National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for api gravity aromatics

  1. Glossary API Gravity: An

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation...

  2. Landed Costs of Imported Crude by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    API Gravity (Dollars per Barrel) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes API Gravity Sep-15 ...

  3. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    API Gravity (Dollars per Barrel) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes API Gravity Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History 20.0º or Less 31.93 34.72 40.00 40.44 37.34 39.18 1993-2016 20.1º to 25.0º 33.32 35.99 41.97 43.04 39.42 40.45 1993-2016 25.1º to 30.0º 27.70 31.68 37.41 37.93 33.47 34.17 1993-2016 30.1º to 35.0º 31.90 35.92 40.94 44.51 41.82 41.22 1993-2016 35.1º to

  4. Percentages of Total Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Percentages of Total Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity (Percent by Interval) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes API Gravity Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History 20.0º or Less 15.82 15.37 15.79 16.03 16.65 19.61 1983-2016 20.1º to 25.0º 40.58 40.60 44.06 37.92 40.00 38.13 1983-2016 25.1º to 30.0º 6.44 5.96 8.63 10.60 10.98 8.27 1983-2016 30.1º to 35.0º 28.91 26.65 21.40

  5. Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Production by API Gravity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Lease Condensate Production by API Gravity Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes API Gravity Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History Lower 48 States 8,663 8,458 8,377 8,241 8,255 8,285 2015-2016 20.0º or Lower 408 405 407 398 406 397 2015-2016 20.1º to 25.0º 178 168 167 172 175 170 2015-2016 25.1º to 30.0º 733 714 692 667 759 714 2015-2016 30.1º to 35.0º

  6. Table 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    18.62 19.26 Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-182, "Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Report." 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity Energy...

  7. Table 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    20.23 20.91 Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-182, "Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Report." 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity Energy...

  8. ,"Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    API Gravity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity",6,"Monthly","8/2016","10/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","11/1/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","12/1/2016" ,"Excel File

  9. F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    API Gravity (Dollars per Barrel) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes API Gravity Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History 20.0º or Less 26.57 29.03 35.85 39.85 36.05 36.83 1983-2016 20.1º to 25.0º 26.35 29.59 35.32 37.92 35.46 34.62 1983-2016 25.1º to 30.0º 30.41 36.10 40.01 43.98 40.31 41.13 1983-2016 30.1º to 35.0º 35.27 37.76 45.82 46.85 42.71 41.54 1983-2016 35.1º to

  10. Glossary API Gravity: An

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia. PAD District II: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska,...

  11. Development of a centrifugal downhold separator with in-situ recycle of produced water (initial tests with 34.1 API gravity crude)

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.F.; Jubin, R.T.; Robinson, S.M.

    1998-11-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is currently developing a Centrifugal Downhole Separator (CDHS) which will extend the application of remotely operated separations equipment developed for the nuclear industry to in-well recovery of oil with in-situ recycle of the produced water. These units have been successfully used for surface treatment of produced water and wastewater generated during environmental clean-up operations. Performance data has shown that centrifugal units are capable of separating stable emulsions into ``single-phase`` streams with generally less than 1% cross-phase contamination. Initial testing will be conducted with a bench-scale separator to determine the separation efficiency of various crude oils and to provide information necessary to scale up the separator. Information from the bench-scale unit will be used in the design of a larger prototype, which will have a much larger height/diameter ratio and will incorporate some of the components necessary for down-hole operations. The prototype separator will be operated in the lab to verify scale-up parameters and separation efficiencies, as well as to provide information necessary to design a full-scale system. The full-scale system will be fabricated, installed in the field, and operated to demonstrate the technology. This paper discusses the initial testing of the bench-scale separator with a crude oil having an API gravity of 34.06{degrees}.

  12. SNMP API

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance (perfSONAR) Software & Tools Development Data for Researchers Partnerships Publications Workshops Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Blog ESnet Live Home » Network R&D » Data for Researchers » SNMP API Network R&D Software-Defined Networking (SDN) Experimental Network Testbeds Performance (perfSONAR)

  13. DyninstAPI Patches

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2012-04-01

    We are seeking a code review of patches against DyninstAPI 8.0. DyninstAPI is an open source binary instrumentation library from the University of Wisconsin and University of Maryland. Our patches port DyninstAPI to the BlueGene/P and BlueGene/Q systems, as well as fix DyninstAPI bugs and implement minor new features in DyninstAPI.

  14. OpenEI Community - API

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    API is now deprecated http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogutility-rate-database-version-1-api-now-deprecated

    There comes a time in every API version's lifecycle when it needs to...

  15. Web Service Interface (API)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Web Browser Interface (WBUI) Web Service Interface (API) Read More... Fasterdata IPv6 ... Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 ...

  16. Web Service Interface (API)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Service Interface (API) Engineering Services The Network OSCARS How It Works Who's Using OSCARS? OSCARS and Future Tech OSCARS Standard and Open Grid Forum OSCARS Developers Community Web Browser Interface (WBUI) Web Service Interface (API) Read More... Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools The ESnet Engineering Team Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems:

  17. Correlations estimate volume distilled using gravity, boiling point

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.; Consuelo Perez de Alba, M. del; Manriquez, L.; Guardia Mendoz, P. de la

    1995-10-23

    Mathematical nd graphic correlations have been developed for estimating cumulative volume distilled as a function of crude API gravity and true boiling point (TBP). The correlations can be used for crudes with gravities of 21--34{degree} API and boiling points of 150--540 C. In distillation predictions for several mexican and Iraqi crude oils, the correlations have exhibited accuracy comparable to that of laboratory measurements. The paper discusses the need for such a correlation and the testing of the correlation.

  18. Databrowser API for MCL

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2004-07-01

    This code provides an application programming interface to the Macintosh OSX Carbon Databrowser from Macintosh Common Lisp. The Databrowser API is made available to Lisp via high level native CLOS classes and methods, obviating the need to write low-level Carbon code. This code is primarily ‘glue’ in that its job is to provide an interface between two extant software tools: Macintosh Common Lisp and the OSX Databrowser, both of which are COTS products from privatemore » vendors. The Databrowser is an extremely useful user interface widget that is provided with Apple’s OSX (and to some extent, OS9) operating systems. One Apple-sanctioned method for using the Databrowser is via an API called Carbon, which is designed for C and C++ programmers. We have translated the low-level Carbon programming interface to the Databrowser into high-level object-oriented Common Lisp calls, functions, methods. and classes to enable MCL programmers to more readily take advantage of the Databrowser from Lisp programs.« less

  19. APIs | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    by Ianjkalin(84) Contributor 23 September, 2012 - 15:52 Datapalooza Announcements APIs Big Data Datapalooza EDI EERE Open Data OpenEI New data has been liberated Rmckeel's...

  20. Energy API Browser | OpenEI

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    of interest to center. Selected API information will be displayed below. Alternatively, you can download a CSV with this API data. Last reviewed on 08.23.2013 Powered by OpenEI...

  1. The Web as an API.

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, J. H.

    2001-01-01

    As programmers we have worked with many Application Development Interface API development kits. They are well suited for interaction with a particular system. A vast source of information can be made accessible by using the http protocol through the web as an API. This setup has many advantages including the vast knowledge available on setting web servers and services. Also, these tools are available on most hardware and operating system combinations. In this paper I will cover the various types of systems that can be developed this way, their advantages and some drawbacks of this approach. Index Terms--Application Programmer Interface, Distributed applications, Hyper Text Transfer Protocol, Web.

  2. NMI Handler API V2.6

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2005-02-15

    This patch provides an API that facilitates developing kernel modules that function as NMI (nonmaskable interrupt) handlers.

  3. ,"Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,"Excel File Name:","petpridfp3km.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavpetpetpridfp3km.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ...

  4. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    through 1980 reflect the month of reporting; values since then reflect the month of acquisition, which can be the month of loading, the month of landing, or sometime between those...

  5. Revised API Gravity ranges of EIA-182 Crude Streams

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Sweet Mississippi Sweet New Mexico Intermediate North Dakota Sweet North Texas Sweet OK Sweet South Texas Sweet Tx - Panhandle Note: These data are published in Table 20 of the...

  6. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Form FEA-F701-M-0, "Transfer Pricing Report," January 1978 through December 1978; Form ERA-51, "Transfer Pricing Report," January 1979 through September 1982; Form EP-51,...

  7. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Notes section for additional detail. Sources: Energy Information Administration, Form FEA-F701-M-0, "Transfer Pricing Report," January 1978 through December 1978; Form ERA-51,...

  8. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1993 January ... 11.69 12.53 15.50 16.21 17.71 17.57 W February ... 12.19 13.21 16.75 16.98 18.68 18.67 18.63 March ... 12.81 13.71...

  9. Landed Costs of Imported Crude by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History 20.0 or Less 56.38 71.54 96.89 97.49 95.87 85.31 1978-2014 20.1 to 25.0 55.68 71.07 93.32 91.32 88.35 81.44 1978-2014 25.1 to...

  10. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History 20.0 or Less 54.05 72.40 101.30 102.79 99.40 87.83 1993-2014 20.1 to 25.0 55.66 75.04 103.07 101.56 100.70 91.05 1993-2014 25.1...

  11. Percentages of Total Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History 20.0 or Less 14.08 15.13 17.20 16.66 16.20 18.49 1978-2014 20.1 to 25.0 26.11 26.01 27.47 29.77 33.87 36.73 1978-2014 25.1 to...

  12. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1978; Form ERA-51, "Transfer Pricing Report," January 1979 through September 1982; Form EP-51, "Monthly Foreign Crude Oil Transaction Report," October 1982 through June 1984; Form...

  13. Landed Costs of Imported Crude by API Gravity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    India's Housing Sector - Energy Information Administration Canadian Energy Demand Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector SERIES: Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis Canadian Energy Demand Release date: June 2, 2015 The residential sector is one of the main end-use sectors in Canada accounting for 16.7% of total end-use site energy consumption in 2009 (computed from NRCan 2012. pp, 4-5). In this year, the residential sector accounted for 54.5% of buildings total site

  14. tagging API | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    REEEP REEGLE structured tagging API Reegle and OpenEI share the vision that easy access to energy information will help drive future developments in clean energy development....

  15. Api Nova Energia Srl | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search Name: Api Nova Energia Srl Place: Roma, Italy Zip: 198 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Develops, builds, finances, acquires, owns and operates energy production...

  16. What is the Vehicle API? | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    What is the Vehicle API? Home > Groups > Developer The vehicle API does not seem to contain any end point. Is there some documentation about this service? http:...

  17. API Requirements for Dynamic Graph Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, B; Eliassi-Rad, T

    2006-10-13

    Given a large-scale time-evolving multi-modal and multi-relational complex network (a.k.a., a large-scale dynamic semantic graph), we want to implement algorithms that discover patterns of activities on the graph and learn predictive models of those discovered patterns. This document outlines the application programming interface (API) requirements for fast prototyping of feature extraction, learning, and prediction algorithms on large dynamic semantic graphs. Since our algorithms must operate on large-scale dynamic semantic graphs, we have chosen to use the graph API developed in the CASC Complex Networks Project. This API is supported on the back end by a semantic graph database (developed by Scott Kohn and his team). The advantages of using this API are (i) we have full-control of its development and (ii) the current API meets almost all of the requirements outlined in this document.

  18. The JANA Calibrations and Conditions Database API

    SciTech Connect

    David Lawrence

    2010-07-01

    Calibrations and conditions databases can be accessed from within the JANA Event Processing framework through the API defined in its JCalibration base class. The API is designed to support everything from databases, to web services to flat files for the backend. A Web Service backend using the gSOAP toolkit has been implemented which is particularly interesting since it addresses many modern cybersecurity issues including support for SSL. The API allows constants to be retrieved through a single line of C++ code with most of the context, including the transport mechanism, being implied by the run currently being analyzed and the environment relieving developers from implementing such details.

  19. Gravity brake

    DOEpatents

    Lujan, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanical gravity brake that prevents hoisted loads within a shaft from free-falling when a loss of hoisting force occurs. A loss of hoist lifting force may occur in a number of situations, for example if a hoist cable were to break, the brakes were to fail on a winch, or the hoist mechanism itself were to fail. Under normal hoisting conditions, the gravity brake of the invention is subject to an upward lifting force from the hoist and a downward pulling force from a suspended load. If the lifting force should suddenly cease, the loss of differential forces on the gravity brake in free-fall is translated to extend a set of brakes against the walls of the shaft to stop the free fall descent of the gravity brake and attached load.

  20. Make aromatics from LPG

    SciTech Connect

    Doolan, P.C. ); Pujado, P.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) consists mainly of the propane and butane fraction recovered from gas fields, associated petroleum gas and refinery operations. Apart from its use in steam cracking and stream reforming, LPG has few petrochemical applications. The relative abundance of LPG and the strong demand for aromatics - benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX) - make it economically attractive to produce aromatics via the aromatization of propane and butanes. This paper describes the Cyclar process, which is based on a catalyst formulation developed by BP and which uses UOP's CCR catalyst regeneration technology, converts propane, butanes or mixtures thereof to petrochemical-quality aromatics in a single step.

  1. Overview of API (COPM) - measurement activities

    SciTech Connect

    Beckstrom, J.C.

    1995-12-01

    The American Petroleum Institute was founded in 1919 as an outgrowth of the National Petroleum War Committee. That committee was comprised of U.S. oil industry leaders who worked together with the federal government to meet the tremendous demand for petroleum fuel during World War I. The experience demonstrated that, oil industry representatives could work together on common problems affecting the industry and still compete with one another in the marketplace. This in an important concept because under U.S. antitrust law, industry competitors can work together toward mutual objectives using API as the forum. API was the first national petroleum trade association to include all five of the major branches of the industry - exploration, production, refining, transportation and marketing. Today, API is the oil industry`s largest trade association with about 250 member companies. As a non-profit organization, API`s objectives, as set fort in its charter, are: (1) Promote the interests of the U.S. oil industry; (2) Encourage the development of petroleum technology; (3) Cooperate with government on matters of national concern; (4) Foster foreign and domestic trade in U.S. petroleum products; and (5) Inform government and the general public on matters affecting the petroleum industry.

  2. Gravity settling

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Hyman R.; Long, R. H.; Simone, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    Solids are separated from a liquid in a gravity settler provided with inclined solid intercepting surfaces to intercept the solid settling path to coalesce the solids and increase the settling rate. The intercepting surfaces are inverted V-shaped plates, each formed from first and second downwardly inclined upwardly curved intersecting conical sections having their apices at the vessel wall.

  3. OpenEI API. Implementation help | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    OpenEI API. Implementation help Home > Groups > Developer Hi Everyone, I am trying to determine the best way to consume the OpenEI utility rates and have come across the REST API....

  4. Asset Score API Webinar June 14, 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Asset Score API Webinar June 14, 2013 Asset Score API Webinar June 14, 2013 asset_score_api_webinar_061413.wmv (45.39 MB) More Documents & Publications Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot distance_webinar_2013_03_05.wmv

  5. QER- Comment of American petroleum Institute (API)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Please find attached API's comments (and associated attachments) to the Department of Energy's Public Comment on the Quadrennial Energy Review [79 FR 50638, Doc. No. 2014-20114]. Please do not hesitate to contact me should you have any questions or need anything else.

  6. Is nonrelativistic gravity possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Kocharyan, A. A.

    2009-07-15

    We study nonrelativistic gravity using the Hamiltonian formalism. For the dynamics of general relativity (relativistic gravity) the formalism is well known and called the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) formalism. We show that if the lapse function is constrained correctly, then nonrelativistic gravity is described by a consistent Hamiltonian system. Surprisingly, nonrelativistic gravity can have solutions identical to relativistic gravity ones. In particular, (anti-)de Sitter black holes of Einstein gravity and IR limit of Horava gravity are locally identical.

  7. Collaboration Topics - Acceleration Hardware and APIs | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Acceleration Hardware and APIs This work explores areas of common interest in programming models for the coming exascale era. Initially, the intent was to aggregate NNSA and CEA lab's work in this area into a common repository. Early work will focus on low-level application programming interfaces (APIs), micro-benchmarks, and mini-applications. Work in the out-years will include APIs and languages that provide higher levels of abstraction. Accomplishments 1)

  8. Reegle mentions OpenEI in video on new Content Pool API | OpenEI...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    featured in the video, describes how the reegle tagging api structures and enriches big, unstructured data, turning data into knowledge. The tagging API analyzes documents,...

  9. Investigating an API for resilient exascale computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Stearley, Jon R.; Tomkins, James; VanDyke, John P.; Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Laros, James H.,; Bridges, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    Increased HPC capability comes with increased complexity, part counts, and fault occurrences. In- creasing the resilience of systems and applications to faults is a critical requirement facing the viability of exascale systems, as the overhead of traditional checkpoint/restart is projected to outweigh its bene ts due to fault rates outpacing I/O bandwidths. As faults occur and propagate throughout hardware and software layers, pervasive noti cation and handling mechanisms are necessary. This report describes an initial investigation of fault types and programming interfaces to mitigate them. Proof-of-concept APIs are presented for the frequent and important cases of memory errors and node failures, and a strategy proposed for lesystem failures. These involve changes to the operating system, runtime, I/O library, and application layers. While a single API for fault handling among hardware and OS and application system-wide remains elusive, the e ort increased our understanding of both the mountainous challenges and the promising trailheads. 3

  10. Geological model for oil gravity variations in Oriente Basin, Ecuador

    SciTech Connect

    Dashwood, M.F.; Abbotts, I.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Oriente basin is one of the major productive Subandean basins. Most of the fields produce 29/sup 0/-33/sup 0/ API paraffinic oils, but oils have been discovered with gravities ranging from 10/sup 0/to 35/sup 0/ API. All the oils have been recovered from multiple middle to Late Cretaceous sandstone reservoirs (Hollin and Napo Formations). Wells display a variety of oil gravities by reservoir. The origin of the Oriente oils is problematical and controversial, but structural, geochemical, and well evidence suggest a vast oil kitchen west of the present Andean foothills that was mature for oil generation by at least early Tertiary. Oil analyses indicate a single family of oils is present. Oil gravity variations can be explained systematically in terms of the various alteration processes suffered by the oil in each reservoir. Intermittent early Andean uplift (latest Cretaceous to Mid-Eocene) resulted in biodegradation and water-washing of oils, particularly in the uppermost Napo reservoirs. The main Andean orogeny (Pliocene) uplifted the Hollin reservoir to outcrop in the west, and tilted the basin down to the south. This movement resulted in water washing or flushing of the Hollin aquifer and a phase of northward remigration of oil. Late Andean structures postdated primary oil migration. Almost all structures displaying growth during the Late Cretaceous to early Eocene have been oil bearing, but some, particularly those located on the present-day basin flanks, were later severely biodegraded or breached.

  11. The IRMIS object model and services API.

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, C.; Dohan, D. A.; Arnold, N. D.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2005-01-01

    The relational model developed for the Integrated Relational Model of Installed Systems (IRMIS) toolkit has been successfully used to capture the Advanced Photon Source (APS) control system software (EPICS process variables and their definitions). The relational tables are populated by a crawler script that parses each Input/Output Controller (IOC) start-up file when an IOC reboot is detected. User interaction is provided by a Java Swing application that acts as a desktop for viewing the process variable information. Mapping between the display objects and the relational tables was carried out with the Hibernate Object Relational Modeling (ORM) framework. Work is well underway at the APS to extend the relational modeling to include control system hardware. For this work, due in part to the complex user interaction required, the primary application development environment has shifted from the relational database view to the object oriented (Java) perspective. With this approach, the business logic is executed in Java rather than in SQL stored procedures. This paper describes the object model used to represent control system software, hardware, and interconnects in IRMIS. We also describe the services API used to encapsulate the required behaviors for creating and maintaining the complex data. In addition to the core schema and object model, many important concepts in IRMIS are captured by the services API. IRMIS is an ambitious collaborative effort for defining and developing a relational database and associated applications to comprehensively document the large and complex EPICS-based control systems of today's accelerators. The documentation effort includes process variables, control system hardware, and interconnections. The approach could also be used to document all components of the accelerator, including mechanical, vacuum, power supplies, etc. One key aspect of IRMIS is that it is a documentation framework, not a design and development tool. We do not

  12. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J. H.; Orellana, P. A.; Laroze, D.

    2014-03-14

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule.

  13. Utility Rate API v2 | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hi, I am running into one issue with the API and that is using an ask query to get the data in the embedded multiple instance template fields. This is the last big problem that...

  14. OpenEI API listing | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    strategy conversation just this week, and we spoke somewhat indirectly about a list of energy APIs on OpenEI. We have the Energy Hackathon Resource page, but I want to draw energy...

  15. DOE Data Explorer API (v0.1) Documentation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Explorer API Documentation Introduction General Guidelines HTTP Methods Response Formats Response Headers Pagination Structure Record Model HTTP Status Codes Record Fields Error Model HTTP Status Codes Error Fields Endpoints Record List (Search) Single Record by ID Introduction Please note: This version of the Data Explorer API (v0.1) is a release candidate being made available for review and testing, and will be deprecated in the near future in favor of an official v1 release. Please

  16. DOE Data Explorer API (v0.1) Documentation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Data Explorer API Documentation Introduction General Guidelines HTTP Methods Response Formats Response Headers Pagination Structure Record Model HTTP Status Codes Record Fields Error Model HTTP Status Codes Error Fields Endpoints Record List (Search) Single Record by ID Introduction Please note: This version of the Data Explorer API (v0.1) is a release candidate being made available for review and testing, and will be deprecated in the near future in favor of an official v1 release. Please

  17. Investigating an API for resilient exascale computing. (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Investigating an API for resilient exascale computing. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Investigating an API for resilient exascale computing. Increased HPC capability comes with increased complexity, part counts, and fault occurrences. In- creasing the resilience of systems and applications to faults is a critical requirement facing the viability of exascale systems, as the overhead of traditional checkpoint/restart is projected to outweigh its bene ts due to fault

  18. Table 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    17.18 17.64 Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-182, "Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Report." Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999...

  19. Table 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    reported. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-182, "Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Report." Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual...

  20. Table 23. Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    12.17 12.80 Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-182, "Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Report." Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998...

  1. Table 28. Percentages of Total Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    through 1980 reflect the month of reporting; values since then reflect the month of acquisition, which can be the month of loading, the month of landing, or sometime between those...

  2. Table 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    through 1980 reflect the month of reporting; values since then reflect the month of acquisition, which can be the month of loading, the month of landing, or sometime between those...

  3. Table 28. Percentages of Total Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Form FEA-F701-M-0, "Transfer Pricing Report," January 1978 through December 1978; Form ERA-51, "Transfer Pricing Report," January 1979 through September 1982; Form EP-51,...

  4. Table 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Form FEA-F701-M-0, "Transfer Pricing Report," January 1978 through December 1978; Form ERA-51, "Transfer Pricing Report," January 1979 through September 1982; Form EP-51,...

  5. Table 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Notes section for additional detail. Sources: Energy Information Administration, Form FEA-F701-M-0, "Transfer Pricing Report," January 1978 through December 1978; Form ERA-51,...

  6. Table 28. Percentages of Total Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Notes section for additional detail. Sources: Energy Information Administration, Form FEA-F701-M-0, "Transfer Pricing Report," January 1978 through December 1978; Form ERA-51,...

  7. F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History 20.0 or Less 54.76 69.51 94.66 96.07 93.91 82.40 1978-2014 20.1 to 25.0 54.36 69.72 94.15 94.35 91.27 80.16 1978-2014 25.1 to...

  8. Table 28. Percentages of Total Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Annual Energy Outlook

    1993 January ... 4.52 18.16 22.93 28.47 23.99 1.48 0.45 February ... 4.19 18.11 19.48 35.50 17.92 3.57 1.22 March ... 4.98 18.66 20.35...

  9. Table 28. Percentages of Total Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1996 January ... 4.15 22.60 17.85 28.54 23.19 2.19 1.48 February ... 4.52 22.26 14.69 28.79 24.96 3.51 1.27 March ... 3.79 19.54 19.77...

  10. Table 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Annual Energy Outlook

    1997 January ... 18.57 19.34 23.73 22.13 24.80 23.89 23.89 February ... 14.79 17.00 21.18 19.69 22.81 22.74 24.44 March ... 14.56 16.06...

  11. Table 27. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Annual Energy Outlook

    1978; Form ERA-51, "Transfer Pricing Report," January 1979 through September 1982; Form EP-51, "Monthly Foreign Crude Oil Transaction Report," October 1982 through June 1984; Form...

  12. F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Information Administration (EIA) Power Plant Environmental International Emissions All Environment Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Reports ‹ environment State Carbon Dioxide Emissions Data for: 2014 | Release Date: November 3, 2016 | Next Release Date: October 2017 Summary By fuel By energy sectors State methodology State analysis (update pending) Additional Tables Coal Commercial Electric Industrial Natural gas Petroleum Residential Transportation States Format Alabama Alaska

  13. Visualize energy APIs with a new OpenEI browser | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 31 August, 2012 - 12:54 APIs Big Data cleanweb data OpenEI OpenEI has created a simple way to see energy APIs available...

  14. Help:US Utility Rate Database API Tutorial | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    with OpenEI API Requests to the OpenEI API can be made in the address bar of your internet search engine. The following is the base of the "request url" that allows a user to...

  15. V-142: Oracle Java Reflection API Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2: Oracle Java Reflection API Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-142: Oracle Java Reflection API Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code April 25, 2013 - 12:14am...

  16. Getting Rate Information from the utility_rates api | OpenEI...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Getting Rate Information from the utilityrates api Home > Groups > Utility Rate Hello, I am trying to use the API to generate information similar to what you can see here: http:...

  17. The utility rate database version 1 API is now deprecated | OpenEI...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    The utility rate database version 1 API is now deprecated Home > Groups > Utility Rate Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 6 September, 2013 - 14:00 API Utility...

  18. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    1996-01-01

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

  19. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-02-06

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chlorinated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method are disclosed. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis. 5 figs.

  20. Gauge/Gravity Duality

    ScienceCinema

    Polchinski, Joseph [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics

    2010-09-01

    Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

  1. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  2. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  3. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1989-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  4. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1994-06-14

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  5. Nucleophilic fluorination of aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Barrio, Jorge R

    2014-03-18

    Iodylbenzene derivatives substituted with electron donating as well as electron withdrawing groups on the aromatic ring are used as precursors in aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. The iodyl group (IO.sub.2) is regiospecifically substituted by nucleophilic fluoride to provide the corresponding fluoroaryl derivatives. No-carrier-added [F-18]fluoride ion derived from anhydrous [F-18](F/Kryptofix, [F-18]CsF or a quaternary ammonium fluoride (e.g., Me.sub.4NF, Et.sub.4NF, n-Bu.sub.4NF, (PhCH.sub.2).sub.4NF) exclusively substitutes the iodyl moiety in these derivatives and provides high specific activity F-18 labeled fluoroaryl analogs. Iodyl derivatives of a benzothiazole analog and 6-iodyl-L-dopa derivatives have been synthesized as precursors and have been used in the preparation of no-carrier-added [F-18]fluorobenzothiazole as well as 6-[F-18]fluoro-L-dopa.

  6. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-09-07

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

  7. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1989-07-18

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  8. Hawaii Gravity Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-12-15

    Gravity model for the state of Hawaii. Data is from the following source: Flinders, A.F., Ito, G., Garcia, M.O., Sinton, J.M., Kauahikaua, J.P., and Taylor, B., 2013, Intrusive dike complexes, cumulate cores, and the extrusive growth of Hawaiian volcanoes: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 40, p. 3367–3373, doi:10.1002/grl.50633.

  9. Noncomparative scaling of aromaticity through electron itinerancy

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Satadal; Goswami, Tamal; Misra, Anirban

    2015-10-15

    Aromaticity is a multidimensional concept and not a directly observable. These facts have always stood in the way of developing an appropriate theoretical framework for scaling of aromaticity. In the present work, a quantitative account of aromaticity is developed on the basis of cyclic delocalization of π-electrons, which is the phenomenon leading to unique features of aromatic molecules. The stabilization in molecular energy, caused by delocalization of π-electrons is obtained as a second order perturbation energy for archetypal aromatic systems. The final expression parameterizes the aromatic stabilization energy in terms of atom to atom charge transfer integral, onsite repulsion energy and the population of spin orbitals at each site in the delocalized π-electrons. An appropriate computational platform is framed to compute each and individual parameter in the derived equation. The numerical values of aromatic stabilization energies obtained for various aromatic molecules are found to be in close agreement with available theoretical and experimental reports. Thus the reliable estimate of aromaticity through the proposed formalism renders it as a useful tool for the direct assessment of aromaticity, which has been a long standing problem in chemistry.

  10. Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids. Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M. 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 40 CHEMISTRY; COAL LIQUIDS;...

  11. Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and hydrotreating of coal liquids. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids. ...

  12. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J. H.; Rey-Gonzlez, R. R.; Laroze, D.

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices.

  13. Dehydrocyclodimerization, converting LPG to aromatics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.A.; Hilder, G.K.

    1984-03-01

    British Petroleum (BP) recognized the potential need for ways of exploiting feedstocks with low opportunity cost and commenced a research program at its Sunbury Research Center to discover and develop a catalyst for the conversion of LPG to a liquid product. The successful outcome of this research program is the Cyclar /SUP SM/ process, a joint development of UOP Process Division and British Petroleum. The Cyclar process offers a single-step conversion of LPG to an aromatic product which has a highvalue, is easily transported and useful both to fuel and petrochemical applications. The LPG producer can invest in a single unit, avoiding the need to identify and develop markets for multiple C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ products. This catalytic process, which employs UOP Continuous Catalyst Regeneration (CCR) technology, can also be applied to refinery light ends to produce a high-quality gasoline. Aromatic and hydrogen yields from propane and butane feeds surpass those obtained from catalytic reforming of Light Arabian naphtha. This paper describes the principles of the Cyclar process and illustrates yields and economics for several interesting applications.

  14. Geometric scalar theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Novello, M.; Bittencourt, E.; Goulart, E.; Salim, J.M.; Toniato, J.D.; Moschella, U. E-mail: eduhsb@cbpf.br E-mail: egoulart@cbpf.br E-mail: toniato@cbpf.br

    2013-06-01

    We present a geometric scalar theory of gravity. Our proposal will be described using the ''background field method'' introduced by Gupta, Feynman, Deser and others as a field theory formulation of general relativity. We analyze previous criticisms against scalar gravity and show how the present proposal avoids these difficulties. This concerns not only the theoretical complaints but also those related to observations. In particular, we show that the widespread belief of the conjecture that the source of scalar gravity must be the trace of the energy-momentum tensor which is one of the main difficulties to couple gravity with electromagnetic phenomenon in previous models does not apply to our geometric scalar theory. From the very beginning this is not a special relativistic scalar gravity. The adjective ''geometric'' pinpoints its similarity with general relativity: this is a metric theory of gravity. Some consequences of this new scalar theory are explored.

  15. Gravity Techniques | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    in density, such as at fault contacts. 2 Gravity techniques are also applied towards reservoir monitoring for subsidence and mass gain or loss within a geothermal reservoir...

  16. Gravity Methods | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Methods Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gravity Methods Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(3) Exploration...

  17. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  18. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-01-05

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  19. Geologic interpretation of gravity anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Andreyev, B.A.; Klushin, I.G.

    1990-04-19

    This Russian textbook provides a sufficiently complete and systematic illumination of physico-geologic and mathematical aspect of complex problem of interpretation of gravity anomalies. The rational methods of localization of anomalies are examined in detail. All methods of interpreting gravity anomalies are described which have found successful application in practice. Also given are ideas of some new methods of the interpretation of gravity anomalies, the prospects for further development and industrial testing. Numerous practical examples to interpretation are given. Partial Contents: Bases of gravitational field theory; Physico-geologic bases of gravitational prospecting; Principles of geologic interpretation of gravity anomalies; Conversions and calculations of anomalies; Interpretation of gravity anomalies for bodies of correct geometric form and for bodies of arbitrary form; Geologic interpretation of the results of regional gravitational photographing; Searches and prospecting of oil- and gas-bearing structures and of deposits of ore and nonmetalliferous useful minerals.

  20. Category:Gravity Techniques | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    the following 3 subcategories, out of 3 total. A Airborne Gravity Survey 1 pages G Ground Gravity Survey 1 pages M Microgravity-Hybrid Microgravity 1 pages...

  1. Library API for Z-Order Memory Layout

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2015-02-01

    This library provides a simple-to-use API for implementing an altnerative to traditional row-major order in-memory layout, one based on a Morton- order space filling curve (SFC) , specifically, a Z-order variant of the Morton order curve. The library enables programmers to, after a simple initialization step, to convert a multidimensional array from row-major to Z- order layouts, then use a single, generic API call to access data from any arbitrary (i,j,k) location from within themore » array, whether it it be stored in row- major or z-order format. The motivation for using a SFC in-memory layout is for improved spatial locality, which results in increased use of local high speed cache memory. The basic idea is that with row-major order layouts, a data access to some location that is nearby in index space is likely far away in physical memory, resulting in poor spatial locality and slow runtime. On the other hand, with a SFC-based layout, accesses that are nearby in index space are much more likely to also be nearby in physical memory, resulting in much better spatial locality, and better runtime performance. Numerous studies over the years have shown significant runtime performance gains are realized by using a SFC-based memory layout compared to a row-major layout, sometimes by as much as 50%, which result from the better use of the memory and cache hierarchy that are attendant with a SFC-based layout (see, for example, [Beth2012]). This library implementation is intended for use with codes that work with structured, array-based data in 2 or 3 dimensions. It is not appropriate for use with unstructured or point-based data.« less

  2. Quantum Field Theory & Gravity

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664 Email Bruce Carlsten (505) 667-5657 Email Quantum Field Theory and Gravity at Los Alamos The HEP effort at Los Alamos in this area is actively pursing a number of questions in this area. What is the final state of complete gravitational collapse? What happens at the event horizon? What is dark energy? How did the

  3. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons for fullerene synthesis in flames

    DOEpatents

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.

    2006-12-19

    This invention provides improved methods for combustion synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, employing multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels selected for high carbon conversion to extractable fullerenes. The multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels include those that contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. More specifically, multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels contain a substantial amount of indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof. Coal tar and petroleum distillate fractions provide low cost hydrocarbon fuels containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including without limitation, indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof.

  4. How to get TOU information using REST API... | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    like I have to make more than one API calls (one for zip code to Utility etc.). I am OK with that. I found this page http:en.openei.orgservicesdocrestutilrates that...

  5. Where can I find APIs and other resources for developers competing...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Where can I find APIs and other resources for developers competing at Cleanweb hackathons? Home > Groups > Developer Submitted by Rmckeel on 25 June, 2012 - 07:23 1 answer Points:...

  6. API for current energy usage data per consumer | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    API for current energy usage data per consumer Home > Groups > Developer Hello, I'm a web application developer working on an app to determine an individuals environmental impact,...

  7. Positive signs in massive gravity

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we derive new constraints on massive gravity from unitarity and analyticity of scattering amplitudes. Our results apply to a general effective theory defined by Einstein gravity plus the leading soft diffeomorphism-breaking corrections. We calculate scattering amplitudes for all combinations of tensor, vector, and scalar polarizations. Furthermore, the high-energy behavior of these amplitudes prescribes a specific choice of couplings that ameliorates the ultraviolet cutoff, in agreement with existing literature. We then derive consistency conditions from analytic dispersion relations, which dictate positivity of certain combinations of parameters appearing in the forward scattering amplitudes. These constraints exclude all but a small islandmore » in the parameter space of ghost-free massive gravity. And while the theory of the "Galileon" scalar mode alone is known to be inconsistent with positivity constraints, this is remedied in the full massive gravity theory.« less

  8. Cosmological perturbations in unimodular gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Caixia; Brandenberger, Robert H.; Cai, Yifu; Chen, Pisin E-mail: rhb@hep.physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: chen@slac.stanford.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study cosmological perturbation theory within the framework of unimodular gravity. We show that the Lagrangian constraint on the determinant of the metric required by unimodular gravity leads to an extra constraint on the gauge freedom of the metric perturbations. Although the main equation of motion for the gravitational potential remains the same, the shift variable, which is gauge artifact in General Relativity, cannot be set to zero in unimodular gravity. This non-vanishing shift variable affects the propagation of photons throughout the cosmological evolution and therefore modifies the Sachs-Wolfe relation between the relativistic gravitational potential and the microwave temperature anisotropies. However, for adiabatic fluctuations the difference between the result in General Relativity and unimodular gravity is suppressed on large angular scales. Thus, no strong constraints on the theory can be derived.

  9. A RESTful API for accessing microbial community data for MG-RAST

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Wilke, Andreas; Bischof, Jared; Harrison, Travis; Brettin, Tom; D'Souza, Mark; Gerlach, Wolfgang; Matthews, Hunter; Paczian, Tobias; Wilkening, Jared; Glass, Elizabeth M.; et al

    2015-01-08

    Metagenomic sequencing has produced significant amounts of data in recent years. For example, as of summer 2013, MGRAST has been used to annotate over 110,000 data sets totaling over 43 Terabases. With metagenomic sequencing finding even wider adoption in the scientific community, the existing web-based analysis tools and infrastructure in MG-RAST provide limited capability for data retrieval and analysis, such as comparative analysis between multiple data sets. Moreover, although the system provides many analysis tools, it is not comprehensive. By opening MG-RAST up via a web services API (application programmers interface) we have greatly expanded access to MG-RAST data, asmore » well as provided a mechanism for the use of third-party analysis tools with MG-RAST data. This RESTful API makes all data and data objects created by the MG-RAST pipeline accessible as JSON objects. As part of the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase project (KBase, http:// kbase.us) we have implemented a web services API for MG-RAST. This API complements the existing MG-RAST web interface and constitutes the basis of KBase’s microbial community capabilities. In addition, the API exposes a comprehensive collection of data to programmers. This API, which uses a RESTful (Representational State Transfer) implementation, is compatible with most programming environments and should be easy to use for end users and third parties. It provides comprehensive access to sequence data, quality control results, annotations, and many other data types. Where feasible, we have used standards to expose data and metadata. Code examples are provided in a number of languages both to show the versatility of the API and to provide a starting point for users. We present an API that exposes the data in MG-RAST for consumption by our users, greatly enhancing the utility of the MG-RAST service.« less

  10. A RESTful API for accessing microbial community data for MG-RAST

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, Andreas; Bischof, Jared; Harrison, Travis; Brettin, Tom; D'Souza, Mark; Gerlach, Wolfgang; Matthews, Hunter; Paczian, Tobias; Wilkening, Jared; Glass, Elizabeth M.; Desai, Narayan; Meyer, Folker; Gardner, Paul P.

    2015-01-08

    Metagenomic sequencing has produced significant amounts of data in recent years. For example, as of summer 2013, MGRAST has been used to annotate over 110,000 data sets totaling over 43 Terabases. With metagenomic sequencing finding even wider adoption in the scientific community, the existing web-based analysis tools and infrastructure in MG-RAST provide limited capability for data retrieval and analysis, such as comparative analysis between multiple data sets. Moreover, although the system provides many analysis tools, it is not comprehensive. By opening MG-RAST up via a web services API (application programmers interface) we have greatly expanded access to MG-RAST data, as well as provided a mechanism for the use of third-party analysis tools with MG-RAST data. This RESTful API makes all data and data objects created by the MG-RAST pipeline accessible as JSON objects. As part of the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase project (KBase, http:// kbase.us) we have implemented a web services API for MG-RAST. This API complements the existing MG-RAST web interface and constitutes the basis of KBase’s microbial community capabilities. In addition, the API exposes a comprehensive collection of data to programmers. This API, which uses a RESTful (Representational State Transfer) implementation, is compatible with most programming environments and should be easy to use for end users and third parties. It provides comprehensive access to sequence data, quality control results, annotations, and many other data types. Where feasible, we have used standards to expose data and metadata. Code examples are provided in a number of languages both to show the versatility of the API and to provide a starting point for users. We present an API that exposes the data in MG-RAST for consumption by our users, greatly enhancing the utility of the MG-RAST service.

  11. Aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in a laminar premixed n-butane flame

    SciTech Connect

    Marinov, N.M.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.; Vincitore, A.M.; Castaldi, M.J.; Senkan, S.M.; Melius, C.F.

