAS Upgrade Equipment Initiatives Stable Beams Radioactive Beams CARIBU Beams Workshop...

  13. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stable Beams Available from ATLAS Updated August, 2009 Beam currents listed in the table were obtained with naturally occurring material for the given isotope. The maximum energy...

  14. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    The ATLAS Program Advisory Committee (PAC) Current PAC Membership: Gordon Ball TRIUMF Dan Bardayan University of Notre Dame Peter Butler University of Liverpool Michael Carpenter...

  15. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Equipment Information There are several major pieces of experimental equipment at ATLAS. These are listed below along with contact information for the system experts:...

  16. Atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect

    Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Humphreys, M.; Smosna, R.A.

    1995-06-01

    This regional study of gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin has four main objectives: to organize all of the -as reservoirs in the Appalachian basin into unique plays based on common age, lithology, trap type and other geologic similarities; to write, illustrate and publish an atlas of major gas plays; to prepare and submit a digital data base of geologic, engineering and reservoir parameters for each gas field; and technology transfer to the oil and gas industry during the preparation of the atlas and data base.

  17. ATLAS note ATL-COM-PHYS-2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Chekanov, S.; Boomsma, J.; High Energy Physics

    2009-12-22

    The program InvMass has been developed to perform a general model-independent search for new particles using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at CERN. The search is performed by examining statistically significant variations from the Standard Model predictions in exclusive event classes classified according to the number of identified objects. The program, called InvMass, finds all relevant particle groups identified with the ATLAS detector and analyzes their production rates, invariant masses and the total transverse momenta. The generic code of InvMass can easily be adapted for any particle types identified with the ATLAS detector. Several benchmark tests are presented.

  18. BNL ATLAS Grid Computing

    ScienceCinema

    Michael Ernst

    2010-01-08

    As the sole Tier-1 computing facility for ATLAS in the United States and the largest ATLAS computing center worldwide Brookhaven provides a large portion of the overall computing resources for U.S. collaborators and serves as the central hub for storing,

  19. An atlas of thermal data for biomass and other fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, S.; Reed, T.B.

    1995-06-01

    Biomass is recognized as a major source of renewable energy. In order to convert biomass energy to more useful forms, it is necessary to have accurate scientific data on the thermal properties of biomass. This Atlas has been written to supply a uniform source of that information. In the last few decades Thermal analysis (TA) tools such as thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, thermo mechanical analysis, etc. have become more important. The data obtained from these techniques can provide useful information in terms of reaction mechanism, kinetic parameters, thermal stability, phase transformation, heat of reaction, etc. for gas-solid and gas-liquid systems. Unfortunately, there are no ASTM standards set for the collection of these types of data using TA techniques and therefore, different investigators use different conditions which suit their requirements for measuring this thermal data. As a result, the information obtained from different laboratories is not comparable. This Atlas provides the ability to compare new laboratory results with a wide variety of related data available in the literature and helps ensure consistency in using these data.

  20. BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Atlas and BioFuels Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas AgencyCompany Organization: National Renewable Energy...

  1. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Safety at ATLAS For onsite emergencies, call 911 on the internal phones (or 630-252-1911 on cell phones) Safety Aspects of radiation safety at ATLAS: Health Physics Coverage at ATLAS is provided by Argonne National Laboratory. Health Physics personnel must be notified if there is a possible contamination incident, or if target and/or detectors are to be removed from a beam line following an experiment. HP Contact information: Angel Garcia (HP Technician): 2-9179 (4-1352 pager) Dave

  2. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    The purpose of this note is to announce an important workshop for the ATLAS users to be held at Argonne National Laboratory on AUGUST 8 and 9, 2009. As you are aware, major changes are in store for the ATLAS facility. First, the Energy Upgrade and the CARIBU (CAlifornium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade) projects are nearing completion. In addition, the role of ATLAS for the low-energy nuclear physics community needs to be revisited in light of the decision to site the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

  3. Cryogenic distillation: a fuel enrichment system for near-term tokamak-type D-T fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, B.; Davis, J.F.

    1980-02-01

    The successful operation and economic viability of deuterium-tritium- (D-T-) fueled tokamak-type commercial power fusion reactors will depend to a large extent on the development of reliable tritium-containment and fuel-recycle systems. Of the many operating steps in the fuel recycle scheme, separation or enrichment of the isotropic species of hydrogen by cryogenic distillation is one of the most important. A parametric investigation was carried out to study the effects of the various operating conditions and the composition of the spent fuel on the degree of separation. A computer program was developed for the design and analysis of a system of interconnected distillation columns for isotopic separation such that the requirements of near-term D-T-fueled reactors are met. The analytical results show that a distillation cascade consisting of four columns is capable of reprocessing spent fuel varying over a wide range of compositions to yield reinjection-grade fuel with essentially unlimited D/T ratio.

  4. ATLAS Metadata Task Force

    SciTech Connect

    ATLAS Collaboration; Costanzo, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Gadomski, S.; Jezequel, S.; Klimentov, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Malon, D.; Mornacchi, G.; Nemethy, P.; Pauly, T.; von der Schmitt, H.; Barberis, D.; Gianotti, F.; Hinchliffe, I.; Mapelli, L.; Quarrie, D.; Stapnes, S.

    2007-04-04

    This document provides an overview of the metadata, which are needed to characterizeATLAS event data at different levels (a complete run, data streams within a run, luminosity blocks within a run, individual events).

  5. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Radioactive Beams Delivered by ATLAS Updated July, 2009 a Beams produced using the "In-flight" method (see below). b Beams produced using the "Two-accelerator" or "Batch" method...

  6. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    solenoid (i.e., MRI magnet). It has been commissioned, tested and used at ATLAS with secondary short-lived beams. It also has the potential of being moved to other...

  7. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Scheduling Considerations Beamtime at ATLAS is normally scheduled in two-month blocks. We make every effort to produce an accurate schedule at least two weeks prior to its approval...

  8. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Approved ATLAS Experiments Sorted by PAC meetings: November 6-7, 2015 March 8-9, 2015 September 19, 2014 November 22-23, 2013 December 14-15, 2012 January 13-14, 2012 April 22-23,...

  9. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Nuclear Physics at the Department of Energy to upgrade the capabilities of ATLAS in the area of physics with rare isotopes. A copy of the proposal for the CAlifornium...

  10. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Information Shaofei Zhu ATLAS User Liaison Physicist zhu@anl.gov (630) 252-4412 Shaofei Zhu Barbara Weller Administrative Secretary bweller@anl.gov (630) 252-4044 Barbara...

  11. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    This is the second announcement of the ATLAS User Group Meeting that will take place on August 8-9, 2009. As stated in our original message (http:www.phy.anl.govatlas...

  12. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Radioactive Beams Delivered by ATLAS Updated July, 2009 a Beams produced using the "In-flight" method (Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 380 (2008)) (see below). b Beams produced using the...

  13. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Guest Facilities User Agreement All ATLAS Facility Users must have an appointment at Argonne to work at the facility. In order for a non-Argonne person to perform research at ATLAS the Department of Energy requires that a Guest Facilities User Agreement be executed. The purpose of the User Agreement is to define administrative obligations such as safety, liability, ownership of property, and intellectual property rights. These rights and obligations vary based upon category of use.

  14. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 ATLAS User’s Meeting: May 15-16, 2014 Dear Colleagues, The ATLAS accelerator complex at Argonne National Laboratory restarted operation after an extended shutdown to complete its intensity and efficiency upgrade. This upgrade project consisted of a reconfigured injection line and a positive-ion injector that now includes a high-intensity CW RFQ for initial acceleration. In addition, a major reconfiguration of the booster section was also part of the project. A new cryostat with

  15. Type B Accident Investigation of the Mineral Oil Leak Discovered on January 8, 2001, Resulting in Property Damage at the Atlas Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by Acting Chief Operating Officer for Defense Programs, Ralph E. Erickson.

  16. Template:AtlasTabs | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    AtlasTabs Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTemplate:AtlasTabs&oldid686795...

  17. Atlas Solar Innovations | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Innovations Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Atlas Solar Innovations Name: Atlas Solar Innovations Address: 2640 NW 15th Court Place: Pompano Beach, Florida Zip: 33069 Sector:...

  18. Biofuels Atlas (United States) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Atlas (United States) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biofuels Atlas (United States) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Potentials & Scenarios...

  19. River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    dress":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Language: English River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Screenshot References: EPRI1 River Atlas2 The...

  20. Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS) ATLAS is an integrated web-based logistics management system allowing users to manage inbound and outbound freight ...

  1. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS USERS WORKSHOP: AGENDA Saturday, August 8 (Bldg. 203 Auditorium) 8:45 - 9:15 Registration & Coffee 9:15 - 9:30 Welcome & introduction to the meeting: W. Loveland An updated Strategic Plan: Why? R. Janssens 9:30 - 10:00 Status of ATLAS (& Energy Upgrade) R. Pardo 10:00 - 10:30 Status of CARIBU R. Pardo & G. Savard 10:30 - 10:45 Coffee 10:45 - 12:45 Status report on existing equipment & Planned Upgrades*: 10:45 - 11:00 HELIOS A. Wuosmaa 11:00 - 11:15 Gammasphere M.

  2. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2-3, 2010 ATLAS PAC Meeting Please note: Because of the pressure on ATLAS beam time, the PAC ranked the approved experiments in two categories. Priority I experiments are those that must be run at all costs. Priority II experiments are those that should be granted beam time (indicated in parenthesis) if at all possible. Priority I experiments are approved for the present cycle of experiments, but can be run during the next PAC cycle as well if scheduling conflicts occur. Priority II

  3. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    April 22-23, 2011 ATLAS PAC Meeting Please note: Because of the pressure on ATLAS beam time, the PAC ranked the approved experiments in two categories. Priority I experiments are those that must be run at all costs. Priority II experiments are those that should be granted beam time (indicated in parenthesis) if at all possible. Priority I experiments are approved for the present cycle of experiments, but can be run during the next PAC cycle as well if scheduling conflicts occur. Priority II

  4. Carbon Sequestration Atlas IV Video

    SciTech Connect

    Rodosta, Traci

    2013-04-19

    The Carbon Sequestration Atlas is a collection of all the storage sites of CO2 such as, petroleum, natural gas, coal, and oil shale.

  5. Carbon Sequestration Atlas IV Video

    ScienceCinema

    Rodosta, Traci

    2014-06-27

    The Carbon Sequestration Atlas is a collection of all the storage sites of CO2 such as, petroleum, natural gas, coal, and oil shale.

  6. BioFuels Atlas Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Kristi Moriarity's presentation on NREL's BioFuels Atlas from the May 12, 2011, Clean Cities and Biomass Program State webinar.

  7. ATLAS Support Center | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS Support Center Our mission is to support ATLAS physics analyses and hardware R&D, in particular for U.S. ATLAS physicists. We are one of the three ATLAS Support Centers in the U.S. We offer for ATLAS users: A model Tier-3 (T3g) for ATLAS analysis Meeting and office space for visitors A dedicated video conference facility Computer accounts ATLAS software expertise and consultation T3g setup expertise and consultation Analysis expertise and consultation The support center is operated by

  8. Big Sky Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Big Sky Carbon Atlas is an online geoportal designed for you to discover, interpret, and access geospatial data and maps relevant to decision support and education on carbon sequestration in the Big Sky Region. In serving as the public face of the Partnership's spatial Data Libraries, the Atlas provides a gateway to geographic information characterizing CO2 sources, potential geologic sinks, terrestrial carbon fluxes, civil and energy infrastructure, energy use, and related themes. In addition to directly serving the BSCSP and its stakeholders, the Atlas feeds regional data to the NatCarb Portal, contributing to a national perspective on carbon sequestration. Established components of the Atlas include a gallery of thematic maps and an interactive map that allows you to: • Navigate and explore regional characterization data through a user-friendly interface • Print your map views or publish them as PDFs • Identify technical references relevant to specific areas of interest • Calculate straight-line or pipeline-constrained distances from point sources of CO2 to potential geologic sink features • Download regional data layers (feature under development) (Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

  9. THE AKARI 2.5-5.0 μm SPECTRAL ATLAS OF TYPE-1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATOR, LINE RATIO, AND HOT DUST TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dohyeong; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Ji Hoon; Jun, Hyunsung David; Lee, Seong-Kook; Woo, Jong-Hak; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Wada, Takehiko; Takagi, Toshinobu; Oyabu, Shinki; Ohyama, Youichi E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2015-01-01

    We present 2.5-5.0 μm spectra of 83 nearby (0.002 < z < 0.48) and bright (K < 14 mag) type-1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taken with the Infrared Camera on board AKARI. The 2.5-5.0 μm spectral region contains emission lines such as Brβ (2.63 μm), Brα (4.05 μm), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (3.3 μm), which can be used for studying the black hole (BH) masses and star formation activity in the host galaxies of AGNs. The spectral region also suffers less dust extinction than in the ultra violet (UV) or optical wavelengths, which may provide an unobscured view of dusty AGNs. Our sample is selected from bright quasar surveys of Palomar-Green and SNUQSO, and AGNs with reverberation-mapped BH masses from Peterson et al. Using 11 AGNs with reliable detection of Brackett lines, we derive the Brackett-line-based BH mass estimators. We also find that the observed Brackett line ratios can be explained with the commonly adopted physical conditions of the broad line region. Moreover, we fit the hot and warm dust components of the dust torus by adding photometric data of SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, and ISO to the AKARI spectra, finding hot and warm dust temperatures of ∼1100 K and ∼220 K, respectively, rather than the commonly cited hot dust temperature of 1500 K.

  10. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stable Beams Available from ATLAS Updated August, 2009 Beam currents listed in the table were obtained with naturally occurring material for the given isotope. The maximum energy quoted corresponds to the that computed with the optimal charge state. Higher energies are possible by using another charge state or by double stripping. a Other isotopes available with currents proportional to their abundance. For more beam current isotopically enriched material may be used, but the User should, in

  11. WESTCARB Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (known as WESTCARB) was established in Fall 2003. It is one of seven research partnerships co-funded by DOE to characterize regional carbon sequestration opportunities and conduct pilot-scale validation tests. The California Energy Commission manages WESTCARB and is a major co-funder. WESTCARB is characterizing the extent and capacity of geologic formations capable of storing CO2, known as sinks. Results are entered into a geographic information system (GIS) database, along with the location of major CO2-emitting point sources in each of the six WESTCARB states, enabling researchers and the public to gauge the proximity of candidate CO2 storage sites to emission sources and the feasibility of linking them via pipelines. Specifically, the WESTCARB GIS database (also known as the carbon atlas) stores layers of geologic information about potential underground storage sites, such as porosity and nearby fault-lines and aquifers. Researchers use these data, along with interpreted geophysical data and available oil and gas well logs to estimate the region's potential geologic storage capacity. The database also depicts existing pipeline routes and rights-of-way and lands that could be off-limits, which can aid the development of a regional carbon management strategy. The WESTCARB Carbon Atlas, which is accessible to the public, provides a resource for public discourse on practical solutions for regional CO2 management. A key WESTCARB partner, the Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center, has developed data serving procedures to enable the WESTCARB Carbon Atlas to be integrated with those from other regional partnerships, thereby supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's national carbon atlas, NATCARB

  12. Energy Datapalooza Community | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    > Energy Datapalooza Community Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Global Atlas Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Global Atlas IRENA...

  13. ATLAS upgrade June09_v3

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS efficiency and intensity upgrade Guy Savard and Robert V. F. Janssens June 12, 2009 The ATLAS facility is on a constant quest to improve and increase the capabilities it...

  14. Global Atlas | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Global Atlas Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 11 February, 2013 - 15:18 IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential data...

  15. Atlas Lighting: Order (2015-CE-48001)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Atlas Lighting Products to pay a $6,000 civil penalty after finding Atlas Lighting had failed to certify that certain models of illuminated exit signs comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  16. European Wind Atlas: Offshore | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontenteuropean-wind-atlas-offshore,http:c Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This...

  17. European Wind Atlas: Onshore | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontenteuropean-wind-atlas-onshore,http:cl Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This...

  18. European Wind Atlas: France | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontenteuropean-wind-atlas-france,http:cle Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This...

  19. BioFuels Atlas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, K.

    2011-02-01

    Presentation for biennial merit review of Biofuels Atlas, a first-pass visualization tool that allows users to explore the potential of biomass-to-biofuels conversions at various locations and scales.

  20. From whence did ATLAS arise?

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    whence did ATLAS arise? (the quarter century: 1960-85) Once upon a time, there was an Argonne tandem (started 1960) Here is a typical schedule from the 60-s. 2 We even had an...

  1. Atlas Multimedia Educational Lab for Interactive Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2008-04-01

    AMELIA is an application with focus on particle physics processes in ATLAS. This will allow students and othe users to decode the collision events that unfold after the head-on collisions of protons at the Large hadron Collider. AMELIA uses the Irrlicht engine for the 3D graphics and wxWidgets for the interface. It uses the best aspects of technical animation and allows users to control 3D representations of collision events and to manipulate 3D models ofmore » the detector and see how particles are detected as they pass through. It allows the user to rotate, zoom and select virtual pieces of the ATLAS detector and events. The characteristics of the events (momentum etc.) can also be read, and one can select tracks for analysis, activate context-oriented media, etc. This framework intends to integrate different types of media into a single product. This way, videos, animations, sound, interactive visualization and data analysis will be bound together in the same package.-« less

  2. Atlas Multimedia Educational Lab for Interactive Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pequenao, Joao

    2008-04-01

    AMELIA is an application with focus on particle physics processes in ATLAS. This will allow students and othe users to decode the collision events that unfold after the head-on collisions of protons at the Large hadron Collider. AMELIA uses the Irrlicht engine for the 3D graphics and wxWidgets for the interface. It uses the best aspects of technical animation and allows users to control 3D representations of collision events and to manipulate 3D models of the detector and see how particles are detected as they pass through. It allows the user to rotate, zoom and select virtual pieces of the ATLAS detector and events. The characteristics of the events (momentum etc.) can also be read, and one can select tracks for analysis, activate context-oriented media, etc. This framework intends to integrate different types of media into a single product. This way, videos, animations, sound, interactive visualization and data analysis will be bound together in the same package.-

  3. Solar Atlas (PACA Region - France) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Atlas (PACA Region - France) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Solar Atlas (PACA Region - France) AgencyCompany Organization: MINES ParisTech Sector:...

  4. Wind Energy Atlas of Brazil | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Atlas of Brazil Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Wind Energy Atlas of Brazil Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website:...

  5. Ontario Renewable Energy Atlas (Canada) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Renewable Energy Atlas (Canada) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Ontario Renewable Energy Atlas (Canada) Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials &...

  6. ATLAS diboson excesses from the stealth doublet model (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ATLAS diboson excesses from the stealth doublet model Title: ATLAS diboson excesses from the stealth doublet model Authors: Chao, Wei Search DOE PAGES for author "Chao, Wei" Search...

  7. Global Atlas for Solar and Wind Energy | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Atlas for Solar and Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Atlas for Solar and Wind Energy AgencyCompany Organization: International Renewable Energy...

  8. 2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    10 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: 2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the...

  9. Consumer Energy Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This first edition of the Atlas provides, in reference form, a central source of information to consumers on key contacts concerned with energy in the US. Energy consumers need information appropriate to local climates and characteristics - best provided by state and local governments. The Department of Energy recognizes the authority of state and local governments to manage energy programs on their own. Therefore, emphasis has been given to government organizations on both the national and state level that influence, formulate, or administer policies affecting energy production, distribution, and use, or that provide information of interest to consumers and non-specialists. In addition, hundreds of non-government energy-related membership organizations, industry trade associations, and energy publications are included.

  10. ATLAS Science and Technology Review

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    th Anniversary Celebration October 22-23, 2010 Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory Building 203, Auditorium Friday, October 22: The Past as Prologue 8:00 - 8:30 Registration and coffee Chair: R.V.F. Janssens 8:30 - 8:45 Welcome by Laboratory Director and ALD E. Isaacs/S. Streiffer 8:45 - 9:30 Summary of the History of ATLAS W.F. Henning Chair: B.B. Back 9:30 - 10:30 Reminiscences 10:30 - 10:50 Break Chair: J. Nolen 10:50 - 11:25 The Impact of ATLAS on SRF Development and Applications

  11. The ATLAS Positron Experiment -- APEX

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.; Dunford, R.; Kutschera, W.; Rhein, M.D.; Schiffer, J.P.; Wilt, P.; Wuosmaa, A.; Austin, S.M.; Kashy, E.; Winfield, J.S.; Yurkon, J.E.; Bazin, D.; Calaprice, F.P.; Young, A.; Chan, K.C.; Chisti, A.; Chowhury, P.; Greenberg, J.S.; Kaloskamis, N.; Lister, C.J.; Fox, J.D.; Roa, E.; Freedman, S.; Maier, M.R.; Freer, M.; Gazes, S.; Hallin, A.L.; Liu, M.; Happ, T.; Perera, A.; Wolfs, F.L.H.; Trainor, T.; Wolanski, M. |

    1994-03-01

    APEX -- the ATLAS Positron Experiment -- is designed to measure electrons and positrons emitted in heavy-ion collisions. Its scientific goal is to gain insight into the puzzling positron-line phenomena observed at the GSI Darmstadt. It is in operation at the ATLAS accelerator at Argonne National Lab. The assembly of the apparatus is finished and beginning 1993 the first positrons produced in heavy-ion collisions were observed. The first full scale experiment was carried out in December 1993, and the data are currently being analyzed. In this paper, the principles of operation are explained and a status report on the experiment is given.

  12. World Bank eAtlas of Global Development | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    World Bank eAtlas of Global Development1 "This eAtlas, a new online companion to Atlas of Global Development, third edition, builds on the Atlas topics, allowing you to...

  13. ATLAS_Strategic_Plan_09_v5

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Introduction This strategic plan is developed jointly by the ATLAS user community and the Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory. This plan is a public document, hence ...

  14. ATLAS_Strategic_Plan_14_August _9

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduction This strategic plan is developed jointly by the ATLAS user community and the Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory. This plan is a public document, hence ...

  15. Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Armenia

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    G. Scott, S. Haymes, D. Heimiller, R. George National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Armenia July 2003 * NRELTP-500-33544 Wind Energy Resource...

  16. ATLAS APPROVED IN-BEAM EXPERIMENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    7 785 Baktash Band Termination, Superdeformation and Complex Clusters in 32S 5 TOTAL 82 ATLAS APPROVED SOURCE EXPERIMENTS (Depending on Gammasphere Availability) Exp Spokesperson...

  17. Carbon Storage Atlas, Employee Newsletter Earn International...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    internal employee newsletter, inTouch, earned 2013 National Association of Government Communicators awards. NETL's Carbon Storage Atlas IV and FE's internal employee newsletter, ...

  18. Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    ATLAS Collaboration; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is a high precision silicon tracking device located closest to the LHC interaction point. It belongs to the first generation of its kind in a hadron collider experiment. It will provide crucial pattern recognition information and will largely determine the ability of ATLAS to precisely track particle trajectories and find secondary vertices. It was the last detector to be installed in ATLAS in June 2007, has been fully connected and tested in-situ during spring and summer 2008, and is ready for the imminent LHC turn-on. The highlights of the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS pixel system are presented.

  19. ATLAS Enhanced Capabilities and Questions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ATLAS Enhanced Capabilities and Questions ATLAS Enhanced Capabilities and Questions Enhanced Capabilities ATLAS provides an enterprise wide solution for managing DOE's transportation activities. ATLAS combined and enhanced the existing tools in a reliable, efficient, user friendly and secure cloud platform. ATLAS tools and electronic forms were designed by expert users to promote compliance in an intuitive (logical and easy to use) format and to provide easy access for qualified users.

  20. Philippines Wind Energy Resource Atlas Development

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.

    2000-11-29

    This paper describes the creation of a comprehensive wind energy resource atlas for the Philippines. The atlas was created to facilitate the rapid identification of good wind resource areas and understanding of the salient wind characteristics. Detailed wind resource maps were generated for the entire country using an advanced wind mapping technique and innovative assessment methods recently developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  1. Renewable Energy Atlas of the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, J.; Hlava, K.; Greenwood, H.; Carr, A.

    2013-12-13

    The Renewable Energy Atlas (Atlas) of the United States is a compilation of geospatial data focused on renewable energy resources, federal land ownership, and base map reference information. This report explains how to add the Atlas to your computer and install the associated software. The report also includes: A description of each of the components of the Atlas; Lists of the Geographic Information System (GIS) database content and sources; and A brief introduction to the major renewable energy technologies. The Atlas includes the following: A GIS database organized as a set of Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS Personal GeoDatabases, and ESRI ArcReader and ArcGIS project files providing an interactive map visualization and analysis interface.

  2. Upgrading the ATLAS control system

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, F.H.; Ferraretto, M.

    1993-09-01

    Heavy-ion accelerators are tools used in the research of nuclear and atomic physics. The ATLAS facility at the Argonne National Laboratory is one such tool. The ATLAS control system serves as the primary operator interface to the accelerator. A project to upgrade the control system is presently in progress. Since this is an upgrade project and not a new installation, it was imperative that the development work proceed without interference to normal operations. An additional criteria for the development work was that the writing of additional ``in-house`` software should be kept to a minimum. This paper briefly describes the control system being upgraded, and explains some of the reasons for the decision to upgrade the control system. Design considerations and goals for the new system are described, and the present status of the upgrade is discussed.

  3. atlasUserMeeting14

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    GRETINA Mario Cromaz, LBNL Work supported under contract number DE-AC02-05CH11231. 2014 ATLAS User's Meeting ANL - May 15-16, 2014 The GRETINA Spectrometer 2 * first generation gamma-ray tracking array * spherical shell of Ge covering 25% of available solid angle (scalable to full 4 coverage) * consists of seven 4-crystal modules (quads), 36-way segmented HPGe crystals (1000 segments) * tracking ability removes need for active suppression, scales to very high efficiencies * physics runs now

  4. ATLAS at the LHC | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ATLAS at the LHC ATLAS at the LHC The Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland is the largest physics machine on Earth, and involves a collaboration of thousands of scientists who have used it to investigate the structure and properties of the tiniest building blocks of matter. At one of the experiments being performed on the LHC, called ATLAS, more than 3,000 scientists have undertaken the search for new discoveries based upon the head-on collisions of protons of extraordinarily high

  5. Canadian Wind Energy Atlas Potential Website | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentcanadian-wind-energy-atlas-potential- Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance...

  6. Energy Data Jam | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Global Atlas Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Global Atlas IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Graham7781 11 Feb 2013 - 15:18...

  7. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Solar Radiation Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    NREL

    1998-12-16

    This atlas provides a record of monthly mean solar radiation generated by a Climatological Solar Radiation model, using quasi-climatological inputs of cloud cover, aerosol optical depth, precipitable water vapor, ozone, surface albedo, and atmospheric pressure.

  8. Atlas Lighting: Proposed Penalty (2015-CE-48001)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Atlas Lighting Products failed to certify a variety of illuminated exit sign basic models as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  9. Utility Rate | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    > Posts by term > Utility Rate Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Global Atlas Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Global Atlas IRENA...

  10. Final technical evaluation report for the proposed revised reclamation plan for the Atlas Corporation Moab Mill

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This final Technical Evaluation Report (TER) summarizes the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff`s review of Atlas Corporation`s proposed reclamation plan for its uranium mill tailings pile near Moab, Utah. The proposed reclamation would allow Atlas to (1) reclaim the tailings pile for permanent disposal and long-term custodial care by a government agency in its current location on the Moab site, (2) prepare the site for closure, and (3) relinquish responsibility of the site after having its NRC license terminated. The NRC staff concludes that, subject to license conditions identified in the TER, the proposed reclamation plan meets the requirements identified in NRC regulations, which appear primarily in 10 CFR Part 40. 112 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs.

  11. Renewable energy atlas of the United States.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, J.A.; Hlava, K.Greenwood, H.; Carr, A.

    2012-05-01

    The Renewable Energy Atlas (Atlas) of the United States is a compilation of geospatial data focused on renewable energy resources, federal land ownership, and base map reference information. It is designed for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USFS) and other federal land management agencies to evaluate existing and proposed renewable energy projects. Much of the content of the Atlas was compiled at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to support recent and current energy-related Environmental Impact Statements and studies, including the following projects: (1) West-wide Energy Corridor Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) (BLM 2008); (2) Draft PEIS for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (DOE/BLM 2010); (3) Supplement to the Draft PEIS for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (DOE/BLM 2011); (4) Upper Great Plains Wind Energy PEIS (WAPA/USFWS 2012, in progress); and (5) Energy Transport Corridors: The Potential Role of Federal Lands in States Identified by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 368(b) (in progress). This report explains how to add the Atlas to your computer and install the associated software; describes each of the components of the Atlas; lists the Geographic Information System (GIS) database content and sources; and provides a brief introduction to the major renewable energy technologies.

  12. Term Appointments

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    A term appointment is a non-permanent time limited appointment for a period of more than 1 year but not more than 4 years. The appointment allows eiligibility for benefits and retirement coverage.

  13. Clean and Renewable Energy | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    > Clean and Renewable Energy Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Global Atlas Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Global Atlas IRENA...

  14. Energy Data Initiative (EDI) | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    > Energy Data Initiative (EDI) Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Term: Global Atlas Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Global Atlas IRENA...

  15. NREL Releases BioEnergy Atlas - a Comprehensive Biomass Mapping

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Application - News Releases | NREL NREL Releases BioEnergy Atlas - a Comprehensive Biomass Mapping Application September 28, 2010 BioEnergy Atlas, a Web portal that provides access to two bioenergy analysis and mapping tools, was released today by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The visualization screening tools, BioPower and BioFuels Atlas, allow users to layer related bioenergy data onto a single map to gather information on biomass feedstocks,

  16. Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) Fact Sheet | Argonne

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) Fact Sheet The ATLAS facility is a leading facility for nuclear structure research in the United States. Any stable ion can be accelerated in ATLAS, the world's first superconducting linear accelerator for ions, and delivered to one of its several target stations. It provides a wide range of beams for nuclear reaction and structure research to a large community of users from the United States and abroad. About 20% of

  17. Mafic Atlas: Looking at basalt rock formations for potential carbon sequestration application

    DOE Data Explorer

    Basalt formations are prevalent in the Big Sky region, and while less studied than other potential storage sites for CO2, they may play an important role in geologic sequestration due to their unique geochemical and physical properties. Regionally, basalts offer significant long-term storage potential estimated in the range of 33-134 billion metric tons. These estimates scaled globally suggest that the five largest basalt provinces could sequester 10,000 years of the world’s CO2 emissions. Basalt provinces are globally distributed and could significantly expand CO2 storage options in regions where conventional storage is limited or non-existent. BSCSP and Idaho State University developed a national Mafic Atlas to assess the sequestration potential of basalts through modeling studies, laboratory testing, and insights developed from mafic rock pilot projects. The Mafic Atlas online mapping application highlights the Columbia River Basalt Group in Washington and Oregon and its proximity to the West Coast power load. Features of the map include: • Carbon storage capacity estimates for regional basalt provinces • Click-able well locations that link to US Geological Survey well log datasets • Live GeoRSS feeds and an address finder • Custom drawing and printing tools to create your own map • Search tools to explore the Mafic database. [copied from http://www.bigskyco2.org/atlas/mafic

  18. Advances in Ion Accelerators Boost Argonne's ATLAS User Facility...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Advances in Ion Accelerators Boost Argonne's ATLAS User Facility Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities ...