    1998-07-01

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling work has been performed to investigate aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation pathways in a premixed, rich, sooting, n-butane-oxygen-argon burner stabilized flame. An atmospheric pressure, laminar flat flame operated at an equivalence ratio of 2.6 was used to acquire experimental data for model validation. Gas composition analysis was conducted by an on-line gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer technique. Measurements were made in the main reaction and post-reaction zones for a number of low molecular weight species, aliphatics, aromatics, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranging from two to five-fused aromatic rings. Reaction flux and sensitivity analysis were used to help identify the important reaction sequences leading to aromatic and PAH growth and destruction in the n-butane flame. Reaction flux analysis showed the propargyl recombination reaction was the dominant pathway to benzene formation. The consumption of propargyl by H atoms was shown to limit propargyl, benzene, and naphthalene formation in flames as exhibited by the large negative sensitivity coefficients. Naphthalene and phenanthrene production was shown to be plausibly formed through reactions involving resonantly stabilized cyclopentadienyl and indenyl radicals. Many of the low molecular weight aliphatics, combustion by-products, aromatics, branched aromatics, and PAHs were fairly well simulated by the model. Additional work is required to understand the formation mechanisms of phenyl acetylene, pyrene, and fluoranthene in the n-butane flame. 73 refs.

  12. Experimental and modeling investigation of aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in a premixed ethylene flame

    SciTech Connect

    Castaldi, M.J.; Marinov, N.M.; Melius, C.F.

    1996-02-01

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling has been performed to investigate aromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbon formation pathways in a rich, sooting, ethylene-oxygen-argon premixed flame. An atmospheric pressure, laminar flat flame operated at an equivalence ratio of 2.5 was used to acquire experimental data for model validation. Gas composition analysis was conducted by an on-line gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) technique. Measurements were made in the flame and post-flame zone for a number of low molecular weight species, aliphatics, aromatics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranging from two to five-aromatic fused rings. The modeling results show the key reaction sequences leading to aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon growth involve the combination of resonantly stabilized radicals. In particular, propargyl and 1-methylallenyl combination reactions lead to benzene and methyl substituted benzene formation, while polycyclic aromatics are formed from cyclopentadienyl radicals and fused rings that have a shared C{sub 5} side structure. Naphthalene production through the reaction step of cyclopentadienyl self-combination and phenanthrene formation from indenyl and cyclopentadienyl combination were shown to be important in the flame modeling study. The removal of phenyl by O{sub 2} leading to cyclopentadienyl formation is expected to play a pivotal role in the PAH or soot precursor growth process under fuel-rich oxidation conditions.

  13. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Robert E. [557 Escondido Cir., Livermore, CA 94550; Dolbeare, Frank A. [5178 Diane La., Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-10-21

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes.

  14. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Robert E.; Dolbeare, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 5-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes.

  15. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, R.E.; Dolbeare, F.A.

    1980-10-21

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes. No Drawings

  16. RECOVERY OF URANIUM BY AROMATIC DITHIOCARBAMATE COMPLEXING

    DOEpatents

    Neville, O.K.

    1959-08-11

    A selective complexing organic solvent extraction process is presented for the separation of uranium values from an aqueous nitric acid solution of neutron irradiated thorium. The process comprises contacting the solution with an organic aromatic dithiccarbamaie and recovering the resulting urancdithiccarbamate complex with an organic solvent such as ethyl acetate.

  17. Mechanical Characteristics of Submerged Arc Weldment in API Gas Pipeline Steel of Grade X65

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemi, S. H.; Mohammadyani, D.

    2011-01-17

    The mechanical properties of submerged arc weldment (SAW) in gas transportation pipeline steel of grade API X65 (65 ksi yield strength) were investigated. This steel is produced by thermo mechanical control rolled (TMC), and is largely used in Iran gas piping systems and networks. The results from laboratory study on three different regions; i.e. base metal (BM), fusion zone (FZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) were used to compare weldment mechanical characteristics with those specified by API 5L (revision 2004) standard code. Different laboratory experiments were conducted on test specimens taken from 48 inch outside diameter and 14.3 mm wall thickness gas pipeline. The test results showed a gradient of microstructure and Vickers hardness data from the centerline of FZ towards the unaffected MB. Similarly, lower Charpy absorbed energy (compared to BM) was observed in the FZ impact specimens. Despite this, the API specifications were fulfilled in three tested zones, ensuring pipeline structural integrity under working conditions.

  18. Separation, characterization and instrumental analysis of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon ring classes in petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielowiec, J.; Beshai, J.E.; George, A.E.

    1980-08-01

    To develop effective utilization technology for heavy streams from conventional fuels and unconventional resources such as heavy oils and oilsand bitumens, detailed information on the chemical composition of the feedstocks is needed. Attempts were made during the seventies to modify the API Project 60 scheme of analysis or to develop chemically more efficient, and less time-consuming, separation and characterization methods. These attempts aimed to improve characterization by separating the samples into concentrates of different structural types. Samples throughput was increased by using pressure and higher performance chromatographic systems. Other valuable contributions, such as coal-liquid characterization in terms of different chemical functionalities have also been made. The separation of aromatic ring classes and characterization or identification of their major components was our primary objective in this study. A silica-R(NH/sub 2/)/sub 2/-based HPLC system was used in our laboratory to study the analytical potential of this approach; the work was described in a previous publication. In the present study, the applicability of HPLC separation by this system and instrumental spectrometric characterization of 3- and 4-ring PAHs isolated from two Canadian oils were investigated. The oils used, Medicine River and Lloydminster, are examples of hydrocarbon-dominated materials representing light and heavy processing feedstocks, respectively.

  19. Monitoring of vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.

    2004-06-01

    An apparatus for monitoring vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a high-temperature environment has an excitation source producing electromagnetic radiation, an optical path having an optical probe optically communicating the electromagnetic radiation received at a proximal end to a distal end, a spectrometer or polychromator, a detector, and a positioner coupled to the first optical path. The positioner can slidably move the distal end of the optical probe to maintain the distal end position with respect to an area of a material undergoing combustion. The emitted wavelength can be directed to a detector in a single optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration, in a dual optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration or in a dual optical probe 90.degree. side scattered configuration. The apparatus can be used to monitor an emitted wavelength of energy from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon as it fluoresces in a high temperature environment.

  20. Synthetic fuel aromaticity and staged combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Longanbach, J. R.; Chan, L. K.; Levy, A.

    1982-11-15

    Samples of middle and heavy SRC-II distillates were distilled into 50 C boiling point range fractions. These were characterized by measurements of their molecular weight, elemental analysis and basic nitrogen content and calculation of average molecular structures. The structures typically consisted of 1 to 3 aromatic rings fused to alicyclic rings with short, 1 to 3 carbon aliphatic side chains. The lower boiling fractions contained significant amounts (1 atom/molecule) of oxygen while the heavier fractions contained so few heteroatoms that they were essentially hydrocarbons. Laboratory scale oxidative-pyrolysis experiments were carried out at pyrolysis temperatures of 500 to 1100 C and oxygen concentrations from 0 to 100 percent of stoichiometry. Analysis of liquid products, collected in condensers cooled with liquid nitrogen showed that aromatization is a major reaction in the absence of oxygen. The oxygen-containing materials (phenolics) seem to be more resistant to thermal pyrolysis than unsubstituted aromatics. Nitrogen converts from basic to nonbasic forms at about 500 C. The nonbasic nitrogen is more stable and survives up to 700 C after which it is slowly removed. A recently constructed 50,000 Btu/hr staged combustor was used to study the chemistry of the nitrogen and aromatics. SRC II combustion was studied under fuel-rich, first-stage conditions at air/fuel ratios from 0.6 to 1.0 times stoichiometric. The chemistry of the fuel during combustion calls for further investigation in order to examine the mechanism by which HCN is evolved as a common intermediate for the formation of the nitrogen-containing gaseous combustion products. 25 references, 45 figures, 25 tables.

  1. Characterization and analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, G.M.; Smith, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Sampling and analytical procedures were developed for determining the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in animal-exposure chambers during studies on exposure to diesel exhaust, coal dust, or mixtures of these two pollutants. Fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(e)pyrene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene were used as representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. High-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection was used for analysis. Coal-dust only samples revealed a broad, rising background in the chromatogram with small peaks superimposed corresponding to fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo(a)anthracene, diesel exhaust only samples showed many peaks on a flat baseline including those corresponding to fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene. In general, no polynuclear aromatics were noted in the clean air samples. The authors note that relatively minor changes in air/fuel ratio, lubricant, fuel, and load may have substantial effects on very minor components of the exhaust emission.

  2. Unexpected Cancellations in Gravity Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.; Carrasco, J.J.; Forde, D.; Ita, H.; Johansson, H.; /UCLA

    2007-07-13

    Recent computations of scattering amplitudes show that N = 8 supergravity is surprisingly well behaved in the ultraviolet and may even be ultraviolet finite in perturbation theory. The novel cancellations necessary for ultraviolet finiteness first appear at one loop in the guise of the ''no-triangle hypothesis''. We study one-loop amplitudes in pure Einstein gravity and point out the existence of cancellations similar to those found previously in N = 8 supergravity. These cancellations go beyond those found in the one-loop effective action. Using unitarity, this suggests that generic theories of quantum gravity based on the Einstein-Hilbert action may be better behaved in the ultraviolet at higher loops than suggested by naive power counting, though without additional (supersymmetric) cancellations they diverge. We comment on future studies that should be performed to support this proposal.

  3. Measurement analysis and quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Albers, Mark; Kiefer, Claus; Reginatto, Marcel

    2008-09-15

    We consider the question of whether consistency arguments based on measurement theory show that the gravitational field must be quantized. Motivated by the argument of Eppley and Hannah, we apply a DeWitt-type measurement analysis to a coupled system that consists of a gravitational wave interacting with a mass cube. We also review the arguments of Eppley and Hannah and of DeWitt, and investigate a second model in which a gravitational wave interacts with a quantized scalar field. We argue that one cannot conclude from the existing gedanken experiments that gravity has to be quantized. Despite the many physical arguments which speak in favor of a quantum theory of gravity, it appears that the justification for such a theory must be based on empirical tests and does not follow from logical arguments alone.

  4. Tagged Neutron Source for API Inspection Systems with Greatly Enhanced Spatial Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    2012-06-04

    We recently developed induced fission and transmission imaging methods with time- and directionally-tagged neutrons offer new capabilities for characterization of fissile material configurations and enhanced detection of special nuclear materials (SNM). An Advanced Associated Particle Imaging (API) generator with higher angular resolution and neutron yield than existing systems is needed to fully exploit these methods.

  5. Emergent Horava gravity in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Volovik, G.E.; L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kosygina 2, 119334 Moscow ; Zubkov, M.A.

    2014-01-15

    First of all, we reconsider the tight-binding model of monolayer graphene, in which the variations of the hopping parameters are allowed. We demonstrate that the emergent 2D Weitzenbock geometry as well as the emergent U(1) gauge field appear. The emergent gauge field is equal to the linear combination of the components of the zweibein. Therefore, we actually deal with the gauge fixed version of the emergent 2+1 D teleparallel gravity. In particular, we work out the case, when the variations of the hopping parameters are due to the elastic deformations, and relate the elastic deformations with the emergent zweibein. Next, we investigate the tight-binding model with the varying intralayer hopping parameters for the multilayer graphene with the ABC stacking. In this case the emergent 2D Weitzenbock geometry and the emergent U(1) gauge field appear as well, and the emergent low energy effective field theory has the anisotropic scaling. -- Highlights: The tight-binding model for graphene with varying hopping parameters is considered. The emergent gravity and emergent gauge fields are derived. For the case of the multilayer graphene we obtain the analogue of Horava gravity with anisotropic scaling.

  6. Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Reagen, William K.; Schulz, Amber L.; Ingram, Jani C.; Lancaster, Gregory D.; Grey, Alan E.

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for ro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound.

  7. Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Reagen, W.K.; Schulz, A.L.; Ingram, J.C.; Lancaster, G.D.; Grey, A.E.

    1994-04-26

    This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for nitro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound. 4 figures.

  8. Born-Infeld gravity in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Alishahiha, Mohsen; Naseh, Ali; Soltanpanahi, Hesam

    2010-07-15

    In this paper we explore different aspects of three dimensional Born-Infeld as well as Born-Infeld-Chern-Simons gravity. We show that the models have anti-de Sitter and anti-de Sitter wave vacuum solutions. Moreover, we observe that although Born-Infeld-Chern-Simons gravity admits a logarithmic solution, Born-Infeld gravity does not, though it has a limiting logarithmic solution as we approach the critical point.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and mid-infrared continuum emission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Polycyclic ... We report the detection of 6.2 m polycyclic aromatic ... OSTI Identifier: 22357024 Resource Type: Journal Article ...

  10. Ground Gravity Survey | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Et Al., 2000) Dixie Valley Geothermal Area 1999 2000 Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management Ground Gravity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Blackwell, Et...

  11. Gravity Data for west-central Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-04-06

    Modeled Bouger Gravity data was extracted from the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies Gravity Database of the U.S. at http://irpsrvgis08.utep.edu/viewers/Flex/GravityMagnetic/GravityMagnetic_CyberShare/ on 2/29/2012. The downloaded text file was opened in an Excel spreadsheet. This spreadsheet data was then converted into an ESRI point shapefile in UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection, showing location and gravity (in milligals). This data was then converted to grid and then contoured using ESRI Spatial Analyst. This dataset contains the original spreadsheet data, a point shapefile showing gravity station locations and Bouger gravity, and a line shapefile showing 1 milligal contours. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Gravity Contour Shapefile Extent: West -108.366690 East -105.478730 North 40.932318 South 36.961606 Gravity Point Shapefile Extent: West -108.366692 East -105.478847 North 40.932361 South 36.961606 Data from From University of Texas: Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies

  12. Growth histories in bimetric massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Marcus; Buchberger, Igor; Enander, Jonas; Mrtsell, Edvard; Sjrs, Stefan E-mail: igor.buchberger@kau.se E-mail: edvard@fysik.su.se

    2012-12-01

    We perform cosmological perturbation theory in Hassan-Rosen bimetric gravity for general homogeneous and isotropic backgrounds. In the de Sitter approximation, we obtain decoupled sets of massless and massive scalar gravitational fluctuations. Matter perturbations then evolve like in Einstein gravity. We perturb the future de Sitter regime by the ratio of matter to dark energy, producing quasi-de Sitter space. In this more general setting the massive and massless fluctuations mix. We argue that in the quasi-de Sitter regime, the growth of structure in bimetric gravity differs from that of Einstein gravity.

  13. Airborne Gravity Survey | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Gravity Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Distribution of density in the subsurface enables inference of rock type. StratigraphicStructural:...

  14. Simultaneous measurement of gravity acceleration and gravity gradient with an atom interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sorrentino, F.; Lien, Y.-H.; Rosi, G.; Tino, G. M.; Bertoldi, A.; Bodart, Q.; Cacciapuoti, L.; Angelis, M. de; Prevedelli, M.

    2012-09-10

    We demonstrate a method to measure the gravitational acceleration with a dual cloud atom interferometer; the use of simultaneous atom interferometers reduces the effect of seismic noise on the gravity measurement. At the same time, the apparatus is capable of accurate measurements of the vertical gravity gradient. The ability to determine the gravity acceleration and gravity gradient simultaneously and with the same instrument opens interesting perspectives in geophysical applications.

  15. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T.

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  16. Negative mass solitons in gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cebeci, Hakan; Sarioglu, Oezguer; Tekin, Bayram

    2006-03-15

    We first reconstruct the conserved (Abbott-Deser) charges in the spin-connection formalism of gravity for asymptotically (Anti)-de Sitter spaces, and then compute the masses of the AdS soliton and the recently found Eguchi-Hanson solitons in generic odd dimensions, unlike the previous result obtained for only five dimensions. These solutions have negative masses compared to the global AdS or AdS/Z{sub p} spacetimes. As a separate note, we also compute the masses of the recent even dimensional Taub-NUT-Reissner-Nordstroem metrics.

  17. Naked singularities and quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Tomohiro; Iguchi, Hideo; Nakao, Ken-ichi; Singh, T. P.; Tanaka, Takahiro; Vaz, Cenalo

    2001-08-15

    There are known models of spherical gravitational collapse in which the collapse ends in a naked shell-focusing singularity for some initial data. If a massless scalar field is quantized on the classical background provided by such a star, it is found that the outgoing quantum flux of the scalar field diverges in the approach to the Cauchy horizon. We argue that the semiclassical approximation (i.e., quantum field theory on a classical curved background) used in these analyses ceases to be valid about one Planck time before the epoch of naked singularity formation, because by then the curvature in the central region of the star reaches the Planck scale. It is shown that during the epoch in which the semiclassical approximation is valid, the total emitted energy is about one Planck unit, and is not divergent. We also argue that back reaction in this model does not become important so long as gravity can be treated classically. It follows that the further evolution of the star will be determined by quantum gravitational effects, and without invoking quantum gravity it is not possible to say whether the star radiates away on a short time scale or settles down into a black hole state.

  18. Laboratory Investigation of Organic Aerosol Formation from Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments

    Molina, Luisa T.; Molina, Mario J.; Zhang, Renyi

    2006-08-23

    Our work for this DOE funded project includes: (1) measurements of the kinetics and mechanism of the gas-phase oxidation reactions of the aromatic hydrocarbons initiated by OH; (2) measurements of aerosol formation from the aromatic hydrocarbons; and (3) theoretical studies to elucidate the OH-toluene reaction mechanism using quantum-chemical and rate theories.

  19. Home Energy Scoring Tools (website) and Application Programming Interfaces, APIs (aka HEScore)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2012-05-01

    A web-based residential energy rating tool with APIs that runs the LBNL website: Provides customized estimates of residential energy use and energy bills based on building description information provided by the user. Energy use is estimated using engineering models developed at LBNL. Space heating and cooling use is based on the DOE-2. 1E building simulation model. Other end-users (water heating, appliances, lighting, and misc. equipment) are based on engineering models developed by LBNL.

  20. A cosmological study in massive gravity theory

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Supriya Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2015-09-15

    A detailed study of the various cosmological aspects in massive gravity theory has been presented in the present work. For the homogeneous and isotropic FLRW model, the deceleration parameter has been evaluated, and, it has been examined whether there is any transition from deceleration to acceleration in recent past, or not. With the proper choice of the free parameters, it has been shown that the massive gravity theory is equivalent to Einstein gravity with a modified Newtonian gravitational constant together with a negative cosmological constant. Also, in this context, it has been examined whether the emergent scenario is possible, or not, in massive gravity theory. Finally, we have done a cosmographic analysis in massive gravity theory.

  1. Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves by Periodic Resonator...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves by Periodic Resonator Arrays Prev Next Title: Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves by Periodic Resonator Arrays Authors: Hu,...

  2. Ground Gravity Survey At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey At Clear Lake Area (Skokan, 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Clear Lake Area...

  3. A new quasidilaton theory of massive gravity (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A new quasidilaton theory of massive gravity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A new quasidilaton theory of massive gravity We present a new quasidilaton theory of...

  4. Ground Gravity Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Coso Geothermal...

  5. Ground Gravity Survey At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) ...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Crump's Hot...

  6. Category:Airborne Gravity Survey | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Category Edit History Category:Airborne Gravity Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Airborne Gravity Survey...

  7. Ground Gravity Survey At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Biehler...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Biehler, 1964) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At...

  8. Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey...

  9. Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (FURUMOTO...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (FURUMOTO, 1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey...

  10. Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) ...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Snake River...

  11. Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey...

  12. Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Broyles...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Broyles, Et Al., 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity...

  13. Integration of Full Tensor Gravity and ZTEM Passive Low Frequency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Data Acquisition Integration of Full Tensor Gravity and ZTEM Passive Low Frequency EM Instruments for Simultaneous Data Acquisition Integration of Full Tensor Gravity and ...

  14. Cosmological singularities in Born-Infeld determinantal gravity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cosmological singularities in Born-Infeld determinantal gravity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Cosmological singularities in Born-Infeld determinantal gravity Authors: ...

  15. Problems with propagation and time evolution in f ( T ) gravity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Problems with propagation and time evolution in f ( T ) gravity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Problems with propagation and time evolution in f ( T ) gravity Authors: ...

  16. Risk assessment of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, L. ); Lax, I. ); Torndal, U.B.; Eriksson, L.C. )

    1993-06-01

    Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) constitute a group of substances formed during incomplete combustion. Sources include diesel vehicles, heating, smoking, certain types of food-processing, and incomplete combustion in general. 2-Nitrofluorene (NF) represents a model substance for the nitro-PAHs. An attempt has been made to estimate the lifetime human cancer risk due to background exposure to nitro-PAHs by two different models. The first model is based on genotoxic lesions produced by gamma-irradiation and the second model is based on an earlier published mega study (24,000 animals) on the carcinogenicity of the major metabolite of NF. Both models agreed well -- representing a yearly human cancer risk in the range of 0.15--49 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] for an urban citizen. The weaknesses and strengths of the models are discussed. 55 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Coupling of oxidative dehydrogenation and aromatization reactions of butane

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wen-Qing; Suib, S.L. )

    1994-01-01

    Coupling of oxidative dehydrogenation and aromatization of butane by using a dual function catalyst has led to a significant enhancement of the yields (from 25 to 40%) and selectivities to aromatics (from 39 to 64%). Butane is converted to aromatics by using either zinc-promoted [Ga]-ZSM-5 or zinc and gallium copromoted [Fe]-ZSM-5 zeolite as a catalyst. However, the formation of aromatics is severely limited by hydrocracking of butane to methane, ethane, and propane due to the hydrogen formed during aromatization reactions. On the other hand, the oxidative dehydrogenation of butane to butene over molybdate catalysts is found to be accompanied by a concurrent undesirable reaction, i.e., total oxidation. When two of these reactions (oxidative dehydrogenation and aromatization of butane) are coupled by using a dual function catalyst they have shown to complement each other. It is believed that the rate-limiting step for aromatization (butane to butene) is increased by adding an oxidative dehydrogenation catalyst (Ga-Zn-Mg-Mo-O). The formation of methane, ethane, and propane was suppressed due to the removal of hydrogen initially formed as water. Studies of ammonia TPD show that the acidities of [Fe]-ZSM-5 are greatly affected by the existence of metal oxides such as Ga[sub 2]O[sub 3], MgO, ZnO, and MoO[sub 3]. 40 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Gauge natural formulation of conformal gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Campigotto, M.; Fatibene, L.

    2015-03-15

    We consider conformal gravity as a gauge natural theory. We study its conservation laws and superpotentials. We also consider the Mannheim and Kazanas spherically symmetric vacuum solution and discuss conserved quantities associated to conformal and diffeomorphism symmetries.

  19. Bouguer gravity map | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    LibraryAdd to library Map: Bouguer gravity mapInfo GraphicMapChart Cartographers J. Behrendt and L. Bajwa Organization U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Geological...

  20. Quantum gravity and renormalization: The tensor track

    SciTech Connect

    Rivasseau, Vincent

    2012-06-27

    We propose a new program to quantize and renormalize gravity based on recent progress on the analysis of large random tensors. We compare it briefly with other existing approaches.

  1. Gravity waves from cosmic bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Michael P.; Saraswat, Prashant; Shaghoulian, Edgar E-mail: ps88@stanford.edu

    2013-02-01

    Our local Hubble volume might be contained within a bubble that nucleated in a false vacuum with only two large spatial dimensions. We study bubble collisions in this scenario and find that they generate gravity waves, which are made possible in this context by the reduced symmetry of the global geometry. These gravity waves would produce B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which could in principle dominate over the inflationary background.

  2. Measuring antimatter gravity with muonium

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Daniel M.; Kirch, Klaus; Mancini, Derrick; Phillips, James D.; Phillips, Thomas J.; Roberts, Thomas J.; Terry, Jeff; Bravina, L.; Foka, Y.; Kabana, S.

    2015-05-29

    The gravitational acceleration of antimatter, ¯g, has never been directly measured and could bear importantly on our understanding of gravity, the possible existence of a fifth force, and the nature and early history of the universe. Only two avenues for such a measurement appear to be feasible: antihydrogen and muonium. The muonium measurement requires a novel, monoenergetic, low-velocity, horizontal muonium beam directed at an atom interferometer. The precision three-grating interferometer can be produced in silicon nitride or ultrananocrystalline diamond using state-of-the-art nanofabrication. The required precision alignment and calibration at the picometer level also appear to be feasible. With 100 nmmore » grating pitch, a 10% measurement of ¯g can be made using some months of surface-muon beam time, and a 1% or better measurement with a correspondingly larger exposure. This could constitute the first gravitational measurement of leptonic matter, of 2nd-generation matter and, possibly, the first measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter.« less

  3. Nonderivative modified gravity: a classification

    SciTech Connect

    Comelli, D.; Nesti, F.; Pilo, L. E-mail: fabrizio.nesti@irb.hr

    2014-11-01

    We analyze the theories of gravity modified by a generic nonderivative potential built from the metric, under the minimal requirement of unbroken spatial rotations. Using the canonical analysis, we classify the potentials V according to the number of degrees of freedom (DoF) that propagate at the nonperturbative level. We then compare the nonperturbative results with the perturbative DoF propagating around Minkowski and FRW backgrounds. A generic V implies 6 propagating DoF at the non-perturbative level, with a ghost on Minkowski background. There exist potentials which propagate 5 DoF, as already studied in previous works. Here, no V with unbroken rotational invariance admitting 4 DoF is found. Theories with 3 DoF turn out to be strongly coupled on Minkowski background. Finally, potentials with only the 2 DoF of a massive graviton exist. Their effect on cosmology is simply equivalent to a cosmological constant. Potentials with 2 or 5 DoF and explicit time dependence appear to be a further viable possibility.

  4. Measuring antimatter gravity with muonium

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel M.; Kirch, Klaus; Mancini, Derrick; Phillips, James D.; Phillips, Thomas J.; Roberts, Thomas J.; Terry, Jeff; Bravina, L.; Foka, Y.; Kabana, S.

    2015-05-29

    The gravitational acceleration of antimatter, ¯g, has never been directly measured and could bear importantly on our understanding of gravity, the possible existence of a fifth force, and the nature and early history of the universe. Only two avenues for such a measurement appear to be feasible: antihydrogen and muonium. The muonium measurement requires a novel, monoenergetic, low-velocity, horizontal muonium beam directed at an atom interferometer. The precision three-grating interferometer can be produced in silicon nitride or ultrananocrystalline diamond using state-of-the-art nanofabrication. The required precision alignment and calibration at the picometer level also appear to be feasible. With 100 nm grating pitch, a 10% measurement of ¯g can be made using some months of surface-muon beam time, and a 1% or better measurement with a correspondingly larger exposure. This could constitute the first gravitational measurement of leptonic matter, of 2nd-generation matter and, possibly, the first measurement of the gravitational acceleration of antimatter.

  5. zorder-lib: Library API for Z-Order Memory Layout

    SciTech Connect

    Nowell, Lucy; Edward W. Bethel

    2015-04-01

    This document describes the motivation for, elements of, and use of the zorder-lib, a library API that implements organization of and access to data in memory using either a-order (also known as "row-major" order) or z-order memory layouts. The primary motivation for this work is to improve the performance of many types of data- intensive codes by increasing both spatial and temporal locality of memory accesses. The basic idea is that the cost associated with accessing a datum is less when it is nearby in either space or time.

  6. Exporting ADOL-C API for scripting languages using SWIG | Argonne

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility Exporting ADOL-C API for scripting languages using SWIG Event Sponsor: Mathematics and Computer Science Division Seminar Start Date: Nov 4 2016 - 10:30am Building/Room: Building 240/Room 1406-1407 Location: Argonne National Laboratory Speaker(s): K. Kulshreshtha S.H.K. Narayanan J. Bessac K. MacIntyre Host: Paul Hovland Scripting languages are gaining acceptance in the scientific community for purposes of prototyping and due to ease of use. In the context of

  7. HDF5-FastQuery: An API for Simplifying Access to Data Storage,Retrieval, Indexing and Querying

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, E. Wes; Gosink, Luke; Shalf, John; Stockinger, Kurt; Wu,Kesheng

    2006-06-15

    This work focuses on research and development activities that bridge a gap between fundamental data management technology index, query, storage and retrieval and use of such technology in computational and computer science algorithms and applications. The work has resulted in a streamlined applications programming interface (API) that simplifies data storage and retrieval using the HDF5 data I/O library, and eases use of the FastBit compressed bitmap indexing software for data indexing/querying. The API, which we call HDF5-FastQuery, will have broad applications in domain sciences as well as associated data analysis and visualization applications.

  8. Massive gravity wrapped in the cosmic web

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Junsup; Lee, Jounghun; Li, Baojiu E-mail: jounghun@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-03-20

    We study how the filamentary pattern of the cosmic web changes if the true gravity deviates from general relativity (GR) on a large scale. The f(R) gravity, whose strength is controlled to satisfy the current observational constraints on the cluster scale, is adopted as our fiducial model and a large, high-resolution N-body simulation is utilized for this study. By applying the minimal spanning tree algorithm to the halo catalogs from the simulation at various epochs, we identify the main stems of the rich superclusters located in the most prominent filamentary section of the cosmic web and determine their spatial extents per member cluster to be the degree of their straightness. It is found that the f(R) gravity has the effect of significantly bending the superclusters and that the effect becomes stronger as the universe evolves. Even in the case where the deviation from GR is too small to be detectable by any other observables, the degree of the supercluster straightness exhibits a conspicuous difference between the f(R) and the GR models. Our results also imply that the supercluster straightness could be a useful discriminator of f(R) gravity from the coupled dark energy since it is shown to evolve differently between the two models. As a final conclusion, the degree of the straightness of the rich superclusters should provide a powerful cosmological test of large scale gravity.

  9. Quantum gravity effects in the Kerr spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, M.; Tuiran, E.

    2011-02-15

    We analyze the impact of the leading quantum gravity effects on the properties of black holes with nonzero angular momentum by performing a suitable renormalization group improvement of the classical Kerr metric within quantum Einstein gravity. In particular, we explore the structure of the horizons, the ergosphere, and the static limit surfaces as well as the phase space available for the Penrose process. The positivity properties of the effective vacuum energy-momentum tensor are also discussed and the 'dressing' of the black hole's mass and angular momentum are investigated by computing the corresponding Komar integrals. The pertinent Smarr formula turns out to retain its classical form. As for their thermodynamical properties, a modified first law of black-hole thermodynamics is found to be satisfied by the improved black holes (to second order in the angular momentum); the corresponding Bekenstein-Hawking temperature is not proportional to the surface gravity.

  10. Charged black holes in generalized teleparallel gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, M.E.; Houndjo, M.J.S.; Tossa, J.; Momeni, D.; Myrzakulov, R. E-mail: sthoundjo@yahoo.fr E-mail: d.momeni@yahoo.com

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we investigate charged static black holes in 4D for generalized teleparallel models of gravity, based on torsion as the geometric object for describing gravity according to the equivalence principle. As a motivated idea, we introduce a set of non-diagonal tetrads and derive the full system of non linear differential equations. We prove that the common Schwarzschild gauge is applicable only when we study linear f(T) case. We reobtain the Reissner-Nordstrom-de Sitter (or RN-AdS) solution for the linear case of f(T) and perform a parametric cosmological reconstruction for two nonlinear models. We also study in detail a type of the no-go theorem in the framework of this modified teleparallel gravity.

  11. Astrophysical black holes in screened modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Anne-Christine; Jha, Rahul; Muir, Jessica; Gregory, Ruth E-mail: r.a.w.gregory@durham.ac.uk E-mail: jlmuir@umich.edu

    2014-08-01

    Chameleon, environmentally dependent dilaton, and symmetron gravity are three models of modified gravity in which the effects of the additional scalar degree of freedom are screened in dense environments. They have been extensively studied in laboratory, cosmological, and astrophysical contexts. In this paper, we present a preliminary investigation into whether additional constraints can be provided by studying these scalar fields around black holes. By looking at the properties of a static, spherically symmetric black hole, we find that the presence of a non-uniform matter distribution induces a non-constant scalar profile in chameleon and dilaton, but not necessarily symmetron gravity. An order of magnitude estimate shows that the effects of these profiles on in-falling test particles will be sub-leading compared to gravitational waves and hence observationally challenging to detect.

  12. Differential geometry, Palatini gravity and reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Capriotti, S.

    2014-01-15

    The present article deals with a formulation of the so called (vacuum) Palatini gravity as a general variational principle. In order to accomplish this goal, some geometrical tools related to the geometry of the bundle of connections of the frame bundle LM are used. A generalization of Lagrange-Poincar reduction scheme to these types of variational problems allows us to relate it with the Einstein-Hilbert variational problem. Relations with some other variational problems for gravity found in the literature are discussed.

  13. A commercial project for private investments. Update of the 280 MW api Energia IGCC plant construction in central Italy.

    SciTech Connect

    Del Bravo, R.; Pinacci, P.; Trifilo, R.

    1998-07-01

    This paper has the aim to give a general overview of the api Energia IGCC project starting from the project background in 1992 and ending with the progress of construction. api Energia S.p.A., a joint VENTURE between api anonima petroli italiana S.p.A., Roma, Italy (51%), ABB Sae Sadelmi S.p.A., Milano, Italy (25%) and Texaco Development Corporation (24%), is building a 280 MW Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle plant in the api refinery at Falconara Marittima, on Italy' s Adriatic coast, using heavy oil residues. The plant is based on the modern concept of employing a highly efficient combined cycle power plant fed with a low heating value fuel gas produced by gasifying heavy refinery residues. This scheme provides consistent advantages in terms of efficiency and environmental impact over alternative applications of the refinery residues. The electric power produced will feed the national grid. The project has been financed using the ``project financing'' scheme: over 1,000 billion Lira, representing 75% of the overall capital requirement, have been provided by a pool of international banks. In November 1996 the project reached financial closure and immediately after the detailed design and procurement activities started. Engineering, Procurement and Construction activities, carried out by a Consortium of companies of the ABB group, are totally in line with the schedule. Commercial operation of the plant, is scheduled for November 1999.

  14. Ground Gravity Survey At Baltazor Hot Springs Area (Isherwood...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    (Fig. 2) shows a gravity low within the valley area that presumably is related to low-density Cenozoic sediments. The steep gravity gradient along the east side of the valley...

  15. Ground Gravity Survey At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Colwell...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    and a nearby absolute gravity benchmark was tied in. Gravity data indicated a high density region in-between lower density regions to the east and west. The high density region...

  16. The inverse-square law and quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, M.M.; Goldman, T.; Hughes, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses a modification to central potential of gravity when antimatter is involved and the possible existence of quantum gravity and a fifth force of nature. 1 ref. (LSP)

  17. Zero-Gravity Centrifugal Force | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    to create centrifugal force create its on gravity? Example if you were spinning a iron ball in space, just as the earth spins, does the iron ball create its on gravity? scott...

  18. Classification of Malaysia aromatic rice using multivariate statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, A. H.; Adom, A. H.; Shakaff, A. Y. Md; Masnan, M. J.; Zakaria, A.; Rahim, N. A.; Omar, O.

    2015-05-15

    Aromatic rice (Oryza sativa L.) is considered as the best quality premium rice. The varieties are preferred by consumers because of its preference criteria such as shape, colour, distinctive aroma and flavour. The price of aromatic rice is higher than ordinary rice due to its special needed growth condition for instance specific climate and soil. Presently, the aromatic rice quality is identified by using its key elements and isotopic variables. The rice can also be classified via Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) or human sensory panels. However, the uses of human sensory panels have significant drawbacks such as lengthy training time, and prone to fatigue as the number of sample increased and inconsistent. The GC–MS analysis techniques on the other hand, require detailed procedures, lengthy analysis and quite costly. This paper presents the application of in-house developed Electronic Nose (e-nose) to classify new aromatic rice varieties. The e-nose is used to classify the variety of aromatic rice based on the samples odour. The samples were taken from the variety of rice. The instrument utilizes multivariate statistical data analysis, including Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and K-Nearest Neighbours (KNN) to classify the unknown rice samples. The Leave-One-Out (LOO) validation approach is applied to evaluate the ability of KNN to perform recognition and classification of the unspecified samples. The visual observation of the PCA and LDA plots of the rice proves that the instrument was able to separate the samples into different clusters accordingly. The results of LDA and KNN with low misclassification error support the above findings and we may conclude that the e-nose is successfully applied to the classification of the aromatic rice varieties.

  19. Ultrasonic hydrometer. [Specific gravity of electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Swoboda, C.A.

    1982-03-09

    The disclosed ultrasonic hydrometer determines the specific gravity (density) of the electrolyte of a wet battery, such as a lead-acid battery. The hydrometer utilizes a transducer that when excited emits an ultrasonic impulse that traverses through the electrolyte back and forth between spaced sonic surfaces. The transducer detects the returning impulse, and means measures the time t between the initial and returning impulses. Considering the distance d between the spaced sonic surfaces and the measured time t, the sonic velocity V is calculated with the equation V = 2d/t. The hydrometer also utilizes a thermocouple to measure the electrolyte temperature. A hydrometer database correlates three variable parameters including sonic velocity in and temperature and specific gravity of the electrolyte, for temperature values between 0 and 40/sup 0/C and for specific gravity values between 1.05 and 1.30. Upon knowing two parameters (the calculated sonic velocity and the measured temperature), the third parameter (specific gravity) can be uniquely found in the database. The hydrometer utilizes a microprocessor for data storage and manipulation.

  20. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl (18E) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOEpatents

    Ding, Yu-Shin; Fowler, Joanna S.; Wolf, Alfred P.

    1993-01-01

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  1. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl ([sup 18]F) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOEpatents

    Yushin Ding; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1993-10-19

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  2. Development of genetically engineered bacteria for production of selected aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Thomas E.; Watkins, Carolyn S.; Bulmer, Deborah K.; Johnson, Bruce F.; Amaratunga, Mohan

    2001-01-01

    The cloning and expression of genes in the common aromatic pathway of E. coli are described. A compound for which chorismate, the final product of the common aromatic pathway, is an anabolic intermediate can be produced by cloning and expressing selected genes of the common aromatic pathway and the genes coding for enzymes necessary to convert chorismate to the selected compound. Plasmids carrying selected genes of the common aromatic pathway are also described.

  3. A review of the selective catalytic reduction of aromatic nitro compounds into aromatic amines, isocyanates, carbamates, and ureas using CO

    SciTech Connect

    Tafesh, A.M.; Weiguny, J.

    1996-09-01

    Although the use of CO as a reductant had been in the past confined to few reactions, its use in organic synthesis, especially in the reductive carbonylation of nitro aromatics and the oxidative carbonylation of aromatic amines, has increased dramatically. Since the discovery of CO-induced reduction of nitro groups, there has been a wide spread increase of interest in the application and mechanistic understanding of this reaction. In a major review published in 1988 it was noted, that in practice no studies of the mechanism of N-carbonylation of aromatic nitro compounds with alcohols leading to carbamates have been carried out. This review clearly shows a major change since that publication. Indeed, metal-catalyzed reductive carbonylation of nitro aromatics using CO as reducing agent has been in the past 10 years the subject of intense investigation both in academia and in the chemical industry. Several articles and reviews have covered the subject up to the late 1980s. The authors will concentrate on more recent literature, but sometimes older data will be used to establish an understanding of these reactions. 127 refs.

  4. Junction conditions in extended Teleparallel gravities

    SciTech Connect

    De la Cruz-Dombriz, lvaro; Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Sez-Gmez, Diego E-mail: peter.dunsby@uct.ac.za

    2014-12-01

    In the context of extended Teleparallel gravity theories, we address the issue of junction conditions required to guarantee the correct matching of different regions of spacetime. In the absence of shells/branes, these conditions turn out to be more restrictive than their counterparts in General Relativity as in other extended theories of gravity. In fact, the general junction conditions on the matching hypersurfaces depend on the underlying theory and a new condition on the induced tetrads in order to avoid delta-like distributions in the field equations. This result imposes strict consequences on the viability of standard solutions such as the Einstein-Straus-like construction. We find that the continuity of the scalar torsion is required in order to recover the usual General Relativity results.

  5. Twisted covariant noncommutative self-dual gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Jimenez, S.; Garcia-Compean, H.; Obregon, O.; Ramirez, C.

    2008-12-15

    A twisted covariant formulation of noncommutative self-dual gravity is presented. The formulation for constructing twisted noncommutative Yang-Mills theories is used. It is shown that the noncommutative torsion is solved at any order of the {theta} expansion in terms of the tetrad and some extra fields of the theory. In the process the first order expansion in {theta} for the Plebanski action is explicitly obtained.

  6. Regulation of flexible arms under gravity

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Siciliano, B.

    1993-08-01

    A simple controller is presented for the regulation problem of robot arms with flexible links under gravity. It consists of a joint PD feedback plus a constant feedforward. Global asymptotic stability of the reference equilibrium state is shown under a structural assumption about link elasticity and a mild condition on the proportional gain. The result holds also in the absence of internal damping of the flexible arm. A numerical case study is presented.

  7. Gravity controlled anti-reverse rotation device

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, Robert J.; Wetherill, Todd M.

    1983-01-01

    A gravity assisted anti-reverse rotation device for preventing reverse rotation of pumps and the like. A horizontally mounted pawl is disposed to mesh with a fixed ratchet preventing reverse rotation when the pawl is advanced into intercourse with the ratchet by a vertically mounted lever having a lumped mass. Gravitation action on the lumped mass urges the pawl into mesh with the ratchet, while centrifugal force on the lumped mass during forward, allowed rotation retracts the pawl away from the ratchet.

  8. Neutron stars as laboratories for gravity physics

    SciTech Connect

    Deliduman, Cemsinan

    2014-01-01

    We study the structure of neutron stars in R+?R gravity model with perturbative method. We obtain mass-radius relations for four representative equations of state (EoS). We find that, for |?|~10? cm, the results differ substantially from the results of general relativity. The effects of modified gravity are seen as mimicking a stiff or soft EoS for neutron stars depending upon whether ? is negative or positive, respectively. Some of the soft EoS that are excluded within the framework of general relativity can be reconciled for certain values of ? of this order with the 2 solar mass neutron star recently observed. Indeed, if the EoS is ever established to be soft, modified gravity of the sort studied here may be required to explain neutron star masses as large as 2 M{sub ?}. The associated length scale ?(?)~10? cm is of the order of the the typical radius of neutron stars implying that this is the smallest value we could find by using neutron stars as a probe. We thus conclude that the true value of ? is most likely much smaller than 10? cm.

  9. Cosmology in general massive gravity theories

    SciTech Connect

    Comelli, D.; Nesti, F.; Pilo, L. E-mail: fabrizio.nesti@aquila.infn.it

    2014-05-01

    We study the cosmological FRW flat solutions generated in general massive gravity theories. Such a model are obtained adding to the Einstein General Relativity action a peculiar non derivative potentials, function of the metric components, that induce the propagation of five gravitational degrees of freedom. This large class of theories includes both the case with a residual Lorentz invariance as well as the case with rotational invariance only. It turns out that the Lorentz-breaking case is selected as the only possibility. Moreover it turns out that that perturbations around strict Minkowski or dS space are strongly coupled. The upshot is that even though dark energy can be simply accounted by massive gravity modifications, its equation of state w{sub eff} has to deviate from -1. Indeed, there is an explicit relation between the strong coupling scale of perturbations and the deviation of w{sub eff} from -1. Taking into account current limits on w{sub eff} and submillimiter tests of the Newton's law as a limit on the possible strong coupling scale, we find that it is still possible to have a weakly coupled theory in a quasi dS background. Future experimental improvements on short distance tests of the Newton's law may be used to tighten the deviation of w{sub eff} form -1 in a weakly coupled massive gravity theory.

  10. Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Jaars, K.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Venter, A. D.; Josipovic, M.; Pienaar, J. J.; Vakkari, Ville; Aaltonen, H.; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M.; Tiitta, P.; Guenther, Alex B.; Hellen, H.; Laakso, L.; Hakola, H.

    2014-07-11

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are associated with direct adverse human health effects and can have negative impacts on ecosystems due to their toxicity, as well as indirect negative effects through the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol that affect human health, crop production and regional climate. Measurements were conducted at the Welgegund measurement station (South Africa) that is considered to be a regionally representative background site. However, the site is occasionally impacted by plumes from major anthropogenic source regions in the interior of South Africa, which include the western Bushveld Igneous Complex (e.g. platinum, base metal and ferrochrome smelters), the eastern Bushveld Igneous Complex (platinum and ferrochrome smelters), the Johannesburg-Pretoria metropolitan conurbation (>10 million people), the Vaal Triangle (e.g. petrochemical and industries), the Mpumalanga Highveld (e.g. coal-fired power plants and petrochemical industry) and also a region of anti-cyclonic recirculation of air mass over the interior of South Africa. The aromatic hydrocarbon measurements were conducted with an automated sampler on Tenax-TA and Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes with heated inlet for one year. Samples were collected twice a week for two hours during daytime and two hours 1 during night-time. A thermal desorption unit, connected to a gas chromatograph and a mass 2 selective detector was used for sample preparation and analysis. Results indicated that the 3 monthly median total aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations ranged between 0.01 to 3.1 ppb. 4 Benzene levels did not exceed local air quality standards. Toluene was the most abundant 5 species, with an annual median concentration of 0.63 ppb. No statistically significant 6 differences in the concentrations measured during daytime and night-time were found and no distinct seasonal patterns were observed. Air mass back trajectory analysis proved that the lack of seasonal cycles could be

  11. Redox shuttles having an aromatic ring fused to a 1,1,4,4-tetrasubstituted cyclohexane ring

    DOEpatents

    Weng, Wei; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Amine, Khalil

    2015-12-01

    An electrolyte includes an alkali metal salt; an aprotic solvent; and a redox shuttle additive including an aromatic compound having at least one aromatic ring fused with at least one non-aromatic ring, the aromatic ring having two or more oxygen or phosphorus-containing substituents.

  12. Amination of electrophilic aromatic compounds by vicarious nucleophilic substitution

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, Alexander R.; Pagoria, Philip F.; Schmidt, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process to aminate electrophilic aromatic compounds by vicarious nucleophilic substitution of hydrogen using quaternary hydrazinium salts. The use of trialkylhydrazinium halide, e.g., trimethylhydrazinium iodide, as well as hydroxylamine, alkoxylamines, and 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole to produce aminated aromatic structures, such as 1,3-diamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (DATB), 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and 3,5-diamino-2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (DATNT), is described. DATB and TATB are useful insensitive high explosives. TATB is also used for the preparation of benzenehexamine, a starting material for the synthesis of novel materials (optical imaging devices, liquid crystals, ferromagnetic compounds).

  13. Ion source and beam guiding studies for an API neutron generator

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, A.; Ji, Q.; Persaud, A.; Ludewigt, B. A.; Schenkel, T.

    2013-04-19

    Recently developed neutron imaging methods require high neutron yields for fast imaging times and small beam widths for good imaging resolution. For ion sources with low current density to be viable for these types of imaging methods, large extraction apertures and beam focusing must be used. We present recent work on the optimization of a Penning-type ion source for neutron generator applications. Two multi-cusp magnet configurations have been tested and are shown to increase the extracted ion current density over operation without multi-cusp magnetic fields. The use of multi-cusp magnetic confinement and gold electrode surfaces have resulted in increased ion current density, up to 2.2 mA/cm{sup 2}. Passive beam focusing using tapered dielectric capillaries has been explored due to its potential for beam compression without the cost and complexity issues associated with active focusing elements. Initial results from first experiments indicate the possibility of beam compression. Further work is required to evaluate the viability of such focusing methods for associated particle imaging (API) systems.

  14. THE INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF NEUTRAL POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ricca, Alessandra; Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr.; Allamandola, Louis J. E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov

    2013-10-10

    The mid-infrared spectra of neutral homogeneous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters have been computed using density functional theory including an empirical correction for dispersion. The C-H out-of-plane bending modes are redshifted for all the clusters considered in this work. The magnitude of the redshift and the peak broadening are dependent on PAH size, shape, and on the PAH arrangement in the cluster.

  15. --No Title--

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by API Gravity (Dollars per Barrel) | | | | | | | Year | 20.0 |...

  16. MODELING GALACTIC EXTINCTION WITH DUST AND 'REAL' POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mulas, Giacomo; Casu, Silvia; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Zonca, Alberto E-mail: silvia@oa-cagliari.inaf.it E-mail: azonca@oa-cagliari.inaf.it

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the remarkable apparent variety of galactic extinction curves by modeling extinction profiles with core-mantle grains and a collection of single polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Our aim is to translate a synthetic description of dust into physically well-grounded building blocks through the analysis of a statistically relevant sample of different extinction curves. All different flavors of observed extinction curves, ranging from the average galactic extinction curve to virtually 'bumpless' profiles, can be described by the present model. We prove that a mixture of a relatively small number (54 species in 4 charge states each) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons can reproduce the features of the extinction curve in the ultraviolet, dismissing an old objection to the contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the interstellar extinction curve. Despite the large number of free parameters (at most the 54 Multiplication-Sign 4 column densities of each species in each ionization state included in the molecular ensemble plus the 9 parameters defining the physical properties of classical particles), we can strongly constrain some physically relevant properties such as the total number of C atoms in all species and the mean charge of the mixture. Such properties are found to be largely independent of the adopted dust model whose variation provides effects that are orthogonal to those brought about by the molecular component. Finally, the fitting procedure, together with some physical sense, suggests (but does not require) the presence of an additional component of chemically different very small carbonaceous grains.

  17. Gravity Survey of the Carson Sink - Data and Maps

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    A detailed gravity survey was carried out for the entire Carson Sink in western Nevada (Figure 1) through a subcontract to Zonge Engineering, Inc. The Carson Sink is a large composite basin containing three known, blind high‐temperature geothermal systems (Fallon Airbase, Stillwater, and Soda Lake). This area was chosen for a detailed gravity survey in order to characterize the gravity signature of the known geothermal systems and to identify other potential blind systems based on the structural setting indicated by the gravity data. Data: Data were acquired at approximately 400, 800, and 1600 meter intervals for a total of 1,243 stations. The project location and station location points are presented in Figure 14. The station distribution for this survey was designed to complete regional gravity coverage in the Carson Sink area without duplication of available public and private gravity coverage. Gravity data were acquired using a Scintrex CG‐5 gravimeter and a LaCoste and Romberg (L&R) Model‐G gravimeter. The CG‐5 gravity meter has a reading resolution of 0.001 milligals and a typical repeatability of less than 0.005 milligals. The L&R gravity meter has a reading resolution of 0.01 milligals and a typical repeatability of 0.02 milligals. The basic processing of gravimeter readings to calculate through to the Complete Bouguer Anomaly was made using the Gravity and Terrain Correction software version 7.1 for Oasis Montaj by Geosoft LTD. Results: The gravity survey of the Carson Sink yielded the following products. Project location and station location map (Figure 14). Complete Bouguer Anomaly @ 2.67 gm/cc reduction density. Gravity Complete Bouguer Anomaly at 2.50 g/cc Contour Map (Figure 15). Gravity Horizontal Gradient Magnitude Shaded Color Contour Map. Gravity 1st Vertical Derivative Color Contour Map. Interpreted Depth to Mesozoic Basement (Figure 16), incorporating drill‐hole intercept values. Preliminary Interpretation of Results: The Carson Sink

  18. Ground Gravity Survey At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D....

  19. Ground Gravity Survey At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Chocolate Mountains Area...

  20. Ground Gravity Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Exploration Activity Details...

  1. Category:Ground Gravity Survey | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Category:Ground Gravity Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

  2. Lorentz Invariant phenomenological model of quantum gravity: A minimalistic presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonder, Yuri

    2012-08-24

    The purpose of this paper is to give a minimalistic and self-contained presentation of a Lorentz Invariant phenomenological model of Quantum Gravity.

  3. Ground Gravity Survey At Rio Grande Rift Region (Aiken & Ander...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    DOE-funding Unknown References Carlos L.V. Aiken, Mark E. Ander (1981) A Regional Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Magnetotellurics Additional...

  4. Ground Gravity Survey At Walker Lake Valley Area (Shoffner, Et...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    N. Hinz, A. Sabin, M. Lazaro, S. Alm (2010) Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Exploration Using 3D Gravity Inversion In Walker Valley, Nevada...

  5. Ground Gravity Survey At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP)...

  6. Three-dimensional gravity modeling and focusing inversion using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Using synthetic data from models of varying complexity and a field data set, it is demonstrated that, given an adequate depth weighting function, the gravity inversion in the ...

  7. A gravity model for the Coso geothermal area, California | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Most of the gravity variations can be explained by two lithologic units: (1) low density wedges of Quarternary alluvium with interbedded thin basalts (2.4 gcmsup 3)...

  8. Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Leslie...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    of the seaward extension of the ERZ. Gravity measurements of Puna Ridge show a high density anomaly at depth which corresponds to high velocity data obtained from seismic...

  9. Ground Gravity Survey (Nannini, 1986) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    depth inside the sedimentary formations of the basement and often present a negative density contrast when compared to the latter. Gravity could help to identify these bodies by...

  10. Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature in the Humboldt House geothermal area, Pershing County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  11. Ground Gravity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) |...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  12. Ground Gravity Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown...

  13. Ground Gravity Survey At Truckhaven Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Truckhaven Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity...

  14. Ground Gravity Survey At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The...

  15. Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco...

  16. Ground Gravity Survey At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

  17. Ground Gravity Survey At Under Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Finally, the gravity survey also shows anomalies that correlate with the seismic and microseismic data. All of these results will be integrated to obtain the most probable...

  18. Ground Gravity Survey At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Swanberg...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Basis Examination of geothermal resources of New Mexico Notes detailed gravity and magnetics survey of Lightning Dock to identify burried structures as a source of the thermal...

  19. Ground Gravity Survey At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Unknown Exploration Basis Faulder 1991 Conceptual Geological Model compilation and literature review of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area. Notes Gravity modeling and...

  20. Perturbations of nested branes with induced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sbis, Fulvio; Koyama, Kazuya E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk

    2014-06-01

    We study the behaviour of weak gravitational fields in models where a 4D brane is embedded inside a 5D brane equipped with induced gravity, which in turn is embedded in a 6D spacetime. We consider a specific regularization of the branes internal structures where the 5D brane can be considered thin with respect to the 4D one. We find exact solutions corresponding to pure tension source configurations on the thick 4D brane, and study perturbations at first order around these background solutions. To perform the perturbative analysis, we adopt a bulk-based approach and we express the equations in terms of gauge invariant and master variables using a 4D scalar-vector-tensor decomposition. We then propose an ansatz on the behaviour of the perturbation fields when the thickness of the 4D brane goes to zero, which corresponds to configurations where gravity remains finite everywhere in the thin limit of the 4D brane. We study the equations of motion using this ansatz, and show that they give rise to a consistent set of differential equations in the thin limit, from which the details of the internal structure of the 4D brane disappear. We conclude that the thin limit of the ''ribbon'' 4D brane inside the (already thin) 5D brane is well defined (at least when considering first order perturbations around pure tension configurations), and that the gravitational field on the 4D brane remains finite in the thin limit. We comment on the crucial role of the induced gravity term on the 5D brane.

  1. Testing chameleon gravity with the Coma cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Terukina, Ayumu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Lombriser, Lucas; Bacon, David; Koyama, Kazuya; Nichol, Robert C. E-mail: lucas.lombriser@port.ac.uk E-mail: david.bacon@port.ac.uk E-mail: bob.nichol@port.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We propose a novel method to test the gravitational interactions in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. When gravity is modified, this is typically accompanied by the introduction of an additional scalar degree of freedom, which mediates an attractive fifth force. The presence of an extra gravitational coupling, however, is tightly constrained by local measurements. In chameleon modifications of gravity, local tests can be evaded by employing a screening mechanism that suppresses the fifth force in dense environments. While the chameleon field may be screened in the interior of the cluster, its outer region can still be affected by the extra force, introducing a deviation between the hydrostatic and lensing mass of the cluster. Thus, the chameleon modification can be tested by combining the gas and lensing measurements of the cluster. We demonstrate the operability of our method with the Coma cluster, for which both a lensing measurement and gas observations from the X-ray surface brightness, the X-ray temperature, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are available. Using the joint observational data set, we perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the parameter space describing the different profiles in both the Newtonian and chameleon scenarios. We report competitive constraints on the chameleon field amplitude and its coupling strength to matter. In the case of f(R) gravity, corresponding to a specific choice of the coupling, we find an upper bound on the background field amplitude of |f{sub R0}| < 6 10{sup ?5}, which is currently the tightest constraint on cosmological scales.

  2. Ostrogradski Hamiltonian approach for geodetic brane gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cordero, Ruben; Molgado, Alberto

    2010-12-07

    We present an alternative Hamiltonian description of a branelike universe immersed in a flat background spacetime. This model is named geodetic brane gravity. We set up the Regge-Teitelboim model to describe our Universe where such field theory is originally thought as a second order derivative theory. We refer to an Ostrogradski Hamiltonian formalism to prepare the system to its quantization. This approach comprize the manage of both first- and second-class constraints and the counting of degrees of freedom follows accordingly.

  3. A new quasidilaton theory of massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mukohyama, Shinji

    2014-12-01

    We present a new quasidilaton theory of Poincare invariant massive gravity, based on the recently proposed framework of matter coupling that makes it possible for the kinetic energy of the quasidilaton scalar to couple to both physical and fiducial metrics simultaneously. We find a scaling-type exact solution that expresses a self-accelerating de Sitter universe, and then analyze linear perturbations around it. It is shown that in a range of parameters all physical degrees of freedom have non-vanishing quadratic kinetic terms and are stable in the subhorizon limit, while the effective Newton's constant for the background is kept positive.

  4. A high frequency resonance gravity gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bagaev, S. N.; Kvashnin, N. L.; Skvortsov, M. N.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Krysanov, V. A.; Oreshkin, S. I.; Motylev, A. M.; Popov, S. M.; Samoilenko, A. A.; Yudin, I. S.; Rudenko, V. N.

    2014-06-15

    A new setup OGRANthe large scale opto-acoustical gravitational detector is described. As distinguished from known gravitational bar detectors it uses the optical interferometrical readout for registering weak variations of gravity gradient at the kilohetz frequency region. At room temperature, its sensitivity is limited only by the bar Brownian noise at the bandwidth close to 100 Hz. It is destined for a search for rare eventsgravitational pulses coincident with signals of neutrino scintillator (BUST) in the deep underground of Baksan Neutrino Observatory of INR RAS.

  5. Coordinate time dependence in quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bojowald, Martin; Singh, Parampreet; Skirzewski, Aureliano

    2004-12-15

    The intuitive classical space-time picture breaks down in quantum gravity, which makes a comparison and the development of semiclassical techniques quite complicated. Using ingredients of the group averaging method to solve constraints one can nevertheless introduce a classical coordinate time into the quantum theory, and use it to investigate the way a semiclassical continuous description emerges from discrete quantum evolution. Applying this technique to test effective classical equations of loop cosmology and their implications for inflation and bounces, we show that the effective semiclassical theory is in good agreement with the quantum description even at short scales.

  6. Low gravity fluid-thermal experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Krotiuk, W.J.; Cuta, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is the lead laboratory for the thermal-hydraulic research in the US Department of Energy Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power Program. PNL must provide the tools necessary to analyze proposed space reactor concepts, which include single- and two-phase alkali metal and gas-cooled designs. PNL has divided its activities for this task into three basic areas: computer code development, thermal-hydraulic modeling, and experimentation. The subject of this paper is the low-gravity experimental program currently underway at PNL in support of the MMW Program.

  7. Dualities of 3D dilaton gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Cadoni, M. |

    1996-12-01

    We investigate Brans-Dicke dilaton gravity theories in 2+1 dimensions. We show that the reduced field equations for solutions with a diagonal metric and depending only on one spacetime coordinate have a continuous O(2) symmetry. Using this symmetry we derive general static and cosmological solutions of the theory. The action of the discrete group O(2,{bold Z}) on the space of the solutions is discussed. Three-dimensional string effective theory and three-dimensional general relativity are discussed in detail. In particular, we find that the previously discovered black string solution is dual to a spacetime with a conical singularity. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Massive gravity on de Sitter and unique candidate for partially massless gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Renaux-Petel, Sbastien E-mail: srenaux@lpthe.jussieu.fr

    2013-01-01

    We derive the decoupling limit of Massive Gravity on de Sitter in an arbitrary number of space-time dimensions d. By embedding d-dimensional de Sitter into d+1-dimensional Minkowski, we extract the physical helicity-1 and helicity-0 polarizations of the graviton. The resulting decoupling theory is similar to that obtained around Minkowski. We take great care at exploring the partially massless limit and define the unique fully non-linear candidate theory that is free of the helicity-0 mode in the decoupling limit, and which therefore propagates only four degrees of freedom in four dimensions. In the latter situation, we show that a new Vainshtein mechanism is at work in the limit m{sup 2} ? 2H{sup 2} which decouples the helicity-0 mode when the parameters are different from that of partially massless gravity. As a result, there is no discontinuity between massive gravity and its partially massless limit, just in the same way as there is no discontinuity in the massless limit of massive gravity. The usual bounds on the graviton mass could therefore equivalently well be interpreted as bounds on m{sup 2}?2H{sup 2}. When dealing with the exact partially massless parameters, on the other hand, the symmetry at m{sup 2} = 2H{sup 2} imposes a specific constraint on matter. As a result the helicity-0 mode decouples without even the need of any Vainshtein mechanism.

  9. f(T,T) gravity and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S.N.; Otalora, G.; Saridakis, Emmanuel N. E-mail: flobo@cii.fc.ul.pt

    2014-12-01

    We present an extension of f(T) gravity, allowing for a general coupling of the torsion scalar T with the trace of the matter energy-momentum tensor T. The resulting f(T,T) theory is a new modified gravity, since it is different from all the existing torsion or curvature based constructions. Applied to a cosmological framework, it leads to interesting phenomenology. In particular, one can obtain a unified description of the initial inflationary phase, the subsequent non-accelerating, matter-dominated expansion, and then the transition to a late-time accelerating phase. Additionally, the effective dark energy sector can be quintessence or phantom-like, or exhibit the phantom-divide crossing during the evolution. Moreover, in the far future the universe results either to a de Sitter exponential expansion, or to eternal power-law accelerated expansions. Finally, a detailed study of the scalar perturbations at the linear level reveals that f(T,T) cosmology can be free of ghosts and instabilities for a wide class of ansatzes and model parameters.

  10. A dynamical inconsistency of Horava gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Henneaux, Marc; Kleinschmidt, Axel; Lucena Gomez, Gustavo

    2010-03-15

    The dynamical consistency of the nonprojectable version of Horava gravity is investigated by focusing on the asymptotically flat case. It is argued that for generic solutions of the constraint equations the lapse must vanish asymptotically. We then consider particular values of the coupling constants for which the equations are tractable and in that case we prove that the lapse must vanish everywhere--and not only at infinity. Put differently, the Hamiltonian constraints are generically all second-class. We then argue that the same feature holds for generic values of the couplings, thus revealing a physical inconsistency of the theory. In order to cure this pathology, one might want to introduce further constraints but the resulting theory would then lose much of the appeal of the original proposal by Horava. We also show that there is no contradiction with the time-reparametrization invariance of the action, as this invariance is shown to be a so-called 'trivial gauge symmetry' in Horava gravity, hence with no associated first-class constraints.

  11. Drawdown behavior of gravity drainage wells

    SciTech Connect

    Aasen, J.A.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    An analytical solution for drawdown in gravity drainage wells is developed. The free-surface flow is viewed as incompressible, and anisotropy effects are included. The well is a line source well, and the reservoir is infinitely large. The model is valid for small drawdowns. The uniform wellbore potential inner boundary condition is modelled using the proper Green`s function. The discontinuity at the wellbore is solved by introducing a finite skin radius, and the formulation produces a seepage face. The calculated wellbore flux distribution and wellbore pressures are in fair agreement with results obtained using a numerical gravity drainage simulator. Three distinct flow periods are observed. The wellbore storage period is caused by the moving liquid level, and the duration is short. During the long intermediate flow period, the wellbore pressure is nearly constant. In this period the free surface moves downwards, and the liquid is produced mainly by vertical drainage. At long times the semilog straight line appears. The confined liquid solutions by Theis (1935) and van Everdingen and Hurst (1949) may be used during the pseudoradial flow period if the flowrate is low. New type curves are presented that yield both vertical and horizontal permeabilities.

  12. Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compouns as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

  13. Reduction of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Zero-Valent Iron and Palladium Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Hun; Shin, Won Sik; Ko, Seok-Oh; Kim, Myung-Chul

    2004-03-31

    Permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is an alternative technology for soil and groundwater remediation. Zero valent iron, which is the most popular PRB material, is only applicable to halogenated aliphatic organics and some heavy metals. The objective of this study was to investigate reductive dechlorination of halogenated compounds and reduction of non-halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons using zero valent metals (ZVMs) and catalysts as reactive materials for PRBs. A group of small aromatic hydrocarbons such as monochlorophenols, phenol and benzene were readily reduced with palladium catalyst and zero valent iron. Poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also tested with the catalysts and zero valent metal combinations. The aromatic rings were reduced and partly reduced PAHs were found as the daughter compounds. The current study demonstrates reduction of aromatic compounds by ZVMs and modified catalysts and implicates that PRB is applicable not only for halogenated organic compounds but nonhalogenated aromatic compounds such as PAHs.

  14. Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline

    DOEpatents

    Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

    1993-01-19

    The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compounds as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

  15. Disformal transformations, veiled General Relativity and Mimetic Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Deruelle, Nathalie; Rua, Josephine E-mail: rua@cbpf.br

    2014-09-01

    In this Note we show that Einstein's equations for gravity are generically invariant under ''disformations''. We also show that the particular subclass when this is not true yields the equations of motion of ''Mimetic Gravity''. Finally we give the ''mimetic'' generalization of the Schwarzschild solution.

  16. Bimetric gravity doubly coupled to matter: theory and cosmological implications

    SciTech Connect

    Akrami, Yashar; Koivisto, Tomi S.; Mota, David F.; Sandstad, Marit E-mail: t.s.koivisto@astro.uio.no E-mail: marit.sandstad@astro.uio.no

    2013-10-01

    A ghost-free theory of gravity with two dynamical metrics both coupled to matter is shown to be consistent and viable. Its cosmological implications are studied, and the models, in particular in the context of partially massless gravity, are found to explain the cosmic acceleration without resorting to dark energy.

  17. Two-phase alkali-metal experiments in reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-06-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. A literature search of relevant experiments in reduced gravity is reported on here, and reveals a paucity of data for such correlations. The few ongoing experiments in reduced gravity are noted. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. A similar situation exists regarding two-phase alkali-metal flow and heat transfer, even in normal gravity. Existing data are conflicting and indequate for the task of modeling a space reactor using a two-phase alkali-metal coolant. The major features of past experiments are described here. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from the two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Analyses undertaken here give every expectation that the correlations developed from this data base will provide a valid representation of alkali-metal heat transfer and pressure drop in reduced gravity.

  18. Massive gravitational waves in Chern-Simons modified gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon E-mail: tymoon@inje.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    We consider the nondynamical Chern-Simons (nCS) modified gravity, which is regarded as a parity-odd theory of massive gravity in four dimensions. We first find polarization modes of gravitational waves for θ=x/μ in nCS modified gravity by using the Newman-Penrose formalism where the null complex tetrad is necessary to specify gravitational waves. We show that in the Newman–Penrose formalism, the number of polarization modes is one in addition to an unspecified Ψ{sub 4}, implying three degrees of freedom for θ=x/μ. This compares with two for a canonical embedding of θ=t/μ. Also, if one introduces the Ricci tensor formalism to describe a massive graviton arising from the nCS modified gravity, one finds one massive mode after making second-order wave equations, which is compared to five found from the parity-even Einstein–Weyl gravity.

  19. Process for conversion of light olefins to LPG and aromatics

    SciTech Connect

    Martindale, D.C.; Andermann, R.E.; Mowry, J.R.

    1989-01-03

    A hydrocarbon conversion process is described which comprises passing a hydrocarbon feed stream comprising at least 30 mole percent olefins having 3 to 4 carbon atoms per molecule and also comprising at least 50 mole percent paraffins having 3 to 4 carbon atoms per molecule and containing less than 10 mole percent C/sub 5/-plus hydrocarbons into a catalytic reaction zone operated at low severity conditions and contacting the feed stream with a solid catalyst gallium. A reaction zone effluent stream is produced comprising C/sub 6/-C/sub 8/ aromatic hydrocarbons and C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ paraffins, with the reaction zone effluent stream containing less than 10 mole percent olefinic hydrocarbons. The low severity conditions include a combination of pressure, feed space velocity and temperature, including a temperature below 425/sup 0/C, which results in a partial conversion of the feed hydrocarbons into aromatic hydrocarbons whereby: (i) when the effluent is separated there are produced a first product stream, which first product stream is rich in C/sub 6/-C/sub 8/ aromatic hydrocarbons and is withdrawn from the process, with the second product stream, which second product stream is rich in C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ paraffins and is withdrawn from the process, with the second product stream having a flow rate equal to at least 30 wt. percent of the flow rate of the feed stream; and (ii) the mass flow rate of paraffinic hydrocarbons out of the reaction zone exceeds the mass flow rate of paraffinic hydrocarbons into the reaction zone.

  20. Ground Gravity Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Glass Buttes Area...

  1. Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove...

  2. Ground Gravity Survey At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP)...

  3. Ground Gravity Survey At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Fort Bliss Area (DOE...

  4. Ground Gravity Survey At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey At New River Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At New River Area (DOE...

  5. Mixing lengths scaling in a gravity flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rivera, Micheal [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Jun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the mixing processes in a gravity current. The turbulent transport of momentum and buoyancy can be described in a very direct and compact form by a Prandtl mixing length model [1]: the turbulent vertical fluxes of momentum and buoyancy are found to scale quadraticatly with the vertical mean gradients of velocity and density. The scaling coefficient is the square of the mixing length, approximately constant over the mixing zone of the stratified shear layer. We show in this paper how, in different flow configurations, this length can be related to the shear length of the flow {radical}({var_epsilon}/{partial_derivative}{sub z}u{sup 3}).

  6. Semiclassical approximation to supersymmetric quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, Claus; Lueck, Tobias; Moniz, Paulo

    2005-08-15

    We develop a semiclassical approximation scheme for the constraint equations of supersymmetric canonical quantum gravity. This is achieved by a Born-Oppenheimer type of expansion, in analogy to the case of the usual Wheeler-DeWitt equation. The formalism is only consistent if the states at each order depend on the gravitino field. We recover at consecutive orders the Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the functional Schroedinger equation, and quantum gravitational correction terms to this Schroedinger equation. In particular, the following consequences are found: (i) the Hamilton-Jacobi equation and therefore the background spacetime must involve the gravitino, (ii) a (many-fingered) local time parameter has to be present on super Riem {sigma} (the space of all possible tetrad and gravitino fields) (iii) quantum supersymmetric gravitational corrections affect the evolution of the very early Universe. The physical meaning of these equations and results, in particular, the similarities to and differences from the pure bosonic case, are discussed.

  7. Testing quantum gravity via cosmogenic neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Joy

    2005-01-15

    Implications of some proposed theories of quantum gravity for neutrino flavor oscillations are explored within the context of modified dispersion relations of special relativity. In particular, approximate expressions for Planck scale-induced deviations from the standard oscillation length are obtained as functions of neutrino mass, energy, and propagation distance. Grounding on these expressions, it is pointed out that, in general, even those deviations that are suppressed by the second power of the Planck energy may be observable for ultra-high-energy neutrinos, provided they originate at cosmological distances. In fact, for neutrinos in the highest energy range of EeV to ZeV, deviations that are suppressed by as much as the seventh power of the Planck energy may become observable. Accordingly, realistic possibilities of experimentally verifying these deviations by means of the next generation neutrino detectors--such as IceCube and ANITA--are investigated.

  8. Production of green aromatics and olefins by catalytic fast pyrolysis of wood sawdust

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Torren R.; Cheng, Yu-Ting; Jae, Jungho; Huber, George W.

    2011-10-26

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis of pine wood sawdust and furan (a model biomass compound) with ZSM-5 based catalysts was studied with three different reactors: a bench scale bubbling fluidized bed reactor, a fixed bed reactor and a semi-batch pyroprobe reactor. The highest aromatic yield from sawdust of 14% carbon in the fluidized bed reactor was obtained at low biomass weight hourly space velocities (less than 0.5 h-1) and high temperature (600 °C). Olefins (primarily ethylene and propylene) were also produced with a carbon yield of 5.4% carbon. The biomass weight hourly space velocity and the reactor temperature can be used to control both aromatic yield and selectivity. At low biomass WHSV the more valuable monocyclic aromatics are produced and the formation of less valuable polycyclic aromatics is inhibited. Lowering the reaction temperature also results in more valuable monocyclic aromatics. The olefins produced during the reaction can be recycled to the reactor to produce additional aromatics. Propylene is more reactive than ethylene. Co-feeding propylene to the reactor results in a higher aromatic yield in both continuous reactors and higher conversion of the intermediate furan in the fixed bed reactor. When olefins are recycled aromatic yields from wood of 20% carbon can be obtained. After ten reaction–regeneration cycles there were metal impurities deposited on the catalyst, however, the acid sites on the zeolite are not affected. Of the three reactors tested the batch pyroprobe reactor yielded the most aromatics, however, the aromatic product is largely naphthalene. The continuous reactors produce less naphthalene and the sum of aromatics plus olefin products is higher than the pyroprobe reactor.

  9. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Dinelli, B. M.; Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E.; Moriconi, M. L.; Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2013-06-20

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  10. Synthesis of condensed phases containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons fullerenes and nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2004-10-19

    The invention relates to methods for producing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fullerenes, and nanotubes, comprising: a. heating at least one carbon-containing material to form a condensed phase comprising at least one polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon; b. collecting at least some of the condensed phase; c. reacting the condensed phase to form fullerenes and/or nanotubes.

  11. UV resonance Raman characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coal liquid distillates

    SciTech Connect

    Rumelfanger, R.; Asher, S.A.; Perry, M.B.

    1988-02-01

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy has been used to characterize the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon composition of a series of distillates of coal-derived liquids. The UV Raman spectra easily monitor changes in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon composition as a function of distillation temperature. Specific species, such as pyrene, can be determined by judicious choice of excitation wavelength.

  12. Geology and geochemistry of crude oils, Bolivar coastal fields, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Bockmeulen, H.; Barker, C.; Dickey, P.A.

    1983-02-01

    The Bolivar Coastal Fields (BCF) are located on the eastern margin of Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela. They form the largest oil field outside of the Middle East and contain mostly heavy oil with a gravity less than 22/sup 0/ API. Thirty crude oils from the BCF were collected along two parallel and generally southwest-northeast trends. These oils were characterized by their API gravity, percent saturates, aromatics, NSO and asphalitic compounds, gas chromatograms for whole oils, C/sub 4/-C/sub 7/ fractions, and aromatics. Also, 24 associated waters were sampled and analyzed for Ca/sup + +/, Mg/sup + +/, Na/sup +/, HCO/sub 3//sup -/, CO/sub 3//sup - -/, SO/sub 4//sup - -/, pH, and total dissolved solids (TDS). The geological and geochemical significances of these analyses are discussed with particular emphasis on the genesis of the petroleum.

  13. Perihelion precession for modified Newtonian gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Hans-Juergen

    2008-07-15

    We calculate the perihelion precession {delta} for nearly circular orbits in a central potential V(r). Differently from other approaches to this problem, we do not assume that the potential is close to the Newtonian one. The main idea in the deduction is to apply the underlying symmetries of the system to show that {delta} must be a function of r{center_dot}V{sup ''}(r)/V{sup '}(r) and to use the transformation behavior of {delta} in a rotating system of reference. This is equivalent to say that the effective potential can be written in a one-parameter set of possibilities as the sum of centrifugal potential and potential of the central force. We get the following universal formula valid for V{sup '}(r)>0 reading {delta}(r)=2{pi}{center_dot}[(1/{radical}(3+r{center_dot}V{sup ''}(r)/V{sup '}(r)))-1]. It has to be read as follows: a circular orbit at this value r exists and is stable if and only if this {delta} is well-defined as real; and if this is the case, then the angular difference from one perihelion to the next one for nearly circular orbits at this r is exactly 2{pi}+{delta}(r). Then we apply this result to examples of recent interest like modified Newtonian gravity and linearized fourth-order gravity. In the second part of the paper, we generalize this universal formula to static spherically symmetric space-times ds{sup 2}=-e{sup 2{lambda}}{sup (r)}dt{sup 2}+e{sup 2{mu}}{sup (r)}dr{sup 2}+r{sup 2}d{omega}{sup 2}; for orbits near r it reads {delta}=2{pi}{center_dot}[(e{sup {mu}}{sup (r)}/{radical}(3-2r{center_dot}{lambda}{sup '}(r)+r{center_dot}{lambda}{sup ''}(r)/{lambda}{sup '}(r)))-1] and can be applied to a large class of theories. For the Schwarzschild black hole with mass parameter m>0 it leads to {delta}=2{pi}{center_dot}[(1/{radical}(1-(6m/r)))-1], a surprisingly unknown formula. It represents a strict result and is applicable for all values r>6m and is in good agreement with the fact that stable circular orbits exist for r>6m only. For r>>m, one can

  14. Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D....

  15. Ground Gravity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Blackwell...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    local studies conducted in the past. Gravity data measured in the 1970's by Hunt Oil, Sun Oil, and Southland royalty (all unpublished reports) ware used. These data were combined...

  16. Ground Gravity Survey At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (U...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    survey was completed by MWH Geo-Surveys. Interpretations were made by creating a 3D density inversion map. Gravity and magnetic data were used in siting the first production...

  17. Ground Gravity Survey At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    lithologic distrubtions Notes Gravity low associated with Mt. Princeton Batholith; density contrast of -0.5 gcm3 of valley-fill sediments relative to batholith References J.E....

  18. Geologic interpretation of gravity and magnetic data in the Salida...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    interpretation of gravity and magnetic data in the Salida region, Colorado Authors J.E. Case and R.F. Sikora Published U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report, 1984 Report...

  19. Ground Gravity Survey At Truckhaven Area (Layman Energy Associates...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    9. The 95 magnetotelluric (MT) soundings cover a central area of about 80 square kilometers. The 126 gravity stations extend over a broader area of about 150 square kilometers,...

  20. Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    of about -196 mgal over the alluvium-covered graben areas. The gravity high over the Raft River Mountains apparently corresponds with the Raft River Mountains anticline. A belt...

  1. Ground Gravity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    project area. These data were used in conjunction with past gravity data reported in by Smith et al (2001) and Blackwell et al (2005). The analysis of these data had not been...

  2. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves associated with midlatitude thunderstorms

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Lay, Erin H.; Shao, Xuan -Min; Kendrick, Alexander K.; Carrano, Charles S.

    2015-07-30

    Acoustic waves with periods of 2–4 min and gravity waves with periods of 6–16 min have been detected at ionospheric heights (25–350 km) using GPS total electron content measurements. The area disturbed by these waves and the wave amplitudes have been associated with underlying thunderstorm activity. A statistical study comparing Next Generation Weather Radar thunderstorm measurements with ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves in the midlatitude U.S. Great Plains region was performed for the time period of May–July 2005. An increase of ionospheric acoustic wave disturbed area and amplitude is primarily associated with large thunderstorms (mesoscale convective systems). Ionospheric gravity wavemore » disturbed area and amplitude scale with thunderstorm activity, with even small storms (i.e., individual storm cells) producing an increase of gravity waves.« less

  3. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves associated with midlatitude thunderstorms

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, Erin H.; Shao, Xuan -Min; Kendrick, Alexander K.; Carrano, Charles S.

    2015-07-30

    Acoustic waves with periods of 2–4 min and gravity waves with periods of 6–16 min have been detected at ionospheric heights (25–350 km) using GPS total electron content measurements. The area disturbed by these waves and the wave amplitudes have been associated with underlying thunderstorm activity. A statistical study comparing Next Generation Weather Radar thunderstorm measurements with ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves in the midlatitude U.S. Great Plains region was performed for the time period of May–July 2005. An increase of ionospheric acoustic wave disturbed area and amplitude is primarily associated with large thunderstorms (mesoscale convective systems). Ionospheric gravity wave disturbed area and amplitude scale with thunderstorm activity, with even small storms (i.e., individual storm cells) producing an increase of gravity waves.

  4. Extremely strong tubular stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, Mark A.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Horner, Ian J.; Liu, Rui; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Si; Yung, Ka Yi; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Cai, Zhonghou; Bright, Frank V.; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Gong, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the third-generation rigid macrocycles evolved from progenitor 1, cyclic aromatic oligoamides 3, with a backbone of reduced constraint, exhibit extremely strong stacking with an astoundingly high affinity (estimated lower limit of Kdimer > 1013 M-1 in CHCl3), which leads to dispersed tubular stacks that undergo further assembly in solution. Computational study reveals a very large binding energy (-49.77 kcal mol-1) and indicates highly cooperative local dipole interactions that account for the observed strength and directionality for the stacking of 3. In the solid-state, X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the aggregation of 3 results in well-aligned tubular stacks. The persistent tubular assemblies of 3, with their non-deformable sub-nm pore, are expected to possess many interesting functions. One such function, transmembrane ion transport, is observed for 3.