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - CJC_ATLAS09 [Compatibility Mode]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    transfer using RIB + 7 Li ti t ATLAS reactions at ATLAS W. B. Walters, C. J. Chiara ATLAS Workshop 8 August 2009 * Investigation of single-particle and i l h l t t single-hole states in neutron-rich nuclei e g near nuclei, e.g. near N=82 (energies, spins parities ) spins, parities...). * Idea presented here is "borrowed", but serves as a reminder of how recently developed techniques y p q can be extended to future ATLAS use. Pioneering work by D. C. Radford: highly selective study of n

  20. Wind Resource Atlas of Oaxaca | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    characteristics and distribution of wind resources in Oaxaca, Mexico, at a wind power density of 50 meters above ground. The detailed wind resource maps contained in the atlas...

  1. ATLAS Large Scale Thin Gap Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Soha, Aria

    2014-04-29

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of the ATLAS sTGC New Small Wheel collaboration who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the FY2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program.

  2. United States Atlas of Renewable Resources

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Atlas is an interactive application of the renewable energy resources in the contiguous United States, Alaska and Hawaii. It illustrates the geographic distribution of wind, solar, geothermal, and biomass resources, as well as other pertinent information such as transportation network and administrative boundaries.[Copied from http://www.nrel.gov/gis/maps.html

  3. Loan Terms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Terms Loan Terms The following terms are important to understand and use confidently as you discuss, negotiate, and finalize details of the clean energy loan product with the selected financial institution partners. You will need to negotiate loan origination procedures, interest rates, loan tenors, underwriting guidelines, and other terms outlined below. Eligible Borrowers: Eligible borrowers must be defined. Eligible Projects: Eligible project types and measures must be defined. Loan

  4. Two-stage atlas subset selection in multi-atlas based image segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Tingting Ruan, Dan

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Fast growing access to large databases and cloud stored data presents a unique opportunity for multi-atlas based image segmentation and also presents challenges in heterogeneous atlas quality and computation burden. This work aims to develop a novel two-stage method tailored to the special needs in the face of large atlas collection with varied quality, so that high-accuracy segmentation can be achieved with low computational cost. Methods: An atlas subset selection scheme is proposed to substitute a significant portion of the computationally expensive full-fledged registration in the conventional scheme with a low-cost alternative. More specifically, the authors introduce a two-stage atlas subset selection method. In the first stage, an augmented subset is obtained based on a low-cost registration configuration and a preliminary relevance metric; in the second stage, the subset is further narrowed down to a fusion set of desired size, based on full-fledged registration and a refined relevance metric. An inference model is developed to characterize the relationship between the preliminary and refined relevance metrics, and a proper augmented subset size is derived to ensure that the desired atlases survive the preliminary selection with high probability. Results: The performance of the proposed scheme has been assessed with cross validation based on two clinical datasets consisting of manually segmented prostate and brain magnetic resonance images, respectively. The proposed scheme demonstrates comparable end-to-end segmentation performance as the conventional single-stage selection method, but with significant computation reduction. Compared with the alternative computation reduction method, their scheme improves the mean and medium Dice similarity coefficient value from (0.74, 0.78) to (0.83, 0.85) and from (0.82, 0.84) to (0.95, 0.95) for prostate and corpus callosum segmentation, respectively, with statistical significance. Conclusions: The authors

  5. Targets for the APEX experiment at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.P.; Thomas, G.E.; Leonard, R.H.

    1994-12-31

    Targets of lead, tantalum, thorium and uranium have been produced for experiments with the APEX (Argonne Positron Experiment) apparatus at ATLAS (Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System). APEX is a device built at Argonne National Laboratory to investigate the anomalous positrons observed in collisions of very heavy ion beams on heavy targets. Both fixed and rotating targets have been used. The rotating target system involves a 4-quadrant wheel rotating at speeds up to 700 rpm with the position encoded into the data stream. In addition to the hundreds of targets produced for the heavy-ion reactions studied, a wide variety of targets were employed for beam diagnostics, detector calibration and target wheel development. The experiment used very heavy ion beams ({sup 238}U, {sup 206}Pb and {sup 208}Pb) from ATLAS and targets of {sup 206}Pb, {sup 208}Pb, {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U produced in the laboratory.

  6. Recent Higgs results from the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Brendlinger, Kurt; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-06-24

    This paper presents recent results on the Higgs boson from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The Collaboration reports on measurements of the signal strength, couplings, and spin of the Higgs in several decay channels. We find all measurements to be consistent with Standard Model predictions. The Higgs branching fraction to invisible particles is constrained and no evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model is found.

  7. Controls and data acquisition on Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Scudder, D.W.; Hosack, K.W.; Parsons, W.M.; Reass, W.A.; Thompson, M.C.; Wysocki, F.J.; Creager, J.

    1997-09-01

    The control and data acquisition systems for Atlas will use a large degree of decentralization. By distributing control points close to the systems being controlled, the authors expect to simplify the task of isolating electronic systems from the large expected EMI pulses, allow connection of the various parts of the system by high-level fiber-optic networks, allow a simple configuration of the control and data acquisition screen rooms, and simplify the software efforts through the resulting modularization. The Atlas control system must control capacitor charging, machine and diagnostic timing and triggering, marx module diagnostics, vacuum systems, gas handling for railgaps, safety interlocks, and oil handling. Many of these tasks will be performed by industrial-style programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Each of 38 Marx bank maintenance units will have a control and diagnostic package which will monitor both charging and discharging current and railgap trigger timing. An unusual feature of digitizers to record each Marx module`s output waveform, plus nanosecond resolution time interval meters to record the firing time of each railgap. The machine data acquisition system for Atlas will be built around an SQL database, use National Instruments LabVIEW software to control data acquisition instruments and provide links for a variety of experimentalists` data analysis packages. World Wide Web access will provide an interface through which users can monitor experimental data and machine status.

  8. Key Terms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Key Terms Key Terms Three Door Keys data-key-571156_960_720.png Key Terms Low Vision: non-correctable reduced vision Blindness: lack of visual perception Hearing Impairment: full or partial decrease in the ability to detect or understand sounds Physical Impairment: a physical condition that permanently prevents normal body movement or control Cognitive Disabilities: difficulty with one or more types of mental tasks

  9. Enhancing atlas based segmentation with multiclass linear classifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Sdika, Michaël

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To present a method to enrich atlases for atlas based segmentation. Such enriched atlases can then be used as a single atlas or within a multiatlas framework. Methods: In this paper, machine learning techniques have been used to enhance the atlas based segmentation approach. The enhanced atlas defined in this work is a pair composed of a gray level image alongside an image of multiclass classifiers with one classifier per voxel. Each classifier embeds local information from the whole training dataset that allows for the correction of some systematic errors in the segmentation and accounts for the possible local registration errors. The authors also propose to use these images of classifiers within a multiatlas framework: results produced by a set of such local classifier atlases can be combined using a label fusion method. Results: Experiments have been made on the in vivo images of the IBSR dataset and a comparison has been made with several state-of-the-art methods such as FreeSurfer and the multiatlas nonlocal patch based method of Coupé or Rousseau. These experiments show that their method is competitive with state-of-the-art methods while having a low computational cost. Further enhancement has also been obtained with a multiatlas version of their method. It is also shown that, in this case, nonlocal fusion is unnecessary. The multiatlas fusion can therefore be done efficiently. Conclusions: The single atlas version has similar quality as state-of-the-arts multiatlas methods but with the computational cost of a naive single atlas segmentation. The multiatlas version offers a improvement in quality and can be done efficiently without a nonlocal strategy.

  10. The ATLAS Experiment: Getting Ready for the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Jenni, Peter

    2006-05-15

    At CERN the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project is well advanced. First proton-proton collisions at the high-energy frontier are expected for the second half of 2007. In parallel to the collider construction the powerful general-purpose ATLAS detector is being assembled in its underground cavern by a world-wide collaboration. ATLAS will explore new domains of particle physics. After briefly overviewing the LHC construction and installation progress, the status of the ATLAS experiment will be presented, including examples of the exciting prospects for new physics.

  11. A New ATLAS Muon CSC Readout System with System on Chip Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A New ATLAS Muon CSC Readout System with System on Chip Technology on ATCA Platform Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A New ATLAS Muon CSC Readout System with System on...

  12. Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) AgencyCompany...

  13. Coeur d Alene Fiber Fuels Inc aka Atlas | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Coeur d Alene Fiber Fuels Inc aka Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Name: Coeur d' Alene Fiber Fuels, Inc. (aka Atlas) Place: Hauser, Idaho Zip: ID 83854 Product: Coeur...

  14. NETL's 2015 Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Increase in U.S. CO2 Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    NETL's 2015 Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Increase in U.S. CO2 Storage Potential NETL's 2015 Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Increase in U.S. CO2 Storage Potential September 28, 2015 - ...

  15. Summary of the ATLAS experiment’s sensitivity to supersymmetry after LHC Run 1 -- interpreted in the phenomenological MSSM

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-10-21

    A summary of the constraints from the ATLAS experiment on R -parity-conserving supersymmetry is presented. Results from 22 separate ATLAS searches are considered, each based on analysis of up to 20.3 fb–1 of proton-proton collision data at centre-of-mass energies of √s =7 and 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. The results are interpreted in the context of the 19-parameter phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model, in which the lightest supersymmetric particle is a neutralino, taking into account constraints from previous precision electroweak and flavour measurements as well as from dark matter related measurements. The results are presented in terms ofmore » constraints on supersymmetric particle masses and are compared to limits from simplified models. The impact of ATLAS searches on parameters such as the dark matter relic density, the couplings of the observed Higgs boson, and the degree of electroweak fine-tuning is also shown. As a result, spectra for surviving supersymmetry model points with low fine-tunings are presented.« less

  16. Summary of the ATLAS experiment’s sensitivity to supersymmetry after LHC Run 1 -- interpreted in the phenomenological MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. 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A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M. -A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzo, T. G.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-10-21

    A summary of the constraints from the ATLAS experiment on R -parity-conserving supersymmetry is presented. Results from 22 separate ATLAS searches are considered, each based on analysis of up to 20.3 fb–1 of proton-proton collision data at centre-of-mass energies of √s =7 and 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. The results are interpreted in the context of the 19-parameter phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model, in which the lightest supersymmetric particle is a neutralino, taking into account constraints from previous precision electroweak and flavour measurements as well as from dark matter related measurements. The results are presented in terms of constraints on supersymmetric particle masses and are compared to limits from simplified models. The impact of ATLAS searches on parameters such as the dark matter relic density, the couplings of the observed Higgs boson, and the degree of electroweak fine-tuning is also shown. As a result, spectra for surviving supersymmetry model points with low fine-tunings are presented.

  17. Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the Dominican Republic

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    October 2001 * NRELTP-500-27602 Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the Dominican Republic D. Elliott M. Schwartz R. George S. Haymes D. Heimiller G. Scott National Renewable Energy...

  18. Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Armenia (CD-ROM)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Resource Atlas of Armenia (CD-ROM) http:www.nrel.govdocsfy03osti33877CD.zip (ZIP 31.9 MB) NRELCD-500-33877 July 2003 Instructions: The URL above links to a zipped archive...

  19. Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Natural Resources Atlas ...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Natural Resources Atlas Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Vermont Agency of Natural Resources Natural...

  20. PROJECT PROFILE: Abengoa Solar, LLC - ATLAS | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    INNOVATION The Advanced Trough with Lower-cost System-Architecture design (ATLAS) builds upon the state-of-the-art SpaceTube large-aperture collector and SolarMat innovative ...

  1. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS - PAC September 19, 2014

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    September 19, 2014 ATLAS PAC Meeting Please note: Because of the pressure on ATLAS beam time, the PAC ranked the approved experiments in two categories. Priority I experiments are those that must be run at all costs. Priority II experiments are those that should be granted beam time (indicated in parenthesis) if at all possible. Priority I experiments are approved for the present cycle of experiments, but can be run during the next PAC cycle as well if scheduling conflicts occur. Priority II

  2. Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Lighting Types

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    is termed fluorescence). A ballast is required to regulate and control the current and voltage. Two types of ballasts are used, magnetic and electronic. Electronic ballasts have...

  3. A HIGH-RESOLUTION, MULTI-EPOCH SPECTRAL ATLAS OF PECULIAR STARS INCLUDING RAVE, GAIA , AND HERMES WAVELENGTH RANGES

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasella, Lina; Munari, Ulisse; Zwitter, Tomaz

    2010-12-15

    We present an Echelle+CCD, high signal-to-noise ratio, high-resolution (R = 20,000) spectroscopic atlas of 108 well-known objects representative of the most common types of peculiar and variable stars. The wavelength interval extends from 4600 to 9400 A and includes the RAVE, Gaia, and HERMES wavelength ranges. Multi-epoch spectra are provided for the majority of the observed stars. A total of 425 spectra of peculiar stars, which were collected during 56 observing nights between 1998 November and 2002 August, are presented. The spectra are given in FITS format and heliocentric wavelengths, with accurate subtraction of both the sky background and the scattered light. Auxiliary material useful for custom applications (telluric dividers, spectrophotometric stars, flat-field tracings) is also provided. The atlas aims to provide a homogeneous database of the spectral appearance of stellar peculiarities, a tool useful both for classification purposes and inter-comparison studies. It could also serve in the planning and development of automated classification algorithms designed for RAVE, Gaia, HERMES, and other large-scale spectral surveys. The spectrum of XX Oph is discussed in some detail as an example of the content of the present atlas.

  4. An energy atlas of five Central American countries. Un atlas energetico de cinco paises Centroamericanos

    SciTech Connect

    Trocki, L.; Newman, C.K.; Gurule, F.; Aragon, P.C.; Peck, C.

    1988-08-01

    In a series of maps and figures, this atlas summarizes what is known about the energy resources and how these resources and oil imports supply the energy needs of five Central American countries: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Costa Rica, and Panama. The main exploited energy resources are firewood, hydroelectric energy, bagasse from sugar cane residues, and geothermal energy. Limited oil exploration in the region has uncovered modest oil resources only in Guatemala. Peat and small coal deposits are also known to exist but are not presently being exploited. After the description of energy resources, this atlas describes energy supply and demand patterns in each country. It concludes with a description of socioeconomic data that strongly affect energy demand. 4 refs.

  5. Reliable and redundant FPGA based read-out design in the ATLAS TileCal Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Akerstedt, Henrik; Muschter, Steffen; Drake, Gary; Anderson, Kelby; Bohm, Christian; Oreglia, Mark; Tang, Fukun

    2015-10-01

    The Tile Calorimeter at ATLAS [1] is a hadron calorimeter based on steel plates and scintillating tiles read out by PMTs. The current read-out system uses standard ADCs and custom ASICs to digitize and temporarily store the data on the detector. However, only a subset of the data is actually read out to the counting room. The on-detector electronics will be replaced around 2023. To achieve the required reliability the upgraded system will be highly redundant. Here the ASICs will be replaced with Kintex-7 FPGAs from Xilinx. This, in addition to the use of multiple 10 Gbps optical read-out links, will allow a full read-out of all detector data. Due to the higher radiation levels expected when the beam luminosity is increased, opportunities for repairs will be less frequent. The circuitry and firmware must therefore be designed for sufficiently high reliability using redundancy and radiation tolerant components. Within a year, a hybrid demonstrator including the new readout system will be installed in one slice of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter. This will allow the proposed upgrade to be thoroughly evaluated well before the planned 2023 deployment in all slices, especially with regard to long term reliability. Different firmware strategies alongside with their integration in the demonstrator are presented in the context of high reliability protection against hardware malfunction and radiation induced errors.

  6. Preliminary Results of 3D-DDTC Pixel Detectors for the ATLAS Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    La Rosa, Alessandro; /CERN; Boscardin, M.; /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; /Trento U. /INFN, Trento; Darbo, G.; Gemme, C.; /INFN, Genoa; Pernegger, H.; /CERN; Piemonte, C.; /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo; Povoli, M.; /Trento U. /INFN, Trento; Ronchin, S.; /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo; Zoboli, A.; /Trento U. /INFN, Trento; Zorzi, N.; /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo; Bolle, E.; /Oslo U.; Borri, M.; /INFN, Turin /Turin U.; Da Via, C.; /Manchester U.; Dong, S.; /SLAC; Fazio, S.; /Calabria U.; Grenier, P.; /SLAC; Grinstein, S.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Gjersdal, H.; /Oslo U.; Hansson, P.; /SLAC; Huegging, F.; /Bonn U. /SLAC /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /Oslo U. /Bergen U. /Oslo U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Bonn U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Bonn U. /SLAC

    2012-04-04

    3D Silicon sensors fabricated at FBK-irst with the Double-side Double Type Column (DDTC) approach and columnar electrodes only partially etched through p-type substrates were tested in laboratory and in a 1.35 Tesla magnetic field with a 180 GeV pion beam at CERN SPS. The substrate thickness of the sensors is about 200 {mu}m, and different column depths are available, with overlaps between junction columns (etched from the front side) and ohmic columns (etched from the back side) in the range from 110 {mu}m to 150 {mu}m. The devices under test were bump bonded to the ATLAS Pixel readout chip (FEI3) at SELEX SI (Rome, Italy). We report leakage current and noise measurements, results of functional tests with Am{sup 241} {gamma}-ray sources, charge collection tests with Sr90 {beta}-source and an overview of preliminary results from the CERN beam test.

  7. Expected Performance of the ATLAS Experiment - Detector, Trigger and Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington /Athens U. /Natl. Tech. U., Athens /Baku, Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /Belgrade U. /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /Humboldt U., Berlin /Bern U., LHEP /Birmingham U. /Bogazici U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U.

    2011-11-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN promises a major step forward in the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter. The ATLAS experiment is a general-purpose detector for the LHC, whose design was guided by the need to accommodate the wide spectrum of possible physics signatures. The major remit of the ATLAS experiment is the exploration of the TeV mass scale where groundbreaking discoveries are expected. In the focus are the investigation of the electroweak symmetry breaking and linked to this the search for the Higgs boson as well as the search for Physics beyond the Standard Model. In this report a detailed examination of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector is provided, with a major aim being to investigate the experimental sensitivity to a wide range of measurements and potential observations of new physical processes. An earlier summary of the expected capabilities of ATLAS was compiled in 1999 [1]. A survey of physics capabilities of the CMS detector was published in [2]. The design of the ATLAS detector has now been finalised, and its construction and installation have been completed [3]. An extensive test-beam programme was undertaken. Furthermore, the simulation and reconstruction software code and frameworks have been completely rewritten. Revisions incorporated reflect improved detector modelling as well as major technical changes to the software technology. Greatly improved understanding of calibration and alignment techniques, and their practical impact on performance, is now in place. The studies reported here are based on full simulations of the ATLAS detector response. A variety of event generators were employed. The simulation and reconstruction of these large event samples thus provided an important operational test of the new ATLAS software system. In addition, the processing was distributed world-wide over the ATLAS Grid facilities and hence provided an important test of the ATLAS computing system - this is the origin of

  8. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS - PAC December 14-15, 2012

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    December 14-15, 2012 ATLAS PAC Meeting Please note: Because of the pressure on ATLAS beam time, the PAC ranked the approved experiments in two categories. Priority I experiments are those that must be run at all costs. Priority II experiments are those that should be granted beam time (indicated in parenthesis) if at all possible. Priority I experiments are approved for the present cycle of experiments, but can be run during the next PAC cycle as well if scheduling conflicts occur. Priority II

  9. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS - PAC December 14-15, 2012

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    November 22-23, 2013 ATLAS PAC Meeting Please note: Because of the pressure on ATLAS beam time, the PAC ranked the approved experiments in two categories. Priority I experiments are those that must be run at all costs. Priority II experiments are those that should be granted beam time (indicated in parenthesis) if at all possible. Priority I experiments are approved for the present cycle of experiments, but can be run during the next PAC cycle as well if scheduling conflicts occur. Priority II

  10. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS - PAC January 13-14, 2012

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    January 13-14, 2012 ATLAS PAC Meeting Please note: Because of the pressure on ATLAS beam time, the PAC ranked the approved experiments in two categories. Priority I experiments are those that must be run at all costs. Priority II experiments are those that should be granted beam time (indicated in parenthesis) if at all possible. Priority I experiments are approved for the present cycle of experiments, but can be run during the next PAC cycle as well if scheduling conflicts occur. Priority II

  11. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS - PAC March 08, 2015

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    March 08-09, 2015 ATLAS PAC Meeting Please note: Because of the pressure on ATLAS beam time, the PAC ranked the approved experiments in two categories. Priority I experiments are those that must be run at all costs. Priority II experiments are those that should be granted beam time (indicated in parenthesis) if at all possible. Priority I experiments are approved for the present cycle of experiments, but can be run during the next PAC cycle as well if scheduling conflicts occur. Priority II

  12. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS - PAC November 6, 2015

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    November 06-07, 2015 ATLAS PAC Meeting Please note: Because of the pressure on ATLAS beam time, the PAC ranked the approved experiments in two categories. Priority I experiments are those that must be run at all costs. Priority II experiments are those that should be granted beam time (indicated in parenthesis) if at all possible. Priority I experiments are approved for the present cycle of experiments, but can be run during the next PAC cycle as well if scheduling conflicts occur. Priority II

  13. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS - PAC November 6, 2015

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    October 21-22, 2016 ATLAS PAC Meeting Please note: Because of the pressure on ATLAS beam time, the PAC ranked the approved experiments in two categories. Priority I experiments are those that must be run at all costs. Priority II experiments are those that should be granted beam time (indicated in parenthesis) if at all possible. Priority I experiments are approved for the present cycle of experiments, but can be run during the next PAC cycle as well if scheduling conflicts occur. Priority II

  14. Status of the AFP project in the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taevsk, Marek

    2015-04-10

    Status of the AFP project in the ATLAS experiment is summarized. The AFP system is composed of a tracker to detect intact, diffractively scattered protons, and of a time-of-flight detector serving to suppress background from pile-up interactions. The whole system, located around 210?m from the main ATLAS detector, is placed in Roman Pots which move detectors from and to the incident proton beams. A typical distance of the closest approach of the tracker to these beams is 23?mm. The main physics motivation lies in measuring diffractive processes in runs with not a very high amount of pile-up.

  15. Meeting with Atlas Copco [I-AMS.FID3644896] | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    with Atlas Copco [I-AMS.FID3644896] Meeting with Atlas Copco [I-AMS.FID3644896] Dear Pete: Attached is another electronic copy of the PowerPoint presentation made by my client, Atlas Copco, at yesterday's meeting by Luc De Beul, Vice President for New Business Technologies. As we discussed prior to and at the meeting, it is expected that these materials, the list of attendees and this summary of our discussion will be put in the public docket. Meeting with Atlas Copco (81.63 KB) More Documents

  16. ATLAS/BNL Physicist Marc-Andre Pleier Explains the Higgs Mechanism

    ScienceCinema

    Pleier,Marc-Andre

    2016-07-12

    ATLAS/BNL Physicist Marc-Andre Pleier explains his role in analyzing data from the Large Hadron Collider and the search for the Higgs boson

  17. IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential | OpenEI...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Home > Groups > Utility Rate Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 11 February, 2013 -...

  18. ATLAS/BNL Physicist Marc-Andre Pleier Explains the Higgs Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Pleier,Marc-Andre

    2013-10-07

    ATLAS/BNL Physicist Marc-Andre Pleier explains his role in analyzing data from the Large Hadron Collider and the search for the Higgs boson

  19. Electronic Atlas Maps U.S. Renewable Energy Resources - News Releases |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Electronic Atlas Maps U.S. Renewable Energy Resources January 6, 2012 A new geospatial application developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) allows users to easily and accurately map potential renewable energy resources in the United States. The interactive tool, RE Atlas, is free to use and available online at http://maps.nrel.gov/re_atlas. "Ease of use and breadth of data make RE Atlas an excellent tool for policymakers, planners,

  20. NETL’s 2015 Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Increase in U.S. CO2 Storage Potential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) today released the fifth edition of the Carbon Storage Atlas (Atlas V), which shows prospective carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resources of at least 2,600 billion metric tons – an increase over the findings of the 2012 Atlas.

  1. Report to users of ATLAS - September 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Hofman, D.

    1998-11-18

    The ATLAS facility has provided a total of 5749 hours of beam for research in FY1998. The accelerator operation had a very high 93% reliability factor during that period. With the startup of Gammasphere in January, our schedule has attempted to minimize scheduled downtime and maximize beam-time for research. Our best performance so far occurred during the month of May when a total of 639 hours was provided for research. From the accelerator point-of-view, recent major highlights have included first operation of a new production configuration for our {sup 17}F beams which increased the beam current on-target to 2 x 10{sup 6} {sup 17}F ions/see. The {sup 17}F production target was moved approximately 4 meters upstream and a new superconducting solenoid was added to the system to refocus the highly divergent secondary beam. This new location also places the target upstream of a new superconducting resonator which was used to reduce the energy spread of the beam delivered to the spectrograph to less than 300 keV (FWHM). An improved, liquid nitrogen cooled, multiple gas cell has also significantly contributed to better performance.

  2. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-07-20

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup à la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute in great detail the flux of HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of transverse photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0–1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  3. Failure Atlas for Rolling Bearings in Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Tallian, T. E.

    2006-01-01

    This Atlas is structured as a supplement to the book: T.E. Tallian: Failure Atlas for Hertz Contact Machine Elements, 2nd edition, ASME Press New York, (1999). The content of the atlas comprises plate pages from the book that contain bearing failure images, application data, and descriptions of failure mode, image, and suspected failure causes. Rolling bearings are a critical component of the mainshaft system, gearbox and generator in the rapidly developing technology of power generating wind turbines. The demands for long service life are stringent; the design load, speed and temperature regimes are demanding and the environmental conditions including weather, contamination, impediments to monitoring and maintenance are often unfavorable. As a result, experience has shown that the rolling bearings are prone to a variety of failure modes that may prevent achievement of design lives. Morphological failure diagnosis is extensively used in the failure analysis and improvement of bearing operation. Accumulated experience shows that the failure appearance and mode of failure causation in wind turbine bearings has many distinguishing features. The present Atlas is a first effort to collect an interpreted database of specifically wind turbine related rolling bearing failures and make it widely available. This Atlas is structured as a supplement to the book: T. E. Tallian: Failure Atlas for Hertz Contact Machine Elements, 2d edition, ASME Press New York, (1999). The main body of that book is a comprehensive collection of self-contained pages called Plates, containing failure images, bearing and application data, and three descriptions: failure mode, image and suspected failure causes. The Plates are sorted by main failure mode into chapters. Each chapter is preceded by a general technical discussion of the failure mode, its appearance and causes. The Plates part is supplemented by an introductory part, describing the appearance classification and failure classification

  4. GENERAL TERMS & CONDITIONS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ......... 3 1.12 PAYMENT ......in delivery schedule obligations. 1.12 PAYMENT Unless otherwise provided, terms of ...

  5. Award Types

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Awards Team (505) 667-7824 Email Types of Awards The Awards Office, sponsored by the Technology Transfer Division and the Science and Technology Base Program Office, coordinates...

  6. Searches for scalar leptoquarks in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-05

    In this study, searches for pair-produced scalar leptoquarks are performed using 20 fb-1 of proton–proton collision data provided by the LHC and recorded by the ATLAS detector at √s = 8 TeV. Events with two electrons (muons) and two or more jets in the final state are used to search for first (second)-generation leptoquarks. The results from two previously published ATLAS analyses are interpreted in terms of third-generation leptoquarks decaying to bντb¯ν¯τ and tντt¯ν¯τ final states. No statistically significant excess above the Standard Model expectation is observed in any channel and scalar leptoquarks are excluded at 95 % CL withmore » masses up to mLQ1 < 1050 GeV for first-generation leptoquarks, mLQ2 < 1000 GeV for second-generation leptoquarks, mLQ3 < 625 GeV for third-generation leptoquarks in the bντb¯ν¯τ channel, and 200 mLQ3 < 640 GeV in the tντt¯ν¯τ.« less

  7. Vector and Scalar Bosons at DØ and ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Lammers, Sabine Sabine

    2014-09-26

    Vector Boson Fusion (VBF) has never been measured in hadron collisions, but it is one of the most sensitive modes for low mass Standard Model Higgs production at ATLAS. The objective of this proposal is to measure VBF production of W and Z bosons at the DØ Experiment taking place at the Tevatron Collider near Chicago, Illinois, and at the ATLAS Experiment, running at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland. The framework developed in these measurements will be used to discover and study the Higgs Boson produced through the same mechanism (VBF) at ATLAS. The 10 f b-1 dataset recently collected by the DØ experiment provides a unique opportunity to observe evidence of VBF production of W Bosons, which will provide the required theoretical knowledge - VBF cross sections - and experimental knowledge - tuning of measurement techniques - on which to base the VBF measurements at the LHC. At the time of this writing, the ATLAS experiment has recorded 5 fb-1 of data at √s = 7 TeV, and expects to collect at least another 5 in 2012. Assuming Standard Model cross sections, this dataset will allow for the observation of VBF production of W, Z and Higgs bosons. The major challenges for the first observation of VBF interactions are: developing highly optimized forward jet identification algorithms, and accurately modeling both rates and kinematics of background processes. With the research program outlined in this grant proposal, I plan to address each of these areas, paving the way for VBF observation. The concentration on VBF production for the duration of this grant will be at ATLAS where the anticipated high pileup rates necessitates a cleaner signal. My past experience with forward jet identification at the ZEUS experiment, and with W+(n)Jets measurements at DØ , puts me in a unique position to lead this effort. The proposed program will have a dual focus: on DØ where the VBF analysis effort is mature and efforts of a postdoc will be required to bring the VBF W

  8. Measurement of the properties of the Higgs boson at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, Timothy; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-03-05

    An update on the Higgs boson search in the decay channels H???, H?ZZ{sup (*)}?4l, H?WW{sup (*)}?lvlv, H??{sup +}?{sup ?} and H?bb{sup } at the ATLAS detector is presented. Proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 25/fb at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV are used for these results. The latest combined and individual channel measurements of the mass, signal strength, spin and parity, coupling constants and Higgs boson production are reported. Results on the measurements of the properties of the Higgs boson are all consistent with the Standard Model.