  5. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) in marsh sediments, Iraq

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Saad, H.T.; Al-Timari, A.A. )

    1989-12-01

    Recently there has been a growing concern in the release of harmful organics into the environment. Carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) are a class of compounds of interset due to their possible harmful effects to man as well as organisms. Anthropogenic PAH's may reach aquatic environment as a result of both industrial and domestic effluents, deposition of airborne particles, surface runoff and oil spillage. Having a relatively low water solubility and high affinity to sorb to the suspended particulate matter, most of the PAH's introduced to the aquatic environment tend to accumulate in bottom sediments. Sedimentary PAH's may thus provide a record of the input and history of these pollutants. Consequently, the distribution of PAH's in aquatic sediments have received considerable attention. The purpose of the present work was to establish the distribution of PAH's in the sediments of the marsh region located in southern Iraq.

  6. Extremely strong tubular stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Kline, Mark A.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Horner, Ian J.; Liu, Rui; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Si; Yung, Ka Yi; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Cai, Zhonghou; Bright, Frank V.; et al

    2014-09-16

    As the third-generation rigid macrocycles evolved from progenitor 1, cyclic aromatic oligoamides 3, with a backbone of reduced constraint, exhibit extremely strong stacking with an astoundingly high affinity (estimated lower limit of K-dimer > 1013 M-1 in CHCl3), which leads to dispersed tubular stacks that undergo further assembly in solution. Computational study reveals a very large binding energy (-49.77 kcal mol-1) and indicates highly cooperative local dipole interactions that account for the observed strength and directionality for the stacking of 3. In the solid-state, X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the aggregation of 3 results in well-aligned tubular stacks. Furthermore, themore » persistent tubular assemblies of 3, with their non-deformable sub-nm pore, are expected to possess many interesting functions. One such function, transmembrane ion transport, is observed for 3.« less

  7. Extremely strong tubular stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Kline, Mark A.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Horner, Ian J.; Liu, Rui; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Si; Yung, Ka Yi; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Cai, Zhonghou; Bright, Frank V.; et al

    2015-01-01

    As the third-generation rigid macrocycles evolved from progenitor 1, cyclic aromatic oligoamides 3, with a backbone of reduced constraint, exhibit extremely strong stacking with an astoundingly high affinity (estimated lower limit of Kdimer > 1013 M-1 in CHCl3), which leads to dispersed tubular stacks that undergo further assembly in solution. Computational study reveals a very large binding energy (-49.77 kcal mol-1) and indicates highly cooperative local dipole interactions that account for the observed strength and directionality for the stacking of 3. In the solid-state, X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the aggregation of 3 results in well-aligned tubular stacks. The persistentmore » tubular assemblies of 3, with their non-deformable sub-nm pore, are expected to possess many interesting functions. One such function, transmembrane ion transport, is observed for 3.« less

  8. NUT-charged black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M.H.; Mann, R.B.

    2005-12-15

    We investigate the existence of Taub-NUT (Newman-Unti-Tamburino) and Taub-bolt solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity and obtain the general form of these solutions in d dimensions. We find that for all nonextremal NUT solutions of Einstein gravity having no curvature singularity at r=N, there exist NUT solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity that contain these solutions in the limit that the Gauss-Bonnet parameter {alpha} goes to zero. Furthermore there are no NUT solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity that yield nonextremal NUT solutions to Einstein gravity having a curvature singularity at r=N in the limit {alpha}{yields}0. Indeed, we have nonextreme NUT solutions in 2+2k dimensions with nontrivial fibration only when the 2k-dimensional base space is chosen to be CP{sup 2k}. We also find that the Gauss-Bonnet gravity has extremal NUT solutions whenever the base space is a product of 2-torii with at most a two-dimensional factor space of positive curvature. Indeed, when the base space has at most one positively curved two-dimensional space as one of its factor spaces, then Gauss-Bonnet gravity admits extreme NUT solutions, even though there a curvature singularity exists at r=N. We also find that one can have bolt solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with any base space with factor spaces of zero or positive constant curvature. The only case for which one does not have bolt solutions is in the absence of a cosmological term with zero curvature base space.

  9. Two-phase computer codes for zero-gravity applications

    SciTech Connect

    Krotiuk, W.J.

    1986-10-01

    This paper discusses the problems existing in the development of computer codes which can analyze the thermal-hydraulic behavior of two-phase fluids especially in low gravity nuclear reactors. The important phenomenon affecting fluid flow and heat transfer in reduced gravity is discussed. The applicability of using existing computer codes for space applications is assessed. Recommendations regarding the use of existing earth based fluid flow and heat transfer correlations are made and deficiencies in these correlations are identified.

  10. TESTING ALTERNATIVE THEORIES OF GRAVITY USING THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Casanellas, Jordi; Pani, Paolo; Lopes, Ilidio; Cardoso, Vitor E-mail: paolo.pani@ist.utl.pt E-mail: vitor.cardoso@ist.utl.pt

    2012-01-20

    We propose a new approach to test possible corrections to Newtonian gravity using solar physics. The high accuracy of current solar models and new precise observations allow us to constrain corrections to standard gravity at unprecedented levels. Our case study is Eddington-inspired gravity, an attractive modified theory of gravity which results in non-singular cosmology and collapse. The theory is equivalent to standard gravity in vacuum, but it sensibly differs from it within matter. For instance, it affects the evolution and the equilibrium structure of the Sun, giving different core temperature profiles, and deviations in the observed acoustic modes and in solar neutrino fluxes. Comparing the predictions from a modified solar model with observations, we constrain the coupling parameter of the theory, |{kappa}{sub g}| {approx}< 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} m{sup 5} s{sup -2} kg{sup -1}. Our results show that the Sun can be used to efficiently constrain alternative theories of gravity.

  11. Cosmological stability bound in massive gravity and bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Fasiello, Matteo; Tolley, Andrew J. E-mail: andrew.j.tolley@case.edu

    2013-12-01

    We give a simple derivation of a cosmological bound on the graviton mass for spatially flat FRW solutions in massive gravity with an FRW reference metric and for bigravity theories. This bound comes from the requirement that the kinetic term of the helicity zero mode of the graviton is positive definite. The bound is dependent only on the parameters in the massive gravity potential and the Hubble expansion rate for the two metrics. We derive the decoupling limit of bigravity and FRW massive gravity, and use this to give an independent derivation of the cosmological bound. We recover our previous results that the tension between satisfying the Friedmann equation and the cosmological bound is sufficient to rule out all observationally relevant FRW solutions for massive gravity with an FRW reference metric. In contrast, in bigravity this tension is resolved due to different nature of the Vainshtein mechanism. We find that in bigravity theories there exists an FRW solution with late-time self-acceleration for which the kinetic terms for the helicity-2, helicity-1 and helicity-0 are generically nonzero and positive making this a compelling candidate for a model of cosmic acceleration. We confirm that the generalized bound is saturated for the candidate partially massless (bi)gravity theories but the existence of helicity-1/helicity-0 interactions implies the absence of the conjectured partially massless symmetry for both massive gravity and bigravity.

  12. Finite field-dependent symmetries in perturbative quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker

    2014-01-15

    In this paper we discuss the absolutely anticommuting nilpotent symmetries for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime in linear and non-linear gauges. Further, we analyze the finite field-dependent BRST (FFBRST) transformation for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime. The FFBRST transformation changes the gauge-fixing and ghost parts of the perturbative quantum gravity within functional integration. However, the operation of such symmetry transformation on the generating functional of perturbative quantum gravity does not affect the theory on physical ground. The FFBRST transformation with appropriate choices of finite BRST parameter connects non-linear CurciFerrari and Landau gauges of perturbative quantum gravity. The validity of the results is also established at quantum level using BatalinVilkovisky (BV) formulation. -- Highlights: The perturbative quantum gravity is treated as gauge theory. BRST and anti-BRST transformations are developed in linear and non-linear gauges. BRST transformation is generalized by making it finite and field dependent. Connection between linear and non-linear gauges is established. Using BV formulation the results are established at quantum level also.

  13. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Petroleum Marketing Monthly 1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Petroleum Marketing Monthly 1 Glossary API gravity: An arbitrary scale expressing the gravity or density of liquid petroleum products. The measuring scale is calibrated in terms of degrees API; it may be calculated in terms of the following formula: The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to

  14. Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic Residues in Cellulase Enzymes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    NREL researchers use high-performance computing to demonstrate fundamental roles of aromatic residues in cellulase enzyme tunnels. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) computer simulations of a key industrial enzyme, the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 cellulase (Cel6A), predict that aromatic residues near the enzyme's active site and at the entrance and exit tunnel perform different functions in substrate binding and catalysis, depending on their location in the enzyme. These results suggest that nature employs aromatic-carbohydrate interactions with a wide variety of binding affinities for diverse functions. Outcomes also suggest that protein engineering strategies in which mutations are made around the binding sites may require tailoring specific to the enzyme family. Cellulase enzymes ubiquitously exhibit tunnels or clefts lined with aromatic residues for processing carbohydrate polymers to monomers, but the molecular-level role of these aromatic residues remains unknown. In silico mutation of the aromatic residues near the catalytic site of Cel6A has little impact on the binding affinity, but simulation suggests that these residues play a major role in the glucopyranose ring distortion necessary for cleaving glycosidic bonds to produce fermentable sugars. Removal of aromatic residues at the entrance and exit of the cellulase tunnel, however, dramatically impacts the binding affinity. This suggests that these residues play a role in acquiring cellulose chains from the cellulose crystal and stabilizing the reaction product, respectively. These results illustrate that the role of aromatic-carbohydrate interactions varies dramatically depending on the position in the enzyme tunnel. As aromatic-carbohydrate interactions are present in all carbohydrate-active enzymes, the results have implications for understanding protein structure-function relationships in carbohydrate metabolism and recognition, carbon turnover in nature, and protein engineering strategies for

  15. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    API Gravity Definitions Key Terms Definition API Gravity An arbitrary scale expressing the gravity or density of liquid petroleum products. The measuring scale is calibrated in terms of degrees API; it is calculated as follows: Degrees API = (141.5 / (sp. gr. 60ºF / 60ºF)) - 131.5 The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes

  16. Nonlinear structure formation in nonlocal gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Barreira, Alexandre; Li, Baojiu; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Pascoli, Silvia E-mail: baojiu.li@durham.ac.uk E-mail: c.m.baugh@durham.ac.uk

    2014-09-01

    We study the nonlinear growth of structure in nonlocal gravity models with the aid of N-body simulation and the spherical collapse and halo models. We focus on a model in which the inverse-squared of the d'Alembertian operator acts on the Ricci scalar in the action. For fixed cosmological parameters, this model differs from ΛCDM by having a lower late-time expansion rate and an enhanced and time-dependent gravitational strength ∼ 6% larger today). Compared to ΛCDM today, in the nonlocal model, massive haloes are slightly more abundant (by ∼ 10% at M ∼ 10{sup 14} M{sub ⊙}/h) and concentrated ≈ 8% enhancement over a range of mass scales), but their linear bias remains almost unchanged. We find that the Sheth-Tormen formalism describes the mass function and halo bias very well, with little need for recalibration of free parameters. The fitting of the halo concentrations is however essential to ensure the good performance of the halo model on small scales. For k ∼> 1 h/Mpc, the amplitude of the nonlinear matter and velocity divergence power spectra exhibits a modest enhancement of ∼ 12% to 15%, compared to ΛCDM today. This suggests that this model might only be distinguishable from ΛCDM by future observational missions. We point out that the absence of a screening mechanism may lead to tensions with Solar System tests due to local time variations of the gravitational strength, although this is subject to assumptions about the local time evolution of background averaged quantities.

  17. Gravity survey of the southwestern part of the sourthern Utah geothermal belt

    SciTech Connect

    Green, R.T.; Cook, K.L.

    1981-03-01

    A gravity survey covering an area of 6200 km/sup 2/ was made over the southwestern part of the southern Utah geothermal belt. The objective of the gravity survey is to delineate the geologic structures and assist in the understanding of the geothermal potential of the area. A total of 726 new gravity stations together with 205 existing gravity stations, are reduced to give: (1) a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map, and (2) a fourth-order residual gravity anomaly map; both maps have a 2-mgal contour interval. The complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map shows an east-trending regional gravity belt with a total relief of about 70 mgal which crosses the central portion of the survey area. The gravity belt is attributed to a crustal lateral density variation of 0.1 gm/cc from a depth of 5 to 15 km.

  18. Correlation between precision gravity and subsidence measurements at Cerro Prieto

    SciTech Connect

    Zelwer, R.; Grannell, R.B.

    1982-10-01

    Precision gravity measurements were made in the region of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field at yearly intervals from 1977 to 1981 to assess the feasibility of using gravity to determine subsurface reservoir changes with time. The extent of mass recharge in response to the continued production of fluids from this field was studied. Changes in gravity and ground elevation were observed throughout the region for the period of observation. Results indicate that the largest changes observed were the result of the Magnitude 6.1 (Caltech) Victoria earthquake of 8 June 1980. The epicenter of this earthquake was located 25 km southeast of the field on the Cerro Prieto Fault, which bounds the field on the southwest. Subsidence of up to 55 cm was measured east of the power plant, in the region between the northern end of the Cerro Prieto Fault and the southern end of the Imperial Fault. This area has been postulated to be the site of an active spreading center or pull-apart basin, and has been characterized by a high level of seismic activity during the last 10 years. Minor subsidence and small related gravity changes for the period preceeding the Victoria earthquake suggest that in spite of large fluid production rates, the reservoir is being almost completely recharged and that a measurable increase in subsurface density may be taking place. The results of measurements of horizontal ground motions made in this area are discussed in relation to the gravity and subsidence observations.

  19. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site gravity survey and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Barrows, L.J.; Fett, J.D.

    1983-04-01

    A portion of the WIPP site has been extensively surveyed with high-precision gravity. The main survey (in T22S, R31E) covered a rectangular area 2 by 4-1/3 mi encompassing all of WIPP site Zone II and part of the disturbed zone to the north of the site. Stations were at 293-ft intervals along 13 north-south lines 880 ft apart. The data are considered accurate to within a few hundredths of a milligal. Long-wavelength gravity anomalies correlate well with seismic time structures on horizons below the Castile Formation. Both the gravity anomalies and the seismic time structures are interpreted as resulting from related density and velocity variations within the Ochoan Series. Shorter wavelength negative gravity anomalies are interpreted as resulting from bulk density alteration in the vicinity of karst conduits. The WIPP gravity survey was unable to resolve low-amplitude, long-wavelength anomalies that should result from the geologic structures within the disturbed zone. It did indicate the degree and character of karst development within the surveyed area.

  20. Angular momentum transport via internal gravity waves in evolving stars

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Jim; Lecoanet, Daniel; Cantiello, Matteo; Brown, Ben

    2014-11-20

    Recent asteroseismic advances have allowed for direct measurements of the internal rotation rates of many subgiant and red giant stars. Unlike the nearly rigidly rotating Sun, these evolved stars contain radiative cores that spin faster than their overlying convective envelopes, but slower than they would in the absence of internal angular momentum transport. We investigate the role of internal gravity waves in angular momentum transport in evolving low-mass stars. In agreement with previous results, we find that convectively excited gravity waves can prevent the development of strong differential rotation in the radiative cores of Sun-like stars. As stars evolve into subgiants, however, low-frequency gravity waves become strongly attenuated and cannot propagate below the hydrogen-burning shell, allowing the spin of the core to decouple from the convective envelope. This decoupling occurs at the base of the subgiant branch when stars have surface temperatures of T ≈ 5500 K. However, gravity waves can still spin down the upper radiative region, implying that the observed differential rotation is likely confined to the deep core near the hydrogen-burning shell. The torque on the upper radiative region may also prevent the core from accreting high angular momentum material and slow the rate of core spin-up. The observed spin-down of cores on the red giant branch cannot be totally attributed to gravity waves, but the waves may enhance shear within the radiative region and thus increase the efficacy of viscous/magnetic torques.

  1. First tsunami gravity wave detection in ionospheric radio occultation data

    SciTech Connect

    Coïsson, Pierdavide; Lognonné, Philippe; Walwer, Damian; Rolland, Lucie M.

    2015-05-09

    After the 11 March 2011 earthquake and tsunami off the coast of Tohoku, the ionospheric signature of the displacements induced in the overlying atmosphere has been observed by ground stations in various regions of the Pacific Ocean. We analyze here the data of radio occultation satellites, detecting the tsunami-driven gravity wave for the first time using a fully space-based ionospheric observation system. One satellite of the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) recorded an occultation in the region above the tsunami 2.5 h after the earthquake. The ionosphere was sounded from top to bottom, thus providing the vertical structure of the gravity wave excited by the tsunami propagation, observed as oscillations of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC). The observed vertical wavelength was about 50 km, with maximum amplitude exceeding 1 total electron content unit when the occultation reached 200 km height. We compared the observations with synthetic data obtained by summation of the tsunami-coupled gravity normal modes of the Earth/Ocean/atmosphere system, which models the associated motion of the ionosphere plasma. These results provide experimental constraints on the attenuation of the gravity wave with altitude due to atmosphere viscosity, improving the understanding of the propagation of tsunami-driven gravity waves in the upper atmosphere. They demonstrate that the amplitude of the tsunami can be estimated to within 20% by the recorded ionospheric data.

  2. First tsunami gravity wave detection in ionospheric radio occultation data

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Coïsson, Pierdavide; Lognonné, Philippe; Walwer, Damian; Rolland, Lucie M.

    2015-05-09

    After the 11 March 2011 earthquake and tsunami off the coast of Tohoku, the ionospheric signature of the displacements induced in the overlying atmosphere has been observed by ground stations in various regions of the Pacific Ocean. We analyze here the data of radio occultation satellites, detecting the tsunami-driven gravity wave for the first time using a fully space-based ionospheric observation system. One satellite of the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) recorded an occultation in the region above the tsunami 2.5 h after the earthquake. The ionosphere was sounded from top to bottom, thus providing themore » vertical structure of the gravity wave excited by the tsunami propagation, observed as oscillations of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC). The observed vertical wavelength was about 50 km, with maximum amplitude exceeding 1 total electron content unit when the occultation reached 200 km height. We compared the observations with synthetic data obtained by summation of the tsunami-coupled gravity normal modes of the Earth/Ocean/atmosphere system, which models the associated motion of the ionosphere plasma. These results provide experimental constraints on the attenuation of the gravity wave with altitude due to atmosphere viscosity, improving the understanding of the propagation of tsunami-driven gravity waves in the upper atmosphere. They demonstrate that the amplitude of the tsunami can be estimated to within 20% by the recorded ionospheric data.« less

  3. Estimating the aqueous solubility of aromatic hydrocarbons by high performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, B.G.; Cooke, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    Empirical equations which correlate high performance liquid chromatography capacity factor (k') to aromatic hydrocarbon aqueous solubility are developed. The correlations of k' to octanol-water partition coefficients, and k' to hydrocarbon surface area are also shown.

  4. Refractometric determination of content of aromatic hydrocarbons in AI-93 gasolines

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, L.M.; Ioffe, B.V.; Mikheeva, E.G.

    1982-11-01

    Investigates the possibility of extending the use of the dispersometric method to the control of aromatic hydrocarbon content in AI-93 gasolines. Uses 4 model blends with aromatics content of 20-40% by weight. Finds that the dispersometric method can be used in analyzing both unleaded and leaded AI-93 gasolines, since the addition of ethyl fluid and dye in formulating the leaded gasolines does not affect the accuracy in determining the aromatic hydrocarbon content. Concludes that the dispersometric method can be used to determine the aromatic hydrocarbon content in AI-93 gasolines to within + or - 1.0% by weight, both in the laboratory (IRF-23M refractometer) and under commercial conditions (in ''Nafta-74'' unit).

  5. Selective aromatization of C[sub 3]- and C[sub 4]-paraffins over modified encilite catalysts: 2. Kinetics of n-butane aromatization

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, A.K.; Rao, M.S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    The kinetics of the aromatization of n-butane over Zn-encilite catalyst was studied in a fixed bed reactor under steady-state conditions at atmospheric pressure and in the temperature range of 480--540 C. The experimental data were analyzed, and a dual-site mechanism was proposed. Six rate equations of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood type were tested. The unknown parameters in the rate equations were estimated by a nonlinear regression method. A kinetic equation for n-butane aromatization is proposed.

  6. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in lime spray dryer ash

    SciTech Connect

    Ping Sun; Panuwat Taerakul; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker

    2005-10-01

    Four lime spray dryer (LSD) ash samples were collected from a spreader stoker boiler and measured for their concentrations of 16 U.S. EPA specified polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Results showed that the total measured PAH concentration correlated with the organic carbon content of the LSD ash. Each LSD ash sample was then separated using a 140 mesh sieve into two fractions: a carbon-enriched fraction ({gt}140 mesh) and a lime-enriched fraction ({lt}140 mesh). Unburned carbon was further separated from the carbon-enriched fraction with a lithiumheteropolytungstate (LST) solution. PAH measurements on these different fractions showed that unburned carbon had the highest PAH concentrations followed by the carbon-enriched fraction, indicating that PAHs were primarily associated with the carbonaceous material in LSD ash. However, detectable levels of PAHs were also found in the lime-enriched fraction, suggesting that the fine spray of slaked lime may sorb PAH compounds from the flue gas in the LSD process. 37 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Atmospheric transport and outflow of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from China

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Lang; Shu Tao; Wenxin Liu; Yanxu Zhang; Staci Simonich

    2008-07-15

    A potential receptor influence function (PRIF) model, based on air mass forward trajectory calculations, was applied to simulate the atmospheric transport and outflow of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from China. With a 10 day atmospheric transport time, most neighboring countries and regions, as well as remote regions, were influenced by PAH emissions from China. Of the total annual PAH emission of 114 Gg, 92.7% remained within the boundary of mainland China. The geographic distribution of PRIFs within China was similar to the geographic distribution of the source regions, with high values in the North China Plain, Sichuan Basin, Shanxi, and Guizhou province. The Tarim basin and Sichuan basin had unfavorable meteorological conditions for PAH outflow. Of the PAH outflow from China (8092 tons or 7.1% of the total annual PAH emission), approximately 69.9% (5655 tons) reached no further than the offshore environment of mainland China and the South China Sea. Approximate 227, 71, 746, and 131 tons PAHs reached North Korea, South Korea, Russia-Mongolia region, and Japan, respectively, 2-4 days after the emission. Only 1.4 tons PAHs reached North America after more than 9 days. Interannual variation in the eastward PAH outflow was positively correlated to cold episodes of El Nino/Southern Oscillation. However, trans-Pacific atmospheric transport of PAHs from China was correlated to Pacific North America index (PNA) which is associated with the strength and position of westerly winds. 38 refs., 4 figs.

  8. DUSTY WINDS: EXTRAPLANAR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FEATURES OF NEARBY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Alexander; Veilleux, Sylvain; Rupke, David S. N. E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2013-09-10

    Recent observations have shown the presence of dust and molecular material in galactic winds, but relatively little is known about the distribution of these outflow components. To shed some light on this issue, we have used IRAC images from the Spitzer Space Telescope archive to investigate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission from a sample of 16 local galaxies with known winds. Our focus on nearby sources (median distance 8.6 Mpc) has revealed detailed PAH structure in the winds and allowed us to measure extraplanar PAH emission. We have identified extraplanar PAH features on scales of {approx}0.8-6.0 kpc. We find a nearly linear correlation between the amount of extraplanar PAH emission and the total infrared flux, a proxy for star formation activity in the disk. Our results also indicate a correlation between the height of extraplanar PAH emission and star formation rate surface density, which supports the idea of a surface density threshold on the energy or momentum injection rate for producing detectable extraplanar wind material.

  9. Chemistry of Furan Conversion into Aromatics and Olefins over HZSM-5: A Model Biomass Conversion Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Huber, George W.

    2011-06-03

    The conversion of furan (a model of cellulosic biomass) over HZSM-5 was investigated in a thermogravimetric analysismass spectrometry system, in situ Fourier transform infrared analysis, and in a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor. Furan adsorbed as oligomers at room temperature with a 1.73 of adsorbed furan/Al ratio. These oligomers were polycyclic aromatic compounds that were converted to CO, CO?, aromatics, and olefins at temperatures from 400 to 600 C. Aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, and naphthalene), oligomer isomers (e.g., benzofuran, 2,2-methylenebisfuran, and benzodioxane), and heavy oxygenates (C??{sub +} oligomers) were identified as intermediates formed inside HZSM-5 at different reaction temperatures. During furan conversion, graphite-type coke formed on the catalyst surface, which caused the aromatics and olefins formation to deactivate within the first 30 min of time on-stream. We have measured the effects of space velocity and temperature for furan conversion to help us understand the chemistry of biomass conversion inside zeolite catalysts. The major products for furan conversion included CO, CO?, allene, C?C? olefins, benzene, toluene, styrene, benzofuran, indene, and naphthalene. The aromatics (benzene and toluene) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) selectivity decreased with increasing space velocity. Unsaturated hydrocarbons such as allene, cyclopentadiene, and aromatics selectivity increased with increasing space velocity. The product distribution was selective to olefins and CO at high temperatures (650 C) but was selective to aromatics (benzene and toluene) at intermediate temperatures (450600 C). At low temperatures (450 C), benzofuran and coke contributed 60% of the carbon selectivity. Several different reactions were occurring for furan conversion over zeolites. Some important reactions that we have identified in this study include DielsAlder condensation (e.g., two furans form benzofuran and water), decarbonylation (e

  10. Two-Step Process Converts Lignin into Simple Aromatic Compounds - Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Two-Step Process Converts Lignin into Simple Aromatic Compounds Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Lignin is a major component of non-edible biomass. It is a cheap byproduct of pulp and biofuel production and is one of the few naturally occurring sources of valuable aromatic compounds. Converting lignin's complex biopolymer structure into simple organic chemicals has attracted major interest. For example,

  11. Environmental diagnostic analysis of ground water bacteria and their involvement in utilization of aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wear, J.E. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that select functional groups of bacteria from pristine sites have an innate ability to degrade synthetic aromatics that often contaminate groundwater environments,due to exposure to naturally occurring recalcitrant aromatics in their environment. This study demonstrates that subsurface microbial communities are capable of utilizing lignin and humic acid breakdown products. Utilizers of these compounds were found to be present in most all the wells tested. Even the deepest aquifer tested had utilizers present for all six of the aromatics tested. Highest counts for the aromatics tested were observed with the naturally occurring breakdown products of either lignin or humic acid. Carboxylic acids were found to be an important sole carbon source for groundwater bacteria possibly explained by the fact that they are produced by the oxidative cleavage of aromatic ring structures. The carbohydrate sole carbon sources that demonstrated the greatest densities were ones commonly associated with humics. This study indicates that utilization of naturally occurring aromatic compounds in the subsurface is an important nutritional source for groundwater bacteria. In addition, it suggests that adaptation to naturally occurring recalcitrant substrates is the origin of degradative pathways for xenobiotic compounds with analogous structure. This work has important implications for in situ bioremediation as a method of environmental cleanup.

  12. On the null trajectories in conformal Weyl gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Villanueva, J.R.; Olivares, Marco E-mail: marco.olivaresrubilar@gmail.com

    2013-06-01

    In this work we find analytical solutions to the null geodesics around a black hole in the conformal Weyl gravity. Exact expressions for the horizons are found, and they depend on the cosmological constant and the coupling constants of the conformal Weyl gravity. Then, we study the radial motion from the point of view of the proper and coordinate frames, and compare it with that found in spacetimes of general relativity. The angular motion is also examined qualitatively by means of an effective potential; quantitatively, the equation of motion is solved in terms of wp-Weierstrass elliptic function. Thus, we find the deflection angle for photons without using any approximation, which is a novel result for this kind of gravity.

  13. Monitoring the Bulalo geothermal reservoir, Philippines, using precision gravity data

    SciTech Connect

    San Andres, R.B.; Pedersen, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    Precision gravity monitoring of the Bulalo geothermal field began in 1980 to estimate the natural mass recharge to the reservoir. Between 1980 and 1991, gravity decreases exceeding 2.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} N/kg (250 microgals) were observed in response to fluid withdrawals. A maximum rate of {minus}26 microgals per year was observed near the production center. Mass discharges predicted by recent reservoir simulation modeling generally match those inferred from the observed gravity data. According to simulation studies, no recharge occurred between 1980 and 1984. The mass recharge between 1984 and 1991 was estimated to be 30% of net fluid withdrawal during the same period, equivalent to an average rate of 175 kg/s (630 metric tons per hour).

  14. On axionic field ranges, loopholes and the weak gravity conjecture

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Brown, Jon; Cottrell, William; Shiu, Gary; Soler, Pablo

    2016-04-05

    Here, we clarify some aspects of the impact that the Weak Gravity Conjecture has on models of (generalized) natural inflation. In particular we address certain technical and conceptual concerns recently raised regarding the stringent constraints and conclusions found in our previous work. We also point out the difficulties faced by attempts to evade these constraints. Furthermore, these new considerations improve the understanding of the quantum gravity constraints we found and further support the conclusion that it remains challenging for axions to drive natural inflation.

  15. Spectral regularisation: induced gravity and the onset of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Max A.; Sakellariadou, Mairi E-mail: mairi.sakellariadou@kcl.ac.uk

    2014-01-01

    Using spectral regularisation, we compute the Weyl anomaly and express the anomaly generating functional of the quantum effective action through a collective scalar degree of freedom of all quantum vacuum fluctuations. Such a formulation allows us to describe induced gravity on an equal footing with the anomaly-induced effective action, in a self-consistent way. We then show that requiring stability of the cosmological constant under loop quantum corrections, Sakharov's induced gravity and Starobinsky's anomaly-induced inflation are either both present or both absent, depending on the particle content of the theory.

  16. Minimum length, extra dimensions, modified gravity and black hole remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Maziashvili, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We construct a Hilbert space representation of minimum-length deformed uncertainty relation in presence of extra dimensions. Following this construction, we study corrections to the gravitational potential (back reaction on gravity) with the use of correspondingly modified propagator in presence of two (spatial) extra dimensions. Interestingly enough, for r?0 the gravitational force approaches zero and the horizon for modified Schwarzschild-Tangherlini space-time disappears when the mass approaches quantum-gravity energy scale. This result points out to the existence of zero-temperature black hole remnants in ADD brane-world model.

  17. Stabilization of linear higher derivative gravity with constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tai-jun; Lim, Eugene A. E-mail: eugene.a.lim@gmail.com

    2014-05-01

    We show that the instabilities of higher derivative gravity models with quadratic curvature invariant ?R{sup 2}+?R{sub ??}R{sup ??} can be removed by judicious addition of constraints at the quadratic level of metric fluctuations around Minkowski/de Sitter background. With a suitable parameter choice, we find that the instabilities of helicity-0, 1, 2 modes can be removed while reducing the dimensionality of the original phase space. To retain the renormalization properties of higher derivative gravity, Lorentz symmetry in the constrained theory is explicitly broken.

  18. Gravity Survey of the Carson Sink - Data and Maps

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    Preliminary Interpretation of Results: The Carson Sink is a complex composite basin with several major depocenters (Figures 15 and 16). Major depocenters are present in the south?central, east?central, and northeastern parts of the basin. The distribution of gravity anomalies suggests a complex pattern of faulting in the subsurface of the basin, with many fault terminations, step?overs, and accommodation zones. The pattern of faulting implies that other, previously undiscovered blind geothermal systems are likely in the Carson Sink. The gravity survey was completed near the end of this project. Thus, more thorough analysis of the data and potential locations of blind geothermal systems is planned for future work.

  19. Flat 3-brane with Tension in Cascading Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Khoury, Justin; Tolley, Andrew

    2009-10-16

    In the cascading gravity brane-world scenario, our 3-brane lies within a succession of lower-codimension branes, each with their own induced gravity term, embedded into each other in a higher-dimensional space-time. In the (6+1)-dimensional version of this scenario, we show that a 3-brane with tension remains flat, at least for sufficiently small tension that the weak-field approximation is valid. The bulk solution is singular nowhere and remains in the perturbative regime everywhere.

  20. Gravitomagnetic gyroscope precession in Palatini f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2009-04-15

    We study gravitomagnetic effects in the Palatini formalism of f(R) gravity. On using the Kerr-de Sitter metric, which is a solution of f(R) field equations, we calculate the impact of f(R) gravity on the gravitomagnetic precession of an orbiting gyroscope. We show that, even though an f(R) contribution is present in principle, its magnitude is negligibly small and far to be detectable in the present (like GP-B) and foreseeable space missions or observational tests around the Earth.

  1. Gravity Survey of the Carson Sink - Data and Maps

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Preliminary Interpretation of Results: The Carson Sink is a complex composite basin with several major depocenters (Figures 15 and 16). Major depocenters are present in the south?central, east?central, and northeastern parts of the basin. The distribution of gravity anomalies suggests a complex pattern of faulting in the subsurface of the basin, with many fault terminations, step?overs, and accommodation zones. The pattern of faulting implies that other, previously undiscovered blind geothermal systems are likely in the Carson Sink. The gravity survey was completed near the end of this project. Thus, more thorough analysis of the data and potential locations of blind geothermal systems is planned for future work.

  2. Spherically symmetric static spacetimes in vacuum f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, Rafael; Fiorini, Franco

    2011-10-15

    We show that Schwarzschild geometry remains as a vacuum solution for those four-dimensional f(T) gravitational theories behaving as ultraviolet deformations of general relativity. In the gentler context of three-dimensional gravity, we also find that the infrared-deformed f(T) gravities, like the ones used to describe the late cosmic speed up of the Universe, have as the circularly symmetric vacuum solution a Deser-de Sitter or a Banados, Teitelboim and Zanelli-like spacetime with an effective cosmological constant depending on the infrared scale present in the function f(T).

  3. On the gauge features of gravity on a Lie algebroid structure

    SciTech Connect

    Fabi, S. Harms, B. Hou, S.

    2014-03-15

    We present the geometric formulation of gravity based on the mathematical structure of a Lie Algebroid. We show that this framework provides the geometrical setting to describe the gauge propriety of gravity.

  4. Problems with propagation and time evolution inf(T)gravity (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Problems with propagation and time evolution inf(T)gravity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Problems with propagation and time evolution inf(T)gravity Authors: Ong, Yen...

  5. Toward large N thermal QCD from dual gravity: The heavy quarkonium...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Toward large N thermal QCD from dual gravity: The heavy quarkonium potential Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Toward large N thermal QCD from dual gravity: The heavy ...

  6. How Does Gravity Work to Hold a Human Down? | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Does Gravity Work to Hold a Human Down? Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new ... How Does Gravity Work to Hold a Human Down? 2012.04.13 Chief Scientist Jim Bray discusses ...

  7. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  8. THE AROMATIC FEATURES IN VERY FAINT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Ronin; Hogg, David W.; Moustakas, John

    2011-04-01

    We present optical and mid-infrared photometry of a statistically complete sample of 29 dwarf galaxies (M{sub r} > - 15 mag) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic sample and observed in the mid-infrared with Spitzer IRAC. This sample contains nearby (redshift {approx}<0.005) galaxies 3 mag fainter than previously studied samples. We compare our sample with other star-forming galaxies that have been observed with both IRAC and SDSS. We examine the relationship of the infrared color, [3.6]-[7.8], sensitive to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance and also hot dust and stellar continuum, with star formation rates (SFRs), oxygen abundances, and radiation hardness, all estimated by optical emission lines. Consistent with studies of more luminous dwarfs, we find that these dwarf galaxies show much redder [3.6]-[7.8] color than luminous galaxies with similar specific SFRs. Unlike luminous galaxies, we find that these dwarf galaxies show no significant dependence at all of the [3.6]-[7.8] color on SFR, oxygen abundance, or radiation hardness, despite the fact that the sample spans a significant range in all of these quantities. When the dwarfs in our sample are compared with more luminous dwarfs, we find that the [3.6]-[7.8] color, potentially tracing the PAH emission, depends on oxygen abundance and radiation hardness. However, these two parameters are correlated with one another as well; we break this degeneracy by looking at the PAH-oxygen abundance relation at a fixed radiation hardness and the PAH-hardness relation at a fixed oxygen abundance. This test shows that the [3.6]-[7.8] color in dwarf galaxies appears to depend more directly on oxygen abundance based on the data currently available.

  9. Simulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons transport in multimedia

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Chu, C.J.

    1999-07-01

    Many studies have indicated that the threat from toxic air pollutants such as VOCs comes not through inhalation by humans while the pollutants are in a gaseous state but through absorption when the pollutants are in a solid state such as in an aerosol or particulate form. Pollutants such as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) usually exist in a semi-volatile state. To assess the risk of the PAHs, one needs to estimate the dose of the pollutants to which a human would be exposed through various pathways. In this study, the authors modified a Spatial Multimedia Compartmental Model (SMCM) originally developed by UCLA Professor Cohen to predict the PAHs distribution among multimedia such as air, water, soil and sediment in the Taipei metropolitan area. Three PAHs were considered in this study. They are Benzo(a)pyrene, Pyrene and Chrysene. When PAHs are emitted into atmosphere, physical and chemical mechanisms may redistribute the PAHs among multimedia. Five cases of PAHs distribution in multimedia were simulated: (1) PAHs distribution in a dry condition, (2) PAHs distribution when there are different dry deposition velocities, (3) PAHs distribution under a single rainfall event, (4) PAHs distribution when there are different soil properties, (5) PAHs distribution under a random rainfall case. The simulation results are concluded: (1) In the dry case, the PAHs accumulate mostly in soil and air compartments, (2) Different dry depositing velocities will affect the PAHs distribution among compartments. (3) Different soil properties affect the PAHs concentration in the soil and sediment compartments, (4) The soil PAHs concentrations usually increase for those PAHs with a high solid/gas ratio. (5) The random rainfall only affects the PAHs concentration in the soil.

  10. Complete Bouguer gravity map of the Nevada Test Site and vicinity, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Healey, D.L.; Harris, R.N.; Ponce, D.A.; Oliver, H.W.

    1987-12-31

    About 15,000 gravity stations were used to create the gravity map. Gravity studies at the Nevada Test Site were undertaken to help locate geologically favorable areas for underground nuclear tests and to help characterize potential high-level nuclear waste storage sites. 48 refs. (TEM)

  11. Further stable neutron star models from f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Astashenok, Artyom V.; Capozziello, Salvatore; Odintsov, Sergei D. E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.it

    2013-12-01

    Neutron star models in perturbative f(R) gravity are considered with realistic equations of state. In particular, we consider the FPS, SLy and other equations of state and a case of piecewise equation of state for stars with quark cores. The mass-radius relations for f(R) = R+R(e{sup ?R/R{sub 0}}?1) model and for R{sup 2} models with logarithmic and cubic corrections are obtained. In the case of R{sup 2} gravity with cubic corrections, we obtain that at high central densities (? > 10?{sub ns}, where ?{sub ns} = 2.7 10{sup 14} g/cm{sup 3} is the nuclear saturation density), stable star configurations exist. The minimal radius of such stars is close to 9 km with maximal mass ? 1.9M{sub ?} (SLy equation). A similar situation takes place for AP4 and BSK20 EoS. Such an effect can give rise to more compact stars than in General Relativity. If observationally identified, such objects could constitute a formidable signature for modified gravity at astrophysical level. Another interesting result can be achieved in modified gravity with only a cubic correction. For some EoS, the upper limit of neutron star mass increases and therefore these EoS can describe realistic star configurations (although, in General Relativity, these EoS are excluded by observational constraints)

  12. Extreme neutron stars from Extended Theories of Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Astashenok, Artyom V.; Capozziello, Salvatore; Odintsov, Sergei D. E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.it

    2015-01-01

    We discuss neutron stars with strong magnetic mean fields in the framework of Extended Theories of Gravity. In particular, we take into account models derived from f(R) and f(G) extensions of General Relativity where functions of the Ricci curvature invariant R and the Gauss-Bonnet invariant G are respectively considered. Dense matter in magnetic mean field, generated by magnetic properties of particles, is described by assuming a model with three meson fields and baryons octet. As result, the considerable increasing of maximal mass of neutron stars can be achieved by cubic corrections in f(R) gravity. In principle, massive stars with M>4M{sub ?} can be obtained. On the other hand, stable stars with high strangeness fraction (with central densities ?{sub c}?1.52.0 GeV/fm{sup 3}) are possible considering quadratic corrections of f(G) gravity. The magnetic field strength in the star center is of order 68נ10{sup 18} G. In general, we can say that other branches of massive neutron stars are possible considering the extra pressure contributions coming from gravity extensions. Such a feature can constitute both a probe for alternative theories and a way out to address anomalous self-gravitating compact systems.

  13. On singularities of capillary surfaces in the absence of gravity

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Roytburd, V.

    1983-01-01

    We study numerical solutions to the equation of capillary surfaces in trapezoidal domains in the absence of gravity when the boundary contact angle declines from 90 to some critical value. We also discuss a result on the behavior of solutions in more general domains that confirms numerical calculations.

  14. Entirely passive heat pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity

    DOEpatents

    Koenig, Daniel R.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an entirely passive heat pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity for vertical distances in the order of 3 to 7 meters and more. A return conduit into which an inert gas is introduced is used to lower the specific density of the working fluid so that it may be returned a greater vertical distance from condenser to evaporator.

  15. How does gravity save or kill Q-balls?

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, Takashi; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2011-02-15

    We explore stability of gravitating Q-balls with potential V{sub 4}({phi})=(m{sup 2}/2){phi}{sup 2}-{lambda}{phi}{sup 4}+({phi}{sup 6}/M{sup 2}) via catastrophe theory, as an extension of our previous work on Q-balls with potential V{sub 3}({phi})=(m{sup 2}/2){phi}{sup 2}-{mu}{phi}{sup 3}+{lambda}{phi}{sup 4}. In flat spacetime Q-balls with V{sub 4} in the thick-wall limit are unstable and there is a minimum charge Q{sub min}, where Q-balls with Qgravity into account, on the other hand, there exist stable Q-balls with arbitrarily small charge, no matter how weak gravity is. That is, gravity saves Q-balls with small charge. We also show how stability of Q-balls changes as gravity becomes strong.

  16. Gravity monitoring of CO2 movement during sequestration: Model studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperikova, E.; Hoversten, G.M.

    2008-07-15

    We examine the relative merits of gravity measurements as a monitoring tool for geological CO{sub 2} sequestration in three different modeling scenarios. The first is a combined CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the second is sequestration in a brine formation, and the third is for a coalbed methane formation. EOR/sequestration petroleum reservoirs have relatively thin injection intervals with multiple fluid components (oil, hydrocarbon gas, brine, and CO{sub 2}), whereas brine formations usually have much thicker injection intervals and only two components (brine and CO{sub 2}). Coal formations undergoing methane extraction tend to be thin (3-10 m), but shallow compared to either EOR or brine formations. The injection of CO{sub 2} into the oil reservoir produced a bulk density decrease in the reservoir. The spatial pattern of the change in the vertical component of gravity (G{sub z}) is directly correlated with the net change in reservoir density. Furthermore, time-lapse changes in the borehole G{sub z} clearly identified the vertical section of the reservoir where fluid saturations are changing. The CO{sub 2}-brine front, on the order of 1 km within a 20 m thick brine formation at 1900 m depth, with 30% CO{sub 2} and 70% brine saturations, respectively, produced a -10 Gal surface gravity anomaly. Such anomaly would be detectable in the field. The amount of CO{sub 2} in a coalbed methane test scenario did not produce a large enough surface gravity response; however, we would expect that for an industrial size injection, the surface gravity response would be measurable. Gravity inversions in all three scenarios illustrated that the general position of density changes caused by CO{sub 2} can be recovered, but not the absolute value of the change. Analysis of the spatial resolution and detectability limits shows that gravity measurements could, under certain circumstances, be used as a lower-cost alternative to seismic

  17. Cartan gravity, matter fields, and the gauge principle

    SciTech Connect

    Westman, Hans F.; Zlosnik, Tom G.

    2013-07-15

    Gravity is commonly thought of as one of the four force fields in nature. However, in standard formulations its mathematical structure is rather different from the YangMills fields of particle physics that govern the electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions. This paper explores this dissonance with particular focus on how gravity couples to matter from the perspective of the Cartan-geometric formulation of gravity. There the gravitational field is represented by a pair of variables: (1) a contact vector V{sup A} which is geometrically visualized as the contact point between the spacetime manifold and a model spacetime being rolled on top of it, and (2) a gauge connection A{sub ?}{sup AB}, here taken to be valued in the Lie algebra of SO(2,3) or SO(1,4), which mathematically determines how much the model spacetime is rotated when rolled. By insisting on two principles, the gauge principle and polynomial simplicity, we shall show how one can reformulate matter field actions in a way that is harmonious with Cartans geometric construction. This yields a formulation of all matter fields in terms of first order partial differential equations. We show in detail how the standard second order formulation can be recovered. In particular, the Hodge dual, which characterizes the structure of bosonic field equations, pops up automatically. Furthermore, the energymomentum and spin-density three-forms are naturally combined into a single object here denoted the spin-energymomentum three-form. Finally, we highlight a peculiarity in the mathematical structure of our first-order formulation of YangMills fields. This suggests a way to unify a U(1) gauge field with gravity into a SO(1,5)-valued gauge field using a natural generalization of Cartan geometry in which the larger symmetry group is spontaneously broken down to SO(1,3)U(1). The coupling of this unified theory to matter fields and possible extensions to non-Abelian gauge fields are left as open questions

  18. Effect of artificial aging on the microstructure of weldment on API 5L X-52 steel pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas-Arista, B. . E-mail: bvarista26@yahoo.com.mx; Hallen, J.M. . E-mail: j_hallen@yahoo.com; Albiter, A. . E-mail: aalbiter@imp.mx

    2007-08-15

    The effects of artificial aging on the microstructure in the weldment of an API 5L X-52 steel pipe were studied. Aging was performed at 250 deg. C over a period of 1000 h and values were recorded at every 100 h intervals. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed precipitation strengthening from nearly circular Nb-C containing nanoparticles for the base metal and heat affected zone, and cementite for the weld metal. The largest amount of precipitation in the weldment zone was obtained at 500 h, due to peak-aging, which showed the highest particle density. The weld metal was more susceptible to aging, exhibiting the highest increase in precipitation at 500 h, followed by the heat affected zone. After 500 h, the deterioration in the microstructure was caused by the coarsening of particles due to over-aging. The base metal showed the larger increment in particle size after 900 h of aging accompanied by a bigger decrease in fine particles than in the weld metal.

  19. Multi-gravity separator: an alternate gravity concentrator to process coal fines

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.K.; Bhoi, K.S.; Barnwal, J.P.

    2007-08-15

    The multi-gravity separator (MGS) is a novel piece of equipment for the separation of fine and ultra-fine minerals. However, the published literature does not demonstrate its use in the separation of coal fines. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the effects of different process variables on the performance of an MGS for the beneficiation of coal fines. The results obtained from this study revealed that among the parameters studied, drum rotation and feed solids concentration play dominating roles in controlling the yield and ash content of the clean coal. Mathematical modeling equations that correlate the variables studied and the yield and ash contents of the clean coal were developed to predict the performance of an MGS under different operating and design conditions. The entire exercise revealed that the MGS could produce a clean coal with an ash content of 14.67% and a yield of 71.23% from a feed coal having an ash content of 24.61 %.

  20. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Napier, John M.; Travaglini, Michael A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

  1. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOEpatents

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1983-09-20

    A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

  2. DNA adducts and carcinogenicity of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, P.P.; Herreno-Saenz, D.; Von Tungeln, L.S.

    1994-10-01

    We have been interested in the structure-activity relationships of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs), and have focused on the correlation of structural and electronic features with biological activities, including mutagenicity and tumorigenicity. In our studies, we have emphasized 1-, 2-, 3-, and 6-nitrobenzo[a]pyrenes (nitro-B[a]Ps) and related compounds, all of which are derived from the potent carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene. While 1-, 2-, and 3-nitro-B[a]P are potent mutagens in Salmonella, 6-nitro-B[a]P is a weak mutagen. In vitro metabolism of 1- and 3-nitro-B[a]P has been found to generate multiple pathways for mutagenic activation. The formation of the corresponding trans-7,8-dihydrodiols and 7,8,9,10-tetrahydrotetrols suggests that 1- and 3-nitro-B[a]P trans-7,8-diol-anti-9, 10--epoxides are ultimate metabolites of the parent nitro-B[a]Ps. We have isolated a DNA adduct from the reaction between 3-nitro-B[a]P trans-7,8-diol-anti-9, 10-epoxide and calf thymus DNA, and identified it as 10-(deoxyguanosin-N{sup 2}-yl)-7,8,9-trihydroxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-3-nitro-B[a]P. The same adduct was identified from in vitro metabolism of [{sup 3}H]3-nitro-B[a]P by rat liver microsomes in the presence of calf thymus DNA. A DNA adduct of 3-nitro-B[a]P formed from reaction of N-hydroxy-3-amino-B[a]P, prepared in situ with calf thymus DNA was also isolated. This adduct was identified as 6-(deoxyguanosin-N{sup 2}-yl)-3-amino-B[a]P. The same adduct was obtained from incubating DNA with 3-nitro-B[a]P in the presence of the mammalian nitroreductase, xanthine oxidase, and hypoxanthine. 48 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Fusing porphyrins with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocycles for optoelectronic applications

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Mark E.; Diev, Viacheslav; Hanson, Kenneth; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2015-08-18

    A compound that can be used as a donor material in organic photovoltaic devices comprising a non-activated porphyrin fused with one or more non-activated polycyclic aromatic rings or one or more non-activated heterocyclic rings can be obtained by a thermal fusion process. The compounds can include structures of Formula I: ##STR00001## By heating the reaction mixture of non-activated porphyrins with non-activated polycyclic aromatic rings or heterocyclic rings to a fusion temperature and holding for a predetermined time, fusion of one or more polycyclic rings or heterocyclic rings to the non-activated porphyrin core in meso,.beta. fashion is achieved resulting in hybrid structures containing a distorted porphyrin ring with annulated aromatic rings. The porphyrin core can be olygoporphyrins.

  4. Infrared lessons for ultraviolet gravity: the case of massive gravity and Born-Infeld

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez, Jose Beltrán; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Olmo, Gonzalo J. E-mail: Lavinia.Heisenberg@unige.ch

    2014-11-01

    We generalize the ultraviolet sector of gravitation via a Born-Infeld action using lessons from massive gravity. The theory contains all of the elementary symmetric polynomials and is treated in the Palatini formalism. We show how the connection can be solved algebraically to be the Levi-Civita connection of an effective metric. The non-linearity of the algebraic equations yields several branches, one of which always reduces to General Relativity at low curvatures. We explore in detail a minimal version of the theory, for which we study solutions in the presence of a perfect fluid with special attention to the cosmological evolution. In vacuum we recover Ricci-flat solutions, but also an additional physical solution corresponding to an Einstein space. The existence of two physical branches remains for non-vacuum solutions and, in addition, the branch that connects to the Einstein space in vacuum is not very sensitive to the specific value of the energy density. For the branch that connects to the General Relativity limit we generically find three behaviours for the Hubble function depending on the equation of state of the fluid, namely: either there is a maximum value for the energy density that connects continuously with vacuum, or the energy density can be arbitrarily large but the Hubble function saturates and remains constant at high energy densities, or the energy density is unbounded and the Hubble function grows faster than in General Relativity. The second case is particularly interesting because it could offer an interesting inflationary epoch even in the presence of a dust component. Finally, we discuss the possibility of avoiding certain types of singularities within the minimal model.

  5. Cosmological perturbations in non-local higher-derivative gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Craps, Ben; Jonckheere, Tim De; Koshelev, Alexey S. E-mail: Tim.De.Jonckheere@vub.ac.be

    2014-11-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in a non-local higher-derivative model of gravity introduced by Biswas, Mazumdar and Siegel. We extend previous work, which had focused on classical scalar perturbations around a cosine hyperbolic bounce solution, in three ways. First, we point out the existence of a Starobinsky solution in this model, which is more attractive from a phenomenological point of view (even though it has no bounce). Second, we study classical vector and tensor pertuxsxrbations. Third, we show how to quantize scalar and tensor perturbations in a de Sitter phase (for choices of parameters such that the model is ghost-free). Our results show that the model is well-behaved at this level, and are very similar to corresponding results in local f(R) models. In particular, for the Starobinsky solution of non-local higher-derivative gravity, we find the same tensor-to-scalar ratio as for the conventional Starobinsky model.

  6. Translation invariant time-dependent solutions to massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, J.; Steer, D.A. E-mail: steer@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2013-12-01

    Homogeneous time-dependent solutions of massive gravity generalise the plane wave solutions of the linearised Fierz-Pauli equations for a massive spin-two particle, as well as the Kasner solutions of General Relativity. We show that they also allow a clear counting of the degrees of freedom and represent a simplified framework to work out the constraints, the equations of motion and the initial value formulation. We work in the vielbein formulation of massive gravity, find the phase space resulting from the constraints and show that several disconnected sectors of solutions exist some of which are unstable. The initial values determine the sector to which a solution belongs. Classically, the theory is not pathological but quantum mechanically the theory may suffer from instabilities. The latter are not due to an extra ghost-like degree of freedom.

  7. Trapping and aerogelation of nanoparticles in negative gravity hydrocarbon flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Novosselov, Igor V.; Beres, Nicholas D.; Moosmller, Hans; Sorensen, Christopher M.; Stipe, Christopher B.

    2014-06-16

    We report the experimental realization of continuous carbon aerogel production using a flame aerosol reactor by operating it in negative gravity (?g; up-side-down configuration). Buoyancy opposes the fuel and air flow forces in ?g, which eliminates convectional outflow of nanoparticles from the flame and traps them in a distinctive non-tipping, flicker-free, cylindrical flame body, where they grow to millimeter-size aerogel particles and gravitationally fall out. Computational fluid dynamics simulations show that a closed-loop recirculation zone is set up in ?g flames, which reduces the time to gel for nanoparticles by ?10{sup 6}?s, compared to positive gravity (upward rising) flames. Our results open up new possibilities of one-step gas-phase synthesis of a wide variety of aerogels on an industrial scale.

  8. Galileon gravity and its relevance to late time cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Gannouji, Radouane; Sami, M.

    2010-07-15

    We consider the covariant Galileon gravity taking into account the third order and fourth order scalar field Lagrangians L{sub 3}({pi}) and L{sub 4}({pi}), consisting of three and four {pi}'s with four and five derivatives acting on them, respectively. The background dynamical equations are set up for the system under consideration and the stability of the self-accelerating solution is demonstrated in a general setting. We extended this study to the general case of the fifth order theory. For the spherically symmetric static background, we spell out conditions for the suppression of fifth force effects mediated by the Galileon field {pi}. We study field perturbations in the fixed background and investigate the conditions for their causal propagation. We also briefly discuss metric fluctuations and derive an evolution equation for matter perturbations in Galileon gravity.

  9. Constraints on axion inflation from the weak gravity conjecture

    SciTech Connect

    Rudelius, Tom

    2015-09-08

    We derive constraints facing models of axion inflation based on decay constant alignment from a string-theoretic and quantum gravitational perspective. In particular, we investigate the prospects for alignment and ‘anti-alignment’ of C{sub 4} axion decay constants in type IIB string theory, deriving a strict no-go result in the latter case. We discuss the relationship of axion decay constants to the weak gravity conjecture and demonstrate agreement between our string-theoretic constraints and those coming from the ‘generalized’ weak gravity conjecture. Finally, we consider a particular model of decay constant alignment in which the potential of C{sub 4} axions in type IIB compactifications on a Calabi-Yau three-fold is dominated by contributions from D7-branes, pointing out that this model evades some of the challenges derived earlier in our paper but is highly constrained by other geometric considerations.

  10. Structure formation in a nonlocally modified gravity model

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sohyun; Dodelson, Scott

    2013-01-01

    We study a nonlocally modified gravity model proposed by Deser and Woodard which gives an explanation for current cosmic acceleration. By deriving and solving the equations governing the evolution of the structure in the Universe, we show that this model predicts a pattern of growth that differs from standard general relativity (+dark energy) at the 10-30% level. These differences will be easily probed by the next generation of galaxy surveys, so the model should be tested shortly.

  11. Extended Horava gravity and Einstein-aether theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Ted

    2010-05-15

    Einstein-aether theory is general relativity coupled to a dynamical, unit timelike vector. If this vector is restricted in the action to be hypersurface orthogonal, the theory is identical to the IR limit of the extension of Horava gravity proposed by Blas, Pujolas and Sibiryakov. Hypersurface orthogonal solutions of Einstein-aether theory are solutions to the IR limit of this theory, hence numerous results already obtained for Einstein-aether theory carry over.

  12. Quantum Gravity corrections and entropy at the Planck time

    SciTech Connect

    Basilakos, Spyros; Vagenas, Elias C.; Das, Saurya E-mail: saurya.das@uleth.ca

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the effects of Quantum Gravity on the Planck era of the universe. In particular, using different versions of the Generalized Uncertainty Principle and under specific conditions we find that the main Planck quantities such as the Planck time, length, mass and energy become larger by a factor of order 10?10{sup 4} compared to those quantities which result from the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. However, we prove that the dimensionless entropy enclosed in the cosmological horizon at the Planck time remains unchanged. These results, though preliminary, indicate that we should anticipate modifications in the set-up of cosmology since changes in the Planck era will be inherited even to the late universe through the framework of Quantum Gravity (or Quantum Field Theory) which utilizes the Planck scale as a fundamental one. More importantly, these corrections will not affect the entropic content of the universe at the Planck time which is a crucial element for one of the basic principles of Quantum Gravity named Holographic Principle.

  13. The observational status of Galileon gravity after Planck

    SciTech Connect

    Barreira, Alexandre; Li, Baojiu; Baugh, Carlton M.; Pascoli, Silvia E-mail: baojiu.li@durham.ac.uk E-mail: silvia.pascoli@durham.ac.uk

    2014-08-01

    We use the latest CMB data from Planck, together with BAO measurements, to constrain the full parameter space of Galileon gravity. We constrain separately the three main branches of the theory known as the Cubic, Quartic and Quintic models, and find that all yield a very good fit to these data. Unlike in ?CDM, the Galileon model constraints are compatible with local determinations of the Hubble parameter and predict nonzero neutrino masses at over 5? significance. We also identify that the low l part of the CMB lensing spectrum may be able to distinguish between ?CDM and Galileon models. In the Cubic model, the lensing potential deepens at late times on sub-horizon scales, which is at odds with the current observational suggestion of a positive ISW effect. Compared to ?CDM, the Quartic and Quintic models predict less ISW power in the low l region of the CMB temperature spectrum, and as such are slightly preferred by the Planck data. We illustrate that residual local modifications to gravity in the Quartic and Quintic models may render the Cubic model as the only branch of Galileon gravity that passes Solar System tests.

  14. Cosmological perturbation in f(T) gravity revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, Keisuke; Ong, Yen Chin E-mail: ongyenchin@member.ams.org

    2013-06-01

    We perform detailed investigation of cosmological perturbations in f(T) theory of gravity coupled with scalar field. Our work emphasizes on the way to gauge fix the theory and we examine all possible modes of perturbations up to second order. The analysis includes pseudoscalar and pseudovector modes in addition to the usual scalar, vector, and tensor modes. We find no gravitational propagating degree of freedom in the scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, as well as pseudovector modes. In addition, we find that the scalar and tensor perturbations have exactly the same form as their counterparts in usual general relativity with scalar field, except that the factor of reduced Planck mass squared M{sub pl}{sup 2}?1/(8?G) that occurs in the latter has now been replaced by an effective time-dependent gravitational coupling ?2(df/dT)|{sub T=T{sub 0}}, with T{sub 0} being the background torsion scalar. The absence of extra degrees of freedom of f(T) gravity at second order linear perturbation indicates that f(T) gravity is highly nonlinear. Consequently one cannot conclusively analyze stability of the theory without performing nonlinear analysis that can reveal the propagation of the extra degrees of freedom.

  15. Disformal theories of gravity: from the solar system to cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2014-12-01

    This paper is concerned with theories of gravity that contain a scalar coupled both conformally and disformally to matter through the metric. By systematically deriving the non-relativistic limit, it is shown that no new non-linear screening mechanisms are present beyond the Vainshtein mechanism and chameleon-like screening. If one includes the cosmological expansion of the universe, disformal effects that are usually taken to be absent can be present in the solar system. When the conformal factor is absent, fifth-forces can be screened on all scales when the cosmological field is slowly-rolling. We investigate the cosmology of these models and use local tests of gravity to place new constraints on the disformal coupling and find M?>O(eV), which is not competitive with laboratory tests. Finally, we discuss the future prospects for testing these theories and the implications for other theories of modified gravity. In particular, the Vainshtein radius of solar system objects can be altered from the static prediction when cosmological time-derivatives are non-negligible.

  16. WILSON-BAPPU EFFECT: EXTENDED TO SURFACE GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sunkyung; Kang, Wonseok; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Sang-Gak E-mail: wskang@khu.ac.kr E-mail: sanggak@snu.ac.kr

    2013-10-01

    In 1957, Wilson and Bappu found a tight correlation between the stellar absolute visual magnitude (M{sub V} ) and the width of the Ca II K emission line for late-type stars. Here, we revisit the Wilson-Bappu relationship (WBR) to claim that the WBR can be an excellent indicator of stellar surface gravity of late-type stars as well as a distance indicator. We have measured the width (W) of the Ca II K emission line in high-resolution spectra of 125 late-type stars obtained with the Bohyunsan Optical Echelle Spectrograph and adopted from the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph archive. Based on our measurement of the emission line width (W), we have obtained a WBR of M{sub V} = 33.76 - 18.08 log W. In order to extend the WBR to being a surface gravity indicator, stellar atmospheric parameters such as effective temperature (T{sub eff}), surface gravity (log g), metallicity ([Fe/H]), and micro-turbulence ({xi}{sub tur}) have been derived from self-consistent detailed analysis using the Kurucz stellar atmospheric model and the abundance analysis code, MOOG. Using these stellar parameters and log W, we found that log g = -5.85 log W+9.97 log T{sub eff} - 23.48 for late-type stars.

  17. Nonlinear structure formation in the cubic Galileon gravity model

    SciTech Connect

    Barreira, Alexandre; Li, Baojiu; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Pascoli, Silvia E-mail: baojiu.li@durham.ac.uk E-mail: c.m.baugh@durham.ac.uk

    2013-10-01

    We model the linear and nonlinear growth of large scale structure in the Cubic Galileon gravity model, by running a suite of N-body cosmological simulations using the ECOSMOG code. Our simulations include the Vainshtein screening effect, which reconciles the Cubic Galileon model with local tests of gravity. In the linear regime, the amplitude of the matter power spectrum increases by ? 20% with respect to the standard ?CDM model today. The modified expansion rate accounts for ? 15% of this enhancement, while the fifth force is responsible for only ? 5%. This is because the effective unscreened gravitational strength deviates from standard gravity only at late times, even though it can be twice as large today. In the nonlinear regime (k?>0.1h Mpc{sup ?1}), the fifth force leads to only a modest increase (?<8%) in the clustering power on all scales due to the very efficient operation of the Vainshtein mechanism. Such a strong effect is typically not seen in other models with the same screening mechanism. The screening also results in the fifth force increasing the number density of halos by less than 10%, on all mass scales. Our results show that the screening does not ruin the validity of linear theory on large scales which anticipates very strong constraints from galaxy clustering data. We also show that, whilst the model gives an excellent match to CMB data on small angular scales (l?>50), the predicted integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect is in tension with Planck/WMAP results.

  18. Affine group formulation of the Standard Model coupled to gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Ching-Yi; Ita, Eyo; Soo, Chopin

    2014-04-15

    In this work we apply the affine group formalism for four dimensional gravity of Lorentzian signature, which is based on Klauders affine algebraic program, to the formulation of the Hamiltonian constraint of the interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity with non-vanishing cosmological constant ?, as an affine Lie algebra. We use the hermitian action of fermions coupled to gravitation and YangMills theory to find the density weight one fermionic super-Hamiltonian constraint. This term, combined with the YangMills and Higgs energy densities, are composed with Yorks integrated time functional. The result, when combined with the imaginary part of the ChernSimons functional Q, forms the affine commutation relation with the volume element V(x). Affine algebraic quantization of gravitation and matter on equal footing implies a fundamental uncertainty relation which is predicated upon a non-vanishing cosmological constant. -- Highlights: WheelerDeWitt equation (WDW) quantized as affine algebra, realizing Klauders program. WDW formulated for interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity, as affine algebra. WDW features Hermitian generators in spite of fermionic content: Standard Model addressed. Constructed a family of physical states for the full, coupled theory via affine coherent states. Fundamental uncertainty relation, predicated on non-vanishing cosmological constant.

  19. Halo model and halo properties in Galileon gravity cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Barreira, Alexandre; Li, Baojiu; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Lombriser, Lucas; Pascoli, Silvia E-mail: baojiu.li@durham.ac.uk E-mail: llo@roe.ac.uk E-mail: silvia.pascoli@durham.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the performance of semi-analytical modelling of large-scale structure in Galileon gravity cosmologies using results from N-body simulations. We focus on the Cubic and Quartic Galileon models that provide a reasonable fit to CMB, SNIa and BAO data. We demonstrate that the Sheth-Tormen mass function and linear halo bias can be calibrated to provide a very good fit to our simulation results. We also find that the halo concentration-mass relation is well fitted by a power law. The nonlinear matter power spectrum computed in the halo model approach is found to be inaccurate in the mildly nonlinear regime, but captures reasonably well the effects of the Vainshtein screening mechanism on small scales. In the Cubic model, the screening mechanism hides essentially all of the effects of the fifth force inside haloes. In the case of the Quartic model, the screening mechanism leaves behind residual modifications to gravity, which make the effective gravitational strength time-varying and smaller than the standard value. Compared to normal gravity, this causes a deficiency of massive haloes and leads to a weaker matter clustering on small scales. For both models, we show that there are realistic halo occupation distributions of Luminous Red Galaxies that can match both the observed large-scale clustering amplitude and the number density of these galaxies.

  20. The role of vector fields in modified gravity scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Tasinato, Gianmassimo; Koyama, Kazuya; Khosravi, Nima E-mail: kazuya.koyama@port.ac.uk

    2013-11-01

    Gravitational vector degrees of freedom typically arise in many examples of modified gravity models. We start to systematically explore their role in these scenarios, studying the effects of coupling gravitational vector and scalar degrees of freedom. We focus on set-ups that enjoy a Galilean symmetry in the scalar sector and an Abelian gauge symmetry in the vector sector. These symmetries, together with the requirement that the equations of motion contain at most two space-time derivatives, only allow for a small number of operators in the Lagrangian for the gravitational fields. We investigate the role of gravitational vector fields for two broad classes of phenomena that characterize modified gravity scenarios. The first is self-acceleration: we analyze in general terms the behavior of vector fluctuations around self-accelerating solutions, and show that vanishing kinetic terms of vector fluctuations lead to instabilities on cosmological backgrounds. The second phenomenon is the screening of long range fifth forces by means of Vainshtein mechanism. We show that if gravitational vector fields are appropriately coupled to a spherically symmetric source, they can play an important role for defining the features of the background solution and the scale of the Vainshtein radius. Our general results can be applied to any concrete model of modified gravity, whose low-energy vector and scalar degrees of freedom satisfy the symmetry requirements that we impose.

  1. Stability of spherically symmetric solutions in modified theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Michael D.

    2007-09-15

    In recent years, a number of alternative theories of gravity have been proposed as possible resolutions of certain cosmological problems or as toy models for possible but heretofore unobserved effects. However, the implications of such theories for the stability of structures such as stars have not been fully investigated. We use our 'generalized variational principle', described in a previous work [M. D. Seifert and R. M. Wald, Phys. Rev. D 75, 084029 (2007)], to analyze the stability of static spherically symmetric solutions to spherically symmetric perturbations in three such alternative theories: Carroll et al.'s f(R) gravity, Jacobson and Mattingly's 'Einstein-aether theory', and Bekenstein's TeVeS theory. We find that in the presence of matter, f(R) gravity is highly unstable; that the stability conditions for spherically symmetric curved vacuum Einstein-aether backgrounds are the same as those for linearized stability about flat spacetime, with one exceptional case; and that the 'kinetic terms' of vacuum TeVeS theory are indefinite in a curved background, leading to an instability.

  2. Dust gravitational drift wave in complex plasma under gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Salahshoor, M. Niknam, A. R.

    2014-12-15

    The dispersion relation of electrostatic waves in a complex plasma under gravity is presented. It is assumed that the waves propagate parallel to the external fields. The effects of weak electric field, neutral drag force, and ion drag force are also taken into account. The dispersion relation is numerically examined in an appropriate parameter space in which the gravity plays the dominant role in the dynamics of microparticles. The numerical results show that, in the low pressure complex plasma under gravity, a low frequency drift wave can be developed in the long wavelength limit. The stability state of this wave is switched at a certain critical wavenumber in such a way that the damped mode is transformed into a growing one. Furthermore, the influence of the external fields on the dispersion properties is analyzed. It is shown that the wave instability is essentially due to the electrostatic streaming of plasma particles. It is also found that by increasing the electric field strength, the stability switching occurs at smaller wavenumbers.

  3. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Key Terms Definition API Gravity An arbitrary scale expressing the gravity or density of ... propane, and butane; and many other products used for their energy or chemical content. ...

  4. X:\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma00.vp

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation...

  5. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation...

  6. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Key Terms Definition API Gravity An arbitrary scale expressing the gravity or density of liquid petroleum products. The measuring scale is calibrated in terms of degrees...

  7. Alternative descriptions of catalyst deactivation in aromatization of propane and butane

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, Yu.N.; Vorob`ev, B.L.; Khvorova, E.P.

    1995-08-20

    Deactivation of a zeolite-containing catalyst has been studied in aromatization of propane and butane. Various descriptions of the dependence of the alkane conversion on the coke concentration on the catalyst have been considered, and using a statistical method of estimating the model validity, the most preferable form of the deactivation function has been proposed.

  8. Influence of temperature and process duration on composition of products of butane aromatization on zeolitic catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Vorob`ev, B.L.; Trishin, P.Yu.; Koshelev, Yu.N.

    1995-06-10

    A study has been made of the influence of catalyst deactivation in the course of its service. The composition of products of butane aromatization on zeolitic catalyst and on selectivity of formation of target products and by-products is reported.

  9. Constraints on a f(R) gravity dark energy model with early scaling evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chan-Gyung; Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim E-mail: jchan@knu.ac.kr

    2011-09-01

    The modified gravity with f(R) = R{sup 1+?} (? > 0) allows a scaling solution where the energy density of gravity sector follows the energy density of the dominant fluid. We present initial conditions of background and perturbation variables during the scaling evolution regime in the modified gravity. As a possible dark energy model we consider a gravity with a form f(R) = R{sup 1+?}+qR{sup ?n} (?1 < n ? 0) where the second term drives the late-time acceleration. We show that our f(R) gravity parameters are very sensitive to the baryon perturbation growth and baryon density power spectrum, and present observational constraints on the model parameters. We consider full perturbations of f(R) gravity. Our analysis suggests that only the parameter space extremely close to the ?CDM model is allowed with ??<5 10{sup ?6} and n?>?10{sup ?4}.

  10. Integration of Full Tensor Gravity and ZTEM Passive Low Frequency EM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Instruments for Simultaneous Data Acquisition | Department of Energy Full Tensor Gravity and ZTEM Passive Low Frequency EM Instruments for Simultaneous Data Acquisition Integration of Full Tensor Gravity and ZTEM Passive Low Frequency EM Instruments for Simultaneous Data Acquisition Integration of Full Tensor Gravity and ZTEM Passive Low Frequency EM Instruments for Simultaneous Data Acquisition presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  11. Ground Gravity Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S....

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological Survey, 2012) Exploration Activity Details...

  12. DETECTING GRAVITY MODES IN THE SOLAR {sup 8} B NEUTRINO FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Ildio; Turck-Chize, Sylvaine E-mail: ilopes@uevora.pt

    2014-09-10

    The detection of gravity modes produced in the solar radiative zone has been a challenge in modern astrophysics for more than 30yr and their amplitude in the core is not yet determined. In this Letter, we develop a new strategy to look for standing gravity modes through solar neutrino fluxes. We note that due to a resonance effect, the gravity modes of low degree and low order have the largest impact on the {sup 8} B neutrino flux. The strongest effect is expected to occur for the dipole mode with radial order 2, corresponding to periods of about 1.5 hr. These standing gravity waves produce temperature fluctuations that are amplified by a factor of 170 in the boron neutrino flux for the corresponding period, in consonance with the gravity modes. From current neutrino observations, we determine that the maximum temperature variation due to the gravity modes in the Sun's core is smaller than 5.8 10{sup 4}. This study clearly shows that due to their high sensitivity to the temperature, the {sup 8} B neutrino flux time series is an excellent tool to determine the properties of gravity modes in the solar core. Moreover, if gravity mode footprints are discovered in the {sup 8} B neutrino flux, this opens a new line of research to probe the physics of the solar core as non-standing gravity waves of higher periods cannot be directly detected by helioseismology but could leave their signature on boron neutrino or on other neutrino fluxes.

  13. Ground Gravity Survey At U.S. West Region (Aiken & Ander, 1981...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    and southern Colorado References Carlos L.V. Aiken, Mark E. Ander (1981) A Regional Strategy For Geothermal Exploration With Emphasis On Gravity And Magnetotellurics Additional...

  14. Ground Gravity Survey At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Maui Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  15. Reduced Gravity Education Flight Opportunity for Students at Minority Serving Institutions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    NASA is offering undergraduate students from Minority Serving Institutions an opportunity to test experiments in microgravity aboard NASA's reduced gravity aircraft.

  16. Ground Gravity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1957-1961...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1957-1961) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  17. Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes We...

  18. Ground Gravity Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP)...

  19. Ground Gravity Survey At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration...

  20. Flavor Universal Resonances and Warped Gravity | Argonne National

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Flavor Universal Resonances and Warped Gravity December 6, 2016 3:15PM to 4:15PM Presenter Sungwoo Hong, Maryland University Location Building 362, Room E188 Type Seminar Series HEP Theory Seminar Abstract: Warped higher-dimensional compactifications with "bulk" standard model, or their AdS/CFT dual as the purely 4D scenario of Higgs compositeness and partial compositeness, offer an elegant approach to resolving the electroweak hierarchy problem as well as the origins of

  1. Wheeler-DeWitt equation for brane gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gusin, Pawel

    2008-03-15

    We consider gravity in the system consisting of the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) D3-brane embedded in a flat background geometry, produced by the solutions of supergravity. The effective action for this system is represented by the sum of the Hilbert-Einstein and Dirac-Born-Infeld actions. We derive the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for this system and obtain analytical solutions in some special cases. We also calculate the tunneling probability from the Planckian size of the D3-brane to the classical regime.

  2. Large Searching for Higher Dimensional Gravity with Neutron Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Alejandro

    2007-10-26

    N-dimensional gravity is analized in the context of recent work on 'large' supplementary dimensions. A simple derivation of the compactification radii for additional dimensions in the universe is made, as a function of the Planck and the electro-weak scales. It is argued that the modified gravitational force would give rise to effects that might be within the detection range of dedicated neutron experiments. An analysis suggests that neutron scattering off atomic nuclei with null spin may provide an experimental test for these ideas.

  3. Translation invariant time-dependent massive gravity: Hamiltonian analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, Jihad; Steer, Danile A.; Noui, Karim E-mail: karim.noui@lmpt.univ-tours.fr

    2014-09-01

    The canonical structure of the massive gravity in the first order moving frame formalism is studied. We work in the simplified context of translation invariant fields, with mass terms given by general non-derivative interactions, invariant under the diagonal Lorentz group, depending on the moving frame as well as a fixed reference frame. We prove that the only mass terms which give 5 propagating degrees of freedom are the dRGT mass terms, namely those which are linear in the lapse. We also complete the Hamiltonian analysis with the dynamical evolution of the system.

  4. Self-gravity in neutrino-dominated accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tong; Yu, Xiao-Fei; Gu, Wei-Min; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2014-08-10

    We present the effects of self-gravity on the vertical structure and neutrino luminosity of the neutrino-dominated accretion disks in cylindrical coordinates. It is found that significant changes of the structure appear in the outer region of the disk, especially for high accretion rates (e.g., ? 1 M{sub ?} s{sup 1}), and thus cause the slight increase in the neutrino luminosity. Furthermore, the gravitational instability of the disk is reviewed by the vertical distribution of the Toomre parameter, which may account for the late-time flares in gamma-ray bursts and the extended emission in short-duration gamma-ray bursts.

  5. Condensation during gravity driven ECC: Experiments with PACTEL

    SciTech Connect

    Munther, R.; Kalli, H.; Kouhia, J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper provides the results of the second series of gravity driven emergency core cooling (ECC) experiments with PACTEL (Parallel Channel Test Loop). The simulated accident was a small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) with a break in a cold leg. The ECC flow was provided from a core makeup tank (CMT) located at a higher elevation than the main part of the primary system. The CMT was pressurized with pipings from the pressurizer and a cold leg. The tests indicated that steam condensation in the CMT can prevent ECC and lead to core uncovery.

  6. Properties of solar gravity mode signals in total irradiance observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, R.J.; Chen, J.; Hill, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    Further evidence has been found that a significant fraction of the gravity mode power density in the total irradiance observations appears in sidebands of classified eigenfrequencies. These sidebands whose amplitudes vary from year to year are interpreted as harmonics of the rotational frequencies of the nonuniform solar surface. These findings are for non axisymmetric modes and corroborate the findings of Kroll, Hill and Chen for axisymmetric modes. It is demonstrated the the generation of the sidebands lifts the usual restriction on the parity of the eigenfunctions for modes detectable in total irradiance observations. 14 refs.

  7. Noncommutative scalar field minimally coupled to nonsymmetric gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Kouadik, S.; Sefai, D.

    2012-06-27

    We construct a non-commutative non symmetric gravity minimally coupled model (the star product only couples matter). We introduce the action for the system considered namely a non-commutative scalar field propagating in a nontrivial gravitational background. We expand the action in powers of the anti-symmetric field and the graviton to second order adopting the assumption that the scalar is weekly coupled to the graviton. We compute the one loop radiative corrections to the self-energy of a scalar particle.

  8. Is Cosmic Acceleration Telling Us Something About Gravity?

    ScienceCinema

    Trodden, Mark [Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, United States

    2016-07-12

    Among the possible explanations for the observed acceleration of the universe, perhaps the boldest is the idea that new gravitational physics might be the culprit. In this colloquium I will discuss some of the challenges of constructing a sensible phenomenological extension of General Relativity, give examples of some candidate models of modified gravity and survey existing observational constraints on this approach. I will conclude by discussing how we might hope to distinguish between modifications of General Relativity and dark energy as competing hypotheses to explain cosmic acceleration.

  9. Power API Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-04

    The software serves two purposes. The first purpose of the software is to prototype the Sandia High Performance Computing Power Application Programming Interface Specification effort. The specification can be found at http://powerapi.sandia.gov . Prototypes of the specification were developed in parallel with the development of the specification. Release of the prototype will be instructive to anyone who intends to implement the specification. More specifically, our vendor collaborators will benefit from the availability of the prototype. The second is in direct support of the PowerInsight power measurement device, which was co-developed with Penguin Computing. The software provides a cluster wide measurement capability enabled by the PowerInsight device. The software can be used by anyone who purchases a PowerInsight device. The software will allow the user to easily collect power and energy information of a node that is instrumented with PowerInsight. The software can also be used as an example prototype implementation of the High Performance Computing Power Application Programming Interface Specification.

  10. MediaWiki API

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    IDs to work on Separate values with '|' Maximum number of values 50 (500 for bots) prop - Which properties to get for the titlesrevisionspageids. Module help is available...

  11. Power API Prototype

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2014-12-04

    The software serves two purposes. The first purpose of the software is to prototype the Sandia High Performance Computing Power Application Programming Interface Specification effort. The specification can be found at http://powerapi.sandia.gov . Prototypes of the specification were developed in parallel with the development of the specification. Release of the prototype will be instructive to anyone who intends to implement the specification. More specifically, our vendor collaborators will benefit from the availability of the prototype.more » The second is in direct support of the PowerInsight power measurement device, which was co-developed with Penguin Computing. The software provides a cluster wide measurement capability enabled by the PowerInsight device. The software can be used by anyone who purchases a PowerInsight device. The software will allow the user to easily collect power and energy information of a node that is instrumented with PowerInsight. The software can also be used as an example prototype implementation of the High Performance Computing Power Application Programming Interface Specification.« less

  12. Simulating the quartic Galileon gravity model on adaptively refined meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Baojiu; Barreira, Alexandre; Baugh, Carlton M.; Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Koyama, Kazuya; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Pascoli, Silvia E-mail: baojiu.li@durham.ac.uk E-mail: wojciech.hellwing@durham.ac.uk E-mail: silvia.pascoli@durham.ac.uk

    2013-11-01

    We develop a numerical algorithm to solve the high-order nonlinear derivative-coupling equation associated with the quartic Galileon model, and implement it in a modified version of the ramses N-body code to study the effect of the Galileon field on the large-scale matter clustering. The algorithm is tested for several matter field configurations with different symmetries, and works very well. This enables us to perform the first simulations for a quartic Galileon model which provides a good fit to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy, supernovae and baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) data. Our result shows that the Vainshtein mechanism in this model is very efficient in suppressing the spatial variations of the scalar field. However, the time variation of the effective Newtonian constant caused by the curvature coupling of the Galileon field cannot be suppressed by the Vainshtein mechanism. This leads to a significant weakening of the strength of gravity in high-density regions at late times, and therefore a weaker matter clustering on small scales. We also find that without the Vainshtein mechanism the model would have behaved in a completely different way, which shows the crucial role played by nonlinearities in modified gravity theories and the importance of performing self-consistent N-body simulations for these theories.