  9. Research on data from the ATLAS experiment at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, Milind V.

    2015-07-31

    In this report senior investigator Prof. Milind V. Purohit describes research done with data from the ATLAS experiment at CERN. This includes preparing papers on the performance of the CSC detector, searches for SUSY using a new modern ''big data'' technique, and a search for supersymmetry (SUSY) using the "zero leptons razor" (0LRaz) technique. The prediction of the W=Z+jets background processes by the ATLAS simulation prior to the fit is found to be overestimated in the phase space of interest. In all new signal regions presented in this analysis the number of events observed is consistent with the post-fit SM expectations. Assuming R-parity conservation, the limit on the gluino mass exceeds 1150 GeV at 95% confidence level, for an LSP mass smaller than 100 GeV. Other USC personnel who participated in this project during the period of this grant were a graduate student, Anton Kravchenko.

  10. SUSY searches at the LHC with the ATLAS experiment

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    First ATLAS searches for signals of Supersymmetry in proton-proton collisions at the LHC are presented. These searches are performed in various channels containing different lepton and jet multiplicities in the final states; the full data sample recorded in the 2010 LHC run, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35 pb-1, has been analysed. Limits on squarks and gluins are the most stringent to date.

  11. Terms and Conditions

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Terms and Conditions Network R&D Software-Defined Networking (SDN) Experimental Network Testbeds 100G SDN Testbed Testbed Description Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Dark Fiber Testbed Test Circuit Service Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Previous Testbed Research Performance (perfSONAR) Software & Tools Development Data for Researchers Partnerships Publications Workshops Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600

  12. Terms and Conditions

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Tennessee

    Terms and Conditions Terms and Conditions As a premier national research and development laboratory, LANL seeks to do business with qualified companies that offer value and high quality products and services. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email Use information below as guideline to doing business An "Appendix SFA-1" contains FAR and DEAR Clauses that are incorporated by reference into a particular subcontract. "Exhibit A General Conditions" are the

  13. New Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Hundreds of Years of CO2 Storage Potential |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Hundreds of Years of CO2 Storage Potential New Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Hundreds of Years of CO2 Storage Potential December 21, 2012 - 9:58am Addthis Atlas IV was created by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and includes input from the more than 400 organizations in 43 states and four Canadian provinces that make up the Department’s seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (as shown above). <a

  14. Glossary of Terms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Glossary of Terms Glossary of Terms The glossary features an alphabetical listing of terms used on this website. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 1603 Grant For nearly all technologies and project types that qualify under either the Production Tax Credit or the Investment Tax Credit, section 1603 of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provides funding to reimburse applicants for a portion (either 10% or 30%) of the cost of eligible property under the Internal

  15. A New ATLAS Muon CSC Readout System with System on Chip Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: A New ATLAS Muon CSC Readout System with System on Chip Technology on ATCA Platform Citation ... Sponsoring Org: US DOE Office of Science (DOE SC);High Energy ...

  16. A comparison of NNLO QCD predictions with 7 TeV ATLAS and CMS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with 7 TeV ATLAS and CMS data for V+jet processes Authors: Boughezal, Radja ; Liu, Xiaohui ; Petriello, Frank Publication Date: 2016-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1258296 Grant...

  17. Sandia and Atlas-Copco Secoroc Advance to Phase 2 in Their Geothermal...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... In 2012, the partnership between Sandia and Atlas-Copco Secoroc was awarded a 3.4M DOE grant to develop a down-the-hole (DTH) hammer capable of low-cost, high-production drilling ...

  18. Gateways to the FANTOM5 promoter level mammalian expression atlas

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Lizio, Marina; Harshbarger, Jayson; Shimoji, Hisashi; Severin, Jessica; Kasukawa, Takeya; Sahin, Serkan; Abugessaisa, Imad; Fukuda, Shiro; Hori, Fumi; Ishikawa-Kato, Sachi; et al

    2015-01-05

    The FANTOM5 project investigates transcription initiation activities in more than 1,000 human and mouse primary cells, cell lines and tissues using CAGE. Based on manual curation of sample information and development of an ontology for sample classification, we assemble the resulting data into a centralized data resource (http://fantom.gsc.riken.jp/5/). In conclusion, this resource contains web-based tools and data-access points for the research community to search and extract data related to samples, genes, promoter activities, transcription factors and enhancers across the FANTOM5 atlas.

  19. METALLURGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ATLAS CYLINDRICALLY CONVERGENT SPALLATION EXPERIMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    Thissell, W. R.; Cerreta, E. K.; Anderson, W. A.; Atchison, W. A.; Cochrane, J. C.; Kaul, Ann M.; Keinigs, R. K.; Ladish, J. S.; Lindemuth, I. R.; Oro, D. M.; Paisley, D.; G. Rodriguez,; Salazar, M. A.; Stokes, J. L.; Taylor, A. J.; Tonks, D. L.

    2003-07-18

    The microstructural distribution and nature of damage from three different cylindrically convergent spallation experiments performed on the pulsed power machine named Atlas are presented. Longitudinal momentum trapping was used to minimize the influence of release waves and thereby decrease the dimensionality of the experiments. Two of the experiments involved soft capture of the spalled piece. The material used is a proprietary directionally cast Al alloy with a mostly equiaxed grain morphology and essentially random texture in the region of spallation. The damage was most distributed in the lowest impact velocity shot and became progressively more narrow with increasing impact velocity. The effectiveness of the momentum trap design increased with increasing impact velocity.

  20. Meet a Machine: ATLAS turns NNSA operators into heavylifting heroes |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) ATLAS turns NNSA operators into heavylifting heroes Thursday, July 14, 2016 - 10:27am The United States doesn't explosively test nuclear weapons, but NNSA is still charged with making sure the U.S. nuclear arsenal is safe and secure, and effective. This is why the U.S. nuclear security enterprise is home to the most brilliant minds and cutting-edge technologies for extreme physics and energy science. Learn about one of the members of NNSA's

  1. Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) | U.S. DOE Office of

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities User Facilities Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Project Development Isotope Program Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of

  2. Preparation of northern mid-continent petroleum atlas. Quarterly report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard, L.C.; Carr, T.R.; Watney, W.L.

    1997-02-04

    As proposed, the second year program will continue and expand upon the Kansas elements of the original program, and provide improved on-line access to the prototype atlas. The second year of the program will result in a prototype digital atlas sufficient to demonstrate the approach and to provide a permanent improvement in data access to Kansas operators. The ultimate goal of providing an interactive history-matching interface with a regional data base remains for future development as the program covers more geographic territory and the data base expands. As part of the first year project ``Pages`` and data schema for the atlas overview and field studies were developed and made accessible through the world-wide-web. The atlas structure includes access to geologic, geophysical and production information at levels from the natural, to the regional, to the field to the individual well. Several approaches have been developed that provide efficient and flexible screening and search procedures. The prototype of the digital atlas is accessible through the Kansas Geological Survey Petroleum Research Section (PRS) HomePage (the Universal Resource locator [URL] is http://www.kgs.ukans. edu/PRS/PRS.html). The Digital Petroleum Atlas (DPA) HomePage is available directly at http://www.kgs.ukans.edu/DPA/dpaHome.html.

  3. ATLAS experimental equipment. November 1983 workshop and present status

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The latest workshop was held in November 1983 with the purpose of presenting an overview of the experimental stations planned for ATLAS, describing the current status of each individual apparatus, soliciting final input on devices of the first phase (i.e. on those that will be ready when beams from ATLAS become available in late Spring of 1985), and discussing and collecting new ideas on equipment for the second phase. There were short presentations on the status of the various projects followed by informal discussions. The presentations mainly concentrated on new equipment for target area III, but included some descriptions of current apparatus in target area II that might also be of interest for experiments with the higher-energy beams available in area III. The meeting was well attended with approx. 50 scientists, approximately half of them from institutions outside Argonne. The present proceedings summarize the presentations and discussions of this one-day meeting. In addition we take the opportunity to include information about developments since this meeting and an update of the current status of the various experimental stations. We would like to emphasize again that outside-user input is extremely welcome.

  4. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    March 2015 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights North Sea Brent crude oil ... U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2015 2 ...

  5. A Multiphase Validation of Atlas-Based Automatic and Semiautomatic Segmentation Strategies for Prostate MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Spencer; Rodrigues, George; Department of Epidemiology Patil, Nikhilesh; Bauman, Glenn; Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London ; D'Souza, David; Sexton, Tracy; Palma, David; Louie, Alexander V.; Khalvati, Farzad; Tizhoosh, Hamid R.; Segasist Technologies, Toronto, Ontario ; Gaede, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a rigorous technological assessment and statistical validation of a software technology for anatomic delineations of the prostate on MRI datasets. Methods and Materials: A 3-phase validation strategy was used. Phase I consisted of anatomic atlas building using 100 prostate cancer MRI data sets to provide training data sets for the segmentation algorithms. In phase II, 2 experts contoured 15 new MRI prostate cancer cases using 3 approaches (manual, N points, and region of interest). In phase III, 5 new physicians with variable MRI prostate contouring experience segmented the same 15 phase II datasets using 3 approaches: manual, N points with no editing, and full autosegmentation with user editing allowed. Statistical analyses for time and accuracy (using Dice similarity coefficient) endpoints used traditional descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, and pooled Student t test. Results: In phase I, average (SD) total and per slice contouring time for the 2 physicians was 228 (75), 17 (3.5), 209 (65), and 15 seconds (3.9), respectively. In phase II, statistically significant differences in physician contouring time were observed based on physician, type of contouring, and case sequence. The N points strategy resulted in superior segmentation accuracy when initial autosegmented contours were compared with final contours. In phase III, statistically significant differences in contouring time were observed based on physician, type of contouring, and case sequence again. The average relative timesaving for N points and autosegmentation were 49% and 27%, respectively, compared with manual contouring. The N points and autosegmentation strategies resulted in average Dice values of 0.89 and 0.88, respectively. Pre- and postedited autosegmented contours demonstrated a higher average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.94. Conclusion: The software provided robust contours with minimal editing required. Observed time savings were seen

  6. Evaluation of atlas-based auto-segmentation software in prostate cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Greenham, Stuart; Dean, Jenna; Fu, Cheuk Kuen Kenneth; Goman, Joanne; Mulligan, Jeremy; Tune, Deanna; Sampson, David; Westhuyzen, Justin; McKay, Michael

    2014-09-15

    The performance and limitations of an atlas-based auto-segmentation software package (ABAS; Elekta Inc.) was evaluated using male pelvic anatomy as the area of interest. Contours from 10 prostate patients were selected to create atlases in ABAS. The contoured regions of interest were created manually to align with published guidelines and included the prostate, bladder, rectum, femoral heads and external patient contour. Twenty-four clinically treated prostate patients were auto-contoured using a randomised selection of two, four, six, eight or ten atlases. The concordance between the manually drawn and computer-generated contours were evaluated statistically using Pearson's product–moment correlation coefficient (r) and clinically in a validated qualitative evaluation. In the latter evaluation, six radiation therapists classified the degree of agreement for each structure using seven clinically appropriate categories. The ABAS software generated clinically acceptable contours for the bladder, rectum, femoral heads and external patient contour. For these structures, ABAS-generated volumes were highly correlated with ‘as treated’ volumes, manually drawn; for four atlases, for example, bladder r = 0.988 (P < 0.001), rectum r = 0.739 (P < 0.001) and left femoral head r = 0.560 (P < 0.001). Poorest results were seen for the prostate (r = 0.401, P < 0.05) (four atlases); however this was attributed to the comparison prostate volume being contoured on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) rather than computed tomography (CT) data. For all structures, increasing the number of atlases did not consistently improve accuracy. ABAS-generated contours are clinically useful for a range of structures in the male pelvis. Clinically appropriate volumes were created, but editing of some contours was inevitably required. The ideal number of atlases to improve generated automatic contours is yet to be determined.

  7. DIORAMA Location Type User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, James Russell

    2015-01-29

    The purpose of this report is to present the current design and implementation of the DIORAMA location type object (LocationType) and to provide examples and use cases. The LocationType object is included in the diorama-app package in the diorama::types namespace. Abstractly, the object is intended to capture the full time history of the location of an object or reference point. For example, a location may be speci ed as a near-Earth orbit in terms of a two-line element set, in which case the location type is capable of propagating the orbit both forward and backward in time to provide a location for any given time. Alternatively, the location may be speci ed as a xed set of geodetic coordinates (latitude, longitude, and altitude), in which case the geodetic location of the object is expected to remain constant for all time. From an implementation perspective, the location type is de ned as a union of multiple independent objects defi ned in the DIORAMA tle library. Types presently included in the union are listed and described in subsections below, and all conversions or transformation between these location types are handled by utilities provided by the tle library with the exception of the \\special-values" location type.

  8. Standard Terms and Conditions | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Standard Terms and Conditions Documents related to NREL's standard terms and conditions for subcontracts or purchase orders are available below. Standard Terms and Conditions - Appendix B Appendix B-1 (07/11/14) Standard Terms and Conditions for (1) Cost Sharing, (2) Cost Reimbursement, and (3) Cost Plus Fixed Fee. Appendix B-2 (07/11/14) Standard Terms and Conditions for Fixed-Price or Fixed Unit-Price Level of Effort Research and Development Subcontracts for (1) Commercial Concerns, (2)

  9. High Statistics Study of Nearby Type 1a Supernovae. QUEST Camera...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    QUEST Camera Short Term Maintenance: Final Technical Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High Statistics Study of Nearby Type 1a Supernovae. QUEST Camera Short Term ...

  10. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 10. Alaska region

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.L.; Wentink, T. Jr.; Becker, R. Jr.; Comiskey, A.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-12-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each subregion of Alaska. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a state scale is given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each subregion are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the Alaska wind energy resource. An outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each subregion is included. Assessments for individual subregions are presented as separate chapters. The subregion wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the Alaska wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the subregion chapters.

  11. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 9. The Southwest Region

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, R.L.; Norman, G.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-11-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in Nevada and California. Background on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted is presented. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state are given. Assessments for individual states are presented as separate chapters. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed.

  12. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 4. The Northeast region

    SciTech Connect

    Pickering, K.E.; Vilardo, J.M.; Schakenbach, J.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1980-09-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each state of the region. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled in this chapter into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline are provided for in the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state. Assessments for individual states are presented. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the state chapters.

  13. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 7. The south central region

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.L.; Graves, L.F.; Sprankle, A.C.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-03-01

    This atlas of the south central region combines seven collections of wind resource data: one for the region, and one for each of the six states (Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas). At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than that provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  14. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 2. The North Central Region

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, D.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    The North Central atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data: one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the North Central region (Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota). At the state level, features of the climate, topography and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than is provided in the regional discussion, and that data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and international wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed direction and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  15. Examples from the atlas of major Appalachian Gas Plays

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, D.G.; Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Nuttall, B.C.; Smosna, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    The objectives of this contract are to produce a panted atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays and to compile a machine-readable database of reservoir data. The Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC or the Consortium), a partnership of the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia, and the departments of Geology and Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering at West Virginia University (WVU), agrees with the need to classify gas reservoirs by geologic plays. During meetings with industry representatives, the small independents in the basin emphasized that one of their prime needs was to place each producing reservoir within a stratigraphic framework subdivided by environment of deposition to enable them to develop exploration and development strategies. The text for eight of the 31 play descriptions has been completed, drafting of illustrations for these plays is underway (or complete for some plays), and the review process is ongoing.

  16. ATLAS DISCOVERY POTENTIAL FOR A HEAVY CHARGED HIGGS BOSON.

    SciTech Connect

    ASSAMAGAN,K.A.; COADOU,Y.; DEANDREA,A.

    2002-02-01

    The sensitivity of the ATLAS detector to the discovery of a heavy charged Higgs boson is presented. Assuming a heavy SUSY spectrum, the most promising channels above the top quark mass are H{sup {+-}} {yields} tb and h{sup {+-}} {yields} {tau}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {tau}} which provide coverage in the low and high tan {beta} regions up to {approx} 600 GeV. The achievable precisions on the charged Higgs mass and tan {beta} determination are also discussed. The H{sup {+-}} {yields} W{sup {+-}}h{sup 0} channel, though restricted to a small MSSM parameter space, shows a viable signal in NMSSM where the parameter space is less constrained. The observation of the channel H{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sub L}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} + c.c. may constitute a distinctive evidence for models with singlet neutrinos in large extra dimensions.

  17. Identification of high transverse momentum top quarks in pp collisions at $$$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-06-16

    This study presents studies of the performance of several jet-substructure techniques, which are used to identify hadronically decaying top quarks with high transverse momentum contained in large-radius jets. The efficiency of identifying top quarks is measured using a sample of top-quark pairs and the rate of wrongly identifying jets from other quarks or gluons as top quarks is measured using multijet events collected with the ATLAS experiment in 20.3 fb-1 of 8 TeV proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Predictions from Monte Carlo simulations are found to provide an accurate description of the performance. The techniques are compared inmore » terms of signal efficiency and background rejection using simulations, covering a larger range in jet transverse momenta than accessible in the dataset. Finally and additionally, a novel technique is developed that is optimized to reconstruct top quarks in events with many jets.« less

  18. Search for strong gravity in multijet final states produced in pp collisions at √s = 13 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2016-03-07

    A search is conducted for new physics in multijet final states using 3.6 inverse femtobarns of data from proton-proton collisions at √s = 13 TeV taken at the CERN Large Hadron Collider with the ATLAS detector. Events are selected containing at least three jets with scalar sum of jet transverse momenta (HT) greater than 1 TeV. No excess is seen at large HT and limits are presented on new physics: models which produce final states containing at least three jets and having cross sections larger than 1.6 fb with HT > 5.8 TeV are excluded. As a result, limits aremore » also given in terms of new physics models of strong gravity that hypothesize additional space-time dimensions.« less

  19. Long-Term Stewardship Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Long-term Stewardship Study (“Study” or “Final Study”) to comply with the terms of a settlement agreement between DOE, the Natural Resources Defense...

  20. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts ... to an average of 2.72gal in 2016. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term ...

  1. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    5 1 October 2015 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights EIA ... U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook ...

  2. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    4 1 October 2014 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights EIA ... than last winter (see EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook ...

  3. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    1 December 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights North Sea Brent crude oil ... winter are expected to help lessen U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term ...

  4. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    June 2014 1 June 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights North Sea Brent ... U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2014 2 Global ...

  5. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    April 2015 1 April 2015 Short-Term Energy and Summer Fuels Outlook (STEO) ... U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy and Summer Fuels Outlook April ...

  6. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. Crude oil prices fell ... Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2003. 0 10 20 30 40 ...

  7. Implementation and Performance of the Tau Trigger in the ATLAS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bosman, M.; Casado, P.; Dam, M.; Demers, S.; Igonkina, O.; Osuna, C.; Perez, E.; Soluk, R.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Watson, A.; Xella, S.; /Copenhagen U.

    2011-11-15

    Triggering on hadronic taus at the LHC is a difficult task due to the high rate and occupancy of the events. On the other hand, the tau trigger increases the discovery potential of ATLAS in many physics channels, among others the Standard Model or SuperSymmetric Higgs (charged or neutrals) production. In order to cope with the rate and optimize the efficiency on important physics channels, the results of the current simulation studies indicate that the ATLAS tau trigger should be used either with relatively high transverse momentum thresholds alone, or with more relaxed threshold requirements in combination with other triggers, like the missing transverse energy trigger or a leptonic or jet trigger. In this contribution we describe the ATLAS tau trigger, and we present some of the current results from the simulation studies, focusing both on early physics and on physics at high luminosity.

  8. Webinar: Demonstration of NREL’s BioEnergy Atlas Tools

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will host a free webinar on December 16 demonstrating how to use the BioEnergy Atlas tools. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office funded the BioEnergy Atlas tools, which include the BioFuels and BioPower Atlases. These tools are designed as first-pass visualization tools that allow users to view many bioenergy and related datasets in Google Maps. Users can query and download map data and view incentives and state energy data, as well as select an area on the map for estimated biofuels or biopower production potential. The webinar will review the data source and date of bioenergy data layers. The NREL team will show users how to view and download data behind the map, how to view state energy data and incentives, and how to view and edit potential biofuel or biopower production in a geographical location.

  9. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Reports and Publications

    2016-01-01

    Short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections through 2015 for the United States and international oil forecasts.

  10. Fate of thermal log type Q balls

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Kamada, Kohei; Kasuya, Shinta; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2010-11-15

    We study time evolution of the Q ball in thermal logarithmic potential using lattice simulations. As the temperature decreases due to the cosmic expansion, the thermal logarithmic term in the potential is eventually overcome by a mass term, and we confirm that the Q ball transforms from the thick-wall type to the thin-wall type for a positive coefficient of radiative corrections to the mass term, as recently suggested. Moreover, we find that the Q ball finally ''melts down'' when the Q-ball solution disappears. We also discuss the effects of this phenomenon on the detectability of gravitational waves from the Q-ball formation.

  11. High Statistics Study of Nearby Type 1a Supernovae. QUEST Camera...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Statistics Study of Nearby Type 1a Supernovae. QUEST Camera Short Term Maintenance: Final Technical Report Baltay, Charles 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Study of Type 1a Supernovae...

  12. DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource | Department of Energy DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource DOE's Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas Estimates at Least 2,400 Billion Metric Tons of U.S. CO2 Storage Resource December 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The United States has at least 2,400 billion metric tons of possible carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource in saline formations, oil and gas

  13. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    This increased use of natural gas for electricity generation primarily reflects sustained low prices for the fuel. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy ...

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2015 2 * The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) forecasts warmer summer temperatures ...

  15. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2015 2 Global Petroleum and Other Liquids Global liquids production continues to outpace consumption, ...

  16. Preparations for Physics Studies with ATLAS During the First Years of the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    Fabiola Gianotti

    2016-07-12

    I will review the status of the ATLAS detector installation and commissioning, and discuss the preparation for physics with test-beam studies, detailed simulations, and runs with cosmics. I will then show examples of physics opportunities with the first LHC data.   

  17. Limited Groundwater Investigation of The Atlas Corporation Moab Mill, Moab, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Easterly, CE

    2001-11-05

    The project described in this report was conducted by personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Grand Junction Office (ORNL/GJ). The purpose was to refine information regarding groundwater contamination emanating from the Atlas Corporation's former uranium mill in Moab, Utah.

  18. SU-E-J-132: Automated Segmentation with Post-Registration Atlas Selection Based On Mutual Information

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X; Gao, H; Sharp, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The delineation of targets and organs-at-risk is a critical step during image-guided radiation therapy, for which manual contouring is the gold standard. However, it is often time-consuming and may suffer from intra- and inter-rater variability. The purpose of this work is to investigate the automated segmentation. Methods: The automatic segmentation here is based on mutual information (MI), with the atlas from Public Domain Database for Computational Anatomy (PDDCA) with manually drawn contours.Using dice coefficient (DC) as the quantitative measure of segmentation accuracy, we perform leave-one-out cross-validations for all PDDCA images sequentially, during which other images are registered to each chosen image and DC is computed between registered contour and ground truth. Meanwhile, six strategies, including MI, are selected to measure the image similarity, with MI to be the best. Then given a target image to be segmented and an atlas, automatic segmentation consists of: (a) the affine registration step for image positioning; (b) the active demons registration method to register the atlas to the target image; (c) the computation of MI values between the deformed atlas and the target image; (d) the weighted image fusion of three deformed atlas images with highest MI values to form the segmented contour. Results: MI was found to be the best among six studied strategies in the sense that it had the highest positive correlation between similarity measure (e.g., MI values) and DC. For automated segmentation, the weighted image fusion of three deformed atlas images with highest MI values provided the highest DC among four proposed strategies. Conclusion: MI has the highest correlation with DC, and therefore is an appropriate choice for post-registration atlas selection in atlas-based segmentation. Xuhua Ren and Hao Gao were partially supported by the NSFC (#11405105), the 973 Program (#2015CB856000) and the Shanghai Pujiang Talent Program (#14PJ1404500)

  19. Integration of the Trigger and Data Acquisition Systems in ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Abolins, M.; Adragna, P.; Aleksandrov, E.; Aleksandrov, I.; Amorim, A.; Anderson, K.; Anduaga, X.; Aracena, I.; Asquith, L.; Avolio, G.; Backlund, S.; Badescu, E.; Baines, J.; Barria, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Batreanu, S.; Beck, H.P.; Bee, C.; Bell, P.; Bell, W.H.; Bellomo, M.; /more authors..

    2011-11-09

    During 2006 and the first half of 2007, the installation, integration and commissioning of trigger and data acquisition (TDAQ) equipment in the ATLAS experimental area have progressed. There have been a series of technical runs using the final components of the system already installed in the experimental area. Various tests have been run including ones where level 1 preselected simulated proton-proton events have been processed in a loop mode through the trigger and dataflow chains. The system included the readout buffers containing the events, event building, level 2 and event filter trigger algorithms. The scalability of the system with respect to the number of event building nodes used has been studied and quantities critical for the final system, such as trigger rates and event processing times, have been measured using different trigger algorithms as well as different TDAQ components. This paper presents the TDAQ architecture, the current status of the installation and commissioning and highlights the main test results that validate the system.

  20. Earth's mysterious atmosphere. ATLAS 1: Teachers guide with activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    One of our mission's primary goals is to better understand the physics and chemistry of our atmosphere, the thin envelope of air that provides for human life and shields us from the harshness of space. The Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry the ATLAS 1 science instruments 296 km above Earth, so that they can look down into and through the various layers of the atmosphere. Five solar radiometers will precisely measure the amount of energy the Sun injects into Earth's environment. The chemistry at different altitudes will be measured very accurately by five other instruments called spectrometers. Much of our time in the cockpit of Atlantis will be devoted to two very exciting instruments that measure the auroras and the atmosphere's electrical characteristics. Finally, our ultraviolet telescope will probe the secrets of fascinating celestial objects. This Teacher's Guide is designed as a detective story to help you appreciate some of the many questions currently studied by scientists around the world. Many complex factors affect our atmosphere today, possibly even changing the course of global climate. All who live on Earth must recognize that they play an ever-growing role in causing some of these changes. People must solve this great atmospheric mystery if they are to understand all these changes and know what to do about them.

  1. Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) gridded data products

    SciTech Connect

    Sabine, Christopher; Hankin, S.; Koyuk, H; Bakker, D C E; Pfeil, B; Olsen, A; Metzl, N; Fassbender, A; Manke, A; Malczyk, J; Akl, J; Alin, S R; Bellerby, R G J; Borges, A; Boutin, J; Cai, W-J; Chavez, F P; Chen, A; Cosa, C; Feely, R A; Gonzalez-Davila, M; Goyet, C; Hardman-Mountford, N; Heinze, C; Hoppema, M; Hunt, C W; Hydes, D; Ishii, M; Johannessen, T; Key, R M; Kortzinger, A; Landschutzer, P; Lauvset, S K; Lefevre, N; Lourantou, A; Mintrop, L; Miyazaki, C; Murata, A; Nakadate, A; Nakano, Y; Nakaoka, S; Nojiri, Y; et al.

    2013-01-01

    A well documented, publicly available, global data set for surface ocean carbon dioxide (CO2) parameters has been called for by international groups for nearly two decades. The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) project was initiated by the international marine carbon science community in 2007 with the aim of providing a comprehensive, publicly available, regularly updated, global data set of marine surface CO2, which had been subject to quality control (QC). SOCAT version 1.5 was made public in September 2011 and holds 6.3 million quality controlled surface CO2 data from the global oceans and coastal seas, spanning four decades (1968 2007). The SOCAT gridded data is the second data product to come from the SOCAT project. Recognizing that some groups may have trouble working with millions of measurements, the SOCAT gridded product was generated to provide a robust regularly spaced fCO2 product with minimal spatial and temporal interpolation which should be easier to work with for many applications. Gridded SOCAT is rich with information that has not been fully explored yet, but also contains biases and limitations that the user needs to recognize and address.

  2. Search for resonances in diphoton events at $$\\sqrt{s}=13 $$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2016-09-01

    Searches for new resonances decaying into two photons in the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider are described. The analysis is based on proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb–1 at √s = 13 TeV recorded in 2015. Two searches are performed, one targeted at a spin-2 particle of mass larger than 500 GeV, using Randall-Sundrum graviton states as a benchmark model, and one optimized for a spin-0 particle of mass larger than 200 GeV. Varying both the mass and the decay width, the most significant deviation from the background-only hypothesis is observed atmore » a diphoton invariant mass around 750 GeV with local significances of 3.8 and 3.9 standard deviations in the searches optimized for a spin-2 and spin-0 particle, respectively. The global significances are estimated to be 2.1 standard deviations for both analyses. As a result, the consistency between the data collected at 13 TeV and 8 TeV is also evaluated. Limits on the production cross section times branching ratio to two photons for the two resonance types are reported.« less

  3. Search for heavy Majorana neutrinos with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-29

    A search for heavy Majorana neutrinos in events containing a pair of high-pT leptons of the same charge and high-pT jets is presented. The search uses 20.3 fb-1 of pp collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider with a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV. The data are found to be consistent with the background-only hypothesis based on the Standard Model expectation. In the context of a Type-I seesaw mechanism, limits are set on the production cross-section times branching ratio for production of heavy Majorana neutrinos in the mass range between 100 and 500 GeV. The limits are subsequently interpreted as limits on the mixing between the heavy Majorana neutrinos and the Standard Model neutrinos. In the context of a left-right symmetric model, limits on the production cross-section times branching ratio are set with respect to the masses of heavy Majorana neutrinos and heavy gauge bosons WR and Z'.