  13. Wormholes, emergent gauge fields, and the weak gravity conjecture

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Harlow, Daniel

    2016-01-20

    This paper revisits the question of reconstructing bulk gauge fields as boundary operators in AdS/CFT. In the presence of the ormhole dual to the thermo field double state of two CFTs, the existence of bulk gauge fields is in some tension with the microscopic tensor factorization of the Hilbert space. Here, I explain how this tension can be resolved by splitting the gauge field into charged constituents, and I argue that this leads to a new argument for the "principle of completeness", which states that the charge lattice of a gauge theory coupled to gravity must be fully populated. Imore » also claim that it leads to a new motivation for (and a clarification of) the "weak gravity conjecture", which I interpret as a strengthening of this principle. This setup gives a simple example of a situation where describing low-energy bulk physics in CFT language requires knowledge of high-energy bulk physics. Furthermore, this contradicts to some extent the notion of "effective conformal field theory", but in fact is an expected feature of the resolution of the black hole information problem. An analogous factorization issue exists also for the gravitational field, and I comment on several of its implications for reconstructing black hole interiors and the emergence of spacetime more generally.« less

  14. Confronting DGP braneworld gravity with cosmico observations after Planck data

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Lixin

    2014-02-01

    The normal branch of Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati braneworld gravity with brane tension is confronted by the currently available cosmic observations from the geometrical and dynamical perspectives. On the geometrical side, the type Ia supernova as standard candle, the baryon acoustic oscillation as standard ruler and the cosmic microwave background measurement from the first released 15.5 months data were used to fix the background evolutions. On the dynamical side, the redshift space distortion data will be used to determine the evolution of the matter perturbation. Through a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis, we found the dimensionless crossover scale ?{sub r{sub c}} = 1/(4H{sup 2}{sub 0}r{sup 2}{sub c}) = 0.00183{sub ?0.00183}{sup +0.000338} in a spatially flat normal branch of Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati braneworld. This result suggests that the crossover scale r{sub c} should be around 12H{sup ?1}{sub 0} which is consistent with the previous result r{sub c} > 3H{sup ?1}{sub 0} and greater. It also implies that the five-dimensional gravity effect is weak to be observed in H{sup ?1}{sub 0} scale.

  15. Two-dimensional gravity with a dynamical aether

    SciTech Connect

    Eling, Christopher; Jacobson, Ted

    2006-10-15

    We investigate the two-dimensional behavior of gravity coupled to a dynamical unit timelike vector field, i.e. ''Einstein-aether theory.'' The classical solutions of this theory in two dimensions depend on one coupling constant. When this coupling is positive the only solutions are (i) flat spacetime with constant aether (ii) de Sitter or anti-de Sitter spacetimes with a uniformly accelerated unit vector invariant under a two-dimensional subgroup of SO(2,1) generated by a boost and a null rotation, and (iii) a nonconstant curvature spacetime that has no Killing symmetries and contains singularities. In this case the sign of the curvature is determined by whether the coupling is less or greater than one. When instead the coupling is negative only solutions (i) and (iii) are present. This classical study of the behavior of Einstein-aether theory in 1+1 dimensions may provide a starting point for further investigations into semiclassical and fully quantum toy models of quantum gravity with a dynamical preferred frame.

  16. Synthetic fuel aromaticity and staged combustion. First quarterly technical progress report, September 23-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Arthur; Longanbach, James R.; Chan, Lisa K.

    1981-01-28

    Synthetic liquid fuels, otherwise referred to as synfuels or coal-derived liquids, are probably best characterized from a combustion-environmental point of view as low in hydrogen, low in sulfur, high in nitrogen, and high in aromatics. As a consequence two of the more critical problems in synfuel combustion are NO/sub x/ formation and soot formation (and polycyclic organic matter). This program is directed to these two issues. At first hand the solutions to burning synfuels high in aromatics and fuel-bound nitrogen are diametrically opposed, i.e., high temperature and excess air keep soot levels down, low temperatures and vitiated air keep nitrogen oxide levels down. Staged combustion however offers a logical solution to the above. This program separates and analyzes the synfuel combustion problem via its component parts and then puts them together again phenomenologically via the stage combustion process.

  17. Aromatic-Hydroxyl Interaction of a Lignin Model Compound on SBA-15, Present at Pyrolysis Temperatures

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Kandziolka, III, Michael V.; Kidder, Michelle; Gill, Lance W.; Wu, Zili; Savara, Aditya Ashi

    2014-07-14

    An aromatic alpha-aryl ether compound (a benzyl phenyl ether analogue) was covalently grafted to mesoporous silica SBA-15, to create BPEa-SBA-15. The BPEa-SBA-15 was subjected to successive heating cycles up to 600 °C, with in situ monitoring by DRIFTS. It was found that the toluene moiety coordinates to SBA-15 surface silanol hydroxyl groups via an aromatic–hydroxyl interaction. This interaction is evidenced by a red-shift of the aromatic C–H stretches, as well as a red-shift and broadening of the surface hydroxyl O–H stretches, which are features characteristic of a hydrogen bond. These features remain present during heating until ~400 °C whereupon themore » ether linkage of BPEa-SBA-15 is cleaved, accompanied by loss of the toluene moiety.« less

  18. Addition of CFCl3 to Aromatic Aldehydes via in Situ Grignard Reaction

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Barkakaty, Balaka; Talukdar, Bandana; Lokitz, Bradley

    2015-08-18

    In the case of synthetic modification of trichlorofluoromethane (CFCl3) to non-volatile and useful fluorinated precursors, we realized that it is a cost-effective and an environmentally benign strategy for the safe consumption/destruction of the ozone depleting potential of the reagent. In our report, we present a novel method for in situ Grignard reaction using magnesium powder and CFCl3 for synthesis of dichlorofluoromethyl aromatic alcohols.

  19. Addition of CFCl3 to Aromatic Aldehydes via in Situ Grignard Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Barkakaty, Balaka; Talukdar, Bandana; Lokitz, Bradley

    2015-08-18

    In the case of synthetic modification of trichlorofluoromethane (CFCl3) to non-volatile and useful fluorinated precursors, we realized that it is a cost-effective and an environmentally benign strategy for the safe consumption/destruction of the ozone depleting potential of the reagent. In our report, we present a novel method for in situ Grignard reaction using magnesium powder and CFCl3 for synthesis of dichlorofluoromethyl aromatic alcohols.

  20. Asymmetric Intramolecular Alkylation of Chiral Aromatic Imines via Catalytic C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Watzke, Anja; Wilson, Rebecca; O'Malley, Steven; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2007-04-16

    The asymmetric intramolecular alkylation of chiral aromatic aldimines, in which differentially substituted alkenes are tethered meta to the imine, was investigated. High enantioselectivities were obtained for imines prepared from aminoindane derivatives, which function as directing groups for the rhodium-catalyzed C-H bond activation. Initial demonstration of catalytic asymmetric intramolecular alkylation also was achieved by employing a sterically hindered achiral imine substrate and catalytic amounts of a chiral amine.

  1. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Raw data used to prepare the Gravity Report by Zonge 2012

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jaffe, Todd

    Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Raw data used to prepare the Gravity Report by Zonge 2012

  2. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Raw data used to prepare the Gravity Report by Zonge 2012

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jaffe, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Raw data used to prepare the Gravity Report by Zonge 2012

  3. INTERNAL GRAVITY WAVES IN MASSIVE STARS: ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T. M.; Lin, D. N. C.; McElwaine, J. N.; Lau, H. H. B. E-mail: lin@ucolick.org E-mail: hblau@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2013-07-20

    We present numerical simulations of internal gravity waves (IGW) in a star with a convective core and extended radiative envelope. We report on amplitudes, spectra, dissipation, and consequent angular momentum transport by such waves. We find that these waves are generated efficiently and transport angular momentum on short timescales over large distances. We show that, as in Earth's atmosphere, IGW drive equatorial flows which change magnitude and direction on short timescales. These results have profound consequences for the observational inferences of massive stars, as well as their long term angular momentum evolution. We suggest IGW angular momentum transport may explain many observational mysteries, such as: the misalignment of hot Jupiters around hot stars, the Be class of stars, Ni enrichment anomalies in massive stars, and the non-synchronous orbits of interacting binaries.

  4. Translation invariant time-dependent solutions to massive gravity II

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, J.; Steer, D.A. E-mail: steer@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2014-06-01

    This paper is a sequel to JCAP 12 (2013) 004 and is also devoted to translation-invariant solutions of ghost-free massive gravity in its moving frame formulation. Here we consider a mass term which is linear in the vielbein (corresponding to a ?{sub 3} term in the 4D metric formulation) in addition to the cosmological constant. We determine explicitly the constraints, and from the initial value formulation show that the time-dependent solutions can have singularities at a finite time. Although the constraints give, as in the ?{sub 1} case, the correct number of degrees of freedom for a massive spin two field, we show that the lapse function can change sign at a finite time causing a singular time evolution. This is very different to the ?{sub 1} case where time evolution is always well defined. We conclude that the ?{sub 3} mass term can be pathological and should be treated with care.

  5. Thermodynamic behavior of particular f(R,T)-gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, M. Zubair, M.

    2013-08-15

    We investigate the thermodynamics at the apparent horizon of the FRW universe in f(R, T) theory in the nonequilibrium description. The laws of thermodynamics are discussed for two particular models of the f(R, T) theory. The first law of thermodynamics is expressed in the form of the Clausius relation T{sub h} dS-circumflex{sub h} = {delta} Q , where {delta}Q is the energy flux across the horizon and dS-circumflex is the entropy production term. Furthermore, the conditions for the generalized second law of thermodynamics to be preserved are established with the constraints of positive temperature and attractive gravity. We illustrate our results for some concrete models in this theory.

  6. The application of Raman laser in gravity measurement and metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Ru, Ning; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yu; Fan, Shangchun

    2014-05-27

    Atom Interferometry is proved to be a potential method for measuring the acceleration of atoms due to Gravity, we are now building a feasible system of cold atom gravimeter, it is based on the atom interferometry technology by coherently manipulating the cold atoms in a fountain (with a height of 1m) with specific Raman lasers, the cold atom wave packet is splitted, combined, and then re-splitted in the process. Then the atomic wave packet will acquire different phase because of the different evolution path. The precise acceleration can be deduced through the precision measurement of atomic interference fringes phase, and this will be a high precision standard of acceleration. At present, the preparation of Raman laser and the precise control of the laser Frequency have been finished, and they have been proved to meet the requirements of the experiment.

  7. Vector field models of modified gravity and the dark sector

    SciTech Connect

    Zuntz, J.; Ferreira, P. G.; Zlosnik, T. G; Bourliot, F.; Starkman, G. D.

    2010-05-15

    We present a comprehensive investigation of cosmological constraints on the class of vector field formulations of modified gravity called generalized Einstein-aether models. Using linear perturbation theory we generate cosmic microwave background and large-scale structure spectra for general parameters of the theory, and then constrain them in various ways. We investigate two parameter regimes: a dark matter candidate where the vector field sources structure formation, and a dark energy candidate where it causes late-time acceleration. We find that the dark matter candidate does not fit the data, and identify five physical problems that can restrict this and other theories of dark matter. The dark energy candidate does fit the data, and we constrain its fundamental parameters; most notably we find that the theory's kinetic index parameter n{sub ae} can differ significantly from its {Lambda}CDM value.

  8. Modifying gravity with the aether: An alternative to dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zlosnik, T. G; Ferreira, P. G; Starkman, G. D.

    2007-02-15

    There is evidence that Newton and Einstein's theories of gravity cannot explain the dynamics of a universe made up solely of baryons and radiation. To be able to understand the properties of galaxies, clusters of galaxies and the universe on the whole it has become commonplace to invoke the presence of dark matter. An alternative approach is to modify the gravitational field equations to accommodate observations. We propose a new class of gravitational theories in which we add a new degree of freedom, the Aether, in the form of a vector field that is coupled covariantly, but nonminimally, with the space-time metric. We explore the Newtonian and non-Newtonian limits, discuss the conditions for these theories to be consistent and explore their effect on cosmology.

  9. Phenomenology of electrostatically charged droplet combustion in normal gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Eric K.; Koch, Jeremy A.; Kyritsis, Dimitrios C.

    2008-08-15

    Experimental findings are provided on the effect of electrostatically charging a fuel on single-burning droplet combustion in normal gravity. It was established that significant modification of the flame morphology and the droplet burning time could be achieved, solely by the droplet charge, without the application of external electric fields. Negative charging of the droplets of mixtures of isooctane with either ethanol or a commercially available anti-static additive generated intense motion of the flame and abbreviated the droplet burning time by as much as 40% for certain blend compositions. Positive charging of the droplets generated almost spherical flames, because electrostatic attraction toward the droplets countered the effect of buoyancy. By comparing combustion of droplets of the same conductivity but different compositions, coupling of electrostatics with combustion chemistry was established. (author)

  10. Self-Consistent Cosmological Simulations of DGP Braneworld Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Fabian; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /KICP, Chicago

    2009-09-01

    We perform cosmological N-body simulations of the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati braneworld model, by solving the full non-linear equations of motion for the scalar degree of freedom in this model, the brane bending mode. While coupling universally to matter, the brane-bending mode has self-interactions that become important as soon as the density field becomes non-linear. These self-interactions lead to a suppression of the field in high-density environments, and restore gravity to General Relativity. The code uses a multi-grid relaxation scheme to solve the non-linear field equation in the quasi-static approximation. We perform simulations of a flat self-accelerating DGP model without cosmological constant. However, the type of non-linear interactions of the brane-bending mode, which are the focus of this study, are generic to a wide class of braneworld cosmologies. The results of the DGP simulations are compared with standard gravity simulations assuming the same expansion history, and with DGP simulations using the linearized equation for the brane bending mode. This allows us to isolate the effects of the non-linear self-couplings of the field which are noticeable already on quasi-linear scales. We present results on the matter power spectrum and the halo mass function, and discuss the behavior of the brane bending mode within cosmological structure formation. We find that, independently of CMB constraints, the self-accelerating DGP model is strongly constrained by current weak lensing and cluster abundance measurements.

  11. Testing universal relations of neutron stars with a nonlinear matter-gravity coupling theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Y.-H.; Lin, L.-M.; Leung, P. T. E-mail: lmlin@phy.cuhk.edu.hk

    2014-02-01

    Due to our ignorance of the equation of state (EOS) beyond nuclear density, there is still no unique theoretical model for neutron stars (NSs). It is therefore surprising that universal EOS-independent relations connecting different physical quantities of NSs can exist. Lau et al. found that the frequency of the f-mode oscillation, the mass, and the moment of inertia are connected by universal relations. More recently, Yagi and Yunes discovered the I-Love-Q universal relations among the mass, the moment of inertia, the Love number, and the quadrupole moment. In this paper, we study these universal relations in the Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld (EiBI) gravity. This theory differs from general relativity (GR) significantly only at high densities due to the nonlinear coupling between matter and gravity. It thus provides us an ideal case to test how robust the universal relations of NSs are with respect to the change of the gravity theory. Due to the apparent EOS formulation of EiBI gravity developed recently by Delsate and Steinhoff, we are able to study the universal relations in EiBI gravity using the same techniques as those in GR. We find that the universal relations in EiBI gravity are essentially the same as those in GR. Our work shows that, within the currently viable coupling constant, there exists at least one modified gravity theory that is indistinguishable from GR in view of the unexpected universal relations.

  12. Two-phase reduced gravity experiments for a space reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-08-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. New flow regime maps, models, and correlations are required if the codes are to be successfully applied to reduced-gravity flow and heat transfer. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Because these reduced-gravity experiments will be very basic, and will employ small test loops of simple geometry, a large measure of commonality exists between them and experiments planned by other organizations. It is recommended that a committee be formed, to coordinate all ongoing and planned reduced gravity flow experiments.

  13. Combined application of normal and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography to determining the group composition of aromatic hydrocarbons in petroleum products

    SciTech Connect

    Belous, E.F.; Lanin, S.N.; Nikitin, Yu.S.

    1995-01-01

    The quality and working characteristics of motor fuels essentially depend on the concentration of aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs). Therefore, the development of procedures for the group determination of aromatic hydrocarbons is an important and topical problem in the processing and quality control of petroleum products. The aim of this work was to improve the group separation and quantitative determination of monocyclic and bicyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAH and BAH) in light-end products.

  14. Steam stripping of polycyclic aromatics from simulated high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.P.; Shah, H.B.; Young, S.R.; Edwards, R.E.; Carter, J.T.

    1992-12-31

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be the United States` first facility to process High Level radioactive Waste (HLW) into a borosilicate glass matrix. The removal of aromatic precipitates by hydrolysis, evaporation, liquid-liquid extraction and decantation will be a key step in the processing of the HLW. This step, titled the Precipitate Hydrolysis Process, has been demonstrated by the Savannah River Technology Center with the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF). The mission of the PHEF is to demonstrate processing of simulated high level radioactive waste which contains tetraphenylborate precipitates and nitrite. Aqueous washing or nitrite destruction is used to reduce nitrite. Formic acid with a copper catalyst is used to hydrolyze tetraphenylborate (TPB). The primary offgases are benzene, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and nitric oxide. Hydrolysis of TPB in the presence of nitrite results in the production of polycyclic aromatics and aromatic amines (referred as high boiling organics) such as biphenyl, diphenylamine, terphenyls etc. The decanter separates the organic (benzene) and aqueous phase, but the high boiling organic separation is difficult. This paper focuses on the evaluation of the operating strategies, including steam stripping, to maximize the removal of the high boiling organics from the aqueous stream. Two areas were investigated, (1) a stream stripping comparison of the late wash flowsheet to the HAN flowsheet and (2) the extraction performance of the original decanter to the new decanter. The focus of both studies was to minimize the high boiling organic content of the Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) product in order to minimize downstream impacts caused by organic deposition.

  15. Nitro group orientation, reduction potential, and direct-acting mutagenicity of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hyewook; Fu, Peter P. Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock ); Heflich, R.H. ); Shaikh, A.U. )

    1991-01-01

    Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) are widespread genotoxic environmental pollutants. The authors have been interested in determining the structural and electronic features that may be useful in predicting the direct-acting mutagenic activity of nitro-PAHs in Salmonella typhimurium. In this study, a series of structurally related nitro-PAHs were used to determine the relationships among direct-acting mutagenicity, orientation of the nitro group, and reduction potential of the nitro group. The compounds consisted of isomeric mononitrated and dinitrated benzo(e)pyrenes, their derivatives, and other nitro-PAHs ranging from two to five aromatic-ring molecules in size. A general finding is that nitro-PAHs with their nitro substituent oriented perpendicular to the aromatic system exhibit either very weak or no direct-acting mutagenicity in S. typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. However, if a nitro-PAH of this type has a relatively low first half-wave reduction potential, it may be direct-acting. Furthermore, a positive correlation between the first half-wave reduction potential and direct-acting mutagenicity is found only when the compounds are structurally similar. Consequently, the correlation cannot be made using nitro-PAHs with different molecular size. Nitro-PAHs having a perpendicular nitro orientation always have a higher (absolute value) first half-wave reduction potential than the isomer(s) with a parallel orientation. These findings provide a useful molecular basis for interpreting and predicting the direct-acting mutagenicity of nitro-PAHs.

  16. Flash Vacuum Pyrolysis of Lignin Model Compounds: Reaction Pathways of Aromatic Methoxy Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C., III; Martineau, D.R.

    1999-03-21

    Currently, there is interest in utilizing lignin, a major constituent of biomass, as a renewable source of chemicals and fuels. High yields of liquid products can be obtained from the flash or fast pyrolysis of biomass, but the reaction pathways that lead to product formation are not understood. To provide insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds at 500 C. This presentation will focus on the FVP of {beta}-ether linkages containing aromatic methoxy groups and the reaction pathways of methoxy-substituted phenoxy radicals.

  17. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene

    DOEpatents

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1982-03-31

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

  18. Quantum-gravity induced Lorentz violation and dynamical mass generation

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2011-01-15

    In the eprint by Jean Alexandre [arXiv:1009.5834], a minimal extension of (3+1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics has been proposed, which includes Lorentz violation (LV) in the form of higher-(spatial)-derivative isotropic terms in the gauge sector, suppressed by a mass scale M. The model can lead to dynamical mass generation for charged fermions. In this article, I elaborate further on this idea and I attempt to connect it to specific quantum-gravity models, inspired from string/brane theory. Specifically, in the first part of the article, I comment briefly on the gauge dependence of the dynamical mass generation in the approximations of J. Alexandre [arXiv:1009.5834.], and I propose a possible avenue for obtaining the true gauge-parameter-independent value of the mass by means of pinch technique argumentations. In the second part of the work, I embed the LV QED model into multibrane world scenarios with a view to provide a geometrical way of enhancing the dynamical mass to phenomenologically realistic values by means of bulk warp metric factors, in an (inverse) Randall-Sundrum hierarchy. Finally, in the third part of this paper, I demonstrate that such Lorentz-violating QED models may represent parts of a low-energy effective action (of Finsler-Born-Infeld type) of open strings propagating in quantum D0-particle stochastic space-time foam backgrounds, which are viewed as consistent quantum-gravity configurations. To capture correctly the quantum-fluctuating nature of the foam background, I replace the D0-recoil-velocity parts of this action by appropriate gradient operators in three-space, keeping the photon field part intact. This is consistent with the summation over world-sheet genera in the first-quantized string approach. I identify a class of quantum orderings which leads to the LV QED action of J. Alexandre, arXiv:1009.5834. In this way I argue, following the logic in that work, that the D-foam can lead to dynamically generated masses for charged

  19. Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D....

  20. Gravity survey of Dixie Valley, west-central Nevada | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    to library Report: Gravity survey of Dixie Valley, west-central Nevada Author Donald H. Schaefer Published US Geological Survey, 1983 Report Number 82-111 DOI Not Provided...

  1. Generalised BRST symmetry and gaugeon formalism for perturbative quantum gravity: Novel observation

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker

    2014-05-15

    In this paper the novel features of Yokoyama gaugeon formalism are stressed out for the theory of perturbative quantum gravity in the Einstein curved spacetime. The quantum gauge transformations for the theory of perturbative gravity are demonstrated in the framework of gaugeon formalism. These quantum gauge transformations lead to renormalised gauge parameter. Further, we analyse the BRST symmetric gaugeon formalism which embeds more acceptable KugoOjima subsidiary condition. Further, the BRST symmetry is made finite and field-dependent. Remarkably, the Jacobian of path integral under finite and field-dependent BRST symmetry amounts to the exact gaugeon action in the effective theory of perturbative quantum gravity. -- Highlights: We analyse the perturbative gravity in gaugeon formalism. The generalisation of BRST transformation is also studied in this context. Within the generalised BRST framework we found the exact gaugeon modes in the theory.

  2. Toward the AdS/CFT gravity dual for high energy collisions. II...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    II. The stress tensor on the boundary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Toward the AdSCFT gravity dual for high energy collisions. II. The stress tensor on the boundary ...

  3. Violation of the first law of black hole thermodynamics in f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Rong-Xin; Li, Miao; Miao, Yan-Gang E-mail: mli@itp.ac.cn

    2011-11-01

    We prove that, in general, the first law of black hole thermodynamics, ?Q = T?S, is violated in f(T) gravity. As a result, it is possible that there exists entropy production, which implies that the black hole thermodynamics can be in non-equilibrium even in the static spacetime. This feature is very different from that of f(R) or that of other higher derivative gravity theories. We find that the violation of first law results from the lack of local Lorentz invariance in f(T) gravity. By investigating two examples, we note that f''(0) should be negative in order to avoid the naked singularities and superluminal motion of light. When f''(T) is small, the entropy of black holes in f(T) gravity is approximatively equal to f'(T)/4 A.

  4. Simultaneous effect of modified gravity and primordial non-Gaussianity in large scale structure observations

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzatuny, Nareg; Khosravi, Shahram; Baghram, Shant; Moshafi, Hossein E-mail: khosravi@mail.ipm.ir E-mail: hosseinmoshafi@iasbs.ac.ir

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study the simultaneous effect of primordial non-Gaussianity and the modification of the gravity in f(R) framework on large scale structure observations. We show that non-Gaussianity and modified gravity introduce a scale dependent bias and growth rate functions. The deviation from ΛCDM in the case of primordial non-Gaussian models is in large scales, while the growth rate deviates from ΛCDM in small scales for modified gravity theories. We show that the redshift space distortion can be used to distinguish positive and negative f{sub NL} in standard background, while in f(R) theories they are not easily distinguishable. The galaxy power spectrum is generally enhanced in presence of non-Gaussianity and modified gravity. We also obtain the scale dependence of this enhancement. Finally we define galaxy growth rate and galaxy growth rate bias as new observational parameters to constrain cosmology.

  5. Axi-dilaton gravity in D{>=}4 dimensional space-times with torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Cebeci, H.; Dereli, T.

    2005-01-15

    We study models of axi-dilaton gravity in space-time geometries with torsion. We discuss conformal rescaling rules in both Riemannian and non-Riemannian formulations. We give static, spherically symmetric solutions and examine their singularity behavior.

  6. New Cosmologies on the Horizon. Cosmology and Holography in bigravity and massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Tolley, Andrew James

    2013-03-31

    The goal of this research program is to explore the cosmological dynamics, the nature of cosmological and black hole horizons, and the role of holography in a new class of infrared modified theories of gravity. This will capitalize of the considerable recent progress in our understanding of the dynamics of massive spin two fields on curved spacetimes, culminating in the formulation of the first fully consistent theories of massive gravity and bigravity/bimetric theories.

  7. Uniform density static fluid sphere in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity and its universality

    SciTech Connect

    Dadhich, Naresh; Molina, Alfred; Khugaev, Avas

    2010-05-15

    In Newtonian theory, gravity inside a constant density static sphere is independent of spacetime dimension. Interestingly this general result is also carried over to Einsteinian as well as higher order Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet (Lovelock) gravity notwithstanding their nonlinearity. We prove that the necessary and sufficient condition for universality of the Schwarzschild interior solution describing a uniform density sphere for all n{>=}4 is that its density is constant.

  8. Modification to the luminosity distance redshift relation in modified gravity theories

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, Eanna E.; Rosenthal, Eran; Wasserman, Ira M.

    2009-02-15

    We derive an expression for the luminosity distance as a function of redshift for a flat Robertson-Walker spacetime perturbed by arbitrary scalar perturbations possibly produced by a modified gravity theory with two different scalar perturbation potentials. Measurements of the luminosity distance as function of redshift provide a constraint on a combination of the scalar potentials and so they can complement weak lensing and other measurements in trying to distinguish among the various alternative theories of gravity.

  9. Observation of gravity decays of multiple-neutron nuclei during cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    The Nattoh model predicted that multiple-neutron nuclei such as quad-neutrons can be produced during cold fusion, and the gravity decays of the quad-neutrons were recorded on nuclear emulsions. Several different traces that might be produced by the gravity decays of di-neutron and multiple-neutron nuclei have been successfully observed. The mechanisms of the production of multiple-neutron nuclei are discussed in this paper.

  10. Borehole Gravity Meter Surveys at the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington.

    SciTech Connect

    MacQueen, Jeffrey D.; Mann, Ethan

    2007-04-06

    Microg-LaCoste (MGL) was contracted by Pacfic Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to record borehole gravity density data in 3 wells at the HanfordWaste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The survey was designed to provide highly accurate density information for use in seismic modeling. The borehole gravity meter (BHGM) tool has a very large depth of investigation (hundreds of feet) compared to other density tools so it is not influenced by casing or near welbore effects, such as washouts.

  11. Generalized second law of thermodynamics in f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Karami, K.; Abdolmaleki, A. E-mail: AAbdolmaleki@uok.ac.ir

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the validity of the generalized second law (GSL) of gravitational thermodynamics in the framework of f(T) modified teleparallel gravity. We consider a spatially flat FRW universe containing only the pressureless matter. The boundary of the universe is assumed to be enclosed by the Hubble horizon. For two viable f(T) models containing f(T) = T+?{sub 1}((?T)){sup n} and f(T) = T??{sub 2}T(1?e{sup ?T{sub 0}/T}), we first calculate the effective equation of state and deceleration parameters. Then, (we investigate the null and strong energy conditions and conclude that a sudden future singularity appears in both models. Furthermore, using a cosmographic analysis we check the viability of two models. Finally, we examine the validity of the GSL and find that for both models it) is satisfied from the early times to the present epoch. But in the future, the GSL is violated for the special ranges of the torsion scalar T.

  12. Can f(T) gravity theories mimic ?CDM cosmic history

    SciTech Connect

    Setare, M.R.; Mohammadipour, N. E-mail: N.Mohammadipour@uok.ac.ir

    2013-01-01

    Recently the teleparallel Lagrangian density described by the torsion scalar T has been extended to a function of T. The f(T) modified teleparallel gravity has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy to explain the late time acceleration of the universe. In order to reconstruct the function f(T) by demanding a background ?CDM cosmology we assume that, (i) the background cosmic history provided by the flat ?CDM (the radiation ere with ?{sub eff} = (1/3), matter and de Sitter eras with ?{sub eff} = 0 and ?{sub eff} = ?1, respectively) (ii) the radiation dominate in the radiation era with ?{sub 0r} = 1 and the matter dominate during the matter phases when ?{sub 0m} = 1. We find the cosmological dynamical system which can obey the ?CDM cosmic history. In each era, we find a critical lines that, the radiation dominated and the matter dominated are one points of them in the radiation and matter phases, respectively. Also, we drive the cosmologically viability condition for these models. We investigate the stability condition with respect to the homogeneous scalar perturbations in each era and we obtain the stability conditions for the fixed points in each eras. Finally, we reconstruct the function f(T) which mimics cosmic expansion history.

  13. Topological black holes in Lovelock-Born-Infeld gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M. H.; Alinejadi, N.; Hendi, S. H.

    2008-05-15

    In this paper, we present topological black holes of third order Lovelock gravity in the presence of cosmological constant and nonlinear electromagnetic Born-Infeld field. Depending on the metric parameters, these solutions may be interpreted as black hole solutions with inner and outer event horizons, an extreme black hole or naked singularity. We investigate the thermodynamics of asymptotically flat solutions and show that the thermodynamic and conserved quantities of these black holes satisfy the first law of thermodynamic. We also endow the Ricci flat solutions with a global rotation and calculate the finite action and conserved quantities of these class of solutions by using the counterterm method. We compute the entropy through the use of the Gibbs-Duhem relation and find that the entropy obeys the area law. We obtain a Smarr-type formula for the mass as a function of the entropy, the angular momenta, and the charge, and compute temperature, angular velocities, and electric potential and show that these thermodynamic quantities coincide with their values which are computed through the use of geometry. Finally, we perform a stability analysis for this class of solutions in both the canonical and the grand-canonical ensemble and show that the presence of a nonlinear electromagnetic field and higher curvature terms has no effect on the stability of the black branes, and they are stable in the whole phase space.

  14. Mass gap for gravity localized on Weyl thick branes

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa-Cendejas, N.; Santos, M. A. Reyes; Herrera-Aguilar, A.; Schubert, C.

    2008-06-15

    We consider thick brane configurations in a pure geometric Weyl integrable 5D space-time, a non-Riemannian generalization of Kaluza-Klein (KK) theory involving a geometric scalar field. Thus, the 5D theory describes gravity coupled to a self-interacting scalar field which gives rise to the structure of the thick branes. We continue the study of the properties of a previously found family of solutions which is smooth at the position of the brane but involves naked singularities in the fifth dimension. Analyzing their graviton spectrum, we find that a particularly interesting situation arises for a special case in which the 4D graviton is separated from the KK gravitons by a mass gap. The corresponding effective Schroedinger equation has a modified Poeschl-Teller potential and can be solved exactly. Apart from the massless 4D graviton, it contains one massive KK bound state, and the continuum spectrum of delocalized KK modes. We also discuss the mass hierarchy problem, and explicitly compute the corrections to Newton's law in the thin brane limit.

  15. Asymptotically flat radiating solutions in third order Lovelock gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M. H.; Farhangkhah, N.

    2008-09-15

    In this paper, we present an exact spherically symmetric solution of third order Lovelock gravity in n dimensions which describes the gravitational collapse of a null dust fluid. This solution is asymptotically (anti-)de Sitter or flat depending on the choice of the cosmological constant. Using the asymptotically flat solution for n{>=}7 with a power-law form of the mass as a function of the null coordinate, we present a model for a gravitational collapse in which a null dust fluid radially injects into an initially flat and empty region. It is found that a naked singularity is inevitably formed whose strength is different for the n=7 and n{>=}8 cases. In the n=7 case, the limiting focusing condition for the strength of curvature singularity is satisfied. But for n{>=}8, the strength of curvature singularity depends on the rate of increase of mass of the spacetime. These considerations show that the third order Lovelock term weakens the strength of the curvature singularity.

  16. Avoidance of singularities in asymptotically safe Quantum Einstein Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Kofinas, Georgios; Zarikas, Vasilios

    2015-10-30

    New general spherically symmetric solutions have been derived with a cosmological “constant” Λ as a source. This Λ term is not constant but it satisfies the properties of the asymptotically safe gravity at the ultraviolet fixed point. The importance of these solutions comes from the fact that they may describe the near to the centre region of black hole spacetimes as this is modified by the Renormalization Group scaling behaviour of the fields. The consistent set of field equations which respect the Bianchi identities is derived and solved. One of the solutions (with conventional sign of temporal-radial metric components) is timelike geodesically complete, and although there is still a curvature divergent origin, this is never approachable by an infalling massive particle which is reflected at a finite distance due to the repulsive origin. Another family of solutions (of both signatures) range from a finite radius outwards, they cannot be extended to the centre of spherical symmetry, and the curvature invariants are finite at the minimum radius.

  17. A study on the coagulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon clusters to determine their collision efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Raj, Abhijeet; Sander, Markus; Janardhanan, Vinod; Kraft, Markus [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    This paper presents a theoretical study on the physical interaction between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their clusters of different sizes in laminar premixed flames. Two models are employed for this study: a detailed PAH growth model, referred to as the kinetic Monte Carlo - aromatic site (KMC-ARS) model [Raj et al., Combust. Flame 156 (2009) 896-913]; and a multivariate PAH population balance model, referred to as the PAH - primary particle (PAH-PP) model. Both the models are solved by kinetic Monte Carlo methods. PAH mass spectra are generated using the PAH-PP model, and compared to the experimentally observed spectra for a laminar premixed ethylene flame. The position of the maxima of PAH dimers in the spectra and their concentrations are found to depend strongly on the collision efficiency of PAH coagulation. The variation in the collision efficiency with various flame and PAH parameters is studied to determine the factors on which it may depend. A correlation for the collision efficiency is proposed by comparing the computed and the observed spectra for an ethylene flame. With this correlation, a good agreement between the computed and the observed spectra for a number of laminar premixed ethylene flames is found. (author)

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts and the CYP1A1 restriction fragment length polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, P.G.; Bowman, E.D.; Weston, A.; Harris, C.C.; Sugimura, H.; Caporaso, N.E.; Petruzzelli, S.F. ); Trump, B.F. )

    1992-11-01

    Human cancer risk assessment at a genetic level involves the investigation of carcinogen metabolism and DNA adduct formation. Wide interindividual differences in metabolism result in different DNA adduct levels. For this and other reasons, many laboratories have considered DNA adducts to be a measure of the biologically effective dose of a carcinogen. Techniques for studying DNA adducts using chemically specific assays are becoming available. A modification of the [sup 32]P-postlabeling assay for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon DNA adducts described here provides potential improvements in quantification. DNA adducts, however, reflect only recent exposure to carcinogens; in contrast, genetic testing for metabolic capacity indicates the extent to which carcinogens can be activated and exert genotoxic effects. Such studies may reflect both separate and integrated risk factors together with DNA adduct levels. A recently described restriction fragment length polymorphism for the CYP1A1, which codes for the cytochrome P450 enzyme primarily responsible for the metabolic activation of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, has been found to be associated with lung cancer risk in a Japanese population. In a subset of individuals enrolled in a US lung cancer case-control study, no association with lung cancer was found. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) formation from the pyrolysis of different municipal solid waste fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hui; Wu, Chunfei; Onwudili, Jude A.; Meng, Aihong; Zhang, Yanguo; Williams, Paul T.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • PAH from pyrolysis of 9 MSW fractions was investigated. • Pyrolysis of plastics released more PAH than that of biomass. • Naphthalene was the most abundant PAH in the tar. • The mechanism of PAH release from biomass and plastics was proposed. - Abstract: The formation of 2–4 ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from the pyrolysis of nine different municipal solid waste fractions (xylan, cellulose, lignin, pectin, starch, polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and polyethylene terephthalate (PET)) were investigated in a fixed bed furnace at 800 °C. The mass distribution of pyrolysis was also reported. The results showed that PS generated the most total PAH, followed by PVC, PET, and lignin. More PAH were detected from the pyrolysis of plastics than the pyrolysis of biomass. In the biomass group, lignin generated more PAH than others. Naphthalene was the most abundant PAH, and the amount of 1-methynaphthalene and 2-methynaphthalene was also notable. Phenanthrene and fluorene were the most abundant 3-ring PAH, while benzo[a]anthracene and chrysene were notable in the tar of PS, PVC, and PET. 2-ring PAH dominated all tar samples, and varied from 40 wt.% to 70 wt.%. For PS, PET and lignin, PAH may be generated directly from the aromatic structure of the feedstock.

  20. Enhancing muconic acid production from glucose and lignin-derived aromatic compounds via increased protocatechuate decarboxylase activity

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Johnson, Christopher W.; Salvachua, Davinia; Khanna, Payal; Smith, Holly; Peterson, Darren J.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-04-22

    The conversion of biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules to cis,cis-muconic acid (referred to hereafter as muconic acid or muconate) has been of recent interest owing to its facile conversion to adipic acid, an important commodity chemical. Metabolic routes to produce muconate from both sugars and many lignin-derived aromatic compounds require the use of a decarboxylase to convert protocatechuate (PCA, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), two central aromatic intermediates in this pathway. Several studies have identified the PCA decarboxylase as a metabolic bottleneck, causing an accumulation of PCA that subsequently reduces muconate production. A recent study showed that activity of the PCAmore » decarboxylase is enhanced by co-expression of two genetically associated proteins, one of which likely produces a flavin-derived cofactor utilized by the decarboxylase. Using entirely genome-integrated gene expression, we have engineered Pseudomonas putida KT2440-derived strains to produce muconate from either aromatic molecules or sugars and demonstrate in both cases that co-expression of these decarboxylase associated proteins reduces PCA accumulation and enhances muconate production relative to strains expressing the PCA decarboxylase alone. In bioreactor experiments, co-expression increased the specific productivity (mg/g cells/h) of muconate from the aromatic lignin monomer p-coumarate by 50% and resulted in a titer of >15 g/L. In strains engineered to produce muconate from glucose, co-expression more than tripled the titer, yield, productivity, and specific productivity, with the best strain producing 4.92+/-0.48 g/L muconate. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that overcoming the PCA decarboxylase bottleneck can increase muconate yields from biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules in industrially relevant strains and cultivation conditions.« less

  1. Slowly rotating neutron and strange stars in R{sup 2} gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Staykov, Kalin V.; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.; Doneva, Daniela D.; Kokkotas, Kostas D. E-mail: daniela.doneva@uni-tuebingen.de E-mail: kostas.kokkotas@uni-tuebingen.de

    2014-10-01

    In the present paper we investigate self-consistently slowly rotating neutron and strange stars in R-squared gravity with Lagrangian f(R)=R+aR{sup 2}, where a is a parameter. For this purpose we first derive the equations describing the structure of the slowly rotating compact stars in f(R)-gravity and then simultaneously solve numerically the exterior and the interior problem. The structure of the slowly rotating neutron stars is studied for two different hadronic equations of state and a strange matter equation of state. The moment of inertia and its dependence on the stellar mass and the R-squared gravity parameter a is also examined in details. The numerical results show that the neutron star moment of inertia can be up to 30% larger compared to the corresponding general relativistic models. This is much higher than the change in the maximum mass induced by R-squared gravity and is beyond the EOS uncertainty. In this way the future observations of the moment of inertia of compact stars could allow us to distinguish between general relativity and f(R) gravity, and more generally to test the strong field regime of gravity.

  2. Determination of the Average Aromatic Cluster Size of Fossil Fuels by Solid-State NMR at High Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Kanmi; Kennedy, Gordon J.; Althaus, Stacey M.; Pruski, Marek

    2013-01-07

    We show that the average aromatic cluster size in complex carbonaceous materials can be accurately determined using fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR at a high magnetic field. To accurately quantify the nonprotonated aromatic carbon, we edited the 13C spectra using the recently reported MAS-synchronized spinecho, which alleviated the problem of rotational recoupling of 1H-13C dipolar interactions associated with traditional dipolar dephasing experiments. The dependability of this approach was demonstrated on selected Argonne Premium coal standards, for which full sets of basic structural parameters were determined with high accuracy.

  3. Compounds having aromatic rings and side-chain amide-functionality and a method for transporting monovalent anions across biological membranes using the same

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Jeffery T.; Sidorov, Vladimir; Kotch, Frank W.

    2008-04-08

    A compound containing at least two aromatic rings covalently bonded together, with each aromatic ring containing at least one oxyacetamide-based side chain, the compound being capable of forming a chloride ion channel across a lipid bilayer, and transporting chloride ion across the lipid bilayer.

  4. Constraining modified gravity with large non-Gaussianities

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, Samuel E.

    2009-02-15

    In writing a covariant effective action for single-field inflation, one is allowed to add a Gauss-Bonnet and axion-type curvature couplings. These couplings represent modifications of gravity, and are the unique higher-curvature terms that lead to second order equations of motion in four dimensions. In this paper we study the observational consequences of such couplings for models with large non-Gaussianities. Our focus is on the Gauss-Bonnet term. In particular, we study an effective action where the scalar Lagrangian is a general function of the inflaton and its first derivative. We show that, for large non-Gaussianities, one can write f{sub NL} in terms of only three parameters. The shape of f{sub NL} is also studied, and we find that it is very similar to that of k-inflation. We show that the Gauss-Bonnet term enhances the production of gravitational waves, and allows a smaller speed of sound for scalar perturbations. This, in turn, can lead to larger non-Gaussianities which can be constrained by observations. Using current Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe limits on f{sub NL} and the tensor/scalar ratio, we put constraints on all parameters. As an example, we show that for Dirac-Born-Infeld inflation, the Gauss-Bonnet coupling leads to an interesting observational window with both large f{sub NL} and a large amplitude of gravitational waves. Finally, we show that the Gauss-Bonnet coupling admits a de Sitter phase with a relativistic dispersion relation for scalar perturbations.

  5. Gravity waves from non-minimal quadratic inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Pallis, Constantinos; Shafi, Qaisar

    2015-03-12

    We discuss non-minimal quadratic inflation in supersymmetric (SUSY) and non-SUSY models which entails a linear coupling of the inflaton to gravity. Imposing a lower bound on the parameter c{sub R}, involved in the coupling between the inflaton and the Ricci scalar curvature, inflation can be attained even for subplanckian values of the inflaton while the corresponding effective theory respects the perturbative unitarity up to the Planck scale. Working in the non-SUSY context we also consider radiative corrections to the inflationary potential due to a possible coupling of the inflaton to bosons or fermions. We find ranges of the parameters, depending mildly on the renormalization scale, with adjustable values of the spectral index n{sub s}, tensor-to-scalar ratio r≃(2−4)⋅10{sup −3}, and an inflaton mass close to 3⋅10{sup 13} GeV. In the SUSY framework we employ two gauge singlet chiral superfields, a logarithmic Kähler potential including all the allowed terms up to fourth order in powers of the various fields, and determine uniquely the superpotential by applying a continuous R and a global U(1) symmetry. When the Kähler manifold exhibits a no-scale-type symmetry, the model predicts n{sub s}≃0.963 and r≃0.004. Beyond no-scale SUGRA, n{sub s} and r depend crucially on the coefficient involved in the fourth order term, which mixes the inflaton with the accompanying non-inflaton field in the Kähler potential, and the prefactor encountered in it. Increasing slightly the latter above (−3), an efficient enhancement of the resulting r can be achieved putting it in the observable range. The inflaton mass in the last case is confined in the range (5−9)⋅10{sup 13} GeV.

  6. Effective field theory of gravity for extended objects

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Rothstein, Ira Z.

    2006-05-15

    Using effective field theory (EFT) methods we present a Lagrangian formalism which describes the dynamics of nonrelativistic extended objects coupled to gravity. The formalism is relevant to understanding the gravitational radiation power spectra emitted by binary star systems, an important class of candidate signals for gravitational wave observatories such as LIGO or VIRGO. The EFT allows for a clean separation of the three relevant scales: r{sub s}, the size of the compact objects, r, the orbital radius, and r/v, the wavelength of the physical radiation (where the velocity v is the expansion parameter). In the EFT, radiation is systematically included in the v expansion without the need to separate integrals into near zones and radiation zones. Using the EFT, we show that the renormalization of ultraviolet divergences which arise at v{sup 6} in post-Newtonian (PN) calculations requires the presence of two nonminimal worldline gravitational couplings linear in the Ricci curvature. However, these operators can be removed by a redefinition of the metric tensor, so that the divergences arising at v{sup 6} have no physically observable effect. Because in the EFT finite size features are encoded in the coefficients of nonminimal couplings, this implies a simple proof of the decoupling of internal structure for spinless objects to at least order v{sup 6}. Neglecting absorptive effects, we find that the power counting rules of the EFT indicate that the next set of short distance operators, which are quadratic in the curvature and are associated with tidal deformations, does not play a role until order v{sup 10}. These operators, which encapsulate finite size properties of the sources, have coefficients that can be fixed by a matching calculation. By including the most general set of such operators, the EFT allows one to work within a point-particle theory to arbitrary orders in v.

  7. Universality of the acceleration due to gravity on the surface of a rapidly rotating neutron star

    SciTech Connect

    AlGendy, Mohammad; Morsink, Sharon M.

    2014-08-20

    On the surface of a rapidly rotating neutron star, the effective centrifugal force decreases the effective acceleration due to gravity (as measured in the rotating frame) at the equator while increasing the acceleration at the poles due to the centrifugal flattening of the star into an oblate spheroid. We compute the effective gravitational acceleration for relativistic rapidly rotating neutron stars and show that for a star with mass M, equatorial radius R{sub e} , and angular velocity ?, the deviations of the effective acceleration due to gravity from the nonrotating case take on a universal form that depends only on the compactness ratio M/R{sub e} , the dimensionless square of the angular velocity ?{sup 2}R{sub e}{sup 3}/GM, and the latitude on the star's surface. This dependence is universal, in that it has very little dependence on the neutron star's equation of state. The effective gravity is expanded in the slow-rotation limit to show the dependence on the effective centrifugal force, oblate shape of the star, and the quadrupole moment of the gravitational field. In addition, an empirical fit and simple formula for the effective gravity is found. We find that the increase in the acceleration due to gravity at the poles is of the same order of magnitude as the decrease in the effective acceleration due to gravity at the equator for all realistic value of mass, radius, and spin. For neutron stars that spin with frequencies near 600 Hz, the difference between the effective gravity at the poles and the equator is about 20%.

  8. A Sea Floor Gravity Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Zumberge

    2011-09-30

    Carbon dioxide gas (CO{sub 2}) is a byproduct of many wells that produce natural gas. Frequently the CO{sub 2} separated from the valuable fossil fuel gas is released into the atmosphere. This adds to the growing problem of the climatic consequences of greenhouse gas contamination. In the Sleipner North Sea natural gas production facility, the separated CO{sub 2} is injected into an underground saline aquifer to be forever sequestered. Monitoring the fate of such sequestered material is important - and difficult. Local change in Earth's gravity field over the injected gas is one way to detect the CO{sub 2} and track its migration within the reservoir over time. The density of the injected gas is less than that of the brine that becomes displaced from the pore space of the formation, leading to slight but detectable decrease in gravity observed on the seafloor above the reservoir. Using equipment developed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, we have been monitoring gravity over the Sleipner CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoir since 2002. We surveyed the field in 2009 in a project jointly funded by a consortium of European oil and gas companies and the US Department of Energy. The value of gravity at some 30 benchmarks on the seafloor, emplaced at the beginning of the monitoring project, was observed in a week-long survey with a remotely operated vehicle. Three gravity meters were deployed on the benchmarks multiple times in a campaign-style survey, and the measured gravity values compared to those collected in earlier surveys. A clear signature in the map of gravity differences is well correlated with repeated seismic surveys.

  9. Measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the air along the niagara river

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.M.; Chan, K.W.

    1987-06-01

    Two week-long studies in 1982-1983 have measure ambient concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and phthalate esters in air in both the particulate and gas phase along the US-Canadian border and the Niagara River. Concentrations of the PAH species monitored varied from 3 pg m/sup -3/ to 40 ng m/sup -3/. PAH's with three rings or less were found in significant proportions in the gas phase while larger molecules are almost solely in the particulate phase. Particulate components of the PAH loadings appear to originate locally with Buffalo, NY, Niagara Falls, NY, and Niagara Falls, Ontario, as probably sources. Gas-phase PAH components have a more regional character indicating regional or long-range transport. Levels of benzo(a)pyrene are consistent with previous particulate measurements made along the river since 1981.

  10. Catalytic cracking of aromatic hydrocarbons. Final report, October 1984-March 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, G.A.; Ham, D.O.; Moniz, G.A.

    1986-04-01

    Iron containing minerals and chars were screened as cracking catalysts for aromatic hydrocarbons (AHC) in simulated gasifier effluents. Catalytic activities of six minerals and two chars were measured and used to infer fundamental hetereogeneous rate constants using measured properties of the pore structure of the solids. Measurements were made for 200 ppM and 2000 ppM benzene cracking over the temperature range 400 to 1000/sup 0/C. The active catalyst under gasifier conditions was found to be FeO. The minerals have a higher reactivity per unit mass in chars than in a pure form. H/sub 2/S was found to reduce the catalytic activity to one third of the unpoisoned value, but the catalysts maintained this reduced activity. These minerals have the potential to be economically feasible, disposable catalysts in a fixed bed or fluidized bed process if they can survive for ten hours. 8 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Nitrogen-doped porous aromatic frameworks for enhanced CO2 adsorption

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Fu, Jia; Wu, Jianzhong; Custelcean, Radu; Jiang, De-en

    2014-10-07

    Recently synthesized porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs) exhibit extremely high surface areas and exceptional thermal and hydrothermal stabilities. Using computer-aided design, we propose new PAFs, designated as NPAFs, by introducing nitrogen-containing groups to the biphenyl unit and predict their CO2 adsorption capacities with grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations. Among various NPAFs considered, one with imidazole groups shows the highest adsorption capacity for CO2 (11.5wt % at 1bar and 298K) , in comparison with 5wt % for the parent PAF (PAF- 1) at the same condition. At higher pressures (around 10bar) ,though, another NPAF with pyridinic N groups performs much bettermore » than the rest due to its greater pore volume in addition to the N functionality. This research suggests that adding N functionality to the organic linkers is a promising way to increase CO2 adsorption capacity of PAFs at ambient condition.« less

  12. Nitrogen-doped porous aromatic frameworks for enhanced CO2 adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Jia; Wu, Jianzhong; Custelcean, Radu; Jiang, De-en

    2014-10-07

    Recently synthesized porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs) exhibit extremely high surface areas and exceptional thermal and hydrothermal stabilities. Using computer-aided design, we propose new PAFs, designated as NPAFs, by introducing nitrogen-containing groups to the biphenyl unit and predict their CO2 adsorption capacities with grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations. Among various NPAFs considered, one with imidazole groups shows the highest adsorption capacity for CO2 (11.5wt % at 1bar and 298K) , in comparison with 5wt % for the parent PAF (PAF- 1) at the same condition. At higher pressures (around 10bar) ,though, another NPAF with pyridinic N groups performs much better than the rest due to its greater pore volume in addition to the N functionality. This research suggests that adding N functionality to the organic linkers is a promising way to increase CO2 adsorption capacity of PAFs at ambient condition.

  13. Air pollution from a large steel factory: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from coke-oven batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzo Liberti; Michele Notarnicola; Roberto Primerano; Paolo Zannetti

    2006-03-15

    A systematic investigation of solid and gaseous atmospheric emissions from some coke-oven batteries of one of Europe's largest integrated steel factory (Taranto, Italy) has been carried out. These emissions, predominantly diffuse, originate from oven leakages, as well as from cyclic operations of coal loading and coke unloading. In air monitoring samples, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were consistently detected at concentrations largely exceeding threshold limit values. By means of PAHs speciation profile and benzo-(a)pyrene (BaP) equivalent dispersion modeling from diffuse sources, the study indicated that serious health risks exist not only in working areas, but also in a densely populated residential district near the factory. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Rendering graphene supports hydrophilic with non-covalent aromatic functionalization for transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pantelic, Radosav S., E-mail: pantelic@imbb.forth.gr [National Cancer Institute, 50 South Drive, Building 50, Room 4306, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Fu, Wangyang; Schoenenberger, Christian [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, Basel CH-4056 (Switzerland); Stahlberg, Henning [Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Mattenstrasse 26, WRO-1058, Basel CH-4058 (Switzerland)

    2014-03-31

    Amorphous carbon films have been routinely used to enhance the preparation of frozen-hydrated samples for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), either in retaining protein concentration, providing mechanical stability or dissipating sample charge. However, strong background signal from the amorphous carbon support obstructs that of the sample, and the insulating properties of thin amorphous carbon films preclude any efficiency in dispersing charge. Graphene addresses the limitations of amorphous carbon. Graphene is a crystalline material with virtually no phase or amplitude contrast and unparalleled, high electrical carrier mobility. However, the hydrophobic properties of graphene have prevented its routine application in Cryo-TEM. This Letter reports a method for rendering graphene TEM supports hydrophilica convenient approach maintaining graphene's structural and electrical properties based on non-covalent, aromatic functionalization.

  15. Glossary Glossary

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    calculated in terms of the following for- mula: Deg API 141.5 sp gr60degF 60degF - 131.5 The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed...

  16. Aromatic carboxylate effect on dimensionality of three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers: Syntheses, structures and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ju-Wen; Gong, Chun-Hua; Hou, Li-Li; Tian, Ai-Xiang; Wang, Xiu-Li

    2013-09-15

    Three new metal-organic coordination polymers [Co(4-bbc){sub 2}(bbbm)] (1), [Co(3,5-pdc)(bbbm)]·2H{sub 2}O (2) and [Co(1,4-ndc)(bbbm)] (3) (4-Hbbc=4-bromobenzoic acid, 3,5-H{sub 2}pdc=3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 1,4-H{sub 2}ndc=1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid and bbbm=1,1-(1,4-butanediyl)bis-1H-benzimidazole) were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Polymer 1 is a 1D chain formed by the bbbm ligands and Co{sup II} ions. Polymer 2 exhibits a 2D network with a (3·4·5)(3{sup 2}·4·5·6{sup 2}·7{sup 4}) topology. Polymer 3 possesses a 3D three-fold interpenetrating framework. The versatile structures of title polymers indicate that the aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of 1–3. Moreover, the thermal stability, electrochemical and luminescent properties of 1–3 were investigated. - graphical abstract: Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. The aromatic carboxylates play a key role in the dimensionality of three polymers. The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were obtained. • The aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of three polymers. • The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated.

  17. Device for detecting the specific gravity of a liquid. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Derouin, C.R.; Kerwin, W.J.; McCormick, J.B.; Bobbett, R.E.

    1980-11-18

    A device for detecting the specific gravity of a liquid and a device for detecting the state of charge of a liquid phase electrolyte battery are described. In one embodiment of the present invention, a change in the critical angle of total internal reflection is utilized to determine the index of refraction of the liquid to be measured. It is shown that the index of refraction of the liquid is a function of the specific gravity of the liquid. In applications for measuring the state of charge of a battery, the specific gravity is proportional to the state of charge of the battery. A change in intensity of rays intersecting an interface surface indicates the critical angle which is a direct indication of the specific gravity of the liquid and the state of charge of a battery. In another embodiment, a light beam is projected through a transparent medium and then through a portion of the liquid to be measured. A change in refraction due to a change in the index of refraction of the liquid produces a deflection of the beam which is measured by a detector. The magnitude of deflection of the beam is directly proportional to the specific gravity of the liquid and the state of charge of a battery.

  18. Constraining the range of Yukawa gravity interaction from S2 star orbits

    SciTech Connect

    Borka, D.; Jovanovi?, V. Borka; Jovanovi?, P.; Zakharov, A.F. E-mail: pjovanovic@aob.rs E-mail: zakharov@itep.ru

    2013-11-01

    We consider possible signatures for Yukawa gravity within the Galactic Central Parsec, based on our analysis of the S2 star orbital precession around the massive compact dark object at the Galactic Centre, and on the comparisons between the simulated orbits in Yukawa gravity and two independent sets of observations. Our simulations resulted in strong constraints on the range of Yukawa interaction ? and showed that its most probable value in the case of S2 star is around 5000 - 7000 AU. At the same time, we were not able to obtain reliable constrains on the universal constant ? of Yukawa gravity, because the current observations of S2 star indicated that it may be highly correlated with parameter ? in the range (0 < ? < 1). For ? > 2 they are not correlated. However, the same universal constant which was successfully applied to clusters of galaxies and rotation curves of spiral galaxies (? = 1/3) also gives a satisfactory agreement with the observed orbital precession of the S2 star, and in that case the most probable value for the scale parameter is ? ? 30001500 AU. Also, the Yukawa gravity potential induces precession of S2 star orbit in the same direction as General Relativity for ? > 0 and for ? < ?1, and in the opposite direction for ?1 < ? < 0. The future observations with advanced facilities, such as GRAVITY or/and European Extremely Large Telescope, are needed in order to verify these claims.

  19. Astrophysical tests of modified gravity: the morphology and kinematics of dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Vikram, Vinu; Cabr, Anna; Jain, Bhuvnesh; VanderPlas, J.T. E-mail: annanusca@gmail.com E-mail: jakevdp@cs.washington.edu

    2013-08-01

    This paper is the third in a series on tests of gravity using observations of stars and nearby dwarf galaxies. We carry out four distinct tests using published data on the kinematics and morphology of dwarf galaxies, motivated by the theoretical work of Hui et al. (2009) and Jain and Vanderplas (2011). In a wide class of gravity theories a scalar field couples to matter and provides an attractive fifth force. Due to their different self-gravity, stars and gas may respond differently to the scalar force leading to several observable deviations from standard gravity. HI gas, red giant stars and main sequence stars can be displaced relative to each other, and the stellar disk can display warps or asymmetric rotation curves aligned with external potential gradients. To distinguish the effects of modified gravity from standard astrophysical phenomena, we use a control sample of galaxies that are expected to be screened from the fifth force. In all cases we find no significant deviation from the null hypothesis of general relativity. The limits obtained from dwarf galaxies are not yet competitive with the limits from cepheids obtained in our first paper, but can be improved to probe regions of parameter space that are inaccessible using other tests. We discuss how our methodology can be applied to new radio and optical observations of nearby galaxies.

  20. A STATISTICAL METHOD FOR MEASURING THE GALACTIC POTENTIAL AND TESTING GRAVITY WITH COLD TIDAL STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Penarrubia, Jorge; Walker, Matthew G.

    2012-11-20

    We introduce the Minimum Entropy Method, a simple statistical technique for constraining the Milky Way gravitational potential and simultaneously testing different gravity theories directly from 6D phase-space surveys and without adopting dynamical models. We demonstrate that orbital energy distributions that are separable (i.e., independent of position) have an associated entropy that increases under wrong assumptions about the gravitational potential and/or gravity theory. Of known objects, 'cold' tidal streams from low-mass progenitors follow orbital distributions that most nearly satisfy the condition of separability. Although the orbits of tidally stripped stars are perturbed by the progenitor's self-gravity, systematic variations of the energy distribution can be quantified in terms of the cross-entropy of individual tails, giving further sensitivity to theoretical biases in the host potential. The feasibility of using the Minimum Entropy Method to test a wide range of gravity theories is illustrated by evolving restricted N-body models in a Newtonian potential and examining the changes in entropy introduced by Dirac, MONDian, and f(R) gravity modifications.

  1. Neutron stars in a perturbative f(R) gravity model with strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Deliduman, Cemsinan; Gngr, Can; Kele?, Vildan; Ryu, C.Y.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J. E-mail: cemsinan@msgsu.edu.tr E-mail: kelesvi@itu.edu.tr E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp

    2013-10-01

    In Kaluza-Klein electromagnetism it is natural to associate modified gravity with strong electromagnetic fields. Hence, in this paper we investigate the combined effects of a strong magnetic field and perturbative f(R) gravity on the structure of neutron stars. The effect of an interior strong magnetic field of about 10{sup 17?18} G on the equation of state is derived in the context of a quantum hadrodynamics (QHD) equation of state (EoS) including effects of the magnetic pressure and energy along with occupied Landau levels. Adopting a random orientation of interior field domains, we solve the modified spherically symmetric hydrostatic equilibrium equations derived for a gravity model with f(R) = R+?R{sup 2}. Effects of both the finite magnetic field and the modified gravity are detailed for various values of the magnetic field and the perturbation parameter ? along with a discussion of their physical implications. We show that there exists a parameter space of the modified gravity and the magnetic field strength, in which even a soft equation of state can accommodate a large ( > 2 M{sub s}un) maximum neutron star mass.

  2. Finite element modeling of concentrating solar collectors for evauation of gravity loads, bending, and optical characterization.

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Joshua M.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2010-04-01

    Understanding the effects of gravity and wind loads on concentrating solar power (CSP) collectors is critical for performance calculations and developing more accurate alignment procedures and techniques. This paper presents a rigorous finite-element model of a parabolic trough collector that is used to determine the impact of gravity loads on bending and displacements of the mirror facets and support structure. The geometry of the LUZ LS-2 parabolic trough collector was modeled using SolidWorks, and gravity-induced loading and displacements were simulated in SolidWorks Simulation. The model of the trough collector was evaluated in two positions: the 90{sup o} position (mirrors facing upward) and the 0{sup o} position (mirrors facing horizontally). The slope errors of the mirror facet reflective surfaces were found by evaluating simulated angular displacements of node-connected segments along the mirror surface. The ideal (undeformed) shape of the mirror was compared to the shape of the deformed mirror after gravity loading. Also, slope errors were obtained by comparing the deformed shapes between the 90{sup o} and 0{sup o} positions. The slope errors resulting from comparison between the deformed vs. undeformed shape were as high as {approx}2 mrad, depending on the location of the mirror facet on the collector. The slope errors resulting from a change in orientation of the trough from the 90{sup o} position to the 0{sup o} position with gravity loading were as high as {approx}3 mrad, depending on the location of the facet.

  3. Principal facts and a discussion of terrain correction methods for the complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map of the Cascade Mountains, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Danes, Z.F.; Phillips, W.M.

    1983-02-01

    Since 1974, the Division of Geology and Earth Resources, in conjunction with the US Department of Energy, has supported gravity studies in the Cascade Mountains of Washington State. Results of the Cascade gravity project are summarized graphically as a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map of the Cascade Mountains, Washington (Danes and Phillips, 1983). This report provides supplementary data and documentation for the complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map. Presented are principal gravity facts, simple Bouguer and Free-air gravity anomalies, computational methods, error analysis and a discussion of terrain corrections.

  4. An experimental study of pool boiling heat transfer in reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Shatto, D.P.; Renzi, K.I.; Peterson, G.P.; Morris, T.K.; Aaron, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    Experiments were performed in which pool boiling of pure water at reduced pressures was observed for behavior of the critical heatflux (CHF) and nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficients in a reduced gravitational environment. The experiments took place while alternating between microgravity and g/g{sub o} = 1.8 during parabolic flights aboard the NASA 930 (KC-135A). Heat transfer data were also obtained at Martian gravity levels (g/g{sub o} = 1/3). Parts of the test chamber were constructed of transparent materials to allow viewing and recording of the various boiling regimes encountered during the experiments. Results indicate that the onset of nucleate boiling occurred at lower heat fluxes in reduced gravity, resulting in higher two-phase heat transfer coefficients for g/g{sub o} < 1 than for g/g{sub o} = 1.8. In addition, the results indicate a significant reduction in the critical heat flux under reduced gravity conditions.

  5. Thermodynamics of asymptotically flat charged black holes in third order Lovelock gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M.H.; Shamirzaie, M.

    2005-12-15

    We present a new class of asymptotically flat charge static solutions in third order Lovelock gravity. These solutions present black hole solutions with two inner and outer event horizons, extreme black holes, or naked singularities provided the parameters of the solutions are chosen suitable. We find that the uncharged asymptotically flat solutions can present black holes with two inner and outer horizons. This kind of solution does not exist in Einstein or Gauss-Bonnet gravity, and it is a special effect in third order Lovelock gravity. We compute temperature, entropy, charge, electric potential, and mass of the black hole solutions, and find that these quantities satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. We also perform a stability analysis by computing the determinant of the Hessian matrix of the mass with respect to its thermodynamic variables in both the canonical and the grand-canonical ensembles, and show that there exists only an intermediate stable phase.

  6. MODELING THE NONLINEAR CLUSTERING IN MODIFIED GRAVITY MODELS. I. A FITTING FORMULA FOR THE MATTER POWER SPECTRUM OF f(R) GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2014-04-01

    Based on a suite of N-body simulations of the Hu-Sawicki model of f(R) gravity with different sets of model and cosmological parameters, we develop a new fitting formula with a numeric code, MGHalofit, to calculate the nonlinear matter power spectrum P(k) for the Hu-Sawicki model. We compare the MGHalofit predictions at various redshifts (z ? 1) to the f(R) simulations and find that the relative error of the MGHalofit fitting formula of P(k) is no larger than 6% at k ? 1 h Mpc{sup 1} and 12% at k in (1, 10] h Mpc{sup 1}, respectively. Based on a sensitivity study of an ongoing and a future spectroscopic survey, we estimate the detectability of a signal of modified gravity described by the Hu-Sawicki model using the power spectrum up to quasi-nonlinear scales.

  7. Holographic superconductors in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with Born-Infeld electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Jiliang; Wang Liancheng; Pan Qiyuan; Chen Songbai

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the holographic superconductors in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with Born-Infeld electrodynamics. We find that the Gauss-Bonnet constant, the model parameters, and the Born-Infeld coupling parameter will affect the formation of the scalar hair, the transition point of the phase transition from the second order to the first order, and the relation connecting the gap frequency in conductivity with the critical temperature. The combination of Gauss-Bonnet gravity and the Born-Infeld electrodynamics provides richer physics in the phase transition and the condensation of the scalar hair.

  8. Inflation in Kaluza-Klein cosmology. 1; Transformation to fourth-order gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.J. )

    1990-12-20

    This paper reports on the higher- dimensional Einstein equation with {Gamma}-term shown to be comformally equivalent to the four-dimensional field equation of scale-invariant fourth-order gravity. This holds for a general warped product between space-time and internal space of arbitrary dimension m which turns out to be an Einstein space. (The limit m {yields} {infinity} makes sense ) Thus, the results concerning the attractor property of the power- law inflationary solution derived for fourth-order gravity hold for the Kaluza-Klein model, too.

  9. Quasispherical gravitational collapse in 5D Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Sushant G.; Jhingan, S.

    2010-07-15

    We obtain a general five-dimensional quasispherical collapsing solutions of irrotational dust in Einstein gravity with the Gauss-Bonnet combination of quadratic curvature terms. These solutions are a generalization, to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, of the five-dimensional quasispherical Szkeres like collapsing solutions in general relativity. It is found that the collapse proceeds in the same way as in the analogous spherical collapse, i.e., there exists regular initial data such that the collapse proceed to form naked singularities violating cosmic censorship conjecture. The effect of Gauss-Bonnet quadratic curvature terms on the formation and locations of the apparent horizon is deduced.

  10. Color-kinematics duality for pure Yang-Mills and gravity at one and two

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    loops (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Color-kinematics duality for pure Yang-Mills and gravity at one and two loops Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Color-kinematics duality for pure Yang-Mills and gravity at one and two loops Authors: Bern, Zvi ; Davies, Scott ; Dennen, Tristan ; Huang, Yu-tin ; Nohle, Josh Publication Date: 2015-08-31 OSTI Identifier: 1213605 Grant/Contract Number: FG03-91ER40662; SC0007859; SC0008279 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name:

  11. Grating light reflection spectroelectrochemistry for detection of trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons in water

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY,MICHAEL J.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; KEMME,SHANALYN A.; KASUNIC,K.J.; BLAIR,DIANNA S.; ZAIDI,S.H.; MCNEIL,J.R.; BURGESS,L.W.; BRODSKY,A.M.; SMITH,S.A.

    2000-04-01

    Grating light reflection spectroscopy (GLRS) is an emerging technique for spectroscopic analysis and sensing. A transmission diffraction grating is placed in contact with the sample to be analyzed, and an incident light beam is directed onto the grating. At certain angles of incidence, some of the diffracted orders are transformed from traveling waves to evanescent waves. This occurs at a specific wavelength that is a function of the grating period and the complex index of refraction of the sample. The intensities of diffracted orders are also dependent on the sample's complex index of refraction. The authors describe the use of GLRS, in combination with electrochemical modulation of the grating, for the detection of trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons. The diffraction grating consisted of chromium lines on a fused silica substrate. The depth of the grating lines was 1 {micro}m, the grating period was 1 {micro}m, and the duty cycle was 50%. Since chromium was not suitable for electrochemical modulation of the analyte concentration, a 200 nm gold layer was deposited over the entire grating. This gold layer slightly degraded the transmission of the grating, but provided satisfactory optical transparency for the spectroelectrochemical experiments. The grating was configured as the working electrode in an electrochemical cell containing water plus trace amounts of the aromatic hydrocarbon analytes. The grating was then electrochemically modulated via cyclic voltammetry waveforms, and the normalized intensity of the zero order reflection was simultaneously measured. The authors discuss the lower limits of detection (LLD) for two analytes, 7-dimethylamino-1,2-benzophenoxazine (Meldola's Blue dye) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), probed with an incident HeNe laser beam ({lambda} = 543.5 nm) at an incident angle of 52.5{degree}. The LLD for 7-dimethylamino-1,2-benzophenoxazine is approximately 50 parts per billion (ppb), while the LLD for TNT is approximately 50 parts

  12. Aromatics and phenols from catalytic pyrolysis of Douglas fir pellets in microwave with ZSM-5 as a catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lu; Lei, Hanwu; Ren, Shoujie; Bu, Quan; Liang, Jing; Wei, Yi; Liu, Yupeng; Lee, Guo-Shuh J.; Chen, Shulin; Tang, Juming; Zhang, Qin; Ruan, Roger

    2012-11-04

    Microwave assisted catalytic pyrolysis was investigated to convert Douglas fir pellets to bio-oils by a ZSM-5 Zeolite catalyst. A central composite experimental design (CCD) was used to optimize the catalytic pyrolysis process. The effects of reaction time, temperature and catalyst to biomass ratio on the bio-oil, syngas, and biochar yields were determined. GC/MS analysis results showed that the bio-oil contained a series of important and useful chemical compounds. Phenols, guaiacols, and aromatic hydrocarbons were the most abundant compounds which were about 50-82 % in bio-oil depending on the pyrolysis conditions. Comparison between the bio-oils from microwave pyrolysis with and without catalyst showed that the catalyst increased the content of aromatic hydrocarbons and phenols. A reaction pathway was proposed for microwave assisted catalyst pyrolysis of Douglas fir pellets.

  13. Variations in the structure of aromatic solvents under the influence of microadditives of the C{sub 60} fullerene

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, B. M. Tuichiev, Sh.

    2007-02-15

    The structural ordering of aromatic solvents is investigated using wide-angle X-ray diffraction. It is shown that the degree of structural ordering of aromatic solvents at room temperature decreases in the following sequence: benzene, toluene, and n-xylene. The introduction of the C{sub 60} fullerene ({approx}0.001%) into these solvents leads to an increase in the degree of their ordering. Upon introduction of the fullerene, the degree of structural ordering increases significantly in n-xylene and only slightly in toluene and remains virtually unchanged in benzene. An analysis of the small-angle X-ray diffraction patterns of C{sub 60} fullerene solutions in benzene likewise demonstrates that the introduction of the fullerene into benzene leads to an insignificant change in the degree of structural ordering of this solvent. The specific features of the structure and behavior of benzene upon interaction with C{sub 60} fullerene additives are discussed.

  14. Applications of organo-calcium chemistry to control contaminant aromatic hydrocarbons in advanced coal gasification processes: Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Longwall, J.P.; Chang, C.C.S.; Lai, C.K.S.; Chen, P.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Peters, W.A.

    1988-09-01

    The broad goal of this contract was to provide quantitative understanding of the thermal reactions of aromatics contaminants with calcium oxide under conditions pertinent to their in situ or out-board reduction or elimination from advanced coal gasification process and waste streams. Specific objectives were formalized into the following four tasks: cracking of fresh coal pyrolysis tar, benzene cracking, CaO deactivation behavior, and preliminary economic implications. The approach primarily involved laboratory scale measurements of rates and extents of feed conversion, and of quality indices or compositions of the resulting products, when pure aromatic compounds or newly formed coal pyrolysis tars undergo controlled extents of thermal treatment with CaO of known preparation history. 70 refs., 54 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Gas-phase reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations and their nitrogen-containing analogs with H atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Demarais, Nicholas J.; Yang, Zhibo; Bierbaum, Veronica M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 215 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0215 (United States); Snow, Theodore P., E-mail: Nicholas.Demarais@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Zhibo.Yang@ou.edu, E-mail: Veronica.Bierbaum@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Theodore.Snow@Colorado.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    We have studied the reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations and their nitrogen-containing analogs with H atoms. Reaction rate constants are measured at 300 K using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube. We have implemented the laser induced acoustic desorption technique to allow the study of large, non-volatile species in the gas phase. The extension of this work from previous studies shows that the reactivity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations with H atoms reaches a constant value for large cations. There is a small difference in reactivity when comparing molecules of different size and geometry; however, no difference in reactivity was found when nitrogen was incorporated into the ring.

  16. Catalytic Upgrading of Thermochemical Intermediates to Hydrocarbons: Conversion of Lignocellulosic Feedstocks to Aromatic Fuels and High Value Chemicals

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    3 May, 2013 Technology Area Review: Thermochemical Conversion Randy Cortright PhD Virent, Inc WBS: 3.3.1.10 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement Project Goal -Develop and demonstrate integration of Virent's lignocellulosic biomass solvolysis technology with Virent's BioForming® process to generate aromatic-rich hydrocarbon products for use in either fuels or chemicals applications.  Liquefaction of Biomass and

  17. Effect of nitro-substitution of environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on activities of hepatic phase II enzymes in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pegram, R.A.; Chou, M.W. )

    1989-09-01

    A series of environmentally occurring nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) including those containing nitro-groups oriented coplanarly to the aromatic rings, such as 1- and 3-nitrobenzo(a)pyrene (1- and 3-NBAP), 6-nitrochrysene, and 1- and 4-nitropyrene, and those with a molecular orientation of the nitro-groups perpendicular to the aromatic moieties, such as 7-nitrobenz(a)anthracene and 6-nitrobenzo(a)pyrene (6-NBAP), were used to study the induction of certain rat hepatic phase II conjugating enzymes. Effects of these two different classes of nitro-PAHs on microsomal UDP-glucuronyltransferase (UDPGT), cytosolic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and sulfotransferases (STs) were investigated. After three consecutive daily i.p. injections, 1- and 3-NBAP and 6-nitrochrysene significantly increased the activities of UDPGT and GST, whereas their parent PAHs did not induce UDPGT (and GST activity was also unaltered by benzo(a)pyrene). UDPGT and GST activities were also significantly increased by 1-nitropyrene. In contrast, the sulfotransferases directed to 2-naphthol were not significantly induced by any PAH or nitro-PAH when assayed at either pH 5.5 or 7.5; however, the activities of aryl STs III and IV (pH 5.5) were significantly decreased following treatment with pyrene and two nitro-compounds, 6-NBAP and 7-nitrobenz(a)anthracene, in which the nitro-group is oriented perpendicular to the aromatic moiety. These results indicate that a coplanar orientation of the nitro-group of certain nitrated PAHs facilitates the induction of hepatic phase II enzymes by these compounds in rats, and the comparable induction patterns for P450IA1, UDPGT, and GST provide further evidence supporting the coordinate regulation (through the Ah receptor) of these phase I and phase II activities.

  18. Spherical collapse in Galileon gravity: fifth force solutions, halo mass function and halo bias

    SciTech Connect

    Barreira, Alexandre; Li, Baojiu; Baugh, Carlton M.; Pascoli, Silvia E-mail: liqb@mail.ihep.ac.cn E-mail: silvia.pascoli@durham.ac.uk

    2013-11-01

    We study spherical collapse in the Quartic and Quintic Covariant Galileon gravity models within the framework of the excursion set formalism. We derive the nonlinear spherically symmetric equations in the quasi-static and weak-field limits, focusing on model parameters that fit current CMB, SNIa and BAO data. We demonstrate that the equations of the Quintic model do not admit physical solutions of the fifth force in high density regions, which prevents the study of structure formation in this model. For the Quartic model, we show that the effective gravitational strength deviates from the standard value at late times (z?<1), becoming larger if the density is low, but smaller if the density is high. This shows that the Vainshtein mechanism at high densities is not enough to screen all of the modifications of gravity. This makes halos that collapse at z?<1 feel an overall weaker gravity, which suppresses halo formation. However, the matter density in the Quartic model is higher than in standard ?CDM, which boosts structure formation and dominates over the effect of the weaker gravity. In the Quartic model there is a significant overabundance of high-mass halos relative to ?CDM. Dark matter halos are also less biased than in ?CDM, with the difference increasing appreciably with halo mass. However, our results suggest that the bias may not be small enough to fully reconcile the predicted matter power spectrum with LRG clustering data.

  19. Large-scale structure in brane-induced gravity. I. Perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Scoccimarro, Roman

    2009-11-15

    We study the growth of subhorizon perturbations in brane-induced gravity using perturbation theory. We solve for the linear evolution of perturbations taking advantage of the symmetry under gauge transformations along the extra-dimension to decouple the bulk equations in the quasistatic approximation, which we argue may be a better approximation at large scales than thought before. We then study the nonlinearities in the bulk and brane equations, concentrating on the workings of the Vainshtein mechanism by which the theory becomes general relativity (GR) at small scales. We show that at the level of the power spectrum, to a good approximation, the effect of nonlinearities in the modified gravity sector may be absorbed into a renormalization of the gravitational constant. Since the relation between the lensing potential and density perturbations is entirely unaffected by the extra physics in these theories, the modified gravity can be described in this approximation by a single function, an effective gravitational constant for nonrelativistic motion that depends on space and time. We develop a resummation scheme to calculate it, and provide predictions for the nonlinear power spectrum. At the level of the large-scale bispectrum, the leading order corrections are obtained by standard perturbation theory techniques, and show that the suppression of the brane-bending mode leads to characteristic signatures in the non-Gaussianity generated by gravity, generic to models that become GR at small scales through second-derivative interactions. We compare the predictions in this work to numerical simulations in a companion paper.

  20. Existence of global weak solution for a reduced gravity two and a half layer model

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zhenhua Li, Zilai Yao, Lei

    2013-12-15

    We investigate the existence of global weak solution to a reduced gravity two and a half layer model in one-dimensional bounded spatial domain or periodic domain. Also, we show that any possible vacuum state has to vanish within finite time, then the weak solution becomes a unique strong one.

  1. A scaling analysis of thermoacoustic convection in a zero-gravity environment

    SciTech Connect

    Krane, R.J.; Parang, M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a scaling analysis of a one-dimensional thermoacoustic convection heat transfer process in a zero-gravity environment. The relative importance of the terms in the governing equations is discussed for different time scales without attempting to solve the equations. The scaling analysis suggests certain generalizations that can be made in this class of heat transfer problems.

  2. Asymptotically (anti)-de Sitter solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity without a cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Dehghani, M.H.