  4. Search for heavy Majorana neutrinos with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-29

    A search for heavy Majorana neutrinos in events containing a pair of high-pT leptons of the same charge and high-pT jets is presented. The search uses 20.3 fb-1 of pp collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider with a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV. The data are found to be consistent with the background-only hypothesis based on the Standard Model expectation. In the context of a Type-I seesaw mechanism, limits are set on the production cross-section times branching ratio for production of heavy Majorana neutrinos in the mass range between 100 andmore » 500 GeV. The limits are subsequently interpreted as limits on the mixing between the heavy Majorana neutrinos and the Standard Model neutrinos. In the context of a left-right symmetric model, limits on the production cross-section times branching ratio are set with respect to the masses of heavy Majorana neutrinos and heavy gauge bosons WR and Z'.« less

  5. NEW ATLAS9 AND MARCS MODEL ATMOSPHERE GRIDS FOR THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT (APOGEE)

    SciTech Connect

    Meszaros, Sz.; Allende Prieto, C.; De Vicente, A.; Edvardsson, B.; Gustafsson, B.; Castelli, F.; Garcia Perez, A. E.; Majewski, S. R.; Plez, B.; Schiavon, R.; Shetrone, M.

    2012-10-01

    We present a new grid of model photospheres for the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey of stellar populations of the Galaxy, calculated using the ATLAS9 and MARCS codes. New opacity distribution functions were generated to calculate ATLAS9 model photospheres. MARCS models were calculated based on opacity sampling techniques. The metallicity ([M/H]) spans from -5 to 1.5 for ATLAS and -2.5 to 0.5 for MARCS models. There are three main differences with respect to previous ATLAS9 model grids: a new corrected H{sub 2}O line list, a wide range of carbon ([C/M]) and {alpha} element [{alpha}/M] variations, and solar reference abundances from Asplund et al. The added range of varying carbon and {alpha}-element abundances also extends the previously calculated MARCS model grids. Altogether, 1980 chemical compositions were used for the ATLAS9 grid and 175 for the MARCS grid. Over 808,000 ATLAS9 models were computed spanning temperatures from 3500 K to 30,000 K and log g from 0 to 5, where larger temperatures only have high gravities. The MARCS models span from 3500 K to 5500 K, and log g from 0 to 5. All model atmospheres are publicly available online.

  6. ARM - Measurement - Cloud type

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement : Cloud type Cloud type such as cirrus, stratus, cumulus etc Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  7. A Sorghum bicolor expression atlas reveals dynamic genotype-specific expression profiles for vegetative tissues of grain, sweet and bioenergy sorghums

    SciTech Connect

    Shakoor, N; Nair, R; Crasta, O; Morris, G; Feltus, A; Kresovich, S

    2014-01-23

    Background: Effective improvement in sorghum crop development necessitates a genomics-based approach to identify functional genes and QTLs. Sequenced in 2009, a comprehensive annotation of the sorghum genome and the development of functional genomics resources is key to enable the discovery and deployment of regulatory and metabolic genes and gene networks for crop improvement. Results: This study utilizes the first commercially available whole-transcriptome sorghum microarray (Sorgh-WTa520972F) to identify tissue and genotype-specific expression patterns for all identified Sorghum bicolor exons and UTRs. The genechip contains 1,026,373 probes covering 149,182 exons (27,577 genes) across the Sorghum bicolor nuclear, chloroplast, and mitochondrial genomes. Specific probesets were also included for putative non-coding RNAs that may play a role in gene regulation (e. g., microRNAs), and confirmed functional small RNAs in related species (maize and sugarcane) were also included in our array design. We generated expression data for 78 samples with a combination of four different tissue types (shoot, root, leaf and stem), two dissected stem tissues (pith and rind) and six diverse genotypes, which included 6 public sorghum lines (R159, Atlas, Fremont, PI152611, AR2400 and PI455230) representing grain, sweet, forage, and high biomass ideotypes. Conclusions: Here we present a summary of the microarray dataset, including analysis of tissue-specific gene expression profiles and associated expression profiles of relevant metabolic pathways. With an aim to enable identification and functional characterization of genes in sorghum, this expression atlas presents a new and valuable resource to the research community.

  8. Key Terms | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    sounds Physical Impairment: a physical condition that permanently prevents normal body movement or control Cognitive Disabilities: difficulty with one or more types of mental tasks...

  9. Flowsheets and source terms for radioactive waste projections

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1985-03-01

    Flowsheets and source terms used to generate radioactive waste projections in the Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program are given. Volumes of each waste type generated per unit product throughput have been determined for the following facilities: uranium mining, UF/sub 6/ conversion, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, boiling-water reactors (BWRs), pressurized-water reactors (PWRs), and fuel reprocessing. Source terms for DOE/defense wastes have been developed. Expected wastes from typical decommissioning operations for each facility type have been determined. All wastes are also characterized by isotopic composition at time of generation and by general chemical composition. 70 references, 21 figures, 53 tables.

  10. Long-Term Surveillance Plan...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Albuquerque, New Mexico TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE 2.0 FINAL SITE CONDITIONS ... of 25 5202009 1:38 PM 1. 0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) ...

  11. Energy Exchange Terms and Conditions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    We will be requesting that participants acknowledge that they have read these terms and conditions at the time of registration (also included in the online registration form) and at the time of printing their badges on-site.

  12. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    will average 4.77MMBtu in 2014 and 4.50MMBtu in 2015. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2014 2 Global Petroleum and Other Liquids EIA ...

  13. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Global oil inventory builds in the third quarter U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook November 2015 2 of 2015 averaged 1.6 million bd, down from 2.0 ...

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    EIA projects end-of-October stocks will be 3,919 Bcf, 121 Bcf (3.2%) more than the five-year average. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2015 2 ...

  15. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2016 2 Global Petroleum and Other Liquid Fuels EIA estimates that global petroleum and other liquid fuels ...

  16. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2014 2 Global Petroleum and Other Liquids EIA's world oil balance is virtually unchanged from last month's ...

  17. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    (833Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook iuarterly Projections August 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 20585 t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- iort- nort- lort- '.ort- ...

  18. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that the Brent crude oil spot ... in 2013 and 3.95 per MMBtu in 2014. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term ...

  19. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... in 2017, compared with an average of 2.63MMBtu in 2015. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2016 2 Global Petroleum and Other Liquid Fuels EIA ...

  20. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    0.4 million bd lower, respectively, than in July's STEO. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2015 2 Natural gas working inventories were ...

  1. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... EIA expects the Henry Hub natural gas spot price to average 3.34million British U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2015 2 thermal units ...

  2. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    3.68 per MMBtu in 2013 and 3.84 per MMBtu in 2014. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook November 2013 2 Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels ...

  3. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    This would be the second-highest injection season on record. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2015 2 Low natural gas prices in recent ...

  4. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... in 2017, compared with an average of 2.63MMBtu in 2015. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2016 2 Global Petroleum and Other Liquid Fuels EIA ...

  5. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    3.69 per MMBtu in 2013 and 3.78 per MMBtu in 2014. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook December 2013 2 Global Crude Oil and Liquid Fuels Total ...

  6. Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. Carr; Scott W. White

    2002-06-01

    This annual report describes progress of the project entitled ''Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)''. This project, funded by the Department of Energy, is a cooperative project that assembles a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide geologic sequestration (http://www.midcarb.org). The system links the five states in the consortium into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project is working to provide advanced distributed computing solutions to link database servers across the five states into a single system where data is maintained at the local level but is accessed through a single Web portal and can be queried, assembled, analyzed and displayed. Each individual state has strengths in data gathering, data manipulation and data display, including GIS mapping, custom application development, web development, and database design. Sharing of expertise provides the critical mass of technical expertise to improve CO{sub 2} databases and data access in all states. This project improves the flow of data across servers in the five states and increases the amount and quality of available digital data. The MIDCARB project is developing improved online tools to provide real-time display and analyze CO{sub 2} sequestration data. The system links together data from sources, sinks and transportation within a spatial database that can be queried online. Visualization of high quality and current data can assist decision makers by providing access to common sets of high quality data in a consistent manner.

  7. Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    There could be as much as 5,700 years of carbon dioxide storage potential available in geologic formations in the United States and portions of Canada, according to the latest edition of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Carbon Sequestration Atlas (Atlas III).

  8. European Atlas of Soil Biodiversity | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Resource assessment Resource Type: Publications, Guidemanual Website: eusoils.jrc.ec.europa.eulibrarymapsbiodiversityatlasDocumentsBio UN Region: "Western & Eastern Europe"...

  9. Types of Reuse

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following provides greater detail regarding the types of reuse pursued for LM sites. It should be noted that many actual reuses combine several types of the uses listed below.

  10. Types of Radiation Exposure

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    External Irradiation Contamination Incorporation Biological Effects of Acute, Total Body Irradiation Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Types of radiation ...

  11. Types of Hydropower Turbines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Turbines Types of Hydropower Turbines There are two main types of hydro turbines: impulse and reaction. The type of hydropower turbine selected for a project is based on the height of standing water-referred to as "head"-and the flow, or volume of water, at the site. Other deciding factors include how deep the turbine must be set, efficiency, and cost. Terms used on this page are defined in the glossary. Impulse Turbine The impulse turbine generally uses the velocity of the water to

  12. Postdoc Appointment Types

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Appointment Types Postdoc Appointment Types Most postdocs will be offered a postdoctoral research associate appointment. Each year, approximately 30 Postdoctoral Fellow appointments, including the Distinguished Fellows, are awarded. Postdoc appointment types offer world of possibilities Meet the current LANL Distinguished Postdocs Research Associates Research Associates pursue research as part of ongoing LANL science and engineering programs. Sponsored postdoctoral candidate packages are

  13. The ATLAS Experiment: Mapping the Secrets of the Universe (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Barnett, Michael

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Michael Barnett of Berkeley Lab's Physics Division discusses the ATLAS Experiment at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics' (CERN) Large Hadron Collider. The collider will explore the aftermath of collisions at the highest energy ever produced in the lab, and will recreate the conditions of the universe a billionth of a second after the Big Bang. The ATLAS detector is half the size of the Notre Dame Cathedral and required 2000 physicists and engineers from 35 countries for its construction. Its goals are to examine mini-black holes, identify dark matter, understand antimatter, search for extra dimensions of space, and learn about the fundamental forces that have shaped the universe since the beginning of time and will determine its fate.

  14. Probing lepton flavour violation via neutrinoless τ→3μ decays with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-04-26

    This article presents the sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment to the lepton-flavour-violating decays of τ→3μ. A method utilising the production of τ leptons via W→τν decays is used. This method is applied to the sample of 20.3 fb-1 of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2012. Lastly, no event is observed passing the selection criteria, and the observed (expected) upper limit on the τ lepton branching fraction into three muons, Br(τ→3μ), is 3.76×10-7 (3.94×10-7 ) at 90 % confidence level.

  15. L1 track triggers for ATLAS in the HL-LHC

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Lipeles, E.

    2012-01-01

    The HL-LHC, the planned high luminosity upgrade for the LHC, will increase the collision rate in the ATLAS detector approximately a factor of 5 beyond the luminosity for which the detectors were designed, while also increasing the number of pile-up collisions in each event by a similar factor. This means that the level-1 trigger must achieve a higher rejection factor in a more difficult environment. This presentation discusses the challenges that arise in this environment and strategies being considered by ATLAS to include information from the tracking systems in the level-1 decision. The main challenges involve reducing the data volumemore » exported from the tracking system for which two options are under consideration: a region of interest based system and an intelligent sensor method which filters on hits likely to come from higher transverse momentum tracks.« less

  16. Tailings Pile Seepage Model The Atlas Corporation Moab Mill Moab, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Easterly, CE

    2001-11-05

    The project described in this report was conducted by personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Grand Junction Office (ORNL/GJ). This report has been prepared as a companion report to the Limited Groundwater Investigation of the Atlas Corporation Moab Mill, Moab, Utah. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the tailings pile seepage modeling effort tasked by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  17. Experimental and code simulation of a station blackout scenario for APR1400 with test facility ATLAS and MARS code

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, X. G.; Kim, Y. S.; Choi, K. Y.; Park, H. S.; Cho, S.; Kang, K. H.; Choi, N. H.

    2012-07-01

    A SBO (station blackout) experiment named SBO-01 was performed at full-pressure IET (Integral Effect Test) facility ATLAS (Advanced Test Loop for Accident Simulation) which is scaled down from the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe). In this study, the transient of SBO-01 is discussed and is subdivided into three phases: the SG fluid loss phase, the RCS fluid loss phase, and the core coolant depletion and core heatup phase. In addition, the typical phenomena in SBO-01 test - SG dryout, natural circulation, core coolant boiling, the PRZ full, core heat-up - are identified. Furthermore, the SBO-01 test is reproduced by the MARS code calculation with the ATLAS model which represents the ATLAS test facility. The experimental and calculated transients are then compared and discussed. The comparison reveals there was malfunction of equipments: the SG leakage through SG MSSV and the measurement error of loop flow meter. As the ATLAS model is validated against the experimental results, it can be further employed to investigate the other possible SBO scenarios and to study the scaling distortions in the ATLAS. (authors)

  18. Study of (W/Z)H production and Higgs boson couplings using H→ W W * decays with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-27

    A search for Higgs boson production in association with a W or Z boson, in the H→ W W * decay channel, is performed with a data sample collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies \\( \\sqrt{s}=7 \\) TeV and 8 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb-1 and 20.3 fb-1, respectively. The WH production mode is studied in two-lepton and three-lepton final states, while two- lepton and four-lepton final states are used to search for the ZH production mode. The observed significance, for the combined W H and ZH production, ismore » 2.5 standard deviations while a significance of 0.9 standard deviations is expected in the Standard Model Higgs boson hypothesis. The ratio of the combined W H and ZH signal yield to the Standard Model expectation, μV H , is found to be μ V H = 3.0-1.1+1.3 (stat.)-0.7 +1.0 (sys.) for the Higgs boson mass of 125.36 GeV. The W H and ZH production modes are also combined with the gluon fusion and vector boson fusion production modes studied in the H → W W * → ℓνℓν decay channel, resulting in an overall observed significance of 6.5 standard deviations and μggF + VBF + VH = 1.16-0.15+0.16 (stat.) -0.15+0.18 (sys.). The results are interpreted in terms of scaling factors of the Higgs boson couplings to vector bosons (κV ) and fermions (κF ); the combined results are: |κ V | = 1.06-0.10+0.10, |κ F| = 0.85-0.20+0.26.« less

  19. MIDCONTINENT INTERACTIVE DIGITAL CARBON ATLAS AND RELATIONAL DATABASE (MIDCARB)

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. Carr; Scott W. White

    2003-07-01

    This annual report describes progress in the second year of the three-year project entitled ''Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)''. This project, funded by the Department of Energy, is a cooperative project that assembles a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide geologic sequestration (http://www.midcarb.org). The system links the five states in the consortium into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project is providing advanced distributed computing solutions to link database servers across the five states into a single system where data is maintained at the local level but is accessed through a single Web portal and can be queried, assembled, analyzed and displayed. Each individual state has strengths in data gathering, data manipulation and data display, including GIS mapping, custom application development, web development, and database design. Sharing of expertise provides the critical mass of technical expertise to improve CO{sub 2} databases and data access in all states. This project improves the flow of data across servers in the five states and increases the amount and quality of available digital data. Data is being assembled to analyze CO{sub 2} sequestration potential from a single object (e.g., power plant or well) to a region and across geographic boundaries. The MIDCARB system is robust and capable of being updated from multiple sources on a daily basis. The MIDCARB project has developed improved online tools to provide real-time display and analysis of CO{sub 2} sequestration data. The MIDCARB project is a functional template for distributed data systems to address CO{sub 2} sequestration and other natural resource issues that cross the

  20. Supplemental Modeling and Analysis Report, Atlas Corporation Moab Mill, Moab, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Easterly, CE

    2001-11-05

    The purpose of this report is to provide additional numerical modeling and data evaluation for the Atlas tailings pile near Moab, Utah. A previous report (Tailings Pile Seepage Model: The Atlas Corporation Moab Mill, Moab, Utah, January 9, 1998) prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Grand Junction (ORNL/GJ) presented the results of steady-state modeling of water flow and subsequent discharge to the underlying groundwater system. At the request of the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), this model was expanded to evaluate the impact of drainage from the tailings pile in addition to recharge from precipitation in a transient mode simulation. In addition, the FWS requested transient simulations of contaminant transport in the alluvial aquifer. Subsequently, NRC requested an evaluation of additional hydrologic issues related to the results presented in the Tailings Pile Seepage Model (ORNL/GJ 1998a) and the Limited Groundwater Investigation (ORNL/GJ 1998b). Funding for the report was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy. The following section lists the individual tasks with subsequent sections providing the results. A map for the Atlas Moab Mill site is presented in Fig. 1.1.

  1. Energy Datapalooza Community | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Solar Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry Solar IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Graham7781 11 Feb 2013 - 15:18...

  2. Energy Data Jam | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    IRENA Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry IRENA IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Graham7781 11 Feb 2013 - 15:18...

  3. Energy Datapalooza Community | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    data Type Term Title Author Replies Last Post sort icon Blog entry data IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential Graham7781 11 Feb 2013 - 15:18...

  4. Search for a new resonance decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the ℓℓ/ℓν/νν + bb¯ final states with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-06-16

    A search for a new resonance decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the ℓℓ/ℓν/νν+bb¯ final states is performed using 20.3 fb-1 of pp collision data recorded at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The search is conducted by examining the WH / ZH invariant mass distribution for a localized excess. Thus, no significant deviation from the Standard Model background prediction is observed. The results are interpreted in terms of constraints on the Minimal Walking Technicolor model and on a simplified approach based on a phenomenological Lagrangian of Heavy Vector Triplets.

  5. Search for a new resonance decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the ℓℓ/ℓν/νν + bb¯ final states with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.

    2015-06-16

    A search for a new resonance decaying to a W or Z boson and a Higgs boson in the ℓℓ/ℓν/νν+bb¯ final states is performed using 20.3 fb-1 of pp collision data recorded at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The search is conducted by examining the WH / ZH invariant mass distribution for a localized excess. Thus, no significant deviation from the Standard Model background prediction is observed. The results are interpreted in terms of constraints on the Minimal Walking Technicolor model and on a simplified approach based on a phenomenological Lagrangian ofmore » Heavy Vector Triplets.« less

  6. TRIGA MARK-II source term

    SciTech Connect

    Usang, M. D. Hamzah, N. S. Abi, M. J. B. Rawi, M. Z. M. Rawi Abu, M. P.

    2014-02-12

    ORIGEN 2.2 are employed to obtain data regarding ? source term and the radio-activity of irradiated TRIGA fuel. The fuel composition are specified in grams for use as input data. Three types of fuel are irradiated in the reactor, each differs from the other in terms of the amount of Uranium compared to the total weight. Each fuel are irradiated for 365 days with 50 days time step. We obtain results on the total radioactivity of the fuel, the composition of activated materials, composition of fission products and the photon spectrum of the burned fuel. We investigate the differences of results using BWR and PWR library for ORIGEN. Finally, we compare the composition of major nuclides after 1 year irradiation of both ORIGEN library with results from WIMS. We found only minor disagreements between the yields of PWR and BWR libraries. In comparison with WIMS, the errors are a little bit more pronounced. To overcome this errors, the irradiation power used in ORIGEN could be increased a little, so that the differences in the yield of ORIGEN and WIMS could be reduced. A more permanent solution is to use a different code altogether to simulate burnup such as DRAGON and ORIGEN-S. The result of this study are essential for the design of radiation shielding from the fuel.

  7. Glossary of Nuclear Waste Terms

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Glossary of Nuclear Waste Terms Atom The basic component of all matter; it is the smallest part of an element having all the chemical properties of that element. Atoms are made up of protons and neutrons (in the nucleus) and electronics. Background Radiation Radiation arising from natural radioactive material and always present in the environment, including solar and cosmic radiation and radioactive elements in the upper atmosphere, the ground, building materials and the human body. Canister The

  8. Microsoft Word - BPD Privacy Terms

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Data Privacy Terms (Updated 2014-12) Your company or organization (PROVIDER) has agreed to provide PROPRIETARY DATA regarding building energy performance to the Buildings Performance Database project that the Department of Energy (the Government) and its Laboratories (collectively referred to herein as the RECIPIENT) will use in its research. PROPRIETARY DATA is defined as follows: (a) DATA that embody trade secrets or are commercial or financial information that is confidential and privileged;

  9. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    6 1 October 2016 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Forecast highlights Winter Fuels Outlook  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas, heating oil, electricity, and propane will increase this winter (October 1 through March 31) compared with last winter. Based on projections from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), forecast temperatures this winter, measured using heating degree days, are 3% warmer than the previous 10-year average but colder

  10. ORISE: Radiological Terms Quick Reference Guide

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Type text Type text Type text Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site ... 2015 Quick Reference Information - Radiation Activity: Radioactive materials aren't ...

  11. Search for heavy lepton resonances decaying to a Z boson and a lepton in pp collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-16

    In this study, a search for heavy leptons decaying to a Z boson and an electron or a muon is presented. The search is based on pp collision data taken at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb⁻¹. Three high-transverse-momentum electrons or muons are selected, with two of them required to be consistent with originating from a Z boson decay. No significant excess above Standard Model background predictions is observed, and 95% confidence level limits on the production cross section of high-mass trilepton resonances are derived. The results are interpreted in the context of vector-like lepton and type-III seesaw models. For the vector-like lepton model, most heavy lepton mass values in the range 114–176 GeV are excluded. For the type-III seesaw model, most mass values in the range 100–468 GeV are excluded.

  12. Search for heavy lepton resonances decaying to a Z boson and a lepton in pp collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-16

    In this study, a search for heavy leptons decaying to a Z boson and an electron or a muon is presented. The search is based on pp collision data taken at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb⁻¹. Three high-transverse-momentum electrons or muons are selected, with two of them required to be consistent with originating from a Z boson decay. No significant excess above Standard Model background predictions is observed, and 95% confidence level limits on the production cross section of high-mass trilepton resonances aremore » derived. The results are interpreted in the context of vector-like lepton and type-III seesaw models. For the vector-like lepton model, most heavy lepton mass values in the range 114–176 GeV are excluded. For the type-III seesaw model, most mass values in the range 100–468 GeV are excluded.« less

  13. Glossary of Terms | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Glossary of Terms Glossary of Terms TERM DEFINITION ... and has the authority to enter into a Loan Guarantee ... not have a DUNS you can search for it or request one at ...

  14. HERSCHEL-ATLAS GALAXY COUNTS AND HIGH-REDSHIFT LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS: THE FORMATION OF MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lapi, A.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Fan, L.; Bressan, A.; De Zotti, G.; Danese, L.; Negrello, M.; Dunne, L.; Maddox, S.; Eales, S.; Auld, R.; Dariush, A.; Dye, S.; Baes, M.; Fritz, J.; Bonfield, D. G.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.

    2011-11-20

    Exploiting the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey Science Demonstration Phase survey data, we have determined the luminosity functions (LFs) at rest-frame wavelengths of 100 and 250 {mu}m and at several redshifts z {approx}> 1, for bright submillimeter galaxies with star formation rates (SFRs) {approx}> 100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We find that the evolution of the comoving LF is strong up to z Almost-Equal-To 2.5, and slows down at higher redshifts. From the LFs and the information on halo masses inferred from clustering analysis, we derived an average relation between SFR and halo mass (and its scatter). We also infer that the timescale of the main episode of dust-enshrouded star formation in massive halos (M{sub H} {approx}> 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }) amounts to {approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} yr. Given the SFRs, which are in the range of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, this timescale implies final stellar masses of the order of 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }. The corresponding stellar mass function matches the observed mass function of passively evolving galaxies at z {approx}> 1. The comparison of the statistics for submillimeter and UV-selected galaxies suggests that the dust-free, UV bright phase is {approx}> 10{sup 2} times shorter than the submillimeter bright phase, implying that the dust must form soon after the onset of star formation. Using a single reference spectral energy distribution (SED; the one of the z Almost-Equal-To 2.3 galaxy SMM J2135-0102), our simple physical model is able to reproduce not only the LFs at different redshifts >1 but also the counts at wavelengths ranging from 250 {mu}m to Almost-Equal-To 1 mm. Owing to the steepness of the counts and their relatively broad frequency range, this result suggests that the dispersion of submillimeter SEDs of z > 1 galaxies around the reference one is rather small.

  15. Long Term Care | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Care icon Federal employees can elect to participate in the Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program (FLTCIP) which provides long term care insurance to Federal employees,...

  16. Industry Terms and Definitions | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Terms and Definitions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Industry Terms and Definitions Author Liberty Pioneer educational materials...

  17. Lighting Principles and Terms | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    Principles and Terms Lighting Principles and Terms Light quantity, energy consumption, and light quality are the basic principles of lighting. | Photo courtesy of

  18. Short Term Energy Outlook ,October 2002

    Annual Energy Outlook

    October 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: ... Energy Information AdministrationShort-Term Energy Outlook -- October 2002 2 The OPEC ...

  19. Determination of W boson helicity fractions in top quark decays in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at CDF Run II and production of endcap modules for the ATLAS Silicon Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Moed, Shulamit

    2007-01-01

    The thesis presented here includes two parts. The first part discusses the production of endcap modules for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker at the University of Geneva. The ATLAS experiment is one of the two multi-purpose experiments being built at the LHC at CERN. The University of Geneva invested extensive efforts to create an excellent and efficient module production site, in which 655 endcap outer modules were constructed. The complexity and extreme requirements for 10 years of LHC operation with a high resolution, high efficiency, low noise tracking system resulted in an extremely careful, time consuming production and quality assurance of every single module. At design luminosity about 1000 particles will pass through the tracking system each 25 ns. In addition to requiring fast tracking techniques, the high particle flux causes significant radiation damage. Therefore, modules have to be constructed within tight and accurate mechanical and electrical specification. A description of the ATLAS experiment and the ATLAS Semiconductor tracker is presented, followed by a detailed overview of the module production at the University of Geneva. My personal contribution to the endcap module production at the University of Geneva was taking part, together with other physicists, in selecting components to be assembled to a module, including hybrid reception tests, measuring the I-V curve of the sensors and the modules at different stages of the production, thermal cycling the modules and performing electrical readout tests as an initial quality assurance of the modules before they were shipped to CERN. An elaborated description of all of these activities is given in this thesis. At the beginning of the production period the author developed a statistics package which enabled us to monitor the rate and quality of the module production. This package was then used widely by the ATLAS SCT institutes that built endcap modules of any type, and kept being improved and updated

  20. Long-Term Surveillance Plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ~- 1 .. I I . I I I ' I I I I I t I ' 1 .. ~ * -. . * * , . -. * . - l' ** ... * . DOE/Al/62350-60F ~--- - * ---,~REV. 1 CONTROLLED COPY NO. United States Department of Energy LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN fOR THE SHIPROCK DISPOSAL SITE; SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO September 1994 Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project INTENDED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE This report has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available in paper copy and microfiche. Number of pages in this report: 1 1 3 DOE and DOE

  1. Production summary for extended barrel module fabrication at Argonne for the ATLAS tile calorimeter.

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, V.; Hill, N.; Petereit, E.; Skrzecz, F.; Wood, K.; Proudfoot, J.; Anderson, S.; Caird, A.; Keyser, C.; Kocenko, L.; Matijas, Z.; Nephew, T.; Stanek, R.; Franchini, F.; High Energy Physics

    2007-11-14

    The Tile Calorimeter is one of the main hadronic calorimeters to be used in the ATLAS experiment at CERN [1,2]. It is a steel/scintillator sampling calorimeter which is built by stacking 64 segments in azimuth and 3 separate cylinders to provide a total structure whose length is approximately 12m and whose diameter is a little over 8.4m. It has a total weight of about 2630 metric tons. Important features of this calorimeter are: A minimum gap (1.5mm) between modules in azimuth; Pockets in the structure to hold the scintillator tiles; Recessed channels at the edges of the module into which the readout fibers will sit; and Holes in the structure through which a radioactive source will pass. The mechanical structure for one of the 3 calorimeter sections, the Extended Barrel (EBA) was constructed at Argonne. A schematic of the calorimeter sampling structure and the layout of one of the 64 segments, termed a module, are shown in figure 1. Each module comprises mechanically of a precision machined, structural girder to which 10 submodules are bolted. One of these submodules, the ITC, has a customized shape to accommodate services for other detector elements. Each submodule weighs 850Kg and the assembled mechanical structure of the module weighs approximately 9000Kg (a fully instrumented Extended Barrel modules weighs {approx}9600Kg). A crucial issue for the tile calorimeter assembly is the minimization of the un-instrumented gap between modules when they are stacked on top of each other during final assembly. The design goal was originally 1mm gap which was eventually relaxed to 1.5mm following a careful evaluation of all tolerances in the construction and assembly process as shown in figure 2 [3]. Submodules for this assembly were produced at 4 locations [4] using tooling and procedures which were largely identical [5]. An important issue was the height of each submodule on the stacking fixture on which they were fabricated as this defines the length along the girder

  2. Long-Term Stewardship Baseline Report and Transition Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Kristofferson, Keith

    2001-11-01

    Long-term stewardship consists of those actions necessary to maintain and demonstrate continued protection of human health and the environment after facility cleanup is complete. As the Department of Energys (DOE) lead laboratory for environmental management programs, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) administers DOEs long-term stewardship science and technology efforts. The INEEL provides DOE with technical, and scientific expertise needed to oversee its long-term environmental management obligations complexwide. Long-term stewardship is administered and overseen by the Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology. The INEEL Long-Term Stewardship Program is currently developing the management structures and plans to complete INEEL-specific, long-term stewardship obligations. This guidance document (1) assists in ensuring that the program leads transition planning for the INEEL with respect to facility and site areas and (2) describes the classes and types of criteria and data required to initiate transition for areas and sites where the facility mission has ended and cleanup is complete. Additionally, this document summarizes current information on INEEL facilities, structures, and release sites likely to enter long-term stewardship at the completion of DOEs cleanup mission. This document is not intended to function as a discrete checklist or local procedure to determine readiness to transition. It is an overarching document meant as guidance in implementing specific transition procedures. Several documents formed the foundation upon which this guidance was developed. Principal among these documents was the Long-Term Stewardship Draft Technical Baseline; A Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship, Volumes I and II; Infrastructure Long-Range Plan; Comprehensive Facility Land Use Plan; INEEL End-State Plan; and INEEL Institutional Plan.

  3. Measurement of the polarisation of W bosons produced with large transverse momentum in pp collisions at root s=7 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aad G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; et al.

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes an analysis of the angular distribution of W {yields} e{nu} and W {yields} {mu}{nu} decays, using data from pp collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in 2010, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 35 pb{sup -1}. Using the decay lepton transverse momentum and the missing transverse momentum, the W decay angular distribution projected onto the transverse plane is obtained and analysed in terms of helicity fractions f{sub 0}, f{sub L} and f{sub R} over two ranges of W transverse momentum (p{sub T}{sup W}): 35 < p{sub T}{sup W} < 50 GeV and p{sub T}{sup W} > 50 GeV. Good agreement is found with theoretical predictions. For p{sub T}{sup W} > 50 GeV, the values of f{sub 0} and f{sub L}-f{sub R}, averaged over charge and lepton flavour, are measured to be: f{sub 0} = 0.127 {+-} 0.030 {+-} 0.108 and f{sub L} - f{sub R} = 0.252 {+-} 0.017 {+-} 0.030, where the first uncertainties are statistical, and the second include all systematic effects.

  4. BPD Privacy Terms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Privacy Terms BPD Privacy Terms The Building Performance Database Privacy Terms. This document must be reviewed and accepted when submitting data for use in the BPD. BPD Privacy Terms.pdf (143.9 KB) More Documents & Publications Buildings Performance Database Overview BPD Security Buildings Performance Database - 2013

  5. Long-term, mid-term, and short-term fuel scheduling

    SciTech Connect

    Seymore, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    Since 1973, electrical utilities have gained a sharply increased awareness of the impact of fuel prices and fuel availabilities on their operations and performance. The remarkable increase in oil and gas prices, the ever-present threat of an oil embargo, and the coal strike of 1978 all highlight the instability of the current fuel supply situation. Moreover, one sees little hope of an appreciable near-term or long-term improvement. This study was undertaken to determine practical approaches by which utilities might incorporate the economics of the fuels market into their operational planning, scheduling and dispatching processes. The objective of Phase 1 was not to develop digital computer programs, but rather to determine the mathematical approaches that seem most promising. The computer program development will be done in later phases of the project. A substantial literature search and industry survey were performed. Fuel contract management was found to be of key importance, and the inherent uncertainty in the basic data (heat rate curves, fuel costs, etc.) suggested the use of simplified formulations and solution techniques. The yearly fuel planning problem and the weekly fuel scheduling problems are cast as linear network flow optimization problems, for which very efficient digital computer programs are available.

  6. THE INFRARED PROPERTIES OF SOURCES MATCHED IN THE WISE ALL-SKY AND HERSCHEL ATLAS SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Nicholas A.; Benford, Dominic J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Amblard, Alexandre; Blain, Andrew W.; Dunne, Loretta; Maddox, Steve J.; Hoyos, Carlos; Bourne, Nathan; Smith, Daniel J. B.; Bonfield, David; Baes, Maarten; Bridge, Carrie; Buttiglione, Sara; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Cava, Antonio; Clements, David; Cooray, Asantha; Dariush, Ali; and others

    2012-05-01

    We describe the infrared properties of sources detected over {approx}36 deg{sup 2} of sky in the GAMA 15 hr equatorial field, using data from both the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large-Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and Wide-field Infrared Survey (WISE). With 5{sigma} point-source depths of 34 and 0.048 mJy at 250 {mu}m and 3.4 {mu}m, respectively, we are able to identify 50.6% of the H-ATLAS sources in the WISE survey, corresponding to a surface density of {approx}630 deg{sup -2}. Approximately two-thirds of these sources have measured spectroscopic or optical/near-IR photometric redshifts of z < 1. For sources with spectroscopic redshifts at z < 0.3, we find a linear correlation between the infrared luminosity at 3.4 {mu}m and that at 250 {mu}m, with {+-}50% scatter over {approx}1.5 orders of magnitude in luminosity, {approx}10{sup 9}-10{sup 10.5} L{sub Sun }. By contrast, the matched sources without previously measured redshifts (r {approx}> 20.5) have 250-350 {mu}m flux density ratios which suggest either high-redshift galaxies (z {approx}> 1.5) or optically faint low-redshift galaxies with unusually low temperatures (T {approx}< 20). Their small 3.4-250 {mu}m flux ratios favor a high-redshift galaxy population, as only the most actively star-forming galaxies at low redshift (e.g., Arp 220) exhibit comparable flux density ratios. Furthermore, we find a relatively large active galactic nucleus fraction ({approx}30%) in a 12 {mu}m flux-limited subsample of H-ATLAS sources, also consistent with there being a significant population of high-redshift sources in the no-redshift sample.

  7. Evaluation of Automatic Atlas-Based Lymph Node Segmentation for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleford, Liza J.; Lawson, Joshua D.; Perkins, Charles; Edelman, Scott; Davis, Lawrence

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate if automatic atlas-based lymph node segmentation (LNS) improves efficiency and decreases inter-observer variability while maintaining accuracy. Methods and Materials: Five physicians with head-and-neck IMRT experience used computed tomography (CT) data from 5 patients to create bilateral neck clinical target volumes covering specified nodal levels. A second contour set was automatically generated using a commercially available atlas. Physicians modified the automatic contours to make them acceptable for treatment planning. To assess contour variability, the Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE) algorithm was used to take collections of contours and calculate a probabilistic estimate of the 'true' segmentation. Differences between the manual, automatic, and automatic-modified (AM) contours were analyzed using multiple metrics. Results: Compared with the 'true' segmentation created from manual contours, the automatic contours had a high degree of accuracy, with sensitivity, Dice similarity coefficient, and mean/max surface disagreement values comparable to the average manual contour (86%, 76%, 3.3/17.4 mm automatic vs. 73%, 79%, 2.8/17 mm manual). The AM group was more consistent than the manual group for multiple metrics, most notably reducing the range of contour volume (106-430 mL manual vs. 176-347 mL AM) and percent false positivity (1-37% manual vs. 1-7% AM). Average contouring time savings with the automatic segmentation was 11.5 min per patient, a 35% reduction. Conclusions: Using the STAPLE algorithm to generate 'true' contours from multiple physician contours, we demonstrated that, in comparison with manual segmentation, atlas-based automatic LNS for head-and-neck cancer is accurate, efficient, and reduces interobserver variability.

  8. Dark Matter Benchmark Models for Early LHC Run-2 Searches. Report of the ATLAS/CMS Dark Matter Forum

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Daniel

    2015-07-06

    One of the guiding principles of this report is to channel the efforts of the ATLAS and CMS collaborations towards a minimal basis of dark matter models that should influence the design of the early Run-2 searches. At the same time, a thorough survey of realistic collider signals of Dark Matter is a crucial input to the overall design of the search program.

  9. SPACE code simulation of cold leg small break LOCA in the ATLAS integral test

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B. J.; Kim, H. T.; Kim, J.; Kim, K. D.

    2012-07-01

    SPACE code is a system analysis code for pressurized water reactors. This code uses a two-fluid and three-field model. For a few years, intensive validations have been performed to secure the prediction accuracy of models and correlations for two-phase flow and heat transfer. Recently, the code version 1.0 was released. This study is to see how well SPACE code predicts thermal hydraulic phenomena of an integral effect test. The target experiment is a cold leg small break LOCA in the ATLAS facility, which has the same two-loop features as APR1400. Predicted parameters were compared with experimental observations. (authors)

  10. Saturn's inner satellites: Orbits, masses, and the chaotic motion of atlas from new Cassini imaging observations

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N. J.; Murray, C. D.; Renner, S.; Evans, M. W.

    2015-01-01

    We present numerically derived orbits and mass estimates for the inner Saturnian satellites, Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, and Epimetheus from a fit to 2580 new Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem astrometric observations spanning 2004 February to 2013 August. The observations are provided as machine-readable and Virtual Observatory tables. We estimate GM{sub Atlas} = (0.384 0.001) 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, a value 13% smaller than the previously published estimate but with an order of magnitude reduction in the uncertainty. We also find GM{sub Prometheus} = (10.677 0.006) 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, GM{sub Pandora} = (9.133 0.009) 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, GM{sub Janus} = (126.51 0.03) 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, and GM{sub Epimetheus} = (35.110 0.009) 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, consistent with previously published values, but also with significant reductions in uncertainties. We show that Atlas is currently librating in both the 54:53 co-rotation-eccentricity resonance (CER) and the 54:53 inner Lindblad (ILR) resonance with Prometheus, making it the latest example of a coupled CER-ILR system, in common with the Saturnian satellites Anthe, Aegaeon, and Methone, and possibly Neptune's ring arcs. We further demonstrate that Atlas's orbit is chaotic, with a Lyapunov time of ?10 years, and show that its chaotic behavior is a direct consequence of the coupled resonant interaction with Prometheus, rather than being an indirect effect of the known chaotic interaction between Prometheus and Pandora. We provide an updated analysis of the second-order resonant perturbations involving Prometheus, Pandora, and Epimetheus based on the new observations, showing that these resonant arguments are librating only when Epimetheus is the innermost of the co-orbital pair, Janus and Epimetheus. We also find evidence that the known chaotic changes in the orbits of Prometheus and Pandora are not confined to times of apse anti-alignment.

  11. Priority I and II Experiments Approved at the June 26-27, 2009 ATLAS PAC

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Meeting 6-27, 2009 ATLAS PAC Meeting Proposal # PI Name Title Days 1032-5 S. Marley Study of Excited States in 13O II (8) 1062-2 J. Snyder DSAM Lifetimes and RIV g-factor measurements for fission fragments using GAMMASPHERE and HERCULES 14 1205x-2 M. Paul (gamma,n) production of p-process nuclide 146Sm 5 1207-2 R. Segel Electroweak interaction tests using trapped 8Li ions 10 1253-2 P. Chowdhury Collective oblate rotation at high spins in neutron-rich 184,186W 6 1260-2 J. F. Smith Non-yrast

  12. Priority I and II Experiments Approved at the June 27-28, 2008 ATLAS PAC

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Meeting 7-28, 2008 ATLAS PAC Meeting Proposal # PI Name Title Days 1183-2 A. A. Hecht Towards 100Sn: measuring the masses of the light tin isotopes 4 1206-2 B. S. N. Singh Quantifying oblate collectivity in the N = Z nucleus 68Se 4 1219-2 A. Lopez-Martens Superdeformed ridge properties in 192Hg: probing the new phenomena of ergodic bands and motional narrowing 7 1228X W. Loveland The Synthesis of Superheavy Nuclei Using Damped Collisions--A Test 1 1230 X. Wang Lifetimes of the TSD candidate

  13. Priority I and II Experiments Approved at the November 2-3, 2007 ATLAS PAC

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Meeting November 2-3, 2007 ATLAS PAC Meeting Proposal # PI Name Title Days 993-3 C. Wu Rotational alignment of j15/2 neutron orbitals in the Np isotopes (5) 1046-2 R. Weinstein Continuing Optimization of Pinning Centers: Entanglement and Area Density 2 1113-4 D. Hartley Competition Between the Wobbling Mode and Particle-Hole Excitations: Search for TSD Bands in 167Ta 5 1159-3 D. Seweryniak Core excitations and single-neutron states in 101Sn 10 1163-2 T. Ahn Evolution of the one-phonon

  14. HERSCHEL-ATLAS: TOWARD A SAMPLE OF {approx}1000 STRONGLY LENSED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Lapi, A.; Bressan, S.; Danese, L.; De Zotti, G.; Cai, Z.-Y.; Fan, L.; Fleuren, S.; Sutherland, W.; Negrello, M.; Baes, M.; Baker, A. J.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Frayer, D. T.; Harris, A. I.; and others

    2012-04-10

    While the selection of strongly lensed galaxies (SLGs) with 500 {mu}m flux density S{sub 500} > 100 mJy has proven to be rather straightforward, for many applications it is important to analyze samples larger than the ones obtained when confining ourselves to such a bright limit. Moreover, only by probing to fainter flux densities is it possible to exploit strong lensing to investigate the bulk of the high-z star-forming galaxy population. We describe HALOS (the Herschel-ATLAS Lensed Objects Selection), a method for efficiently selecting fainter candidate SLGs, reaching a surface density of {approx_equal} 1.5-2 deg{sup -2}, i.e., a factor of about 4-6 higher than that at the 100 mJy flux limit. HALOS will allow the selection of up to {approx}1000 candidate SLGs (with amplifications {mu} {approx}> 2) over the full H-ATLAS survey area. Applying HALOS to the H-ATLAS Science Demonstration Phase field ({approx_equal} 14.4 deg{sup 2}) we find 31 candidate SLGs, whose candidate lenses are identified in the VIKING near-infrared catalog. Using the available information on candidate sources and candidate lenses we tentatively estimate a {approx_equal} 72% purity of the sample. As expected, the purity decreases with decreasing flux density of the sources and with increasing angular separation between candidate sources and lenses. The redshift distribution of the candidate lensed sources is close to that reported for most previous surveys for lensed galaxies, while that of candidate lenses extends to redshifts substantially higher than found in the other surveys. The counts of candidate SLGs are also in good agreement with model predictions. Even though a key ingredient of the method is the deep near-infrared VIKING photometry, we show that H-ATLAS data alone allow the selection of a similarly deep sample of candidate SLGs with an efficiency close to 50%; a slightly lower surface density ({approx_equal} 1.45 deg{sup -2}) can be reached with a {approx}70% efficiency.

  15. Experiments Approved at the May 20-21, 2005 ATLAS PAC Meeting

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Priority I Experiments Approved at the May 20-21, 2005 ATLAS PAC Meeting Proposal # PI Name Title Days 1036-2 S. Williams High Spin States in the T = 3/2 Mirror Nuclei 37Ca and 37Cl, and the T = 1/2 Mirror Nuclei 37K and 37Ar 4 1050-2 M.A.Bentley High Spin States in the N=Z-3 Nucleus 49Fe - Coulomb Effects at Large Proton Excess 6 1078-2 N. Scielzo Production of 14O for Future Measurements with the Advanced Penning Trap and Precision Measurement of the Q-Value of the Superallowed Branch 7 1085

  16. Diffraction and forward physics results of the ATLAS experiment from the Run I

    SciTech Connect

    Taevsk, Marek

    2015-04-10

    Various aspects of forward physics have been studied by the ATLAS collaboration using data from Run I at the LHC. In this text, main results of four published analyses are summarized, all based on data from proton-proton collisions at ?(s)=7 TeV collected in 2010 or 2011. Two analyses deal with the diffractive signature, one based on single-sided events, the other on large rapidity gaps in soft events. In addition, a recent measurement of the total pp cross section using the ALFA subdetector and a recent study of higher-order QCD effects using a jet veto are discussed.

  17. Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Pilot Study of Site-Specific Consensus Atlas Implementation for Rectal Cancer Target Volume Delineation in the Cooperative Group Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Clifton D.; Nijkamp, Jasper; Duppen, Joop C.; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Thomas, Charles R.; Wang, Samuel J.; Okunieff, Paul; Jones, William E.; Baseman, Daniel; Patel, Shilpen; Demandante, Carlo G.N.; Harris, Anna M.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Katz, Alan W.; McGann, Camille

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Variations in target volume delineation represent a significant hurdle in clinical trials involving conformal radiotherapy. We sought to determine the effect of a consensus guideline-based visual atlas on contouring the target volumes. Methods and Materials: A representative case was contoured (Scan 1) by 14 physician observers and a reference expert with and without target volume delineation instructions derived from a proposed rectal cancer clinical trial involving conformal radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV), and two clinical target volumes (CTVA, including the internal iliac, presacral, and perirectal nodes, and CTVB, which included the external iliac nodes) were contoured. The observers were randomly assigned to receipt (Group A) or nonreceipt (Group B) of a consensus guideline and atlas for anorectal cancers and then instructed to recontour the same case/images (Scan 2). Observer variation was analyzed volumetrically using the conformation number (CN, where CN = 1 equals total agreement). Results: Of 14 evaluable contour sets (1 expert and 7 Group A and 6 Group B observers), greater agreement was found for the GTV (mean CN, 0.75) than for the CTVs (mean CN, 0.46-0.65). Atlas exposure for Group A led to significantly increased interobserver agreement for CTVA (mean initial CN, 0.68, after atlas use, 0.76; p = .03) and increased agreement with the expert reference (initial mean CN, 0.58; after atlas use, 0.69; p = .02). For the GTV and CTVB, neither the interobserver nor the expert agreement was altered after atlas exposure. Conclusion: Consensus guideline atlas implementation resulted in a detectable difference in interobserver agreement and a greater approximation of expert volumes for the CTVA but not for the GTV or CTVB in the specified case. Visual atlas inclusion should be considered as a feature in future clinical trials incorporating conformal RT.

  18. Long-term corrosion testing pan.

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-08-01

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing needs. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to meet all future testing needs, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2007-7027 to address DOE comments and add a series of tests to address NWTRB recommendations.

  19. Long-term corrosion testing plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R.

    2009-02-01

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing program. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to accommodate all future testing, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2008-4922 to address DOE comments.

  20. September 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... bbld in 2012. Forecast lower-48 crude ... caused a short-term increase in the price of gasoline and diesel fuel in the eastern ... either to fulfill long-term contract ...

  1. Long-term Contract Information and Registrations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE/FE orders granting long-term authorization to export liquefied natural gas by vessel require authorization holders to file long-term contract information with DOE/FE for LNG exports and long...

  2. Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 1 January 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2015. After falling to the...

  3. Short Term Energy Outlook, December 2002

    Annual Energy Outlook

    December 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: ... Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, December 2002. 0 10 20 30 ...

  4. Short Term Energy Outlook, January 2003

    Annual Energy Outlook

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The oil market is ... underground storage levels at a much Energy Information AdministrationShort-Term ...

  5. Short Term Energy Outlook, March 2003

    Annual Energy Outlook

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. February crude oil ... Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, March 2003. 0 10 20 30 40 ...

  6. Short Term Energy Outlook, February 2003

    Annual Energy Outlook

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. World oil markets ... Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2003. 0 10 20 30 ...

  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2014

    Annual Energy Outlook

    4 1 February 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights Temperatures east of the ... U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2014 2 Global ...

  8. Short Term Energy Outlook ,November 2002

    Annual Energy Outlook

    November 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook November 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: During ... Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, November 2002. 0 10 20 30 ...

  9. Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2014

    Annual Energy Outlook

    This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts ... U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2014 2 Global ...

  10. Short-Term Energy Outlook- May 2003

    Annual Energy Outlook

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The April 24 meeting of ... Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, May 2003. Energy ...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Long-term Stewardship

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-term Stewardship Environmental Management System Pollution Prevention Information Repository Index Long-term Stewardship About Long-term Stewardship Groundwater sampling The goal of the LTS Program is the long-term protection of human health and the environment from hazards associated with residual contamination at former Environmental Restoration Project (ER) sites, and minimization of Sandia's environmental liability by ensuring environmental compliance with the requirements provided in

  12. Long-Term Engineered Cap Performance

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary Notes from 22 July 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Long-Term Engineered Cap Performance

  13. Study of (W/Z)H production and Higgs boson couplings using H→ W W * decays with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-27

    A search for Higgs boson production in association with a W or Z boson, in the H→ W W * decay channel, is performed with a data sample collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies \\( \\sqrt{s}=7 \\) TeV and 8 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb-1 and 20.3 fb-1, respectively. The WH production mode is studied in two-lepton and three-lepton final states, while two- lepton and four-lepton final states are used to search for the ZH production mode. The observed significance, for the combined W H and ZH production, is 2.5 standard deviations while a significance of 0.9 standard deviations is expected in the Standard Model Higgs boson hypothesis. The ratio of the combined W H and ZH signal yield to the Standard Model expectation, μV H , is found to be μ V H = 3.0-1.1+1.3 (stat.)-0.7 +1.0 (sys.) for the Higgs boson mass of 125.36 GeV. The W H and ZH production modes are also combined with the gluon fusion and vector boson fusion production modes studied in the H → W W * → ℓνℓν decay channel, resulting in an overall observed significance of 6.5 standard deviations and μggF + VBF + VH = 1.16-0.15+0.16 (stat.) -0.15+0.18 (sys.). The results are interpreted in terms of scaling factors of the Higgs boson couplings to vector bosons (κV ) and fermions (κF ); the combined results are: |κ V | = 1.06-0.10+0.10, |κ F| = 0.85-0.20+0.26.

  14. Descriptive Morphology Terms For MAMA software

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy E.; Porter, Reid B.

    2014-05-21

    The table on the following pages lists a set of morphology terms for describing materials. We have organized these terms by categories. Software uses are welcome to suggest other terms that are needed to accurately describe materials. This list is intended as a initial starting point to generating a consensus terminology list.

  15. Progress with the Single-Sided Module Prototypes for the ATLAS Tracket Upgrade Stave

    SciTech Connect

    Allport, P.P.; Li, Z.; Affolder, A.A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Bates, R. et al.

    2010-06-04

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for the planned luminosity upgrade of the LHC (the super-luminous LHC or sLHC) with a programme of development for tracking able to withstand an order of greater magnitude radiation fluence and much greater hit occupancy rates than the current detector. This has led to the concept of an all-silicon tracker with an enhanced performance pixel-based inner region and short-strips for much of the higher radii. Both sub-systems employ many common technologies, including the proposed 'stave' concept for integrated cooling and support. For the short-strip region, use of this integrated stave concept requires single-sided modules mounted on either side of a thin central lightweight support. Each sensor is divided into four rows of 23.82 mm length strips; within each row, there are 1280 strips of 74.5 {mu}m pitch. Well over a hundred prototype sensors are being delivered by Hamamatsu Photonics (HPK) to Japan, Europe and the US. We present results of the first 20 chip ABCN25 ASIC hybrids for these sensors, results of the first prototype 5120 strip module built with 40 ABCN25 read-out ASICs, and the status of the hybrids and modules being developed for the ATLAS tracker upgradestave programme.

  16. Search for New Physics with Top and Bottom Quarks with ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Khanov, Alexander

    2013-12-11

    The studies performed by the principal investigator during the period of the grant constitute the ground work for search for new physics in channels including top and bottom quarks with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The PI has been involved in search for heavy charged Higgs bosons decaying into top and bottom quark pairs, and top quark rare decays involving Higgs bosons and c-quarks. Both channels have the top quark pair production as their main background, which was studied in detail. The search for heavy charged Higgs and top quark rare decays requires signi cant amount of data accumulated by the experiment. In case no signal is observed in the present data sample collected by ATLAS (5 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at proton-anti proton center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 20 fb{sup -1} at 8 TeV), data from the upgraded detector running at 14 TeV needs to be analyzed. The PI has been working on physics and performance studies at upgraded detector.

  17. Carbon Sequestration Atlas and Interactive Maps from the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration

    DOE Data Explorer

    McPherson, Brian

    In November of 2002, DOE announced a global climate change initiative involving joint government-industry partnerships working together to find sensible, low cost solutions for reducing GHG emissions. As a result, seven regional partnerships were formed; the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) is one of those. These groups are utilizing their expertise to assess sequestration technologies to capture carbon emissions, identify and evaluate appropriate storage locations, and engage a variety of stakeholders in order to increase awareness of carbon sequestration. Stakeholders in this project are made up of private industry, NGOs, the general public, and government entities. There are a total of 44 current organizations represented in the partnership including electric utilities, oil and gas companies, state governments, universities, NGOs, and tribal nations. The SWP is coordinated by New Mexico Tech and encompasses New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Oklahoma, Utah, and portions of Kansas, Nevada, Texas, and Wyoming. Field test sites for the region are located in New Mexico (San Juan Basin), Utah (Paradox Basin), and Texas (Permian Basin).[Taken from the SWP C02 Sequestration Atlas] The SWP makes available at this website their CO2 Sequestration Atlas and an interactive data map.

  18. Dimensional deconstruction and Wess-Zumino-Witten terms (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dimensional deconstruction and Wess-Zumino-Witten terms Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ... the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to ...

  19. Agreement Type Union

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Type Union Local #/Name Number of Employees Project Labor Agreement International Association of Heat and Frost Insulators and Allied Workers 135 2 International Brothehood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmith Forgers and Helpers 92 0 International Union of Bricklayers & Allied Craftsmen 13 0 Regional Council of Carpenters 1780 & 1977 13 Operative Plasterers and Cement Mason International Association Operative Plasterers and Cement Mason International Association 1

  20. Energy.gov Page Types

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn about the standard page types available in the Energy.gov Drupal content management system. For information about other available page types, or to request a new kind of page type, contact...

  1. SU-E-I-71: Quality Assessment of Surrogate Metrics in Multi-Atlas-Based Image Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, T; Ruan, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: With the ever-growing data of heterogeneous quality, relevance assessment of atlases becomes increasingly critical for multi-atlas-based image segmentation. However, there is no universally recognized best relevance metric and even a standard to compare amongst candidates remains elusive. This study, for the first time, designs a quantification to assess relevance metrics’ quality, based on a novel perspective of the metric as surrogate for inferring the inaccessible oracle geometric agreement. Methods: We first develop an inference model to relate surrogate metrics in image space to the underlying oracle relevance metric in segmentation label space, with a monotonically non-decreasing function subject to random perturbations. Subsequently, we investigate model parameters to reveal key contributing factors to surrogates’ ability in prognosticating the oracle relevance value, for the specific task of atlas selection. Finally, we design an effective contract-to-noise ratio (eCNR) to quantify surrogates’ quality based on insights from these analyses and empirical observations. Results: The inference model was specialized to a linear function with normally distributed perturbations, with surrogate metric exemplified by several widely-used image similarity metrics, i.e., MSD/NCC/(N)MI. Surrogates’ behaviors in selecting the most relevant atlases were assessed under varying eCNR, showing that surrogates with high eCNR dominated those with low eCNR in retaining the most relevant atlases. In an end-to-end validation, NCC/(N)MI with eCNR of 0.12 compared to MSD with eCNR of 0.10 resulted in statistically better segmentation with mean DSC of about 0.85 and the first and third quartiles of (0.83, 0.89), compared to MSD with mean DSC of 0.84 and the first and third quartiles of (0.81, 0.89). Conclusion: The designed eCNR is capable of characterizing surrogate metrics’ quality in prognosticating the oracle relevance value. It has been demonstrated to be

  2. HTGR Mechanistic Source Terms White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Moe

    2010-07-01

    The primary purposes of this white paper are: (1) to describe the proposed approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms for HTGR design and licensing, (2) to describe the technology development programs required to validate the design methods used to predict these mechanistic source terms and (3) to obtain agreement from the NRC that, subject to appropriate validation through the technology development program, the approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms is acceptable

  3. Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms of Reference AgencyCompany...

  4. Construction Safety Engineer (Term Position) | Princeton Plasma...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Construction Safety Engineer (Term Position) Department: ESH&S Supervisor(s): Bill Slavin Requisition Number: 1500802 Position Summary: Associated with the IOI (Infrastructure &...

  5. Financing Programs: RFP & Contract Terms and Conditions

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on Feb. 15, 2011, features sample terms and conditions for state and local financial programs that implement requests for proposals and contracts.

  6. Long-Term Stewardship - Hanford Site

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Comprehensive Land-Use Plan - Environmental Impact Statement (HCP EIS), and 64 FR 61615, "Record ... DOE directives, and Hanford Site procedures. hidden Long-Term Stewardship ...

  7. Lighting Principles and Terms | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    by lumens, not watts. To choose the best energy-efficient lighting options for your home, you should understand basic lighting principles and terms. Light Quantity...

  8. Probing lepton flavour violation via neutrinoless $${\\tau \\longrightarrow 3\\mu }$$ τ → 3 μ decays with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-04-26

    This article presents the sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment to the lepton-flavour-violating decays of τ→3μ. A method utilising the production of τ leptons via W→τν decays is used. This method is applied to the sample of 20.3 fb-1 of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2012. No event is observed passing the selection criteria, and the observed (expected) upper limit on the τ lepton branching fraction into three muons, Br(τ→3μ), is 3.76×10-7 (3.94×10-7 ) at 90 % confidence level.

  9. Search for lepton-flavour-violating H → μτ decays of the Higgs boson with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-11-30

    A direct search for lepton-flavour-violating H → μτ decays of the recently discovered Higgs boson with the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented. The analysis is performed in the H → μτ had channel, where τ had is a hadronically decaying τ -lepton. The search is based on the data sample of proton-proton collisions collected by the ATLAS experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV. No statistically significant excess of data over the predicted background is observed. As a result, the observed (expected) 95% confidence-level upper limit onmore » the branching fraction, Br( H → μτ ), is 1.85% (1.24%).« less

  10. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar PV at the Atlas Industrial Park in Duluth, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, M.; Lisell, L.; Mosey, G.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 5, in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Atlas Industrial Park in Duluth, Minnesota, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The EPA provided funding to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to support a feasibility study of solar renewable energy generation at the Atlas Industrial Park. NREL provided technical assistance for this project but did not assess environmental conditions at the site beyond those related to the performance of a photovoltaic (PV) system. The purpose of this study is to assess the site for a possible PV installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV configurations. In addition, the study evaluates financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  11. Search for lepton-flavour-violating H → μτ decays of the Higgs boson with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. 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C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. 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    2015-11-30

    A direct search for lepton-flavour-violating H → μτ decays of the recently discovered Higgs boson with the ATLAS detector at the LHC is presented. The analysis is performed in the H → μτ had channel, where τ had is a hadronically decaying τ -lepton. The search is based on the data sample of proton-proton collisions collected by the ATLAS experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV. No statistically significant excess of data over the predicted background is observed. As a result, the observed (expected) 95% confidence-level upper limit on the branching fraction, Br( H → μτ ), is 1.85% (1.24%).

  12. MARS-KS code validation activity through the atlas domestic standard problem

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, K. Y.; Kim, Y. S.; Kang, K. H.; Park, H. S.; Cho, S.