    2004-09-15

    In this paper I show that one can have asymptotically de Sitter, anti-de Sitter (AdS), and flat solutions in Gauss-Bonnet gravity without a cosmological constant term in field equations. First, I introduce static solutions whose three surfaces at fixed r and t have constant positive (k=1), negative (k=-1), or zero (k=0) curvature. I show that for k={+-}1 one can have asymptotically de Sitter, AdS, and flat spacetimes, while for the case of k=0, one has only asymptotically AdS solutions. Some of these solutions present naked singularities, while some others are black hole or topological black hole solutions. I also find that the geometrical mass of these five-dimensional spacetimes is m+2{alpha}|k|, which is different from the geometrical mass m of the solutions of Einstein gravity. This feature occurs only for the five-dimensional solutions, and is not repeated for the solutions of Gauss-Bonnet gravity in higher dimensions. Second, I add angular momentum to the static solutions with k=0, and introduce the asymptotically AdS charged rotating solutions of Gauss-Bonnet gravity. Finally, I introduce a class of solutions which yields an asymptotically AdS spacetime with a longitudinal magnetic field, which presents a naked singularity, and generalize it to the case of magnetic rotating solutions with two rotation parameters.

  3. Some Cosmological Models for Poincare Gauge Gravity and Accelerated Expansion of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Mebarki, N.

    2010-10-31

    Two cosmological Models for the Poincare Gauge Gravity theory with a non vanishing torsion are proposed. It is shown that the torsion plays an important role in explaining the accelerated expansion of the universe. Some of the cosmological parameters are also expressed in terms of the redshift and the dark energy scenarios are discussed.

  4. Entirely passive heat-pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity

    DOEpatents

    Koenig, D.R.

    1981-02-11

    The disclosure is directed to an entirely passive heat pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity for vertical distances in the order of 3 to 7 and more. A return conduit into which an inert gas is introduced is used to lower the specific density of the working fluid so that it may be returned a greater vertical distance from condenser to evaporator.

  5. Effective matter cosmologies of massive gravity I: non-physical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Y?lmaz, Nejat Tevfik

    2014-08-01

    For the massive gravity, after decoupling from the metric equation we find a broad class of solutions of the Stckelberg sector by solving the background metric in the presence of a diagonal physical metric. We then construct the dynamics of the corresponding FLRW cosmologies which inherit effective matter contribution through the decoupling solution mechanism of the scalar sector.

  6. Linkages and aromatic clusters in a bituminous coal: Final report, September 1, 1985--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.E.

    1988-10-01

    The distribution and arrangement of aromatic clusters, oxygen functional groups, and linkages in an Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal were determined by controlled solubilization of the coal, followed by solvent fractionation of the soluble product and detailed analyses of the product fractions. The solubilization was carried out in reactions with NaOH/ethanol/H/sub 2/O at temperatures of 260/degree/, 300/degree/ and 320/degree/C. Elemental balance and spectroscopic data revealed that the oxygen functional groups of the coal were attacked selectively in the solubilization process, resulting in an orderly definable diminution of the complex coal structure. Also aliphatic linkages present in selected solubilized product fractions were subjected to a transalkylation reaction. A molecular structural model specific to the Illinois coal was constructed, and the hydroliquefaction behavior of the coal was evaluated in terms of potential product distribution and hydrogen consumption. The structural characteristics are compared with those of a Wyoming subbituminous coal in our previous study. 9 refs., 16 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. PAMAM dendrimers and graphene: Materials for removing aromatic contaminants from water

    SciTech Connect

    DeFever, Ryan S.; Geitner, Nicholas K.; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Ding, Feng; Ke, Pu Chun; Sarupria, Sapna

    2015-04-07

    We present results from experiments and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on the association of naphthalene with polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers and graphene oxide (GrO). Specifically, we investigate 3rd-6th generation (G3-G6) PAMAM dendrimers and GrO with different levels of oxidation. The work is motivated by the potential applications of these materials in removing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminants from water. Our experimental results indicate that graphene oxide outperforms dendrimers in removing naphthalene from water. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the prominent factors driving naphthalene association to these seemingly disparate materials are similar. Interestingly, we find that cooperative interactions between the naphthalene molecules play a significant role in enhancing their association to the dendrimers and graphene oxide. Our findings highlight that while selection of appropriate materials is important, the interactions between the contaminants themselves can also be important in governing the effectiveness of a given material. The combined use of experiments and molecular dynamics simulations allows us to comment on the possible factors resulting in better performance of graphene oxide in removing naphthalene from water.

  8. Anaerobic cometabolic transformation of polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: evidence from laboratory and field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Safinowski; Christian Griebler; Rainer U. Meckenstock

    2006-07-01

    The sulfate-reducing enrichment culture N47 can grow on naphthalene or 2-methylnaphthalene as the sole carbon and energy source. The study reported shows that the culture can furthermore cometabolically transform a variety of polycyclic and heteroaromatic compounds with naphthalene or methylnaphthalene as the auxiliary substrate. Most of the cosubstrates were converted to the corresponding carboxylic acids, frequently to several isomers. The mass spectra of specific metabolites that were extracted from supernatants of cultures containing the cosubstrates benzothiophene, benzofuran, and 1-methylnaphthalene resembled known intermediates of the anaerobic naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene degradation pathways. This indicates that some of the tested compounds were first methylated and then transformed to the corresponding methylsuccinic acids by a fumarate addition to the methyl group. For some of the cosubstrates, a partial or total inhibition of growth on the auxiliary substrate was observed. This was caused by a specific combination of auxiliary substrate and cosubstrate. None of the cosubstrates tested could be utilized as the sole carbon source and electron donor by the enrichment culture N47. Field investigations at the tar-oil-contaminated aquifer (at a former gasworks in southwest Germany), where strain N47 originated, revealed the presence of metabolites similar to the ones identified in batch culture supernatants. The findings suggest that aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds can be converted by aquifer organisms and produce a variety of polar compounds that become mobile in groundwater. 51 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface waters of Alessandria District, South Eastern Piedmont (Italy)

    SciTech Connect

    Trova, C.; Cossa, G.; Gandolfo, G.

    1992-10-01

    Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. Because of the high toxicity of some polycyclic compounds, such as benzopyrenes, the determination of their levels in air, water, soil and aquatic organisms was the object of several papers. Anthropogenic pyrolitic and combustion processes, related to industrial plants, domestic heating, automobile traffic, are the major sources of these compounds; from these sources they enter atmospheric environment where their concentration is reduced by scavenging during precipitation events: rain, snow and fog in urban areas usually show high contents of PAHs. Dry and wet atmospheric polluted depositions effluents transport appreciable amounts of PAHs to aquatic environment, where they are rapidly taken up and accumulated by both fish and shellfish. Alessandria District, in South-Eastern Piedmont (Italy), lies in the middle of Torino-Milano-Genova industrial area: in addition to local sources, a relatively long range transport of polluted air masses may conduct to this region atmospheric contaminants, such as polynuclear compounds, that can enter fluvial environments through meteoric precipitation. The object of this work was to evaluate PAH content in surface waters flowing across the described territory. Samplings were carried on during winter season, when the concentration of these pollutants usually reaches the highest levels. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Vapor pressures and thermodynamics of oxygen-containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons measured using Knudsen effusion

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, J.L.; Suuberg, E.M.

    2008-06-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their oxygenated derivatives (OPAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants resulting from the incomplete combustion of coal and fossil fuels. Their vapor pressures are key thermodynamic data essential for modeling fate and transport within the environment. The present study involved nine PAHs containing oxygen heteroatoms, including aldehyde, carboxyl, and nitro groups, specifically 2-nitrofluorene, 9-fluorenecarboxylic acid, 2-fluorenecarboxaldehyde, 2-anthracenecarboxylic acid, 9-anthracenecarboxylic acid, 9-anthraldehyde, 1-nitropyrene, 1-pyrenecarboxaldehyde, and 1-bromo-2-naphthoic acid. The vapor pressures of these compounds, with molecular weights ranging from 194 to 251 g/mol, were measured using the isothermal Knudsen effusion technique in the temperature range of 329 to 421 K. The corresponding enthalpies of sublimation, calculated via the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, are compared to parent, nonoxygenated PAH compound data to determine the effect of the addition of these oxygen-containing heteroatoms. As expected, the addition of -CHO, -COOH, and -NO{sub 2} groups onto these PAHs increases the enthalpy of sublimation and decreases the vapor pressure as compared to the parent PAH; the position of substitution also plays a significant role in determining the vapor pressure of these OPAHs.

  11. Laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bezabeth, D.Z.; McCauley, E.M.; Kelly, P.B.; Jones, A.D.

    1994-12-31

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) are of interest to the environmental community due to their ubiquitous presence and the carcinogenic activity of many members of this class of compounds. Recent attention has been focused on nitro-substituted PAH (nitro-PAH) because of their demonstrated mutagenic and carcinogenic activities. Nitro-PAH are found in diesel exhaust, urban air particulates, coal fly ash, and cigarette smoke. The concentration of nitro-PAH in the environment is typically one to two orders of magnitude less than the unsubstituted PAH. However, the biological activity of nitro-PAH is several orders of magnitude greater than the unsubstituted PAH. Hence, there is a need for an analytical technique which combines sensitivity as well as selectivity for nitro-PAH to allow detection of nitro-PAH over the large background of PAH in the environment. This laboratory is presently investigating the use of laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry as a screening method for nitro-PAH. Previous work in this laboratory examined the positive ion spectra of several nitro-PAH. Weak molecular ion peaks were observed, however, the majority of the detected ions were low mass fragments. The unsubstituted PAH were also found to produce intense positive molecular ion signals in contrast to the very weak molecular signals from the nitro-PAH. Thus, identification of the individual nitro-PAH in an environmental sample would be difficult using only the positive ion spectra.

  12. Effect of aerosol chemical composition on the photodegradation of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Feilberg, A.; Nielsen, T.

    2000-03-01

    The photodegradation of four ring nitro-PAHs in the presence of organic aerosol constituents has been investigated in model systems to determine their degradation mechanism under ambient air conditions. Light-induced radical chain reactions initiated by organic aerosol constituents, e.g., oxy-PAHs, is most likely to be the dominant degradation pathway for particle-associated nitro-PAH. The photodegradation rates were investigated in a chemical model system simulating the liquid film on particles from diesel exhaust and wood stove stack gases. Relative rates were obtained in pure solutions (direct photolysis) and in the presence of different classes of organic aerosol components comprising PAHs, hydroxy-PAHs, substituted phenols, benzaldehydes, and oxy-PAHs (including polycyclic aromatic quinones) (indirect photolysis). Members of the four latter compound classes are demonstrated to accelerate the photodegradation rate. The mechanisms proposed to explain these effects include both radical chain reactions and photoinduced hydrogen abstraction by nitro-PAHs. PAHs that are known sensitizers of singlet Q{sub 2} did not accelerate the decay. Certain oxy-PAHs strongly accelerate the nitro-PAH decay, whereas others have no effect. This difference is related to the nature of the excited state of the oxy-PAH and the ability to initiate radical chain reactions. The relevance of the model system and the environmental implications of the results are discussed, and the results are compared with relative degradation rates from smog chamber studies with the same compounds.

  13. The anharmonic quartic force field infrared spectra of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, Cameron J. Candian, Alessandra; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Huang, Xinchuan; Maltseva, Elena; Buma, Wybren Jan; Petrignani, Annemieke; Oomens, Jos; Lee, Timothy J.

    2015-12-14

    Current efforts to characterize and study interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) rely heavily on theoretically predicted infrared (IR) spectra. Generally, such studies use the scaled harmonic frequencies for band positions and double harmonic approximation for intensities of species, and then compare these calculated spectra with experimental spectra obtained under matrix isolation conditions. High-resolution gas-phase experimental spectroscopic studies have recently revealed that the double harmonic approximation is not sufficient for reliable spectra prediction. In this paper, we present the anharmonic theoretical spectra of three PAHs: naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene, computed with a locally modified version of the SPECTRO program using Cartesian derivatives transformed from Gaussian 09 normal coordinate force constants. Proper treatments of Fermi resonances lead to an impressive improvement on the agreement between the observed and theoretical spectra, especially in the C–H stretching region. All major IR absorption features in the full-scale matrix-isolated spectra, the high-temperature gas-phase spectra, and the most recent high-resolution gas-phase spectra obtained under supersonically cooled molecular beam conditions in the CH-stretching region are assigned.

  14. In situ toxicity evaluations of turbidity and photoinduction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, D.S.; Burton, G.A. Jr; Hess, G.G.

    1996-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are prevalent pollutants in the aquatic environment that can cause a wide range of toxic effects. Earlier studies have shown that toxicity of PAHs can be enhanced by ultraviolet (UV) radiation. In situ and laboratory exposures with Ceriodaphnia dubia were used to evaluate photoinduced toxicity of PAHs in wet-weather runoff and in turbid conditions. Exposure to UV increased the toxicity of PAH-contaminated sediment to C. dubia. Toxicity was removed when UV wavelengths did not penetrate the water column to the exposed organisms. A significant correlation was observed between in situ C. dubia survival and turbidity when organisms were exposed to sunlight. Stormwater runoff samples exhibited an increase in chronic toxicity (reproduction) to C. dubia when exposed to UV wavelengths as compared to C. dubia not exposed to UV wavelengths. Toxicity was reduced significantly in the presence of UV radiation when the organic fraction of stormwater runoff was removed. The PAHs are bound to the sediment and resuspended into the water column once the sediment is disturbed (e.g., during a storm). The in situ and laboratory results showed that photoinduced toxicity occurred frequently during low flow conditions and wet weather runoff and was reduced in turbid conditions.

  15. Use of SPMDs to determine average water concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban stormwater runoff

    SciTech Connect

    DeVita, W.; Crunkilton, R.

    1995-12-31

    Semipermeable polymeric membrane devices (SPMDS) were deployed for 30 day periods to monitor polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in an urban stream which receives much of its flow from urban runoff. SPMDs are capable of effectively sampling several liters of water per day for some PAHs. Unlike conventional methods, SPMDs sample only those non-polar organic contaminants which are truly dissolved and available for bioconcentration. Also, SPMDs may concentrate contaminants from episodic events such as stormwater discharge. The State of Wisconsin has established surface water quality criteria based upon human lifetime cancer risk of 23 ppt for benzo(a)pyrene and 23 ppt as the sum of nine other potentially carcinogenic PAHs. Bulk water samples analyzed by conventional methodology were routinely well above this criteria, but contained particulate bound PAHs as well as PAHs bound by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) which are not available for bioconcentration. Average water concentrations of dissolved PAHs determined using SPMDs were also above this criteria. Variables used for determining water concentration included sampling rate at the exposure temperature, length of exposure and estimation of biofouling of SPMD surface.

  16. Field application of a genetically engineered microorganism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bioremediation process monitoring and control

    SciTech Connect

    Sayler, G.S.; Cox, C.D.; Ripp, S.; Nivens, D.E.; Werner, C.; Ahn, Y.; Matrubutham, U.; Burlage, R.

    1998-11-01

    On October 30, 1996, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) commenced the first test release of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) for use in bioremediation. The specific objectives of the investigation were multifaceted and include (1) testing the hypothesis that a GEM can be successfully introduced and maintained in a bioremediation process, (2) testing the concept of using, at the field scale, reporter organisms for direct bioremediation process monitoring and control, and (3) acquiring data that can be used in risk assessment decision making and protocol development for future field release applications of GEMs. The genetically engineered strain under investigation is Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (King et al., 1990). The original P. fluorescens parent strain was isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated manufactured gas plant soil. Thus, this bacterium is able to biodegrade naphthalene (as well as other substituted naphthalenes and other PAHs) and is able to function as a living bioluminescent reporter for the presence of naphthalene contamination, its bioavailability, and the functional process of biodegradation. A unique component of this field investigation was the availability of an array of large subsurface soil lysimeters. This article describes the experience associated with the release of a genetically modified microorganism, the lysimeter facility and its associated instrumentation, as well as representative data collected during the first eighteen months of operation.

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at selected burning grounds at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, B.W.; Minor, L.K.M.; Flucas, B.J.

    1998-02-01

    A commercial immunoassay field test (IFT) was used to rapidly assess the total concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the soil at selected burning grounds within the explosives corridor at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Results were compared with analyses obtained from LANL Analytical Laboratory and from a commercial laboratory. Both used the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Methods 8270 and 8310. EPA`s Method 8270 employs gas chromatography and mass spectral analyses, whereas EPA`s Method 8310 uses an ultraviolet detector in a high-performance liquid chromatography procedure. One crude oil sample and one diesel fuel sample, analyzed by EPA Method 8270, were included for references. On an average the IFT results were lower for standard samples and lower than the analytical laboratory results for the unknown samples. Sites were selected to determine whether the PAHs came from the material burned or the fuel used to ignite the burn, or whether they are produced by a high-temperature chemical reaction during the burn. Even though the crude oil and diesel fuel samples did contain measurable quantities of PAHs, there were no significant concentrations of PAHs detected in the ashes and soil at the burning grounds. Tests were made on fresh soil and ashes collected after a large burn and on aged soil and ashes known to have been at the site more than three years. Also analyzed were twelve-year-old samples from an inactive open burn cage.

  18. Mechanisms of photoinduced C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} bond breakage in protonated aromatic amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, B.; Barat, M.; Fayeton, J. A.; Perot, M.; Jouvet, C.; Gregoire, G.; Broendsted Nielsen, S.

    2008-04-28

    Photoexcitation of protonated aromatic amino acids leads to C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} bond breakage among other channels. There are two pathways for the C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} bond breakage, one is a slow process (microseconds) that occurs after hydrogen loss from the electronically excited ion, whereas the other is a fast process (nanoseconds). In this paper, a comparative study of the fragmentation of four molecules shows that the presence of the carboxylic acid group is necessary for this fast fragmentation channel to occur. We suggest a mechanism based on light-induced electron transfer from the aromatic ring to the carboxylic acid, followed by a fast internal proton transfer from the ammonium group to the negatively charged carboxylic acid group. The ion formed is a biradical since the aromatic ring is ionized and the carbon of the COOH group has an unpaired electron. Breakage of the weak C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} bond gives two even-electron fragments and is expected to quickly occur. The present experimental results together with the ab initio calculations support the interpretation previously proposed.

  19. Removal of phenols and aromatic amines from wastewater by a combination treatment with tyrosinase and a coagulant

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Tatsumi, Kenji )

    1995-02-20

    Removal of phenols and aromatic amines from industrial wastewater by tyrosinase was investigated. A color change from colorless to dark brown was observed, but no precipitate was formed. Colored products were found to be easily removed by a combination treatment with tyrosinase and a cationic polymer coagulant containing amino group, such as hexamethylenediamine-epichlorohidrin polycondensate, polyethleneimine, or chitosan. The first two coagulants, synthetic polymers, were more effective than chitosan, a polymer produced in crustacean shells. Phenols and aromatic amines are not precipitated by any kind of coagulants, but their enzymatic reaction products are easily precipitated by a cationic polymer coagulant. These results indicate that the combination of tyrosinase and a cationic polymer coagulant is effective in removing carcinogenic phenols and aromatic amines from an aqueous solution. Immobilization of tyrosinase on magnetite gave a good retention of activity (80%) and storage stability i.e., only 5% loss after 15 days of storage at ambient temperature. In the treatment of immobilized tyrosinase, colored enzymatic reaction products were removed by less coagulant compared with soluble tyrosinase.

  20. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY OIL VISCOSITY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 02 PETROLEUM; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; API GRAVITY; BOILING POINTS; MOLECULAR WEIGHT; OIL SANDS; PETROLEUM; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; STEAM; TESTING; ...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (2) thermal recovery (2) viscosity (2) api gravity (1) ... COMBINED MICROBIAL SURFACTANT-POLYMER SYSTEM FOR IMPROVED ... as cost-effective solutions for declining oil production. ...

  2. API | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    service Smart meter After several months of development and testing, the next generation web service for the utility rate database is finally here I encourage you to check out...

  3. Structurally Distinct Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Induce Differential Transcriptional Responses in Developing Zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Goodale, Britton; Tilton, Susan C.; Corvi, Margaret M.; Wilson, Glenn V.; Janszen, Derek B.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment as components of fossil fuels and by-products of combustion. These multi-ring chemicals differentially activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in a structurally dependent manner, and induce toxicity via both AHR-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PAH exposure is known to induce developmental malformations in zebrafish embryos, and recent studies have shown cardiac toxicity induced by compounds with low AHR affinity. Unraveling the potentially diverse molecular mechanisms of PAH toxicity is essential for understanding the hazard posed by complex PAH mixtures present in the environment. We analyzed transcriptional responses to PAH exposure in zebrafish embryos exposed to benz(a)anthracene (BAA), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and pyrene (PYR) at concentrations that induced developmental malformations by 120 h post-fertilization (hpf). Whole genome microarray analysis of mRNA expression at 24 and 48 hpf identified genes that were differentially regulated over time and in response to the three PAH structures. PAH body burdens were analyzed at both time points using GC-MS, and demonstrated differences in PAH uptake into the embryos. This was important for discerning dose-related differences from those that represented unique molecular mechanisms. While BAA misregulated the least number of transcripts, it caused strong induction of cyp1a and other genes known to be downstream of the AHR, which were not induced by the other two PAHs. Analysis of functional roles of misregulated genes and their predicted regulatory transcription factors also distinguished the BAA response from regulatory networks disrupted by DBT and PYR exposure. These results indicate that systems approaches can be used to classify the toxicity of PAHs based on the networks perturbed following exposure, and may provide a path for unraveling the toxicity of complex PAH mixtures.

  4. Trends in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in the Great Lakes atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Ping Sun; Pierrette Blanchard; Kenneth A. Brice; Ronald A. Hites

    2006-10-15

    Atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) concentrations were measured in both the vapor and particle phases at seven sites near the Great Lakes as a part of the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network. Lower molecular weight PAHs, including fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthrene, and pyrene, were dominant in the vapor phase, and higher molecular weight PAHs, including chrysene, benzo(a)pyrene, and coronene, were dominant in the particle phase. The highest PAH concentrations in both the vapor and particle phases were observed in Chicago followed by the semiurban site at Sturgeon Point, NY. The major sources of PAHs in and around Chicago are vehicle emissions, coal and natural gas combustion, and coke production. The spatial difference of PAH concentrations can be explained by the local population density. Long-term decreasing trends of most PAH concentrations were observed in both the vapor and particle phases at Chicago, with half-lives ranging from 3-10 years in the vapor phase and 5-15 years in the particle phase. At Eagle Harbor, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and Sturgeon Point, total PAH concentrations in the vapor phase showed significant, but slow, long-term decreasing trends. At the Sturgeon Point site, which was impacted by a nearby city, particle-phase PAH concentrations also declined. However, most particle-phase PAH concentrations did not show significant long-term decreasing trends at the remote sites. Seasonal trends were also observed for particle-phase PAH concentrations, which were higher in the winter and lower in the summer. 36 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and mid-infrared continuum emission in a z > 4 submillimeter galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Riechers, Dominik A.; Pope, Alexandra; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Carilli, Christopher L.; Walter, Fabian; Hodge, Jacqueline; Morrison, Glenn E.; Dickinson, Mark; Dannerbauer, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    We report the detection of 6.2 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and rest-frame 4-7 μm continuum emission in the z = 4.055 submillimeter galaxy GN20, using the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. This represents the first detection of PAH emission at z > 4. The strength of the PAH emission feature is consistent with a very high star formation rate of ∼1600 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We find that this intense starburst powers at least ∼1/3 of the faint underlying 6 μm continuum emission, with an additional, significant (and perhaps dominant) contribution due to a power-law-like hot dust source, which we interpret to likely be a faint, dust-obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN). The inferred 6 μm AGN continuum luminosity is consistent with a sensitive upper limit on the hard X-ray emission as measured by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory if the previously undetected AGN is Compton-thick. This is in agreement with the finding at optical/infrared wavelengths that the galaxy and its nucleus are heavily dust-obscured. Despite the strong power-law component enhancing the mid-infrared continuum emission, the intense starburst associated with the photon-dominated regions that give rise to the PAH emission appears to dominate the total energy output in the infrared. GN20 is one of the most luminous starburst galaxies known at any redshift, embedded in a rich protocluster of star-forming galaxies. This investigation provides an improved understanding of the energy sources that power such exceptional systems, which represent the extreme end of massive galaxy formation at early cosmic times.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fresh and smoked fish samples from three Nigerian cities

    SciTech Connect

    Akpan, V.; Lodovici, M.; Dolara, P. )

    1994-08-01

    Nigeria is a major producer of crude oil in sub-Saharan Africa. In-shore and off-shore wells are located in richly watered creeks in the southern part of the country. Although published data on environmental impact assessment of the petroleum industry in Nigeria are lacking, there is a growing concern about the possible contamination of estuarine and coastal waters and of marine species by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs). PAHs are ubiquitous priority pollutants that occur naturally in crude oil, automobile exhaust emissions and smoke condensates from incomplete combustion of carbonaceous materials. PAHs with high molecular weight are less readily biodegraded by indigenous microorganisms in some regions, and given their marked hydrophobic characteristics, may persist in the aqueous environment, thus contaminating the food chain by bioaccumulating in aquatic species like fish and mussels. Major Nigerian oil wells are located in the vicinity of breeding and harvesting sites serving the fresh-water fishing industry. Large hauls of fresh fish are normally consumed cooked in soups or smoke cured in handcrafted traditional ovens using freshly cut red mangrove (Rhizophora racemosa) wood as fuel. Though smoke curing is economical and may ensure longer conservation of fish, it undoubtedly increases the burden of PAHs in finished products as a result of partial charring and from smoke condensates or mangroves that also contain PAHs in measurable quantities as reported by Asita et al. (1991). Apart from PAHs analyzed by Emerole (1980) in smoked food samples from Ibadan using simple analytical methods, those from industrial and other anthropogenic sources have rarely been analyzed in Nigeria. We tried therefore to update the data and address this discrepancy. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in motor vehicle fuels and exhaust emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, L.C.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Harley, R.A.; Hammond, S.K.; Miguel, A.H.; Hering, S.V.

    1999-09-15

    Motor vehicles are a significant source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions. Improved understanding of the relationship between fuel composition and PAH emissions is needed to determine whether fuel reformulation is a viable approach for reducing PAH emissions. PAH concentrations were quantified in gasoline and diesel fuel samples collected in summer 1997 in northern California. Naphthalene was the predominant PAH in both fuels, with concentrations of up to 2,600 mg L{sup {minus}1} in gasoline and 1,600 mg L{sup {minus}1} in diesel fuel. Particle-phase PAH size distributions and exhaust emission factors were measured in two bores of a roadway tunnel. Emission factors were determined separately for light-duty vehicles and for heavy-duty diesel trucks, based on measurements of PAHs, CO, and CO{sub 2}. Particle-phase emission factors, expressed per unit mass of fuel burned, ranged up to 21 {micro}g kg{sup {minus}1} for benzo[ghi]perylene for light-duty vehicles and up to {approximately} 1,000 {micro}g kg{sup {minus}1} for pyrene for heavy-duty diesel vehicles. Light-duty vehicles were found to be a significant source of heavier (four- and five-ring) PAHs, whereas heavy-duty diesel engines were the dominant source of three-ring PAHs, such as fluoranthene and pyrene. While no correlation between heavy-duty diesel truck PAH emission factors and PAH concentrations in diesel fuel was found, light-duty vehicle PAH emission factors were found to be correlated with PAH concentrations in gasoline, suggesting that gasoline reformulation may be effective in reducing PAH emissions from motor vehicles.

  8. Suppression of autophagy enhances the cytotoxicity of the DNA-damaging aromatic amine p-anilinoaniline

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Althea; Reiners, John J.

    2008-10-15

    p-Anilinoaniline (pAA) is an aromatic amine that is widely used in hair dying applications. It is also a metabolite of metanil yellow, an azo dye that is commonly used as a food coloring agent. Concentrations of pAA between 10 and 25 {mu}M were cytostatic to cultures of the normal human mammary epithelia cell line MCF10A. Concentrations {>=} 50 {mu}M were cytotoxic. Cytostatic concentrations induced transient G{sub 1} and S cell cycle phase arrests; whereas cytotoxic concentrations induced protracted arrests. Cytotoxic concentrations of pAA caused DNA damage, as monitored by the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay, and morphological changes consistent with cells undergoing apoptosis and/or autophagy. Enzymatic and western blot analyses, and binding analyses of fluorescent labeled VAD-FMK, suggested that caspase family members were activated by pAA. Western blot analyses documented the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, a post-translational modification involved in the development of the autophagosome. Suppression of autophagosome formation, via knockdown of ATG7 with shRNA, prevented pAA-induced vacuolization, enhanced the activation of pro-caspase-3, and increased susceptibility of ATG7-deficient cells to the cytostatic and cytotoxic activities of markedly lower concentrations of pAA. Cells stably transfected with a nonsense shRNA behaved like parental MCF10A cells. Collectively, these data suggest that MCF10A cultures undergo autophagy as a pro-survival response to concentrations of pAA sufficient to induce DNA damage.

  9. Cosmological bounces in spatially flat FRW spacetimes in metric f(R) gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Niladri; Chakrabarty, Saikat Nil; Bhattacharya, Kaushik E-mail: snilch@iitk.ac.in

    2014-10-01

    The present work analyzes the various conditions in which there can be a bouncing universe solution in f(R) gravity. In the article an interesting method, to analyze the bouncing FRW solutions in a spatially flat universe using f(R) gravity models using an effective Einstein frame description of the process, is presented. The analysis shows that a cosmological bounce in the f(R) theory need not be described by an equivalent bounce in the Einstein frame description of the process where actually there may be no bounce at all. Nevertheless the Einstein frame description of the bouncing phenomena turns out to be immensely important as the dynamics of the bounce becomes amenable to logic based on general relativistic intuition. The theory of scalar cosmological perturbations in the bouncing universe models in f(R) theories has also been worked out in the Einstein frame.

  10. Non-perturbative and self-consistent models of neutron stars in R-squared gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.; Doneva, Daniela D.; Kokkotas, Kostas D.; Staykov, Kalin V. E-mail: daniela.doneva@uni-tuebingen.de E-mail: kalin.v.staikov@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper we investigate non-perturbatively and self-consistently the structure of neutron stars in R-squared gravity by simultaneously solving the interior and exterior problem. The mass-radius relations are obtained for several equations of state and for wide range of the R-squared gravity parameter a. Even though the deviation from general relativity for nonzero values of a can be large, they are still comparable with the variations due to different modern realistic equations of state. That is why the current observations of the neutron star masses and radii alone can not put constraints on the value of the parameter a. We also compare our results with those obtained within the perturbative method and we discuss the differences between them.

  11. On the speed of gravity and the jupiter/quasar measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, Stuart

    2004-08-15

    I present the theory and analysis behind the experiment by Fomalont and Kopeikin involving Jupiter and quasar J0842 + 1845 that purported to measure the speed of gravity. The computation of the v{sub J}/c correction to the gravitational time delay difference relevant to the experiment is derived, where v{sub J} is the speed of Jupiter as measured from Earth. Since the v{sub J}/c corrections are too small to have been measured in the Jupiter/quasar experiment, it is impossible that the speed of gravity was extracted from the data, and I explain what went wrong with the data analysis. Finally, mistakes are shown in papers by Fomalont and Kopeikin intended to rebut my work and the work of others.

  12. Patterns of gravity induced aggregate migration during casting of fluid concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Spangenberg, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark); Roussel, N., E-mail: Nicolas.roussel@lcpc.fr [Universite Paris Est, Laboratoire Central des Ponts et Chaussees (LCPC) (France); Hattel, J.H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark); Sarmiento, E.V.; Zirgulis, G. [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway)] [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway); Geiker, M.R. [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway) [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway); Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark)

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, aggregate migration patterns during fluid concrete castings are studied through experiments, dimensionless approach and numerical modeling. The experimental results obtained on two beams show that gravity induced migration is primarily affecting the coarsest aggregates resulting in a decrease of coarse aggregates volume fraction with the horizontal distance from the pouring point and in a puzzling vertical multi-layer structure. The origin of this multi layer structure is discussed and analyzed with the help of numerical simulations of free surface flow. Our results suggest that it finds its origin in the non Newtonian nature of fresh concrete and that increasing casting rate shall decrease the magnitude of gravity induced particle migration.

  13. Modified gravity a la Galileon: Late time cosmic acceleration and observational constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Amna; Sami, M.; Gannouji, Radouane

    2010-11-15

    In this paper we examine the cosmological consequences of fourth order Galileon gravity. We carry out detailed investigations of the underlying dynamics and demonstrate the stability of one de Sitter phase. The stable de Sitter phase contains a Galileon field {pi} which is an increasing function of time ({pi}>0). Using the required suppression of the fifth force, supernovae, Baryon acoustic oscillations, and CMB data, we constrain parameters of the model. We find that the {pi} matter coupling parameter {beta} is constrained to small numerical values such that {beta}<0.02. We also show that the parameters of the third and fourth order in the action (c{sub 3},c{sub 4}) are not independent and with reasonable assumptions, we obtain constraints on them. We investigate the growth history of the model and find that the subhorizon approximation is not allowed for this model. We demonstrate strong scale dependence of linear perturbations in the fourth order Galileon gravity.

  14. Linear mechanism of surface gravity wave generation in horizontally sheared flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kalashnik, M. V.

    2008-01-15

    An analysis is presented of a linear mechanism of surface gravity wave generation in a horizontally sheared flow in a fluid layer with free boundary. A free-surface flow of this type is found to be algebraically unstable. The development of instability leads to the formation of surface gravity waves whose amplitude grows with time according to a power law. Flow stability is analyzed by using a nonmodal approach in which the behavior of a spatial Fourier harmonic of a disturbance is considered in a semi-Lagrangian frame of reference moving with the flow. Shear-flow disturbances are divided into two classes (wave and vortex disturbances) depending on the value of potential vorticity. It is shown that vortex disturbances decay with time while the energy of wave disturbances increases indefinitely. Transformation of vortex disturbances into wave ones under strong shear is described.

  15. The response of plasma density to breaking inertial gravity wave in the lower regions of ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wenbo Mahalov, Alex

    2014-04-15

    We present a three-dimensional numerical study for the E and lower F region ionosphere coupled with the neutral atmosphere dynamics. This model is developed based on a previous ionospheric model that examines the transport patterns of plasma density given a prescribed neutral atmospheric flow. Inclusion of neutral dynamics in the model allows us to examine the charge-neutral interactions over the full evolution cycle of an inertial gravity wave when the background flow spins up from rest, saturates and eventually breaks. Using Lagrangian analyses, we show the mixing patterns of the ionospheric responses and the formation of ionospheric layers. The corresponding plasma density in this flow develops complex wave structures and small-scale patches during the gravity wave breaking event.

  16. The Role of Gravity Waves in the Formation and Organization of Clouds during TWPICE

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, Michael J.; Lane, Todd P.; Hankinson, Mai Chi Nguyen

    2013-09-27

    All convective clouds emit gravity waves. While it is certain that convectively-generated waves play important parts in determining the climate, their precise roles remain uncertain and their effects are not (generally) represented in climate models. The work described here focuses mostly on observations and modeling of convectively-generated gravity waves, using the intensive observations from the DoE-sponsored Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which took place in Darwin, from 17 January to 13 February 2006. Among other things, the research has implications the part played by convectively-generated gravity waves in the formation of cirrus, in the initiation and organization of further convection, and in the subgrid-scale momentum transport and associated large-scale stresses imposed on the troposphere and stratosphere. The analysis shows two groups of inertia-gravity waves are detected: group L in the middle stratosphere during the suppressed monsoon period, and group S in the lower stratosphere during the monsoon break period. Waves belonging to group L propagate to the south-east with a mean intrinsic period of 35 h, and have vertical and horizontal wavelengths of about 5-6 km and 3000-6000 km, respectively. Ray tracing calculations indicate that these waves originate from a deep convective region near Indonesia. Waves belonging to group S propagate to the south-south-east with an intrinsic period, vertical wavelength and horizontal wavelength of about 45 h, 2 km and 2000-4000 km, respectively. These waves are shown to be associated with shallow convection in the oceanic area within about 1000 km of Darwin. The intrinsic periods of high-frequency waves are estimated to be between 20-40 minutes. The high-frequency wave activity in the stratosphere, defined by mass-weighted variance of the vertical motion of the sonde, has a maximum following the afternoon local convection indicating that these waves are generated by local convection

  17. EinsteinCartan gravity, Asymptotic Safety, and the running Immirzi parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Daum, J.-E.; Reuter, M.

    2013-07-15

    In this paper we analyze the functional renormalization group flow of quantum gravity on the EinsteinCartan theory space. The latter consists of all action functionals depending on the spin connection and the vielbein field (co-frame) which are invariant under both spacetime diffeomorphisms and local frame rotations. In the first part of the paper we develop a general methodology and corresponding calculational tools which can be used to analyze the flow equation for the pertinent effective average action for any truncation of this theory space. In the second part we apply it to a specific three-dimensional truncated theory space which is parametrized by Newtons constant, the cosmological constant, and the Immirzi parameter. A comprehensive analysis of their scale dependences is performed, and the possibility of defining an asymptotically safe theory on this hitherto unexplored theory space is investigated. In principle Asymptotic Safety of metric gravity (at least at the level of the effective average action) is neither necessary nor sufficient for Asymptotic Safety on the EinsteinCartan theory space which might accommodate different universality classes of microscopic quantum gravity theories. Nevertheless, we do find evidence for the existence of at least one non-Gaussian renormalization group fixed point which seems suitable for the Asymptotic Safety construction in a setting where the spin connection and the vielbein are the fundamental field variables. -- Highlights: A functional RG equation for a first order formulation of gravity is constructed. The theory space constituted by tetrad and spin connection variables is explored. The RG equation is solved in a 3 dimensional truncation of theory space. The flow of Newtons constant, the cosmological constant and the Immirzi parameter is analyzed. Evidence for the nonperturbative renormalizability of the theory is found.

  18. Astrophysical tests of modified gravity: Constraints from distance indicators in the nearby universe

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Bhuvnesh; Vikram, Vinu; Sakstein, Jeremy

    2013-12-10

    We use distance measurements in the nearby universe to carry out new tests of gravity, surpassing other astrophysical tests by over two orders of magnitude for chameleon theories. The three nearby distance indicatorscepheids, tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) stars, and water masersoperate in gravitational fields of widely different strengths. This enables tests of scalar-tensor gravity theories because they are screened from enhanced forces to different extents. Inferred distances from cepheids and TRGB stars are altered (in opposite directions) over a range of chameleon gravity theory parameters well below the sensitivity of cosmological probes. Using published data, we have compared cepheid and TRGB distances in a sample of unscreened dwarf galaxies within 10 Mpc. We use a comparable set of screened galaxies as a control sample. We find no evidence for the order unity force enhancements expected in these theories. Using a two-parameter description of the models (the coupling strength and background field value), we obtain constraints on both the chameleon and symmetron screening scenarios. In particular we show that f(R) models with background field values f {sub R0} above 5 10{sup 7} are ruled out at the 95% confidence level. We also compare TRGB and maser distances to the galaxy NGC 4258 as a second test for larger field values. While there are several approximations and caveats in our study, our analysis demonstrates the power of gravity tests in the local universe. We discuss the prospects for additional improved tests with future observations.

  19. Constraints on Covariant Horava-Lifshitz Gravity from frame-dragging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Radicella, Ninfa; Lambiase, Gaetano; Parisi, Luca; Vilasi, Gaetano E-mail: lambiase@sa.infn.it E-mail: vilasi@sa.infn.it

    2014-12-01

    The effects of Horava-Lifshitz corrections to the gravito-magnetic field are analyzed. Solutions in the weak field, slow motion limit, referring to the motion of a satellite around the Earth are considered. The post-newtonian paradigm is used to evaluate constraints on the Horava-Lifshitz parameter space from current satellite and terrestrial experiments data. In particular, we focus on GRAVITY PROBE B, LAGEOS and the more recent LARES mission, as well as a forthcoming terrestrial project, GINGER.

  20. The coupling to matter in massive, bi- and multi-gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Noller, Johannes; Melville, Scott E-mail: scott.melville@queens.ox.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we construct a family of ways in which matter can couple to one or more 'metrics'/spin-2 fields in the vielbein formulation. We do so subject to requiring the weak equivalence principle and the absence of ghosts from pure spin-2 interactions generated by the matter action. Results are presented for Massive, Bi- and Multi-Gravity theories and we give explicit expressions for the effective matter metric in all of these cases.