    2012-07-01

    The 2 nd Domestic Standard Problem (DSP-02) exercise using the ATLAS integral effect test data was executed to transfer the integral effect test data to domestic nuclear industries and to contribute to improving the safety analysis methodology for PWRs. A small break loss of coolant accident of a 6-inch break at the cold leg was determined as a target scenario by considering its technical importance and by incorporating interests from participants. Ten calculation results using MARS-KS code were collected, major prediction results were described qualitatively and code prediction accuracy was assessed quantitatively using the FFTBM. In addition, special code assessment activities were carried out to find out the area where the model improvement is required in the MARS-KS code. The lessons from this DSP-02 and recommendations to code developers are described in this paper. (authors)

  13. Alignment of the Pixel and SCT Modules for the 2004 ATLAS Combined Test Beam

    SciTech Connect

    ATLAS Collaboration; Ahmad, A.; Andreazza, A.; Atkinson, T.; Baines, J.; Barr, A.J.; Beccherle, R.; Bell, P.J.; Bernabeu, J.; Broklova, Z.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Cauz, D.; Chevalier, L.; Chouridou, S.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Cobal, M.; Cornelissen, T.; Correard, S.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Cuneo, S.; Dameri, M.; Darbo, G.; de Vivie, J.B.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dobos, D.; Drasal, Z.; Drohan, J.; Einsweiler, K.; Elsing, M.; Emelyanov, D.; Escobar, C.; Facius, K.; Ferrari, P.; Fergusson, D.; Ferrere, D.; Flick,, T.; Froidevaux, D.; Gagliardi, G.; Gallas, M.; Gallop, B.J.; Gan, K.K.; Garcia, C.; Gavrilenko, I.L.; Gemme, C.; Gerlach, P.; Golling, T.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorfine, G.; Gottfert, T.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Hansen, P.H.; Hara, K.; Hartel, R.; Harvey, A.; Hawkings, R.J.; Heinemann, F.E.W.; Henss, T.; Hill, J.C.; Huegging, F.; Jansen, E.; Joseph, J.; Unel, M. Karagoz; Kataoka, M.; Kersten, S.; Khomich, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kostyukhin, V.; Lacasta, C.; Lari, T.; Latorre, S.; Lester, C.G.; Liebig, W.; Lipniacka, A.; Lourerio, K.F.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Mathes, M.; Meroni, C.; Mikulec, B.; Mindur, B.; Moed, S.; Moorhead, G.; Morettini, P.; Moyse, E.W.J.; Nakamura, K.; Nechaeva, P.; Nikolaev, K.; Parodi, F.; Parzhitskiy, S.; Pater, J.; Petti, R.; Phillips, P.W.; Pinto, B.; Poppleton, A.; Reeves, K.; Reisinger, I.; Reznicek, P.; Risso, P.; Robinson, D.; Roe, S.; Rozanov, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sandaker, H.; Santi, L.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schultes, J.; Sfyrla, A.; Shaw, C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, C.J.W.P.; Toczek, B.; Troncon, C.; Tyndel, M.; Vernocchi, F.; Virzi, J.; Anh, T. Vu; Warren, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Wellsf, P.S.; Zhelezkow, A.

    2008-06-02

    A small set of final prototypes of the ATLAS Inner Detector silicon tracking system(Pixel Detector and SemiConductor Tracker), were used to take data during the 2004 Combined Test Beam. Data were collected from runs with beams of different flavour (electrons, pions, muons and photons) with a momentum range of 2 to 180 GeV/c. Four independent methods were used to align the silicon modules. The corrections obtained were validated using the known momenta of the beam particles and were shown to yield consistent results among the different alignment approaches. From the residual distributions, it is concluded that the precision attained in the alignmentof the silicon modules is of the order of 5 mm in their most precise coordinate.

  14. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 8. The southern Rocky Mountain region

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, S.R.; Freeman, D.L.; Hadley, D.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-03-01

    The Southern Rocky Mountain atlas assimilates five collections of wind resource data: one for the region and one for each of the four states that compose the Southern Rocky Mountain region (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah). At the state level, features of the climate, topography and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than is provided in the regional discussion, and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations, over several time scales, in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  15. Reconstruction of hadronic decay products of tau leptons with the ATLAS experiment

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-05-25

    This document presents a new method of reconstructing the individual charged and neutral hadrons in tau decays with the ATLAS detector. The reconstructed hadrons are used to classify the decay mode and to calculate the visible four-momentum of reconstructed tau candidates, significantly improving the resolution with respect to the calibration in the existing tau reconstruction. The performance of the reconstruction algorithm is optimised and evaluated using simulation and validated using samples of Z → ττ and Z(→ μμ)+jets events selected from proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy √s = 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb-1.

  16. Comment on measuring the tt forward-backward asymmetry at ATLAS and CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Arguin, Jean-Francois; Ligeti, Zoltan; Freytsis, Marat

    2011-10-01

    We suggest a new possibility for ATLAS and CMS to explore the tt forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron, by attempting to reconstruct tt events, with one of the tops decaying semileptonically in the central region (|{eta}|<2.5) and the other decaying hadronically in the forward region (|{eta}|>2.5). For several models which give comparable Tevatron signals, we study the charge asymmetry at the LHC as a function of cuts on |{eta}| and on the tt invariant mass, m{sub tt}. We show that there is an interesting complementarity between cuts on |{eta}| and m{sub tt} to suppress the dominant and symmetric gg{yields}tt rate, and different combinations of cuts enhance the distinguishing power between models. This complementarity is likely to hold in other new physics scenarios as well, which affect the tt cross section, so it motivates extending tt reconstruction to higher |{eta}|.

  17. Wind Energy Resource Atlas. Volume 11. Hawaii and Pacific Islands Region

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, T.A.; Hori, A.M.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, and assessments of the wind resource in each division of the region. Background on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be inerpreted is presented. An introduction and outline to the descriptions of the wind resource for each division are provided. Assessments for individual divisions are presented as separate chapters. Much of the information in the division chapters is given in graphic or tabular form. The sequences for each chapter are similar, but some presentations used for Hawaii are inappropriate or impractical for presentation with the Pacific Islands. Hawaii chapter figure and tables are cited below and appropriate Pacific Islands figure and table numbers are included in brackets ().

  18. Study of (W/Z)H production and Higgs boson couplings using H→ W W * decays with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. 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G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saimpert, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Denis, R. D. St.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-08-01

    A search for Higgs boson production in association with a W or Z boson, in the H→ W W* decay channel, is performed with a data sample collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies √s=7 TeV and 8 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb-1 and 20.3 fb-1, respectively. The WH production mode is studied in two-lepton and three-lepton final states, while two- lepton and four-lepton final states are used to search for the ZH production mode. The observed significance, for the combined W H and ZH production, is 2.5 standard deviations while a significance of 0.9 standard deviations is expected in the Standard Model Higgs boson hypothesis. The ratio of the combined W H and ZH signal yield to the Standard Model expectation, μ V H , is found to be μ V H =3.0 -1.1 + 1.3 (stat.) -0.7 +1.0 (sys.) for the Higgs boson mass of 125.36 GeV. The W H and ZH production modes are also combined with the gluon fusion and vector boson fusion production modes studied in the H → W W * → ℓνℓν decay channel, resulting in an overall observed significance of 6.5 standard deviations and μ ggF+VBF+VH=1.16 -0.15 +0.16 (stat.) -0.15 +0.18 (sys.). The results are interpreted in terms of scaling factors of the Higgs boson couplings to vector bosons (κ V ) and fermions (κ F ); the combined results are: |κ V |=1.06 -0.10 +0.10 , |κ F |=0.85 -0.20 +0.26 .

  19. Measurement of the correlation between flow harmonics of different order in lead-lead collisions at s NN = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-14

    Correlations between the elliptic or triangular flow coefficients vm (m=2 or 3) and other flow harmonics vn (n=2 to 5) are measured using ?sNN=2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collision data collected in 2010 by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7 ?b-1. The vm-vn correlations are measured in midrapidity as a function of centrality, and, for events within the same centrality interval, as a function of event ellipticity or triangularity defined in a forward rapidity region. For events within the same centrality interval, v3 is found to be anticorrelated with v2 and this anticorrelation is consistentmorewith similar anticorrelations between the corresponding eccentricities, ?2 and ?3. However, it is observed that v4 increases strongly with v2, and v5 increases strongly with both v2 and v3. The trend and strength of the vm-vn correlations for n=4 and 5 are found to disagree with ?m-?n correlations predicted by initial-geometry models. Instead, these correlations are found to be consistent with the combined effects of a linear contribution to vn and a nonlinear term that is a function of v22 or of v2v3, as predicted by hydrodynamic models. A simple two-component fit is used to separate these two contributions. The extracted linear and nonlinear contributions to v4 and v5 are found to be consistent with previously measured event-plane correlations.less

  20. Long Term Innovative Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Long Term Innovative Technologies Long Term Innovative Technologies Presentation by Bryan Pivovar on DOE's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies, Fuel Cell Presolicitation Workshop - Lakewood, CO March 16, 2010 fuelcell_pre-solicitation_wkshop_mar10_pivovar.pdf (1.2 MB) More Documents & Publications Resonance-Stabilized Anion Exchange Polymer Electrolytes Advanced Cathode Catalysts 2016 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop

  1. Computation of term dominance in text documents

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Travis L.; Benz, Zachary O.; Verzi, Stephen J.

    2012-04-24

    An improved entropy-based term dominance metric useful for characterizing a corpus of text documents, and is useful for comparing the term dominance metrics of a first corpus of documents to a second corpus having a different number of documents.

  2. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 2, Big Hill Site, Texas.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-08-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 2 focuses on the Big Hill SPR site, located in southeastern Texas. Volumes 1, 3, and 4, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  3. A HIGH-RESOLUTION ATLAS OF URANIUM-NEON IN THE H BAND

    SciTech Connect

    Redman, Stephen L.; Terrien, Ryan; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Bender, Chad F. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Ycas, Gabriel G. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Osterman, Steven N. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Diddams, Scott A.; Quinlan, Franklyn [Time and Frequency Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Lawler, James E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Nave, Gillian [Atomic Physics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    We present a high-resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 50,000) atlas of a uranium-neon (U/Ne) hollow-cathode spectrum in the H band (1454-1638 nm) for the calibration of near-infrared spectrographs. We obtained this U/Ne spectrum simultaneously with a laser-frequency comb spectrum, which we used to provide a first-order calibration to the U/Ne spectrum. We then calibrated the U/Ne spectrum using the recently published uranium line list of Redman et al., which is derived from high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer measurements. These two independent calibrations allowed us to easily identify emission lines in the hollow-cathode lamp that do not correspond to known (classified) lines of either uranium or neon, and to compare the achievable precision of each source. Our frequency comb precision was limited by modal noise and detector effects, while the U/Ne precision was limited primarily by the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the observed emission lines and our ability to model blended lines. The standard deviation in the dispersion solution residuals from the S/N-limited U/Ne hollow-cathode lamp was 50% larger than the standard deviation of the dispersion solution residuals from the modal-noise-limited laser-frequency comb. We advocate the use of U/Ne lamps for precision calibration of near-infrared spectrographs, and this H-band atlas makes these lamps significantly easier to use for wavelength calibration.

  4. Tornado type wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Cheng-Ting

    1984-01-01

    A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

  5. Comparing the host galaxies of type Ia, type II, and type Ibc supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, X.; Liang, Y. C.; Chen, X. Y.; Zhong, G. H.; Deng, L. C.; Zhang, B.; Shi, W. B.; Zhou, L.; Dennefeld, M.; Hammer, F.; Flores, H. E-mail: ycliang@bao.ac.cn

    2014-08-10

    We compare the host galaxies of 902 supernovae (SNe), including SNe Ia, SNe II, and SNe Ibc, which are selected by cross-matching the Asiago Supernova Catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. We selected an additional 213 galaxies by requiring the light fraction of spectral observations to be >15%, which could represent well the global properties of the galaxies. Among these 213 galaxies, 135 appear on the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagram, which allows us to compare the hosts in terms of whether they are star-forming (SF) galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs; including composites, LINERs, and Seyfert 2s) or absorption-line galaxies (Absorps; i.e., their related emission lines are weak or non-existent). The diagrams related to the parameters D{sub n}(4000), H?{sub A}, stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and specific SFRs for the SNe hosts show that almost all SNe II and most of the SNe Ibc occur in SF galaxies, which have a wide range of stellar masses and low D{sub n}(4000). The SNe Ia hosts as SF galaxies following similar trends. A significant fraction of SNe Ia occurs in AGNs and absorption-line galaxies, which are massive and have high D{sub n}(4000). The stellar population analysis from spectral synthesis fitting shows that the hosts of SNe II have a younger stellar population than hosts of SNe Ia. These results are compared with those of the 689 comparison galaxies where the SDSS fiber captures less than 15% of the total light. These comparison galaxies appear biased toward higher 12+log(O/H) (?0.1 dex) at a given stellar mass. Therefore, we believe the aperture effect should be kept in mind when the properties of the hosts for different types of SNe are discussed.

  6. Impact of Biodiesel on the Near-term Performance and Long-term...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Impact of Biodiesel on the Near-term Performance and Long-term Durability of Advanced Aftertreatment Systems Compare SCR catalyst performance with ULSD and Soy B20 through engine ...

  7. Search for vectorlike B quarks in events with one isolated lepton, missing transverse momentum, and jets at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-06-19

    A search has been performed for pair production of heavy vectorlike down-type (B) quarks. The analysis explores the lepton-plus-jets final state, characterized by events with one isolated charged lepton (electron or muon), significant missing transverse momentum, and multiple jets. One or more jets are required to be tagged as arising from b quarks, and at least one pair of jets must be tagged as arising from the hadronic decay of an electroweak boson. The analysis uses the full data sample of pp collisions recorded in 2012 by the ATLAS detector at the LHC, operating at a center-of-mass energy of 8more » TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb⁻¹. No significant excess of events is observed above the expected background. Limits are set on vectorlike B production, as a function of the B branching ratios, assuming the allowable decay modes are B → Wt/Zb/Hb. In the chiral limit with a branching ratio of 100% for the decay B → Wt, the observed (expected) 95% C.L. lower limit on the vectorlike B mass is 810 GeV (760 GeV). In the case where the vectorlike B quark has branching ratio values corresponding to those of an SU(2) singlet state, the observed (expected) 95% C.L. lower limit on the vectorlike B mass is 640 GeV (505 GeV). The same analysis, when used to investigate pair production of a colored, charge 5/3 exotic fermion T5/3, with subsequent decay T5/3 → Wt, sets an observed (expected) 95% C.L. lower limit on the T5/3 mass of 840 GeV (780 GeV).« less

  8. Impact of Biodiesel on the Near-term Performance and Long-term Durability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Advanced Aftertreatment Systems | Department of Energy on the Near-term Performance and Long-term Durability of Advanced Aftertreatment Systems Impact of Biodiesel on the Near-term Performance and Long-term Durability of Advanced Aftertreatment Systems Compare SCR catalyst performance with ULSD and Soy B20 through engine testing deer09_williams.pdf (1.02 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Biofuel Impacts on Aftertreatment Devices

  9. Impacts of supersymmetric higher derivative terms on inflation models in supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Shuntaro; Yamada, Yusuke

    2015-07-14

    We show the effects of supersymmetric higher derivative terms on inflation models in supergravity. The results show that such terms generically modify the effective kinetic coefficient of the inflaton during inflation if the cut off scale of the higher derivative operators is sufficiently small. In such a case, the η-problem in supergravity does not occur, and we find that the effective potential of the inflaton generically becomes a power type potential with a power smaller than two.

  10. Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated...

    Energy Saver

    Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites Long-Term ...

  11. Recommendation 188: Long-Term Stewardship Implementation | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    88: Long-Term Stewardship Implementation Recommendation 188: Long-Term Stewardship Implementation ORSSAB offers Recommendations and Comments on the Long-Term Stewardship ...

  12. Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2016

    Annual Energy Outlook

    The pace of inventory builds is expected to slow to an average of 1.4 million bd in 2016 and to 0.4 million bd in 2017. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy ...

  13. Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2014

    Annual Energy Outlook

    will average 4.44MMBtu in 2014 and 4.11MMBtu in 2015. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2014 2 Global Petroleum and Other Liquids EIA ...

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2016

    Annual Energy Outlook

    in 2017, compared with an average of 2.63MMBtu in 2015. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2016 2 Global Petroleum and Other Liquid Fuels ...

  15. Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2016

    Annual Energy Outlook

    other renewables increases from 8% in 2016 to 9% in 2017. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2016 2 Global Petroleum and Other Liquid Fuels ...

  16. Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2014

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... EIA expects the WTI discount to average 10bbl in 2014 and 11bbl in 2015. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2014 2 Cold weather also ...

  17. Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2013

    Annual Energy Outlook

    1 July 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average 102 per ...

  18. Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2014

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... than in last month's STEO, and 4.33MMBtu in 2015. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2014 2 Global Petroleum and Other Liquids EIA ...

  19. Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2013

    Annual Energy Outlook

    1 June 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights * After increasing to 119 per ... in 2013 and to 3.37 per gallon in 2014. Energy price forecasts are highly uncertain, and ...

  20. Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2014

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... Projected natural gas working U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2014 2 inventories reach 3.48 Tcf at the end of October, 0.34 Tcf below ...

  1. Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2016

    Annual Energy Outlook

    67b (at the 95% confidence interval) in October 2016. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2016 2 Global Petroleum and Other Liquid Fuels EIA ...

  2. Appendix SOTERM: Actinide Chemistry Source Term

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    SOTERM-2014 Actinide Chemistry Source Term United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico Compliance Recertification Application 2014 Appendix SOTERM-2014 Actinide Chemistry Source Term Table of Contents SOTERM-1.0 Introduction SOTERM-2.0 Expected WIPP Repository Conditions, Chemistry, and Processes SOTERM-2.1 Ambient Geochemical Conditions SOTERM-2.2 Repository Conditions SOTERM-2.2.1 Repository Pressure SOTERM-2.2.2 Repository

  3. Window Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Window Types Window Types A wood-frame window with insulated window glazing. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/chandlerphoto A wood-frame window with insulated window glazing. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/chandlerphoto Windows come in a number of different frame and glazing types. By combining an energy-efficient frame choice with a glazing type tailored to your climate and application, you can customize each of your home's windows. Types of Window Frames Improving the thermal resistance

  4. Measurement of the cross-section of high transverse momentum vector bosons reconstructed as single jets and studies of jet substructure in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.

    2014-11-04

    This article presents a measurement of the cross-section for high transverse momentum W and Z bosons produced in pp collisions and decaying to all-hadronic final states. The data used in the analysis were recorded by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy ofmore » $$\\sqrt{s}=7\\;{\\rm Te}{\\rm V}$$ and correspond to an integrated luminosity of $$4.6\\;{\\rm f}{{{\\rm b}}^{-1}}$$. The measurement is performed by reconstructing the boosted W or Z bosons in single jets. The reconstructed jet mass is used to identify the W and Z bosons, and a jet substructure method based on energy cluster information in the jet centre-of-mass frame is used to suppress the large multi-jet background. The cross-section for events with a hadronically decaying W or Z boson, with transverse momentum $${{p}_{{\\rm T}}}\\gt 320\\;{\\rm Ge}{\\rm V}$$ and pseudorapidity $$|\\eta |\\lt 1.9$$, is measured to be $${{\\sigma }_{W+Z}}=8.5\\pm 1.7$$ pb and is compared to next-to-leading-order calculations. The selected events are further used to study jet grooming techniques.« less

  5. Search for New Phenomena in tt¯ Events with Large Missing Transverse Momentum in Proton-Proton Collisions at √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2012-01-26

    A search for new phenomena in tt¯ events with large missing transverse momentum in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented. The measurement is based on 1.04  fb⁻¹ of data collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Contributions to this final state may arise from a number of standard model extensions. The results are interpreted in terms of a model where new top-quark partners are pair produced and each decay to an on-shell top (or antitop) quark and a long-lived undetected neutral particle. The data are found to be consistent with standard model expectations. A limitmore » at 95% confidence level is set excluding a cross section times branching ratio of 1.1 pb for a top-partner mass of 420 GeV and a neutral particle mass less than 10 GeV. In a model of exotic fourth generation quarks, top-partner masses are excluded up to 420 GeV and neutral particle masses up to 140 GeV.« less

  6. Measurement of the cross-section of high transverse momentum vector bosons reconstructed as single jets and studies of jet substructure in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2014-11-04

    This article presents a measurement of the cross-section for high transverse momentum W and Z bosons produced in pp collisions and decaying to all-hadronic final states. The data used in the analysis were recorded by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7\\;{\\rm Te}{\\rm V}$ and correspond to an integrated luminosity of $4.6\\;{\\rm f}{{{\\rm b}}^{-1}}$. The measurement is performed by reconstructing the boosted W or Z bosons in single jets. The reconstructed jet mass is used to identify the W and Z bosons, and a jet substructure method based on energy cluster information in the jet centre-of-mass frame is used to suppress the large multi-jet background. The cross-section for events with a hadronically decaying W or Z boson, with transverse momentum ${{p}_{{\\rm T}}}\\gt 320\\;{\\rm Ge}{\\rm V}$ and pseudorapidity $|\\eta |\\lt 1.9$, is measured to be ${{\\sigma }_{W+Z}}=8.5\\pm 1.7$ pb and is compared to next-to-leading-order calculations. The selected events are further used to study jet grooming techniques.

  7. F-term inflation Q-balls

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, John

    2006-02-15

    A general analysis of Q-ball solutions of the supersymmetric F-term hybrid inflation field equations is given. The solutions consist of a complex inflaton field and a real symmetry-breaking field, with a conserved global charge associated with the inflaton. It is shown that the Q-ball solutions for any value of the superpotential coupling, {kappa}, may be obtained from those with {kappa}=1 by rescaling the space coordinates. The complete range of Q-ball solutions for the case {kappa}=1 is given, from which all possible F-term inflation Q-balls can be obtained. The possible role of F-term inflation Q-balls in cosmology is discussed.

  8. Semantic Features for Classifying Referring Search Terms

    SciTech Connect

    May, Chandler J.; Henry, Michael J.; McGrath, Liam R.; Bell, Eric B.; Marshall, Eric J.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2012-05-11

    When an internet user clicks on a result in a search engine, a request is submitted to the destination web server that includes a referrer field containing the search terms given by the user. Using this information, website owners can analyze the search terms leading to their websites to better understand their visitors needs. This work explores some of the features that can be used for classification-based analysis of such referring search terms. We present initial results for the example task of classifying HTTP requests countries of origin. A system that can accurately predict the country of origin from query text may be a valuable complement to IP lookup methods which are susceptible to the obfuscation of dereferrers or proxies. We suggest that the addition of semantic features improves classifier performance in this example application. We begin by looking at related work and presenting our approach. After describing initial experiments and results, we discuss paths forward for this work.

  9. Window Types | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    its U-factor. There are advantages and disadvantages to all types of frame materials, but vinyl, wood, fiberglass, and some composite frame materials provide greater...

  10. DoE Early Career Research Program: Final Report: Model-Independent Dark-Matter Searches at the ATLAS Experiment and Applications of Many-core Computing to High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Farbin, Amir

    2015-07-15

    This is the final report of for DoE Early Career Research Program Grant Titled "Model-Independent Dark-Matter Searches at the ATLAS Experiment and Applications of Many-core Computing to High Energy Physics".

  11. Archived Reference Building Type: Warehouse

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  12. Archived Reference Building Type: Supermarket

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  13. Archived Reference Building Type: Hospital

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  14. Archived Reference Building Type: Hospital

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  15. Archived Reference Building Type: Warehouse

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  16. Search for contact interactions in dimuon events from pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2011-07-01

    A search for contact interactions has been performed using dimuon events recorded with the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at ?s=7 TeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 42 pb?. No significant deviation from the standard model is observed in the dimuon mass spectrum, allowing the following 95% C.L. limits to be set on the energy scale of contact interactions: ?>4.9 TeV (4.5 TeV) for constructive (destructive) interference in the left-left isoscalar compositeness model. These limits are the most stringent to date for ??qq contact interactions.

  17. Terms and Conditions for Site Transition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Terms and Conditions for Site Transition Terms and Conditions for Site Transition Terms and Conditions for Site Transition Terms and Conditions for Site Transition (207.92 KB) More Documents & Publications Development of Site Transition Plan, Use of the Site Transition Framework, and Terms and Conditions for Site Transition Terms and Conditions for EM Clean Up to the Office of Science Site Transition Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance

  18. Development of COTS ADC SEE Test System for the ATLAS LArCalorimeter Upgrade

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Hu, Xue -Ye; Chen, Hu -Cheng; Chen, Kai; Mead, Joseph; Liu, Shu -Bin; An, Qi

    2014-12-01

    Radiation-tolerant, high speed, high density and low power commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are planned to be used in the upgrade to the Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter front end (FE) trigger readout electronics. Total ionization dose (TID) and single event effect (SEE) are two important radiation effects which need to be characterized on COTS ADCs. In our initial TID test, Texas Instruments (TI) ADS5272 was identified to be the top performer after screening a total 17 COTS ADCs from different manufacturers with dynamic range and sampling rate meeting the requirements of the FE electronics. Another interesting feature of ADS5272more » is its 6.5 clock cycles latency, which is the shortest among the 17 candidates. Based on the TID performance, we have designed a SEE evaluation system for ADS5272, which allows us to further assess its radiation tolerance. In this paper, we present a detailed design of ADS5272 SEE evaluation system and show the effectiveness of this system while evaluating ADS5272 SEE characteristics in multiple irradiation tests. According to TID and SEE test results, ADS5272 was chosen to be implemented in the full-size LAr Trigger Digitizer Board (LTDB) demonstrator, which will be installed on ATLAS calorimeter during the 2014 Long Shutdown 1 (LS1).« less

  19. A new ATLAS muon CSC readout system with system on chip technology on ATCA platform

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Bartoldus, R.; Claus, R.; Garelli, N.; Herbst, R. T.; Huffer, M.; Iakovidis, G.; Iordanidou, K.; Kwan, K.; Kocian, M.; Lankford, A. J.; et al

    2016-01-25

    The ATLAS muon Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) backend readout system has been upgraded during the LHC 2013-2015 shutdown to be able to handle the higher Level-1 trigger rate of 100 kHz and the higher occupancy at Run-2 luminosity. The readout design is based on the Reconfigurable Cluster Element (RCE) concept for high bandwidth generic DAQ implemented on the Advanced Telecommunication Computing Architecture (ATCA) platform. The RCE design is based on the new System on Chip XILINX ZYNQ series with a processor-centric architecture with ARM processor embedded in FPGA fabric and high speed I/O resources. Together with auxiliary memories, all ofmore » these components form a versatile DAQ building block that can host applications tapping into both software and firmware resources. The Cluster on Board (COB) ATCA carrier hosts RCE mezzanines and an embedded Fulcrum network switch to form an online DAQ processing cluster. More compact firmware solutions on the ZYNQ for high speed input and output fiberoptic links and TTC allowed the full system of 320 input links from the 32 chambers to be processed by 6 COBs in one ATCA shelf. The full system was installed in September 2014. In conclusion, we will present the RCE/COB design concept, the firmware and software processing architecture, and the experience from the intense commissioning for LHC Run 2.« less

  20. Measurements of the W production cross sections in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.

    2015-02-19

    This paper presents cross sections for the production of a W boson in association with jets, measured in proton–proton collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 7\\) TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the large hadron collider. With an integrated luminosity of 4.6fb-1, this data set allows for an exploration of a large kinematic range, including jet production up to a transverse momentum of 1TeV and multiplicities up to seven associated jets. The production cross sections for W bosons are measured in both the electron and muon decay channels. Differential cross sections for many observables are also presented including measurements of the jetmore » observables such as the rapidities and the transverse momenta as well as measurements of event observables such as the scalar sums of the transverse momenta of the jets. As a result, the measurements are compared to numerous QCD predictions including next-to-leading-order perturbative calculations, resummation calculations and Monte Carlo generators.« less

  1. Searching for New Physics with Top Quarks and Upgrade to the Muon Spectrometer at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Thomas Andrew

    2015-06-29

    Over the funding period of this award, my research has focused on searching for new physics with top quarks and in the Higgs sector. The highly energetic top quark events at the LHC are an excellent venue to search for new physics, as well as make standard model measurements. Further, the recent discovery of the Higgs boson motivates searching for new physics that could be associated with it. This one-year award has facilitated the beginning of my research program, which has resulted in four publications, several conference talks, and multiple leadership positions within physics groups. Additionally, we are contributing to ATLAS upgrades and operations. As part of the Phase I upgrade, I have taken on the responsibility of the design, prototyping, and quality control of a signal packet router for the trigger electronics of the New Small Wheel. This is a critical component of the upgrade, as the router is the main switchboard for all trigger signals to track finding processors. I am also leading the Phase II upgrade of the readout electronics of the muon spectrometer, and have been selected as the USATLAS Level-2 manager of the Phase II upgrade of the muon spectrometer. The award has been critical in these contributions to the experiment.

  2. Evidence for the Higgs-boson Yukawa coupling to tau leptons with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-04-21

    Results of a search for H → ττ decays are presented, based on the full set of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC during 2011 and 2012. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb–1 and 20.3 fb–1 at centre-of-mass energies of √s=7 TeV and √s=8 TeV respectively. All combinations of leptonic (τ → ℓνν¯ with ℓ = e, μ) and hadronic (τ → hadrons ν) tau decays are considered. An excess of events over the expected background from other Standard Model processes is found with an observed (expected) significance of 4.5 (3.4) standard deviations. This excess provides evidence for the direct coupling of the recently discovered Higgs boson to fermions. The measured signal strength, normalized to the Standard Model expectation, of μ = 1.43–0.37+0.43 is consistent with the predicted Yukawa coupling strength in the Standard Model.

  3. Evidence for the Higgs-boson Yukawa coupling to tau leptons with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.

    2015-04-21

    Results of a search for H → ττ decays are presented, based on the full set of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC during 2011 and 2012. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb–1 and 20.3 fb–1 at centre-of-mass energies of √s=7 TeV and √s=8 TeV respectively. All combinations of leptonic (τ → ℓνν¯ with ℓ = e, μ) and hadronic (τ → hadrons ν) tau decays are considered. An excess of events over the expected background from other Standard Model processes is found with an observed (expected) significance of 4.5 (3.4) standardmore » deviations. This excess provides evidence for the direct coupling of the recently discovered Higgs boson to fermions. The measured signal strength, normalized to the Standard Model expectation, of μ = 1.43–0.37+0.43 is consistent with the predicted Yukawa coupling strength in the Standard Model.« less

  4. Observation of an Excited Bc± Meson State with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2014-11-21

    We perform a search for excited states of the B±c meson using 4.9 fb-1 of 7 TeV and 19.2 fb-1 of 8 TeV pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. A new state is observed through its hadronic transition to the ground state, with the latter detected in the decay B±c →J/ψπ±. The state appears in the m(B±c π+π₋)₋m(B±c )₋2m(π±) mass difference distribution with a significance of 5.2 standard deviations. The mass of the observed state is 6842±4±5 MeV, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The mass and decay of thismore » state are consistent with expectations for the second S-wave state of the B±c meson, B±c (2S).« less

  5. A New ATLAS Muon CSC Readout System with System on Chip Technology on ATCA Platform

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Claus, R.; /SLAC

    2015-10-27

    The ATLAS muon Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) back-end readout system has been upgraded during the LHC 2013-2015 shutdown to be able to handle the higher Level-1 trigger rate of 100 kHz and the higher occupancy at Run 2 luminosity. The readout design is based on the Reconfiguration Cluster Element (RCE) concept for high bandwidth generic DAQ implemented on the ATCA platform. The RCE design is based on the new System on Chip Xilinx Zynq series with a processor-centric architecture with ARM processor embedded in FPGA fabric and high speed I/O resources together with auxiliary memories to form a versatile DAQmore » building block that can host applications tapping into both software and firmware resources. The Cluster on Board (COB) ATCA carrier hosts RCE mezzanines and an embedded Fulcrum network switch to form an online DAQ processing cluster. More compact firmware solutions on the Zynq for G-link, S-link and TTC allowed the full system of 320 G-links from the 32 chambers to be processed by 6 COBs in one ATCA shelf through software waveform feature extraction to output 32 S-links. The full system was installed in Sept. 2014. We will present the RCE/COB design concept, the firmware and software processing architecture, and the experience from the intense commissioning towards LHC Run 2.« less

  6. Development of COTS ADC SEE Test System for the ATLAS LArCalorimeter Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xue -Ye; Chen, Hu -Cheng; Chen, Kai; Mead, Joseph; Liu, Shu -Bin; An, Qi

    2014-12-01

    Radiation-tolerant, high speed, high density and low power commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are planned to be used in the upgrade to the Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter front end (FE) trigger readout electronics. Total ionization dose (TID) and single event effect (SEE) are two important radiation effects which need to be characterized on COTS ADCs. In our initial TID test, Texas Instruments (TI) ADS5272 was identified to be the top performer after screening a total 17 COTS ADCs from different manufacturers with dynamic range and sampling rate meeting the requirements of the FE electronics. Another interesting feature of ADS5272 is its 6.5 clock cycles latency, which is the shortest among the 17 candidates. Based on the TID performance, we have designed a SEE evaluation system for ADS5272, which allows us to further assess its radiation tolerance. In this paper, we present a detailed design of ADS5272 SEE evaluation system and show the effectiveness of this system while evaluating ADS5272 SEE characteristics in multiple irradiation tests. According to TID and SEE test results, ADS5272 was chosen to be implemented in the full-size LAr Trigger Digitizer Board (LTDB) demonstrator, which will be installed on ATLAS calorimeter during the 2014 Long Shutdown 1 (LS1).

  7. BWR Source Term Generation and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Ryman

    2003-07-31

    This calculation is a revision of a previous calculation (Ref. 7.5) that bears the same title and has the document identifier BBAC00000-01717-0210-00006 REV 01. The purpose of this revision is to remove TBV (to-be-verified) -41 10 associated with the output files of the previous version (Ref. 7.30). The purpose of this and the previous calculation is to generate source terms for a representative boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assembly for the first one million years after the SNF is discharged from the reactors. This calculation includes an examination of several ways to represent BWR assemblies and operating conditions in SAS2H in order to quantify the effects these representations may have on source terms. These source terms provide information characterizing the neutron and gamma spectra in particles per second, the decay heat in watts, and radionuclide inventories in curies. Source terms are generated for a range of burnups and enrichments (see Table 2) that are representative of the waste stream and stainless steel (SS) clad assemblies. During this revision, it was determined that the burnups used for the computer runs of the previous revision were actually about 1.7% less than the stated, or nominal, burnups. See Section 6.6 for a discussion of how to account for this effect before using any source terms from this calculation. The source term due to the activation of corrosion products deposited on the surfaces of the assembly from the coolant is also calculated. The results of this calculation support many areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR), which include thermal evaluation, radiation dose determination, radiological safety analyses, surface and subsurface facility designs, and total system performance assessment. This includes MGR items classified as Quality Level 1, for example, the Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container (Ref. 7.27, page 7). Therefore, this calculation is subject to the requirements of the

  8. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan; Fu, Tracy; Ross, Jennifer; Chan, James

    1997-01-01

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

  9. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

    1997-08-12

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

  10. ARM - Evaluation Product - Cloud Type

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsCloud Type ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Documentation Use the Data File Inventory tool to view data availability at the file level. Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Cloud Type [ ARM research - evaluation data product ] This data product determines a cloud type using cloud boundaries derived from vertically pointing lidar and radar clouds. It uses Active Remotely Sensed Cloud Locations (ARSCL) data as

  11. Appendix B-8 Standard Terms and Conditions

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    8 STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR SUBCONTRACTS & PURCHASE ORDERS FOR COMMERCIAL ITEMS (Goods & Services) August 3, 2015 Subcontractor is hereby placed on notice that the contracting party to this subcontract is the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC, in its capacity as the Managing and Operating Contractor for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE- AC36-08GO28308. All references to "NREL" in this subcontract shall

  12. Hazardous constituent source term. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-17

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has several facilities that either generate and/or store transuranic (TRU)-waste from weapons program research and production. Much of this waste also contains hazardous waste constituents as regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Toxicity characteristic metals in the waste principally include lead, occurring in leaded rubber gloves and shielding. Other RCRA metals may occur as contaminants in pyrochemical salt, soil, debris, and sludge and solidified liquids, as well as in equipment resulting from decontamination and decommissioning activities. Volatile organic compounds (VOCS) contaminate many waste forms as a residue adsorbed on surfaces or occur in sludge and solidified liquids. Due to the presence of these hazardous constituents, applicable disposal regulations include land disposal restrictions established by Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The DOE plans to dispose of TRU-mixed waste from the weapons program in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by demonstrating no-migration of hazardous constituents. This paper documents the current technical basis for methodologies proposed to develop a post-closure RCRA hazardous constituent source term. For the purposes of demonstrating no-migration, the hazardous constituent source term is defined as the quantities of hazardous constituents that are available for transport after repository closure. Development of the source term is only one of several activities that will be involved in the no-migration demonstration. The demonstration will also include uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of contaminant transport.

  13. Titanium for long-term tritium storage

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.

    1994-12-01

    Due to the reduction of nuclear weapon stockpile, there will be an excess of tritium returned from the field. The excess tritium needs to be stored for future use, which might be several years away. A safe and cost effective means for long term storage of tritium is needed. Storing tritium in a solid metal tritide is preferred to storing tritium as a gas, because a metal tritide can store tritium in a compact form and the stored tritium will not be released until heat is applied to increase its temperature to several hundred degrees centigrade. Storing tritium as a tritide is safer and more cost effective than as a gas. Several candidate metal hydride materials have been evaluated for long term tritium storage. They include uranium, La-Ni-Al alloys, zirconium and titanium. The criteria used include material cost, radioactivity, stability to air, storage capacity, storage pressure, loading and unloading conditions, and helium retention. Titanium has the best combination of properties and is recommended for long term tritium storage.

  14. DOE/EIA-0202(88/3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1988 Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy . oi Lor L- . ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term :

  15. Modelling Z→TT processes in ATLAS with T-embedded Z →μμ data

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-15

    We describe the concept, technical realisation and validation of a largely data-driven method to model events with Z→ττ decays. In Z→μμ events selected from proton-proton collision data recorded at √s=8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2012, the Z decay muons are replaced by τ leptons from simulated Z →ττ decays at the level of reconstructed tracks and calorimeter cells. The τ lepton kinematics are derived from the kinematics of the original muons. Thus, only the well-understood decays of the Z boson and τ leptons as well as the detector response to the τ decay products aremore » obtained from simulation. All other aspects of the event, such as the Z boson and jet kinematics as well as effects from multiple interactions, are given by the actual data. This so-called τ-embedding method is particularly relevant for Higgs boson searches and analyses in ττ final states, where Z→ττ decays constitute a large irreducible background that cannot be obtained directly from data control samples. In this paper, we discuss the relevant concepts based on the implementation used in the ATLAS Standard Model H→ττ analysis of the full datataset recorded during 2011 and 2012.« less

  16. Search for scalar leptoquarks in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 13 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2016-09-07

    An inclusive search for a new-physics signature of lepton-jet resonances has been performed by the ATLAS experiment. Scalar leptoquarks, pair-produced in pp collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 13 TeV at the large hadron collider, have been considered. An integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb–1, corresponding to the full 2015 dataset was used. First (second) generation leptoquarks were sought in events with two electrons (muons) and two or more jets. The observed event yield in each channel is consistent with Standard Model background expectations. The observed (expected) lower limits on the leptoquark mass at 95% confidence level are 1100 and 1050 GeV (1160 and 1040 GeV) for first and second generation leptoquarks, respectively, assuming a branching ratio into a charged lepton and a quark of 100%. Upper limits on the aforementioned branching ratio are also given as a function of leptoquark mass. In conclusion, compared with the results of earlier ATLAS searches, the sensitivity is increased for leptoquark masses above 860 GeV, and the observed exclusion limits confirm and extend the published results.« less

  17. Estimating a model discrepancy term for the Community Land Model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  18. Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2003 Report |...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2003 Report Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2003 Report (8.41 MB) More Documents & Publications Long-Term Surveillance ...

  19. Microsoft Word - NationalPolicyAssurancesAwardTermsFinal81804...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    NationalPolicyAssurancesAwardTermsFinal81804.doc Microsoft Word - NationalPolicyAssurancesAwardTermsFinal81804.doc PDF icon Microsoft Word - NationalPolicyAssurancesAwardTermsFinal...

  20. Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  1. Benefits Summary - Term Appointments in Regular Job Class | Argonne...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Term Appointments in Regular Job Class Download a brochure on benefits offered to term appointments in the regular job class (over 6 months). 2015 Long Term Appts. in Regular...

  2. DOE/EIA-0202(84/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections February 1984 Published: March 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- .iort- iort- lort- <ort- ort Tt- .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term Term .-Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  3. DOE/EIA-0202(84/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook pn Quarterly Projections August 1984 Published: September 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t- jrt .ort lort .iort .iort iort iort iort ort Tt jm .erm -Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  4. DOE/EIA-0202(84/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1984 Published: November 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort lort iort lort \ort ort Tt .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  5. DOE/EIA-0202(85/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1985 Published: February 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort lort lort nort lort *.ort ort Tt .m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  6. DOE/EIA-0202(85/2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook amm Quarterly Projections April 1985 Published: May 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D C t rt jrt .ort lort .iort iort iort lort '.ort ort .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  7. DOE/EIA-0202(85/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1985 Published: August 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D C t rt jrt .ort lort iort iort iort iort '.ort ort Tt .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  8. Property:Water Type | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Type Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Water Type Property Type String Pages using the property "Water Type" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1...

  9. Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    storage for short term power system service (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity storage for short term power system service Country Denmark...

  10. Site Transition Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Site Transition Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (943.69 KB) More Documents & Publications Site Transition Framework ...

  11. Site Transition Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Site Transition Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance The Site Transition Framework (STF) provides a framework ...

  12. National Policy Assurances to be Incorporated as Award Terms...

    Energy Saver

    National Policy Assurances to be Incorporated as Award Terms National Policy Assurances to be Incorporated as Award Terms The following are the National Policy Assurances which are...

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory: Long-Term Environmental Stewardship...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    green? Click image to learn more Next Enduring Environmental Stewardship Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability Long-Term Strategy for Environmental...

  14. Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    October 2013 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) ... 5-year average (see EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook slideshow). ...

  15. Renewable Energy Cross Sectoral Assessments Terms of Reference...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Renewable Energy Cross Sectoral Assessments Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Cross Sectoral Assessments Terms of...

  16. Renewable Energy Economic and Financial Analysis Terms of Reference...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Analysis Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Economic and Financial Analysis Terms of Reference AgencyCompany...

  17. Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Development Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Pipeline Development Terms of Reference AgencyCompany Organization:...

  18. Renewable Energy Business Development Terms of Reference | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Development Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Business Development Terms of Reference AgencyCompany Organization:...

  19. The International CHP/DHC Collaborative - Advancing Near-Term...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The International CHPDHC Collaborative - Advancing Near-Term Low Carbon Technologies, July 2008 The International CHPDHC Collaborative - Advancing Near-Term Low Carbon ...

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory announces strategy for long-term...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Strategy for long-term environmental sustainability Los Alamos National Laboratory announces strategy for long-term environmental sustainability Provides a blueprint for protecting ...

  1. Terms of Reference for the International Partnership for the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Terms of Reference for the International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy Terms of Reference for the International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy Updated version (October ...

  2. Operational Simulation Tools and Long Term Strategic Planning...

    Energy Saver

    Operational Simulation Tools and Long Term Strategic Planning for High Penetrations of PV in the Southeastern U.S. Operational Simulation Tools and Long Term Strategic Planning for ...

  3. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) Title: Long-term measurements of ...

  4. Microsoft Word - National Policy AssurancesAwardTermsREVJuly2005...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    National Policy AssurancesAwardTermsREVJuly2005.doc Microsoft Word - National Policy AssurancesAwardTermsREVJuly2005.doc PDF icon Microsoft Word - National Policy ...

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory: Long-Term Environmental Stewardship...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability (pdf) From today for years to come Over the ...

  6. Transition of Long-Term Response Action Management Requirements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Transition of Long-Term Response Action Management Requirements Transition of Long-Term Response Action Management Requirements The purpose of this memorandum is to provide you ...

  7. Glossary of Transmission Grid Integration Terms | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    of Transmission Grid Integration Terms Abstract The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has produced an extensive list of terms and definitions related to...

  8. Managing Records for the Long Term - 12363

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, John V.; Gueretta, Jeanie

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for managing vast amounts of information documenting historical and current operations. This information is critical to the operations of the DOE Office of Legacy Management. Managing legacy records and information is challenging in terms of accessibility and changing technology. The Office of Legacy Management is meeting these challenges by making records and information management an organizational priority. The Office of Legacy Management mission is to manage DOE post-closure responsibilities at former Cold War weapons sites to ensure the future protection of human health and the environment. These responsibilities include environmental stewardship and long-term preservation and management of operational and environmental cleanup records associated with each site. A primary organizational goal for the Office of Legacy Management is to 'Preserve, Protect, and Share Records and Information'. Managing records for long-term preservation is an important responsibility. Adequate and dedicated resources and management support are required to perform this responsibility successfully. Records tell the story of an organization and may be required to defend an organization in court, provide historical information, identify lessons learned, or provide valuable information for researchers. Loss of records or the inability to retrieve records because of poor records management processes can have serious consequences and even lead to an organisation's downfall. Organizations must invest time and resources to establish a good records management program because of its significance to the organization as a whole. The Office of Legacy Management will continue to research and apply innovative ways of doing business to ensure that the organization stays at the forefront of effective records and information management. DOE is committed to preserving records that document our nation's Cold War legacy, and the Office of Legacy

  9. Terms & Conditions | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Terms & Conditions Work For Others Access to materials/alloy servcies the MPC Facility is conducted thru the DOE "Work for Others" (WFO) channel. WFO projects are preformed under the direction of and fully funded by the requesting party, on a best effort and cost recovery basis. Requesting and Estimate for WFO Project Costs Requests for materials or services should be directed to the Director's office by phone, fax, or email. Provide as much information as possible concerning your

  10. Long-Term Wind Power Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory started collecting wind power data from large commercial wind power plants (WPPs) in southwest Minnesota with dedicated dataloggers and communication links in the spring of 2000. Over the years, additional WPPs in other areas were added to and removed from the data collection effort. The longest data stream of actual wind plant output is more than 10 years. The resulting data have been used to analyze wind power fluctuations, frequency distribution of changes, the effects of spatial diversity, and wind power ancillary services. This report uses the multi-year wind power data to examine long-term wind power variability.

  11. Appendix E: Standard Terms and Conditions

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    E STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR TRAVEL REQUIREMENTS August 5, 2010 Subcontractor is hereby placed on notice that the contracting party to this subcontract is the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC, in its capacity as the Managing and Operating Contractor for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. All references to "NREL" in this subcontract shall mean the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL Appendix E

  12. August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    August 2012 1 August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights  EIA projects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average about $103 per barrel during the second half of 2012, about $3.50 per barrel higher than in last month's Outlook. The forecast Brent crude oil spot price falls to an average of $100 per barrel in 2013. The projected West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price discount to Brent crude oil narrows from about $14 in the third quarter of 2012 to $9 by late 2013.

  13. Atlas of Atomic Spectral Lines of Neptunium Emitted by Inductively Coupled Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    DeKalb, E.L. and Edelson, M. C.

    1987-08-01

    Optical emission spectra from high-purity Np-237 were generated with a glovebox-enclosed inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. Spectra covering the 230-700 nm wavelength range are presented along with general commentary on the methodology used in collecting the data. The Ames Laboratory Nuclear Safeguards and Security Program has been charged with the task of developing optical spectroscopic methods to analyze the composition of spent nuclear fuels. Such materials are highly radioactive even after prolonged 'cooling' and are chemically complex. Neptunium (Np) is a highly toxic by-product of nuclear power generation and is found, in low abundance, in spent nuclear fuels. This atlas of the optical emission spectrum of Np, as produced by an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectroscopic source, is part of a general survey of the ICP emission spectra of the actinide elements. The ICP emission spectrum of the actinides originates almost exclusively from the electronic relaxation of excited, singly ionized species. Spectral data on the Np ion emission spectrum (i.e., the Np II spectrum) have been reported by Tomkins and Fred [1] and Haaland [2]. Tomkins and Fred excited the Np II spectrum with a Cu spark discharge and identified 114 Np lines in the 265.5 - 436.3 nm spectral range. Haaland, who corrected some spectral line misidentifications in the work of Tomkins and Fred, utilized an enclosed Au spark discharge to excite the Np II spectrum and reported 203 Np lines within the 265.4 - 461.0 nm wavelength range.

  14. Constraints on new phenomena via Higgs boson couplings and invisible decays with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.

    2015-11-30

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured the Higgs boson couplings and mass, and searched for invisible Higgs boson decays, using multiple production and decay channels with up to 4.7 fb-1 of pp collision data at √s=7 TeV and 20.3 fb-1 at √s=8 TeV. In the current study, the measured production and decay rates of the observed Higgs boson in the γγ, ZZ, W W , Zγ, bb, τ τ , and μμ decay channels, along with results from the associated production of a Higgs boson with a top-quark pair, are used to probe the scaling of the couplingsmore » with mass. The limits are set on parameters in extensions of the Standard Model including a composite Higgs boson, an additional electroweak singlet, and two-Higgs-doublet models. Together with the measured mass of the scalar Higgs boson in the γγ and ZZ decay modes, a lower limit is set on the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass of mA > 370 GeV in the “hMSSM” simplified Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Results from direct searches for heavy Higgs bosons are also interpreted in the hMSSM. Finally, direct searches for invisible Higgs boson decays in the vector-boson fusion and associated production of a Higgs boson with W/Z (Z → ℓℓ, W/Z → jj) modes are statistically combined to set an upper limit on the Higgs boson invisible branching ratio of 0.25. As a result, the use of the measured visible decay rates in a more general coupling fit improves the upper limit to 0.23, constraining a Higgs portal model of dark matter.« less

  15. Constraints on new phenomena via Higgs boson couplings and invisible decays with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-11-30

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured the Higgs boson couplings and mass, and searched for invisible Higgs boson decays, using multiple production and decay channels with up to 4.7 fb-1 of pp collision data at √s=7 TeV and 20.3 fb-1 at √s=8 TeV. In the current study, the measured production and decay rates of the observed Higgs boson in the γγ, ZZ, W W , Zγ, bb, τ τ , and μμ decay channels, along with results from the associated production of a Higgs boson with a top-quark pair, are used to probe the scaling of the couplings with mass. The limits are set on parameters in extensions of the Standard Model including a composite Higgs boson, an additional electroweak singlet, and two-Higgs-doublet models. Together with the measured mass of the scalar Higgs boson in the γγ and ZZ decay modes, a lower limit is set on the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass of mA > 370 GeV in the “hMSSM” simplified Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Results from direct searches for heavy Higgs bosons are also interpreted in the hMSSM. Finally, direct searches for invisible Higgs boson decays in the vector-boson fusion and associated production of a Higgs boson with W/Z (Z → ℓℓ, W/Z → jj) modes are statistically combined to set an upper limit on the Higgs boson invisible branching ratio of 0.25. As a result, the use of the measured visible decay rates in a more general coupling fit improves the upper limit to 0.23, constraining a Higgs portal model of dark matter.

  16. An on-line acoustic fluorocarbon coolant mixture analyzer for the ATLAS silicon tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, R.; Battistin, M.; Berry, S.; Bitadze, A.; Bonneau, P.; Bousson, N.; Boyd, G.; Botelho-Direito, J.; DiGirolamo, B.; Doubek, M.; Egorov, K.; Godlewski, J.; Hallewell, G.; Katunin, S.; Mathieu, M.; McMahon, S.; Nagai, K.; Perez-Rodriguez, E.; Rozanov, A.; Vacek, V.; Vitek, M.

    2011-07-01

    The ATLAS silicon tracker community foresees an upgrade from the present octafluoro-propane (C{sub 3}F{sub 8}) evaporative cooling fluid - to a composite fluid with a probable 10-20% admixture of hexafluoro-ethane (C{sub 2}F{sub 6}). Such a fluid will allow a lower evaporation temperature and will afford the tracker silicon substrates a better safety margin against leakage current-induced thermal runaway caused by cumulative radiation damage as the luminosity profile at the CERN Large Hadron Collider increases. Central to the use of this new fluid is a new custom-developed speed-of-sound instrument for continuous real-time measurement of the C{sub 3}F{sub 8}/C{sub 2}F{sub 6} mixture ratio and flow. An acoustic vapour mixture analyzer/flow meter with new custom electronics allowing ultrasonic frequency transmission through gas mixtures has been developed for this application. Synchronous with the emission of an ultrasound 'chirp' from an acoustic transmitter, a fast readout clock (40 MHz) is started. The clock is stopped on receipt of an above threshold sound pulse at the receiver. Sound is alternately transmitted parallel and anti-parallel with the vapour flow for volume flow measurement from transducers that can serve as acoustic transmitters or receivers. In the development version, continuous real-time measurement of C{sub 3}F{sub 8}/C{sub 2}F{sub 6} flow and calculation of the mixture ratio is performed within a graphical user interface developed in PVSS-II, the Supervisory, Control and Data Acquisition standard chosen for LHC and its experiments at CERN. The described instrument has numerous potential applications - including refrigerant leak detection, the analysis of hydrocarbons, vapour mixtures for semiconductor manufacture and anesthetic gas mixtures. (authors)

  17. DOE/EIA-0202(87/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1987 i- rt- jrt ort lort lort lort- iort- lort- ort- ort Tt- " t- . m erm Perm -Term -Term -Term -Term ,-Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term 71 e rrn TT1 "1 Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy "nergy -cry Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  18. Short-term energy outlook, July 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares The Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly for distribution on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. In addition, printed versions of the report are available to subscribers in January, April, July and October. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from July 1998 through December 1999. Values for second quarter of 1998 data, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the July 1998 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

  19. Short-term energy outlook, January 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from January 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the fourth quarter 1998, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the January 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

  20. Search for production of vector-like quark pairs and of four top quarks in the lepton-plus-jets final state in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-20

    A search for pair production of vector-like quarks, both up-type (T) and down-type (B), as well as for four-top-quark production, is presented. The search is based on pp collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV recorded in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1. Data are analysed in the lepton-plus-jets final state, characterised by an isolated electron or muon with high transverse momentum, large missing transverse momentum and multiple jets. Dedicated analyses are performed targeting three cases: a T quark with significant branching ratio to a W bosonmore » and a b-quark \\( \\left(T\\overline{T}\\to Wb+\\mathrm{X}\\right) \\), and both a T quark and a B quark with significant branching ratio to a Higgs boson and a third-generation quark (\\( T\\overline{T}\\to Ht+X\\;\\mathrm{and}\\;B\\overline{B}\\to Hb+\\mathrm{X} \\) respectively). No significant excess of events above the Standard Model expectation is observed, and 95% CL lower limits are derived on the masses of the vector-like T and B quarks under several branching ratio hypotheses assuming contributions from T → Wb, Zt, Ht and B → Wt, Zb, Hb decays. The 95% CL observed lower limits on the T quark mass range between 715 GeV and 950 GeV for all possible values of the branching ratios into the three decay modes, and are the most stringent constraints to date. In addition, the most restrictive upper bounds on four-top-quark production are set in a number of new physics scenarios.« less

  1. Search for production of vector-like quark pairs and of four top quarks in the lepton-plus-jets final state in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-20

    A search for pair production of vector-like quarks, both up-type (T) and down-type (B), as well as for four-top-quark production, is presented. The search is based on pp collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV recorded in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1. Data are analysed in the lepton-plus-jets final state, characterised by an isolated electron or muon with high transverse momentum, large missing transverse momentum and multiple jets. Dedicated analyses are performed targeting three cases: a T quark with significant branching ratio to a W boson and a b-quark \\( \\left(T\\overline{T}\\to Wb+\\mathrm{X}\\right) \\), and both a T quark and a B quark with significant branching ratio to a Higgs boson and a third-generation quark (\\( T\\overline{T}\\to Ht+X\\;\\mathrm{and}\\;B\\overline{B}\\to Hb+\\mathrm{X} \\) respectively). No significant excess of events above the Standard Model expectation is observed, and 95% CL lower limits are derived on the masses of the vector-like T and B quarks under several branching ratio hypotheses assuming contributions from T → Wb, Zt, Ht and B → Wt, Zb, Hb decays. The 95% CL observed lower limits on the T quark mass range between 715 GeV and 950 GeV for all possible values of the branching ratios into the three decay modes, and are the most stringent constraints to date. In addition, the most restrictive upper bounds on four-top-quark production are set in a number of new physics scenarios.

  2. Long-term tests of dissimilar metal crevice corrosion in filtered seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, J.R. . Technical Center)

    1994-04-01

    Dissimilar metal crevice (DMC) corrosion has been found in condensers in which superferritic stainless steel tubes have been expanded into type 316 stainless steel (UNS S31600) tube sheets. Low-pH corrosion products, which formed in the tube-to-tube sheet crevice, cause depassivation and attack of the superferritic alloy. Long-term tests in filtered natural seawater confirm DMC corrosion of several superferritic alloys, including one containing 2% nickel, when in contact with type 316. Superaustenitic 6% molybdenum alloys in contact with type 316 did not show DMC corrosion. As expected, type 316 corroded in these exposures. When superferritic and superaustenitic alloys were tested in contact with each other, neither was attacked.

  3. The SLUGGS survey: wide-field stellar kinematics of early-type galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Jacob A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Woodley, Kristin A.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Blom, Christina; Kartha, Sreeja S.; Pastorello, Nicola; Pota, Vincenzo; Usher, Christopher; Strader, Jay; Spitler, Lee R.; Foster, Caroline

    2014-08-20

    We present stellar kinematics of 22 nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs), based on two-dimensional (2D) absorption line stellar spectroscopy out to ?2-4 R {sub e} (effective radii), as part of the ongoing SLUGGS Survey. The galaxies span a factor of 20 in intrinsic luminosity, as well as a full range of environment and ETG morphology. Our data consist of good velocity resolution (?{sub inst} ? 25 km s{sup 1}) integrated stellar-light spectra extracted from the individual slitlets of custom made Keck/DEIMOS slitmasks. We extract stellar kinematics measurements (V, ?, h {sub 3}, and h {sub 4}) for each galaxy. Combining with literature values from smaller radii, we present 2D spatially resolved maps of the large-scale kinematic structure in each galaxy. We find that the kinematic homogeneity found inside 1 R {sub e} often breaks down at larger radii, where a variety of kinematic behaviors are observed. While central slow rotators remain slowly rotating in their halos, central fast rotators show more diversity, ranging from rapidly increasing to rapidly declining specific angular momentum profiles in the outer regions. There are indications that the outer trends depend on morphological type, raising questions about the proposed unification of the elliptical and lenticular (S0) galaxy families in the ATLAS{sup 3D} survey. Several galaxies in our sample show multiple lines of evidence for distinct disk components embedded in more slowly rotating spheroids, and we suggest a joint photometric-kinematic approach for robust bulge-disk decomposition. Our observational results appear generally consistent with a picture of two-phase (in-situ plus accretion) galaxy formation.

  4. Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

    2004-09-01

    The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel, nuclear reactor core components. The Long-Term Corrosion/Degradation (LTCD) Test is designed to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements to the environment. The test is using two proven, industry-standard methodsdirect corrosion testing using metal coupons, and monitored corrosion testing using electrical/resistance probesto determine corrosion rates for various metal alloys generally representing the metals of interest buried at the SDA, including Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, Beryllium S200F, Aluminum 6061, Zircaloy-4, low-carbon steel, and Ferralium 255. In the direct testing, metal coupons are retrieved for corrosion evaluation after having been buried in SDA backfill soil and exposed to natural SDA environmental conditions for times ranging from one year to as many as 32 years, depending on research needs and funding availability. In the monitored testing, electrical/resistance probes buried in SDA backfill soil will provide corrosion data for the duration of the test or until the probes fail. This report provides an update describing the current status of the test and documents results to date. Data from the one-year and three-year results are also included, for comparison and evaluation of trends. In the six-year results, most metals being tested showed extremely low measurable rates of general corrosion. For Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Ferralium 255, corrosion rates fell in the range of no reportable to 0.0002 mils per year (MPY). Corrosion rates for Zircaloy-4 ranged from no measurable corrosion to 0.0001 MPY. These rates are two orders of magnitude lower than those specified in the

  5. Long-term control of root growth

    DOEpatents

    Burton, Frederick G.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Cline, John F.; Skiens, W. Eugene

    1992-05-26

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl-2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin.

  6. Automated fibroglandular tissue segmentation and volumetric density estimation in breast MRI using an atlas-aided fuzzy C-means method

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shandong; Weinstein, Susan P.; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in the clinical management of breast cancer. Studies suggest that the relative amount of fibroglandular (i.e., dense) tissue in the breast as quantified in MR images can be predictive of the risk for developing breast cancer, especially for high-risk women. Automated segmentation of the fibroglandular tissue and volumetric density estimation in breast MRI could therefore be useful for breast cancer risk assessment. Methods: In this work the authors develop and validate a fully automated segmentation algorithm, namely, an atlas-aided fuzzy C-means (FCM-Atlas) method, to estimate the volumetric amount of fibroglandular tissue in breast MRI. The FCM-Atlas is a 2D segmentation method working on a slice-by-slice basis. FCM clustering is first applied to the intensity space of each 2D MR slice to produce an initial voxelwise likelihood map of fibroglandular tissue. Then a prior learned fibroglandular tissue likelihood atlas is incorporated to refine the initial FCM likelihood map to achieve enhanced segmentation, from which the absolute volume of the fibroglandular tissue (|FGT|) and the relative amount (i.e., percentage) of the |FGT| relative to the whole breast volume (FGT%) are computed. The authors' method is evaluated by a representative dataset of 60 3D bilateral breast MRI scans (120 breasts) that span the full breast density range of the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. The automated segmentation is compared to manual segmentation obtained by two experienced breast imaging radiologists. Segmentation performance is assessed by linear regression, Pearson's correlation coefficients, Student's pairedt-test, and Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC). Results: The inter-reader correlation is 0.97 for FGT% and 0.95 for |FGT|. When compared to the average of the two readers manual segmentation, the proposed FCM-Atlas method achieves a correlation ofr = 0.92 for

  7. Probing lepton flavour violation via neutrinoless $$$\\varvec{\\tau \\longrightarrow 3\\mu }$$$ τ ⟶ 3 μ decays with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-04-26

    This article presents the sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment to the lepton-flavour-violating decays of τ→3μ. A method utilising the production of τ leptons via W→τν decays is used. This method is applied to the sample of 20.3 fb−1 of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2012. No event is observed passing the selection criteria, and the observed (expected) upper limit on the τ lepton branching fraction into three muons, Br(τ→3μ), is 3.76×10−7 (3.94×10−7) at 90 % confidence level.

  8. An extended magnetostatic Born-Infeld model with a concave lower order term

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jun; Pan, Xing-Bin

    2013-11-15

    This paper concerns an extended Born-Infeld model with a concave lower order term for the magnetostatic case. Three types of boundary value problems are considered: the boundary condition prescribing the tangential component of A, the natural boundary condition, and the boundary condition prescribing the tangential component of curl A. In each case we obtain existence and regularity of solutions for small boundary data.

  9. Consideration of Dose Limits for Organs at Risk of Thoracic Radiotherapy: Atlas for Lung, Proximal Bronchial Tree, Esophagus, Spinal Cord, Ribs, and Brachial Plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Feng-Ming; Ritter, Timothy; Quint, Douglas J.; Senan, Suresh; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Hurkmans, Coen W.; Timmerman, Robert; Bezjak, Andrea; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Movsas, Benjamin; Marsh, Lon; Okunieff, Paul; Choy, Hak; Curran, Walter J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To review the dose limits and standardize the three-dimenional (3D) radiographic definition for the organs at risk (OARs) for thoracic radiotherapy (RT), including the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: The present study was performed by representatives from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Soutwestern Oncology Group lung cancer committees. The dosimetric constraints of major multicenter trials of 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT were reviewed and the challenges of 3D delineation of these OARs described. Using knowledge of the human anatomy and 3D radiographic correlation, draft atlases were generated by a radiation oncologist, medical physicist, dosimetrist, and radiologist from the United States and reviewed by a radiation oncologist and medical physicist from Europe. The atlases were then critically reviewed, discussed, and edited by another 10 radiation oncologists. Results: Three-dimensional descriptions of the lung, proximal bronchial tree, esophagus, spinal cord, ribs, and brachial plexus are presented. Two computed tomography atlases were developed: one for the middle and lower thoracic OARs (except for the heart) and one focusing on the brachial plexus for a patient positioned supine with their arms up for thoracic RT. The dosimetric limits of the key OARs are discussed. Conclusions: We believe these atlases will allow us to define OARs with less variation and generate dosimetric data in a more consistent manner. This could help us study the effect of radiation on these OARs and guide high-quality clinical trials and individualized practice in 3D-conformal RT and stereotactic body RT.

  10. Study of the B+c ? J/?D+s and B+c ? J/?D*s+ decays with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-05

    The decays B+c ? J/?D+s and B+c ? J/?D*s+ are studied with the ATLAS detector at the LHC using a dataset corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.9 and 20.6 fb1 of pp collisions collected at centre-of-mass energies ?s = 7 TeV and 8 TeV, respectively. Furthermore, signal candidates are identified through J/? ? ?+?- and D(*)+s ? ??+(?/?0) decays.

  11. Born-Infeld-type gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Comelli, Denis

    2005-09-15

    Generalizations of gravitational Born-Infeld type Lagrangians are investigated. Phenomenological constraints (reduction to Einstein-Hilbert action for small curvature, spin-two ghost freedom, and absence of Coulomb-like Schwarschild singularity) select one effective Lagrangian whose dynamics is dictated by the tensors g{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}} and R{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}{sub {rho}}{sub {sigma}} (not R{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}} or the scalar R)

  12. IMPROVED TYPE OF FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Monson, H.O.

    1961-01-24

    A radiator-type fuel block assembly is described. It has a hexagonal body of neutron fissionable material having a plurality of longitudinal equal- spaced coolant channels therein aligned in rows parallel to each face of the hexagonal body. Each of these coolant channels is hexagonally shaped with the corners rounded and enlarged and the assembly has a maximum temperature isothermal line around each channel which is approximately straight and equidistant between adjacent channels.

  13. Adsorption characteristics of water vapor on gear-pellet and honeycomb-pellet types of adsorbents containing A-type zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, A.; Munakata, K.; Hara, K.; Narita, S.; Sugiyama, T.; Kotoh, K.; Tanaka, M.; Uda, T.

    2015-03-15

    It is necessary to recover or process tritiated species that are extensively coexistent in nuclear fusion installations. A conventional way to recover tritium release to atmosphere is catalytic oxidation of tritiated species and adsorption of tritiated water vapor on adsorbents with high surface areas. Therefore, new adsorbents with low pressure loss and high surface areas need to be developed and utilized for such large-scale adsorption systems. In this study, attention was focused on new adsorbents, which are gear-type pellet MS5A adsorbent, gear-type pellet MS4A adsorbent and honeycomb-type pellet MS5A adsorbent. The adsorption characteristics of the new adsorbent were comparatively studied with conventional type of adsorbents (pellet-type MS5A adsorbent and pebble-type MS5A adsorbent), in terms of adsorption capacity, pressure loss and adsorption rate. It was found that the adsorption capacity of water vapor on the gear-type adsorbents is higher than that on a honeycomb-type adsorbent. The experimental breakthrough curves indicate that the adsorption rates of water vapor on gear-type and honeycomb-type adsorbents are smaller than that on conventional type adsorbents. Various adsorption models were also tested to correlate the experimental isotherms. It was found that the Langmuir-Freundlich model could properly correlate the experimental adsorption isotherms.

  14. Charged-particle distributions in pp interactions at √s=8TeV measured with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2016-07-15

    This study presents measurements of distributions of charged particles which are produced in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s=8TeV and recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. A special dataset recorded in 2012 with a small number of interactions per beam crossing (below 0.004) and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 160 μb-1 was used. A minimum-bias trigger was utilised to select a data sample of more than 9 million collision events. The multiplicity, pseudorapidity, and transverse momentum distributions of charged particles are shown in different regions of kinematics and charged-particle multiplicity, including measurements of final statesmore » at high multiplicity. Finally, the results are corrected for detector effects and are compared to the predictions of various Monte Carlo event generator models which simulate the full hadronic final state.« less

  15. Performance of the ATLAS muon trigger in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.

    2015-03-13

    The performance of the ATLAS muon trigger system is evaluated with proton–proton collision data collected in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. It is primarily evaluated using events containing a pair of muons from the decay of Z bosons. The efficiency of the single-muon trigger is measured for muons with transverse momentum 25 < pT < 100 GeV, with a statistical uncertainty of less than 0.01 % and a systematic uncertainty of 0.6 %. The pT range for efficiency determination is extended by using muons from decays of J/ψ mesons, W bosons, andmore » top quarks. The muon trigger shows highly uniform and stable performance. Thus, the performance is compared to the prediction of a detailed simulation.« less

  16. Performance of the ATLAS muon trigger in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-03-13

    The performance of the ATLAS muon trigger system is evaluated with proton–proton collision data collected in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. It is primarily evaluated using events containing a pair of muons from the decay of Z bosons. The efficiency of the single-muon trigger is measured for muons with transverse momentum 25 < pT < 100 GeV, with a statistical uncertainty of less than 0.01 % and a systematic uncertainty of 0.6 %. The pT range for efficiency determination is extended by using muons from decays of J/ψ mesons, W bosons, and top quarks. The muon trigger shows highly uniform and stable performance. Thus, the performance is compared to the prediction of a detailed simulation.

  17. IMG-ABC: An Atlas of Biosynthetic Gene Clusters to Fuel the Discovery of Novel Secondary Metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I-Min; Chu, Ken; Ratner, Anna; Palaniappan, Krishna; Huang, Jinghua; Reddy, T. B.K.; Cimermancic, Peter; Fischbach, Michael; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Pati, Amrita

    2014-10-28

    In the discovery of secondary metabolites (SMs), large-scale analysis of sequence data is a promising exploration path that remains largely underutilized due to the lack of relevant computational resources. We present IMG-ABC (https://img.jgi.doe.gov/abc/) -- An Atlas of Biosynthetic gene Clusters within the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system1. IMG-ABC is a rich repository of both validated and predicted biosynthetic clusters (BCs) in cultured isolates, single-cells and metagenomes linked with the SM chemicals they produce and enhanced with focused analysis tools within IMG. The underlying scalable framework enables traversal of phylogenetic dark matter and chemical structure space -- serving as a doorway to a new era in the discovery of novel molecules.

  18. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson decay to μ⁺ μ⁻ with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    None

    2014-11-01

    A search is reported for Higgs boson decay to μ⁺ μ⁻ using data with an integrated luminosity of 24.8 fb⁻¹ collected with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at√s = 7 and 8 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The observed dimuon invariant mass distribution is consistent with the Standard Model background-only hypothesis in the 120–150 GeV search range. For a Higgs boson with a mass of 125.5 GeV, the observed (expected) upper limit at the 95% confidence level is 7.0 (7.2) times the Standard Model expectation. This corresponds to an upper limit on the branching ratio BR (Hmore » → μ⁺ μ⁻) of 1.5×10⁻³.« less

  19. Measuring asymmetry load pairs of top quarks-antitop in the final states dileptoniques from D0 and ATLAS detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Chapelain, Antoine

    2014-06-20

    Particle physics aims to give a coherent description of the nature and the behavior of elementary particles of matter. Particle accelerators (colliders) allow pushing back our know- ledge in this domain producing particles that cannot be observed by other means. This thesis work contributes to this research eld and focuses on the study of the top quark which is the latest brick of matter discovered and the heaviest known elementary particle. The property of the top quark studied here, the charge asymmetry of the top quark-antiquark pairs, has driven a lot of attention in 2011 because of measurements released by Tevatron experiments. These measurements showed deviations with the predictions made in the framework of the standard model of particle physics. New measurements of the charge asymmetry performed at the Tevatron (with the D0 detector) and at the LHC (with the ATLAS detector) are presented in this thesis.

  20. Search for high-mass diphoton resonances in pp collisions ats=8 TeVwith the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-08-14

    This article describes a search for high-mass resonances decaying to a pair of photons using a sample of 20.3 fb-1 of pp collisions at s√=8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The data are found to be in agreement with the Standard Model prediction, and limits are reported in the framework of the Randall-Sundrum model. This theory leads to the prediction of graviton states, the lightest of which could be observed at the Large Hadron Collider. A lower limit of 2.66 (1.41) TeV at 95% confidence level is set on the mass of the lightestmore » graviton for couplings of k/M¯¯Pl=0.1 (0.01).« less

  1. Measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in diboson final states with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    ATLAS Collaboration,

    2013-10-01

    Measurements are presented of production properties and couplings of the recently discovered Higgs boson using the decays into boson pairs, H→γγ, H→ZZ{sup *}→4ℓ and H→WW{sup *}→ℓνℓν. The results are based on the complete pp collision data sample recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at centre-of-mass energies of {radical s}=7 TeV and {radical s}=8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 25 fb{sup -1}. Evidence for Higgs boson production through vector-boson fusion is reported. Results of combined fits probing Higgs boson couplings to fermions and bosons, as well as anomalous contributions to loop-induced production and decay modes, are presented. All measurements are consistent with expectations for the Standard Model Higgs boson.

  2. Measurement of the top quark mass in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels using √s = 7   TeV ATLAS data

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton (lepton = e,μ) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. The tt¯→ lepton+jets analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative b-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms b-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from b-quarks and u, d, c, s-quarks ormore » gluons, respectively. The analysis of the tt¯→ dilepton channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the mℓb observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+b-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.33 ± 0.75 (stat + JSF + bJSF) ± 1.02(syst) GeV, and 173.79 ± 0.54(stat) ± 1.30(syst) GeV in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels, respectively. Thus, the combination of the two results yields mtop = 172.99 ± 0.48(stat) ± 0.78(syst) GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.91 GeV.« less

  3. Measurement of the top quark mass in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels using √s = 7   TeV ATLAS data

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton (lepton = e,μ) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. The tt¯→ lepton+jets analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative b-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms b-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from b-quarks and u, d, c, s-quarks or gluons, respectively. The analysis of the tt¯→ dilepton channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the mℓb observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+b-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.33 ± 0.75 (stat + JSF + bJSF) ± 1.02(syst) GeV, and 173.79 ± 0.54(stat) ± 1.30(syst) GeV in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels, respectively. Thus, the combination of the two results yields mtop = 172.99 ± 0.48(stat) ± 0.78(syst) GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.91 GeV.

  4. Measurement of the correlation between flow harmonics of different order in lead-lead collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-14

    Correlations between the elliptic or triangular flow coefficients vm (m=2 or 3) and other flow harmonics vn (n=2 to 5) are measured using √sNN=2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collision data collected in 2010 by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7 μb-1. The vm-vn correlations are measured in midrapidity as a function of centrality, and, for events within the same centrality interval, as a function of event ellipticity or triangularity defined in a forward rapidity region. For events within the same centrality interval, v3 is found to be anticorrelated with v2 and this anticorrelation is consistent with similar anticorrelations between the corresponding eccentricities, ε2 and ε3. However, it is observed that v4 increases strongly with v2, and v5 increases strongly with both v2 and v3. The trend and strength of the vm-vn correlations for n=4 and 5 are found to disagree with εmn correlations predicted by initial-geometry models. Instead, these correlations are found to be consistent with the combined effects of a linear contribution to vn and a nonlinear term that is a function of v22 or of v2v3, as predicted by hydrodynamic models. A simple two-component fit is used to separate these two contributions. The extracted linear and nonlinear contributions to v4 and v5 are found to be consistent with previously measured event-plane correlations.

  5. Measurement of the correlation between flow harmonics of different order in lead-lead collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-14

    Correlations between the elliptic or triangular flow coefficients vm (m=2 or 3) and other flow harmonics vn (n=2 to 5) are measured using √sNN=2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collision data collected in 2010 by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7 μb-1. The vm-vn correlations are measured in midrapidity as a function of centrality, and, for events within the same centrality interval, as a function of event ellipticity or triangularity defined in a forward rapidity region. For events within the same centrality interval, v3 is found to be anticorrelated with v2 and this anticorrelation is consistentmore » with similar anticorrelations between the corresponding eccentricities, ε2 and ε3. However, it is observed that v4 increases strongly with v2, and v5 increases strongly with both v2 and v3. The trend and strength of the vm-vn correlations for n=4 and 5 are found to disagree with εm-εn correlations predicted by initial-geometry models. Instead, these correlations are found to be consistent with the combined effects of a linear contribution to vn and a nonlinear term that is a function of v22 or of v2v3, as predicted by hydrodynamic models. A simple two-component fit is used to separate these two contributions. The extracted linear and nonlinear contributions to v4 and v5 are found to be consistent with previously measured event-plane correlations.« less

  6. Measurement of the top quark mass in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels using √s = 7   TeV ATLAS data

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton (lepton = e,μ) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. The tt¯→ lepton+jets analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative b-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms b-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from b-quarks and u, d, c, s-quarks ormore »gluons, respectively. The analysis of the tt¯→ dilepton channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the mℓb observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+b-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.33 ± 0.75 (stat + JSF + bJSF) ± 1.02(syst) GeV, and 173.79 ± 0.54(stat) ± 1.30(syst) GeV in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels, respectively. Thus, the combination of the two results yields mtop = 172.99 ± 0.48(stat) ± 0.78(syst) GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.91 GeV.« less

  7. Property:DeviceType | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    DeviceType Property Type String Description Used for MHK ISDB Allows Values Instrument;Sensor Pages using the property "DeviceType" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous...

  8. Long-term proliferation and safeguards issues in future technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Keisch, B.; Auerbach, C.; Fainberg, A.; Fiarman, S.; Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.; Lemley, J.R.; O'Brien, J.

    1986-02-01

    The purpose of the task was to assess the effect of potential new technologies, nuclear and non-nuclear, on safeguards needs and non-proliferation policies, and to explore possible solutions to some of the problems envisaged. Eight subdivisions were considered: New Enrichment Technologies; Non-Aqueous Reprocessing Technologies; Fusion; Accelerator-Driven Reactor Systems; New Reactor Types; Heavy Water and Deuterium; Long-Term Storage of Spent Fuel; and Other Future Technologies (Non-Nuclear). For each of these subdivisions, a careful review of the current world-wide effort in the field provided a means of subjectively estimating the viability and qualitative probability of fruition of promising technologies. Technologies for which safeguards and non-proliferation requirements have been thoroughly considered by others were not restudied here (e.g., the Fast Breeder Reactor). The time scale considered was 5 to 40 years for possible initial demonstration although, in some cases, a somewhat optimistic viewpoint was embraced. Conventional nuclear-material safeguards are only part of the overall non-proliferation regime. Other aspects are international agreements, export controls on sensitive technologies, classification of information, intelligence gathering, and diplomatic initiatives. The focus here is on safeguards, export controls, and classification.

  9. Atlas-Based Segmentation Improves Consistency and Decreases Time Required for Contouring Postoperative Endometrial Cancer Nodal Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Amy V.; Wortham, Angela; Wernick, Iddo; Evans, Andrew; Ennis, Ronald D.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Accurate target delineation of the nodal volumes is essential for three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for endometrial cancer adjuvant therapy. We hypothesized that atlas-based segmentation ('autocontouring') would lead to time savings and more consistent contours among physicians. Methods and Materials: A reference anatomy atlas was constructed using the data from 15 postoperative endometrial cancer patients by contouring the pelvic nodal clinical target volume on the simulation computed tomography scan according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0418 trial using commercially available software. On the simulation computed tomography scans from 10 additional endometrial cancer patients, the nodal clinical target volume autocontours were generated. Three radiation oncologists corrected the autocontours and delineated the manual nodal contours under timed conditions while unaware of the other contours. The time difference was determined, and the overlap of the contours was calculated using Dice's coefficient. Results: For all physicians, manual contouring of the pelvic nodal target volumes and editing the autocontours required a mean {+-} standard deviation of 32 {+-} 9 vs. 23 {+-} 7 minutes, respectively (p = .000001), a 26% time savings. For each physician, the time required to delineate the manual contours vs. correcting the autocontours was 30 {+-} 3 vs. 21 {+-} 5 min (p = .003), 39 {+-} 12 vs. 30 {+-} 5 min (p = .055), and 29 {+-} 5 vs. 20 {+-} 5 min (p = .0002). The mean overlap increased from manual contouring (0.77) to correcting the autocontours (0.79; p = .038). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that autocontouring leads to increased consistency and time savings when contouring the nodal target volumes for adjuvant treatment of endometrial cancer, although the autocontours still required careful editing to ensure that the lymph nodes at risk of recurrence are properly included in the target

  10. Short-term energy outlook, April 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from April 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the first quarter 1999, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the April 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated forecasting system (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 25 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. Lighting Control Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Lighting Control Types Lighting Control Types Characteristics of the most common lighting controls for offices and other public buildings are outlined below. Also provided is a ...

  12. Principal Types of Volcanoes | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Types of Volcanoes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Principal Types of Volcanoes Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author John Watson...

  13. Type C: Caldera Resource | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    C: Caldera Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type C: Caldera Resource Dictionary.png Type C: Caldera Resource: No definition has been...

  14. Wheel-type magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.

    1983-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a wheel-type magnetic refrigerator capable of cooling over a large temperature range. Ferromagnetic or paramagnetic porous materials are layered circumferentially according to their Curie temperature. The innermost layer has the lowest Curie temperature and the outermost layer has the highest Curie temperature. The wheel is rotated through a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the wheel and parallel to its direction of rotation. A fluid is pumped through portions of the layers using inner and outer manifolds to achieve refrigeration of a thermal load.

  15. Wheel-type magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.

    1983-10-11

    The disclosure is directed to a wheel-type magnetic refrigerator capable of cooling over a large temperature range. Ferromagnetic or paramagnetic porous materials are layered circumferentially according to their Curie temperature. The innermost layer has the lowest Curie temperature and the outermost layer has the highest Curie temperature. The wheel is rotated through a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the wheel and parallel to its direction of rotation. A fluid is pumped through portions of the layers using inner and outer manifolds to achieve refrigeration of a thermal load. 7 figs.

  16. Wheel-type magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.

    1982-01-20

    The disclosure is directed to a wheel-type magnetic refrigerator capable of cooling over a large temperature range. Ferromagnetic or paramagnetic porous materials are layered circumferentially according to their Curie temperature. The innermost layer has the lowest Curie temperature and the outermost layer has the highest Curie temperature. The wheel is rotated through a magnetic field perpendicular to the axis of the wheel and parallel to its direction of rotation. A fluid is pumped through portions of the layers using inner and outer manifolds to achieve refrigeration of a thermal load.

  17. Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance ... to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M). ...

  18. Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    The Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance (LTS-O&M) subtask has a critical long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) role for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ...

  19. Numerical simulation experiments on the long-term evolution of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the long-term evolution of a CO2 plume under a sloping caprock Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical simulation experiments on the long-term evolution of a CO2 plume ...

  20. Weldon Spring, Missouri, Long-Term Stewardship Plan Public Workshop...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Input on the Long-Term Stewardship Plan. What citizens want to see that is not there. What ... after the breakout sessions. 2. Where we are with the Long-Term Stewardship Plan? a. ...

  1. Why is a long-term strategy important?

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Why is a long-term strategy important? Why is a long-term strategy important? Because we protect the environment. That is our practice today, and it is our commitment to a...

  2. Short-Term Energy Carbon Dioxide Emissions Forecasts August 2009

    Reports and Publications

    2009-01-01

    Supplement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook. Short-term projections for U.S. carbon dioxide emissions of the three fossil fuels: coal, natural gas, and petroleum.

  3. Long-term Contract Information and Registrations | Department...

    Energy Saver

    Long-Term Contract Information and Registrations at U.S. LNG Export Facilities DOEFE ... contract information with DOEFE for LNG exports and long-term natural gas supply. ...

  4. Sample Residential Program Term Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Sample Residential Program Term Sheet A sample for defining and elaborating on the specifics of a clean energy loan program. Sample Residential Program Term Sheet (46.79 KB) More ...

  5. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LONG-TERM COLLOID ...

  6. Building America Case Study: Initial and Long Term Movement of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    3 years that examined both the system mechanics of this approach as well as long- term ... initial installation and long-term use due to expansion and contraction of materials. ...

  7. Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013

    Annual Energy Outlook

    3 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights EIA ... 5-year average (see EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook slideshow). ...

  8. Near-term acceleration of hydroclimatic change in the western...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Near-term acceleration of hydroclimatic change in the western U.S. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Near-term acceleration of hydroclimatic change in the western U.S. ...

  9. DOE/EIA-0202(87/3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1987 aergy i . Energy ' Energy Energy Energy i Energy i . Energy . Energy Energy Energy . Energy . Energy Energy Energy Energy i Energy . Energy . Energy Energy Energy Energy . Energy "nergy ; Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term ;

  10. Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. Third quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This document presents the 1997 third quarter short term energy projections. Information is presented for fossil fuels and renewable energy.

  11. Long-Term Grout Performance | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Grout Performance Long-Term Grout Performance Summary Notes from 5 March 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Long-Term Grout Performance Summary Notes from 5 March 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Long-Term Grout Performance (46.57 KB) More Documents & Publications Long-Term Engineered Cap Performance Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013)

  12. Glossary of Terms & Acronyms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Earned Value Management » Glossary of Terms & Acronyms Glossary of Terms & Acronyms Below is the Project Management & Oversight Assesment Glossary of Terms & Acronyms: Term Acronym Definition Architect/ Engineer A/E or A-E Firm or organization that designs buildings, structures, systems, etc. A professional organization providing architectural and engineering services including research, planning, development, design, construction, alteration, or repair of real property;

  13. Terms of Reference for the International Partnership for the Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Economy | Department of Energy Terms of Reference for the International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy Terms of Reference for the International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy Updated version (October 31, 2003) of the Terms of Reference for the International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy, including purpose, functions, organization. rev_terms_ref_iphe.pdf (140.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Non-Paper on Activities and Operations of the IPHE Committees International

  14. 3D printed cellular solid outperforms traditional stochastic foam in long-term mechanical response

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Maiti, A.; Small, W.; Lewicki, J.; Weisgraber, T. H.; Duoss, E. B.; Chinn, S. C.; Pearson, M. A.; Spadaccini, C. M.; Maxwell, R. S.; Wilson, T. S.

    2016-04-27

    3D printing of polymeric foams by direct-ink-write is a recent technological breakthrough that enables the creation of versatile compressible solids with programmable microstructure, customizable shapes, and tunable mechanical response including negative elastic modulus. However, in many applications the success of these 3D printed materials as a viable replacement for traditional stochastic foams critically depends on their mechanical performance and micro-architectural stability while deployed under long-term mechanical strain. To predict the long-term performance of the two types of foams we employed multi-year-long accelerated aging studies under compressive strain followed by a time-temperature-superposition analysis using a minimum-arc-length-based algorithm. The resulting master curvesmore » predict superior long-term performance of the 3D printed foam in terms of two different metrics, i.e., compression set and load retention. To gain deeper understanding, we imaged the microstructure of both foams using X-ray computed tomography, and performed finite-element analysis of the mechanical response within these microstructures. As a result, this indicates a wider stress variation in the stochastic foam with points of more extreme local stress as compared to the 3D printed material, which might explain the latter’s improved long-term stability and mechanical performance.« less

  15. Review of radionuclide source terms used for performance-assessment analyses; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, R.W.

    1993-06-01

    Two aspects of the radionuclide source terms used for total-system performance assessment (TSPA) analyses have been reviewed. First, a detailed radionuclide inventory (i.e., one in which the reactor type, decay, and burnup are specified) is compared with the standard source-term inventory used in prior analyses. The latter assumes a fixed ratio of pressurized-water reactor (PWR) to boiling-water reactor (BWR) spent fuel, at specific amounts of burnup and at 10-year decay. TSPA analyses have been used to compare the simplified source term with the detailed one. The TSPA-91 analyses did not show a significant difference between the source terms. Second, the radionuclides used in source terms for TSPA aqueous-transport analyses have been reviewed to select ones that are representative of the entire inventory. It is recommended that two actinide decay chains be included (the 4n+2 ``uranium`` and 4n+3 ``actinium`` decay series), since these include several radionuclides that have potentially important release and dose characteristics. In addition, several fission products are recommended for the same reason. The choice of radionuclides should be influenced by other parameter assumptions, such as the solubility and retardation of the radionuclides.

  16. Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. First quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-07

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short- term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets.

  17. Estimated long-term health effects

    SciTech Connect

    Cardis, F.; Okeanov, A.E.; Likthariev, I.; Prisyazhniuk; Anspaugh, L.R.; Mabuchi, K.; Ivanov, V.K.

    1996-04-01

    Apart from the dramatic increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed as children, there is no evidence to date of a major public health impact of the radiation exposure from the Chernobyl accident in the three most affected countries. Although some increases in the frequency of cancer in exposed populations have been reported, these results are difficult to interpret, mainly because of differences in the intensity and method of follow-up between exposed populations and the general population to which they are compared. If the experience of atomic bomb survivors and of other exposed populations is applicable, the major radiological impact of the accident will be cancer and the total lifetime numbers of excess cancers will be greatest among the liquidators and among the residents of contaminated territories, of the order of 2,000 to 2,500. These increases would be difficult to detect epidemiologically against an expected background number of 41,500 and 433,000 respectively (size of the exposed populations: 200,000 and 3,700,000, respectively). It is noted, however, that the exposures received by populations exposed as a result of Chernobyl are different (in type and pattern) from those of atomic bomb survivors. Predictions derived from these populations are therefore uncertain. Indeed, the extent of the increase in thyroid cancer incidence in persons exposed as children was not foreseen. In addition, only ten years have passed since the accident. It is essential therefore that monitoring of the health of the population be continued in order to assess the public health impact of the accident, even if, apart from leukemia among liquidators, little detectable increase of cancers due to radiation from the Chernobyl accident is expected.

  18. Corrosion testing of Type 304L stainless steel for waste tank applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.J.; Mickalonis, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    AISI Type 304L stainless steel will be the material of construction for hazardous waste storage tanks. The corrosion behavior of 304L was characterized in simulated waste solutions using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and long term immersion tests. The results were correlated to assess the use of corrosion characteristics determined by electrochemical techniques for predicting long term corrosion behavior. The corrosion behaviors of Type A537 carbon steel and Incoloy 825 were also evaluated. A good correlation was found between the results from the electrochemical techniques and the immersion tests.

  19. Corrosion testing of Type 304L stainless steel for waste tank applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.J.; Mickalonis, J.I.

    1991-12-31

    AISI Type 304L stainless steel will be the material of construction for hazardous waste storage tanks. The corrosion behavior of 304L was characterized in simulated waste solutions using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and long term immersion tests. The results were correlated to assess the use of corrosion characteristics determined by electrochemical techniques for predicting long term corrosion behavior. The corrosion behaviors of Type A537 carbon steel and Incoloy 825 were also evaluated. A good correlation was found between the results from the electrochemical techniques and the immersion tests.

  20. DOE/EIA-0202(84/2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections May 1984 Published: June 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .iort .iort- iort- iort- '.ort- ort- .m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term i-Term rTerm -Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook