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Sample records for annual coal pro

  1. Annual Coal Distribution Report

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: April 16, 2015 | Next Release Date: March 2016 | full report | RevisionCorrection Revision to the Annual Coal Distribution Report ...

  2. "Annual Coal Report

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Annual Coal Report Data Released: January 20, 2015 Data for: 2013 Re-Release Date: April 23, 2015 (CORRECTION) Annual Coal Report 2013 CorrectionUpdate April 23, 2015 The Annual ...

  3. Coal industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  4. Annual Coal Distribution

    Reports and Publications

    2015-01-01

    The Annual Coal Distribution Report (ACDR) provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing state. All data for the report year are final and this report supersedes all data in the quarterly distribution reports.

  5. Coal industry annual 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-06

    Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

  6. Coal industry annual 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, distribution, coal stocks, quality, prices, coal production information, and emissions for a wide audience.

  7. Coal Industry Annual 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

  8. Coal industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  9. Annual Coal Distribution Tables

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2001 (Thousand Short Tons) DESTINATION: Alabama State of Origin by...

  10. Annual Coal Distribution Tables

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2001 State Region Domestic Foreign Total Alabama 14,828 4,508 19,336 Alaska 825 698 1,524 Arizona 13,143 - 13,143...

  11. Annual Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    current Coal Distribution Report Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: April 8, 2016 | Next Release Date: December 2016 | full report Archive Domestic coal distribution by origin State, destination State, consumer category, method of transportation; foreign coal distribution by major coal-exporting state and method of transportation; and domestic and foreign coal distribution by origin state. Year Domestic and foreign distribution of U.S. coal by State of origin Foreign distribution of

  12. Annual Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Distribution Report Release Date: November 14, 2016 | Next Release Date: November 2017 | full report The Annual Coal Distribution Report (ACDR) provides detailed information on U.S. domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing state. All data for 2015 are final and this report supersedes the 2015 quarterly coal distribution reports. Highlights for 2015:

  13. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...... 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal ... and Preparation Report." 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal ...

  14. Annual Coal Report - Energy Information Administration

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Report Release Date: November 3, 2016 | Next Release Date: October 26, 2017 | full report Previous Reports (pdf) Data year: 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 see all Go The Annual Coal Report (ACR) provides annual data on U.S. coal production, number of mines, productive capacity, recoverable reserves, employment, productivity, consumption, stocks, and prices. All data for 2015 and prior years are final. Highlights for 2015: In 2015, U.S. coal production dropped

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Form EIA-7A, "Coal Production and Preparation Report." 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2013 Alaska ...

  16. "Table 2. Real Average Annual Coal Transportation Costs, By Primary...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Real Average Annual Coal Transportation Costs, By Primary Transport Mode and Supply Region" "(2013 dollars per ton)" "Coal Supply Region",2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "Railroad"...

  17. DOE Announces Winners of Annual University Coal Research Grants |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Annual University Coal Research Grants DOE Announces Winners of Annual University Coal Research Grants July 7, 2005 - 2:06pm Addthis Funding to Support Continued Research in Clean Coal Technology MORGANTOWN, WV -- Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman today announced $3 million in funding under the University Coal Research Program (UCR), the department's longest-running student-teacher research grant initiative. Secretary Bodman made the announcement while visiting West

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2014

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Origin State _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2014 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2014 Alabama _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 2014

  19. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Destination State ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2015 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Destination

  20. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Origin State _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2015 Alabama _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic Coal Distribution, by Origin State, 2015

  1. 1983 annual outlook for US coal

    SciTech Connect

    Paull, M.K.

    1983-11-01

    This report highlights projections and discusses them in relation to coal's future domestic uses; the report also examines factors affecting coal's future growth. Coal was the primary source of energy in the United States from the mid-1800's until after World War II. After that war, coal lost most of its markets to oil and natural gas. In the 1960's, coal development was also hampered by environmental and mine safety concerns, and by the emergence of nuclear power. The 1973-74 oil embargo, however, demonstrated that the United States could no longer depend on imported oil to fuel its energy growth. Through 1990, coal is projected to meet an increasing share of total US energy demand. The projections for the 1985 to 1990 time period show an increased growth in coal consumption, particularly in the electric utility sector where new coal-fired power plants are coming on line. The projected growth in coal production, however, is subject to a series of potential constraints and/or obstacles that must be overcome. These potential constraints and obstacles are described after the history of coal supply and demand is reviewed and future projections are discussed.

  2. Second annual clean coal technology conference: Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-09

    The Second Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference was held at Atlanta, Georgia, September 7--9, 1993. The Conference, cosponsored by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) and the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB), seeks to examine the status and role of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) and its projects. The Program is reviewed within the larger context of environmental needs, sustained economic growth, world markets, user performance requirements and supplier commercialization activities. This will be accomplished through in-depth review and discussion of factors affecting domestic and international markets for clean coal technology, the environmental considerations in commercial deployment, the current status of projects, and the timing and effectiveness of transfer of data from these projects to potential users, suppliers, financing entities, regulators, the interested environmental community and the public. Individual papers have been entered separately.

  3. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2015 and 2014 (dollars per short ton) 2015 2014 Annual Percent Change Census Division and State Electric Power 1 Other Industrial Coke Commercial and Institutional Electric Power 1 Other Industrial Coke Commercial and Institutional Electric Power 1 Other Industrial Coke Commercial and Institutional New England 79.72 w - - 80.10 w - - s -4.37 - - Connecticut w - - - w - - - 2.72 - - - Maine w w - - w w - - -7.01

  4. The estimation of the number of underground coal miners and the annual dose to coal miners in China

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F.D.; Pan, Z.Q.; Liu, S.L.; Chen, L.; Ma, J.Z.; Yang, M.L.; Wang, N.P.

    2007-08-15

    This paper introduces an estimation method for the number of underground coal miners and the annual dose to coal miners in China. It shows that there are about 6 million underground miners at present and the proportion is about 1, 1 and 4 million for national key coal mines, state-owned local coal mines, and township and private-ownership coal mines, respectively. The collective dose is about 1.65 X 10{sup 4} person-Sv y{sup -1}, of which township and private-ownership coal mines contribute about 91%. This paper also points out that the 2000 UNSCEAR report gives the number of miners of coal production and their collective dose, which are underestimated greatly because the report only includes the number of underground miners in national key coal mines, which only accounts for 1/6 of the workers all working under the best ventilation conditions in China.

  5. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    and Institutional: Form EIA-3, "Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report, Manufacturing and TransformationProcessing Coal Plants and Commercial and Institutional Coal...

  6. EIA - Coal Distribution

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Annual Coal Distribution Report > Annual Coal Distribution Archives Annual Coal Distribution Archive Release Date: February 17, 2011 Next Release Date: December 2011 Domestic coal ...

  7. Proceedings, twenty-fourth annual international Pittsburgh coal conference

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-01

    Topics covered include: gasification technologies; coal production and preparation; combustion technologies; environmental control technologies; synthesis of liquid fuels, chemicals, materials and other non-fuel uses of coal; hydrogen from coal; advanced synthesis gas cleanup; coal chemistry, geosciences and resources; Fischer-Tropsch technology; coal and sustainability; global climate change; gasification (including underground gasification); materials, instrumentation and controls; and coal utilisation byproducts.

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2015 (million short tons) Continuous 1 Conventional and Other 2 Longwall 3 Total Coal-Producing State Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average

  9. Eleventh annual international Pittsburgh coal conference proceedings: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, S.H.

    1994-12-31

    The conference presented over 300 papers in 39 separate sessions. These presentations are grouped into five topical areas: the technologies in pre- and post-utilization of coal; research and development in coal conversion; advanced coal combustion; environmental control technologies, and environmental policy issues related to coal use. The program has expanded its coverage in non-fuel use of coal. This is reflected in the three sessions on use of coal in the steel industry, and a sessions on carbon products and non-fuel coal applications. Volume 2 includes the following topics: Environmental systems and technologies/Environmental policy; Coal drying, dewatering and reconstitution; Coal cleaning technology; Slurry bed technology; Coal syngas, methanol, DME, olefins and oxygenates; Environmental issues in energy conversion technology; Applied coal geology; Use of coal in the steel industry; Recent developments in coal preparation; International coal gasification projects; Progress on Clean Coal projects; Retrofit air quality control technologies;Fluidized bed combustion; Commercialization of coal preparation technologies; Integrated gasification combined cycle program; the US Department of Energy`s Combustion 2000 program; and Environmental issues in coal utilization. All papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5. Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve Base by Mining Method, 2015 (million short tons) Underground - Minable Coal Surface - Minable Coal Total Coal-Resource State Recoverable Reserves at Producing Mines Estimated Recoverable Reserves Demonstrated Reserve Base Recoverable Reserves at Producing Mines Estimated Recoverable Reserves Demonstrated Reserve Base Recoverable Reserves at Producing Mines Estimated Recoverable Reserves

  11. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...... 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual ... Production and Preparation Report." 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual ...

  12. Annual Energy Outlook 2016 2nd Coal Working Group

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 nd Coal Working Group Coal and Uranium Analysis Team February 9, 2016| Washington, D.C. WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES. DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS AEO2016 MODELING ASSUMPTIONS AND INPUTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. Key results for the AEO2016 Reference case 2 * Coal-fired generation, production, and capacity are all lower in the preliminary AEO2016 Reference case - Coal's share of total electricity generation falls from 38% in 2014 to 18% by 2040, compared to 33% in AEO2015 - Coal

  13. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Mines by State, 2015 and 2014 (million short tons) 2015 2014 Coal-Producing State Recoverable Coal Reserves Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves Average Recovery Percentage Percent Change Recoverable Coal Reserves Alabama 228 49.57 228 46.00 -0.2 Alaska 51 85.00 53 85.00 -2.2 Arizona 209 90.00 216 90.00 -3.2 Arkansas 25 60.00 25 60.00 s Colorado 298 77.52 333 76.35 -10.6 Illinois 2,435 54.85 2,463 59.16

  14. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9. Major U.S. Coal Mines, 2015 Rank Mine Name / Operating Company Mine Type State Production (short tons) 1 North Antelope Rochelle Mine / Peabody Powder River Mining LLC Surface Wyoming 109,343,913 2 Black Thunder / Thunder Basin Coal Company LLC Surface Wyoming 99,450,689 3 Antelope Coal Mine / Antelope Coal LLC Surface Wyoming 35,181,059 4 Cordero Rojo Mine / Cordero Mining LLC Surface Wyoming 22,871,976 5 Eagle Butte Mine / Alpha Coal West, Inc. Surface Wyoming 19,649,723 6 Belle Ayr Mine /

  15. Annual Energy Outlook 2017 1st Coal Working Group

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 st Coal Working Group Coal and Uranium Analysis Team August 31, 2016| Washington, D.C. WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES. DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS AEO2017 MODELING ASSUMPTIONS AND INPUTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. Agenda Coal and Uranium Analysis Team August 31, 2016 | Washington, D.C. 2 * EIA ongoing activities * Modeling focus for AEO2017 * Review of AEO2016 results * General Modeling Assumptions - Focus on productivity and other factors affecting price - Feedback from CWG

  16. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 6,085 670...

  17. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 6,982 679...

  18. Annual Energy Outlook 2016 2nd Coal Working Group

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... Coal Uranium and Analysis Team Washington, DC, February 9, 2016 * We have limited the scope of the update to technologies we think may have changed substantially and technologies ...

  19. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total...

  20. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total...

  1. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing U.S. Mines by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2015 (million short tons) Underground Surface Total Mine Production Range (thousand short tons) Recoverable Coal Reserves Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves Average Recovery Percentage Over 1,000 6,034 62.49 10,074 91.21 16,108 80.45 Over 500 to 1,000 400 49.35 82 83.76 483 55.22 Over 200 to 500 339

  2. Sixth annual coal preparation, utilization, and environmental control contractors conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    A conference was held on coal preparation, utilization and environmental control. Topics included: combustion of fuel slurries; combustor performance; desulfurization chemically and by biodegradation; coal cleaning; pollution control of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides; particulate control; and flue gas desulfurization. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases. (CBS).

  3. 5. annual clean coal technology conference: powering the next millennium. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Fifth Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference focuses on presenting strategies and approaches that will enable clean coal technologies to resolve the competing, interrelated demands for power, economic viability, and environmental constraints associated with the use of coal in the post-2000 era. The program addresses the dynamic changes that will result from utility competition and industry restructuring, and to the evolution of markets abroad. Current projections for electricity highlight the preferential role that electric power will have in accomplishing the long-range goals of most nations. Increase demands can be met by utilizing coal in technologies that achieve environmental goals while keeping the cost- per-unit of energy competitive. Results from projects in the DOE Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program confirm that technology is the pathway to achieving these goals. The industry/government partnership, cemented over the past 10 years, is focused on moving the clean coal technologies into the domestic and international marketplaces. The Fifth Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference provides a forum to discuss these benchmark issues and the essential role and need for these technologies in the post-2000 era. This volume contains technical papers on: advanced coal process systems; advanced industrial systems; advanced cleanup systems; and advanced power generation systems. In addition, there are poster session abstracts. Selected papers from this proceedings have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  4. By Coal Origin State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Alabama ...

  5. State of Illinois 1982 annual coal, oil and gas report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This data compilation contains statistics from the coal industry and petroleum industry of Illinois. Data are given on the production, accidents, explosives, and mechanization of coal mines. Metal mines are only briefly described. The report from the Division of Oil and Gas contains data on oil well completions, oil wells plugged, water input wells, and salt water and waste disposal wells. The results of hearings in the division are included. The Land Reclamation Division reports data on permits and acreage affected by surface mining of coal, limestone, shale, clay, sand, and gravel. 2 figures, 76 tables.

  6. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2015 (dollars per short ton) Coal-Producing State Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Anthracite Total Alabama 84.05 - - - 84.05 Alaska - w - - w Arizona w - - - w Arkansas w - - - w Colorado w w - - 36.12 Illinois 40.77 - - - 40.77 Indiana 46.12 - - - 46.12 Kansas w - - - w Kentucky Total 55.01 - - - 55.01 Kentucky (East) 60.84 - - - 60.84 Kentucky (West) 50.10 - - - 50.10 Louisiana - - w - w Maryland 53.01 - - - 53.01 Mississippi - - w - w

  7. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6. Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Coal Rank, 2015 (thousand short tons) Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Anthracite Total Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Number of Mines Production Number of Mines Production Number of Mines Production Number of Mines Production Number of Mines Production Alabama 37 13,191 - - - - - - 37 13,191 Alaska - - 1 1,177 - - - - 1 1,177 Arizona 1 6,805 - - - - - - 1 6,805 Arkansas 2 91 - - - - - - 2 91 Colorado 7 14,438 2 4,441 - - - - 9 18,879

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2015 (thousand short tons) Continuous 1 Conventional and Other 2 Longwall 3 Total Coal-Producing State Productive Capacity Capacity Utilization Percent Productive Capacity Capacity Utilization Percent Productive Capacity Capacity Utilization Percent Productive Capacity Capacity Utilization Percent Alabama 509 82.44 - - 10,447 90.73 10,955 90.34 Arkansas 275 33.19 - - - - 275 33.19 Colorado 1,000

  9. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0. Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2015 Rank Controlling Company Name Production (thousand short tons) Percent of Total Production 1 Peabody Energy Corp 175,908 19.6 2 Arch Coal Inc 130,654 14.6 3 Cloud Peak Energy 75,040 8.4 4 Alpha Natural Resources 70,398 7.8 5 Murray Energy Corp 55,524 6.2 6 Alliance Resource Partners LP 44,716 5.0 7 Westmoreland Coal Company 36,628 4.1 8 NACCO Industries Inc 30,593 3.4 9 CONSOL Energy Inc 24,929 2.8 10 Energy Future Holdings Corporation 23,344 2.6 11 Coalfield

  10. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems, Volume 1: Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This is the first annual technical progress report for The Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems Program. Two semi-annual technical progress reports were previously issued. This program was initially by the Department of Energy as an R D effort to establish the technology base for the commercial application of direct coal-fired gas turbines. The combustion system under consideration incorporates a modular three-stage slagging combustor concept. Fuel-rich conditions inhibit NO/sub x/ formation from fuel nitrogen in the first stage; coal ash and sulfur is subsequently removed from the combustion gases by an impact separator in the second stage. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage. 27 figs., 15 tabs.

  11. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2015 (dollars per short ton) Coal-Producing State Continuous 1 Conventional and Other 2 Longwall 3 Total Alabama 87.26 - 84.48 84.59 Arkansas w - - w Colorado w - w 34.32 Illinois 35.73 w 42.92 w Indiana 49.05 - - 49.05 Kentucky Total w w - 55.29 Kentucky (East) w w - 63.44 Kentucky (West) 51.15 - - 51.15 Maryland w - - w Montana - - w w New Mexico - - w w Ohio w - w 47.47 Oklahoma w - - w Pennsylvania Total 61.92 - 55.03

  12. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2015 and 2014 (thousand short tons) 2015 2014 Percent Change Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Number of Mines Production Number of Mines Production Number of Mines Production Alabama 37 13,191 36 16,363 2.8 -19.4 Underground 8 9,897 7 12,516 14.3 -20.9 Surface 29 3,294 29 3,847 - -14.4 Alaska 1 1,177 1 1,502 - -21.6 Surface 1 1,177 1 1,502 - -21.6 Arizona 1 6,805 1 8,051 - -15.5 Surface 1 6,805 1 8,051 - -15.5 Arkansas 2 91 2 94 -

  13. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. Productive Capacity of Coal Mines by State, 2015 and 2014 (thousand short tons) 2015 2014 Percent Change Coal-Producing State Underground Surface Total Underground Surface Total Underground Surface Total Alabama 10,955 4,664 15,620 13,915 5,530 19,445 -21.3 -15.7 -19.7 Alaska - 3,000 3,000 - 3,000 3,000 - - - Arizona - 8,500 8,500 - 8,500 8,500 - - - Arkansas 275 - 275 240 - 240 14.6 - 14.6 Colorado 20,622 6,218 26,841 23,200 6,642 29,842 -11.1 -6.4 -10.1 Illinois 69,975 7,390 77,365 68,336

  14. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Capacity Utilization of Coal Mines by State, 2015 and 2014 (percent) 2015 2014 Coal-Producing State Underground Surface Total Underground Surface Total Alabama 90.34 69.67 84.17 89.95 68.96 83.98 Alaska - 39.25 39.25 - 50.06 50.06 Arizona - 80.05 80.05 - 94.71 94.71 Arkansas 33.19 - 33.19 36.25 - 36.25 Colorado 63.72 92.27 70.34 78.07 88.60 80.42 Illinois 74.27 55.83 72.51 77.14 65.64 75.93 Indiana 72.83 77.45 75.28 85.68 74.83 79.47 Kansas - 95.31 95.31 - 76.77 76.77 Kentucky Total 81.28

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Coal Production and Number of Mines by State, County, and Mine Type, 2015 (thousand short tons) Underground Surface Total Coal-Producing State and County Number of Mines Production Number of Mines Production Number of Mines Production Alabama 8 9,897 29 3,294 37 13,191 Bibb - - 1 63 1 63 Franklin - - 2 147 2 147 Jackson - - 1 4 1 4 Jefferson 4 5,214 7 1,356 11 6,570 Shelby 1 138 1 138 2 277 Tuscaloosa 1 2,417 4 102 5 2,519 Walker 2 2,128 11 1,192 13 3,320 Winston - - 2 292 2 292 Alaska - - 1

  16. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. Coal Productivity by State and Mine Type, 2015 and 2014 Number of Mining Operations 2 Number of Employees 3 Average Production per Employee Hour (short tons) 4 Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type 2015 2014 Percent Change 2015 2014 Percent Change 2015 2014 Percent Change Alabama 45 46 -2.2 3,212 3,694 -13.0 1.69 1.88 -10.0 Underground 13 13 - 2,464 2,852 -13.6 1.63 1.84 -11.6 Surface 32 33 -3.0 748 842 -11.2 1.92 2.02 -5.0 Alaska 1 1 - 113 120 -5.8 4.62 5.43 -15.0 Surface 1 1 - 113

  17. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2015 (short tons produced per employee hour) Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type Continuous 2 Conventional and Other 3 Longwall 4 Total Alabama 0.67 - 1.74 1.63 Arkansas 0.56 - - 0.56 Colorado 3.18 - 5.44 5.21 Illinois 4.49 7.95 7.83 6.24 Indiana 3.70 - - 3.70 Kentucky Total 2.78 1.91 - 2.77 Kentucky (East) 1.83 1.91 - 1.83 Kentucky (West) 3.75 - - 3.75 Maryland 1.83 - - 1.83 Montana - - 9.49 9.49 New Mexico - - 6.83

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2015 (short tons produced per employee hour) Mine Production Range (thousand short tons) Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type Above 1,000 Above 500 to 1,000 Above 200 to 500 Above 100 to 200 Above 50 to 100 Above 10 to 50 10 or Under Total 2 Alabama 1.79 - 2.10 1.42 1.56 1.21 1.11 1.69 Underground 1.79 - - 0.75 0.80 1.06 - 1.63 Surface - - 2.10 1.93 1.83 1.31 1.11 1.92 Alaska 4.62 - - - - - - 4.62 Surface 4.62 -

  19. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2015 (short tons produced per employee hour) Union Nonunion Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Underground Surface Underground Surface Alabama 1.75 2.52 0.64 1.90 Alaska - 4.62 - - Arizona - 6.97 - - Arkansas - - 0.56 - Colorado 5.72 5.71 5.12 7.18 Illinois - - 6.24 4.69 Indiana - - 3.72 5.21 Kansas - - - 12.26 Kentucky Total - - 2.78 3.52 Kentucky (East) - - 1.84 3.11 Kentucky (West) - - 3.76 5.65 Louisiana - - - 5.23 Maryland -

  20. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2015 (thousand short tons) Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Continuous 2 Conventional and Other 3 Longwall 4 Total Alabama 419 - 9,478 9,897 Arkansas 91 - - 91 Colorado 815 - 12,327 13,141 Illinois 17,819 2,011 32,143 51,973 Indiana 15,589 19 - 15,608 Kentucky Total 43,216 162 - 43,378 Kentucky (East) 14,436 162 - 14,598 Kentucky (West) 28,780 - - 28,780 Maryland 599 - - 599 Montana - - 6,420 6,420 New Mexico - - 6,518 6,518 Ohio 2,209 7

  1. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0. Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2015 Coal-Producing State and County Number of Mines Sales (thousand short tons) Average Sales Price (dollars per short ton) Alabama 31 13,660 84.05 Bibb 1 w w Franklin 2 w w Jefferson 11 7,143 80.69 Shelby 2 w w Tuscaloosa 3 w w Walker 10 3,131 89.25 Winston 2 w w Alaska 1 w w Denali 1 w w Arizona 1 w w Navajo 1 w w Arkansas 1 w w Sebastian 1 w w Colorado 9 19,254 36.12 Delta 1 w w Gunnison 1 w w La Plata 1 w w Moffat 2 w w

  2. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Average Sales Price of U.S. Coal by State and Disposition, 2015 (dollars per short ton) Coal-Producing State Open Market 1 Captive 2 Total 3 Alabama w w 84.05 Alaska w - w Arizona w - w Arkansas w - w Colorado 31.28 43.30 36.12 Illinois w w 40.77 Indiana 47.08 44.56 46.12 Kansas w - w Kentucky Total 54.61 58.41 55.01 Kentucky (East) 60.56 58.41 60.84 Kentucky (West) 50.10 - 50.10 Louisiana w - w Maryland 48.34 - 53.01 Mississippi w w w Missouri w - w Montana w w 17.44 New Mexico w w w North

  3. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2015 (thousand short tons) Coal Thickness (inches) Underground Surface Total Under 7 - 818 818 7 - Under 13 - 1,848 1,848 13 - Under 19 388 4,884 5,272 19 - Under 25 98 8,632 8,730 25 - Under 31 2,110 9,864 11,974 31 - Under 37 11,441 11,016 22,457 37 - Under 43 14,266 11,633 25,898 43 - Under 49 18,079 13,435 31,514 49 - Under 55 12,961 10,484 23,446 55 - Under 61 38,629 5,891 44,520 61 - Under 67 20,596 14,054 34,649 67 - Under 73 36,735

  4. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7. Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2015 (thousand short tons) Union Nonunion Total Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Underground Surface Underground Surface Underground Surface Alabama 9,478 251 419 2,982 9,897 3,233 Alaska - 1,177 - - - 1,177 Arizona - 6,805 - - - 6,805 Arkansas - - 91 - 91 - Colorado 2,106 2,357 11,035 3,380 13,141 5,738 Illinois - - 51,973 4,103 51,973 4,103 Indiana - - 15,586 18,688 15,586 18,688 Kansas - - - 199 - 199 Kentucky Total - - 43,269 17,557

  5. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8. Coal Disposition by State, 2015 (thousand short tons) Coal-Producing State Open Market Sales 1 Captive Sales / Transactions 2 Exports 3 Total Alabama 5,102 3 8,555 13,660 Alaska 1,013 - 149 1,162 Arizona 6,574 - - 6,574 Arkansas 193 - - 193 Colorado 8,590 9,023 1,641 19,254 Illinois 36,491 10,792 9,757 57,040 Indiana 21,548 13,175 20 34,744 Kansas 199 - - 199 Kentucky Total 56,928 218 2,545 59,691 Kentucky (East) 24,540 218 2,545 27,304 Kentucky (West) 32,388 - - 32,388 Louisiana 3,647 - -

  6. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9. Average Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2015 Mine Production Range (thousand short tons) Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type Above 1,000 Above 500 to 1,000 Above 200 to 500 Above 100 to 200 Above 50 to 100 Above 10 to 50 Above 0 to 10 Zero 2 Total Number of Employees Alabama 2,157 - 326 329 193 72 18 117 3,212 Underground 2,157 - - 135 47 21 - 104 2,464 Surface - - 326 194 146 51 18 13 748 Alaska 113 - - - - - - - 113 Surface

  7. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0. Average Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Union Status, 2015 Union Nonunion Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Underground Surface Underground Surface Alabama 2,209 56 255 658 Alaska - 113 - - Arizona - 403 - - Arkansas - - 73 - Colorado 170 209 1,031 232 Illinois - - 3,746 398 Indiana - - 1,783 1,493 Kansas - - - 7 Kentucky Total 21 12 6,765 2,409 Kentucky (East) 11 12 3,653 2,032 Kentucky (West) 10 - 3,112 377 Louisiana - - - 307 Maryland - - 165 178

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5. Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2015 Company Name Plant Location Top Ten Manufacturers American Crystal Sugar Co MN, ND Archer Daniels Midland IA, IL, MN, NE Carmeuse Lime Stone Inc AL, IN, KY, MI, OH, PA, TN, WI Cemex Inc AL, CA, CO, FL, GA, KY, OH, TN, TX Dakota Gasification Company ND Eastman Chemical Company TN Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LP AL, GA, OK, WI Holcim (US) Inc AL, CO, MD, MO, MT, OK, SC, TX, UT Mittal Steel USA IN NewPage Corporation MD, MI, WI

  9. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6. U.S. Coal Consumption by End Use Sector, Census Division, and State, 2015 and 2014 (thousand short tons) 2015 2014 Total Census Division and State Electric Power 1 Other Industrial Coke Commercial and Institutional Electric Power 1 Other Industrial Coke Commercial and Institutional 2015 2014 Percent Change New England 1,844 75 - - 2,340 90 - - 1,918 2,430 -21.0 Connecticut 359 - - - 499 - - - 359 499 -28.2 Maine 74 30 - - 53 33 - - 104 85 21.4 Massachusetts 1,005 45 - - 1,244 57 - - 1,050

  10. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7. Year-End Coal Stocks by Sector, Census Division, and State, 2015 and 2014 (thousand short tons) 2015 2014 Total Census Division and State Electric Power 1 Other Industrial Coke Commercial and Institutional Producer and Distributor Electric Power 1 Other Industrial Coke Commercial and Institutional Producer and Distributor 2015 2014 Percent Change New England 1,758 6 - - 243 1,611 9 - - 281 2,006 1,900 5.6 Connecticut w - - - - w - - - - w w 191.4 Maine s 1 - - - s 1 - - - 1 1 18.6

  11. Proceedings of the ninth annual underground coal gasification symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Wieber, P.R.; Martin, J.W.; Byrer, C.W.

    1983-12-01

    The Ninth Underground Coal Gasification Symposium was held August 7 to 10, 1983 at the Indian Lakes Resort and Conference Center in Bloomingdale, Illinois. Over one-hundred attendees from industry, academia, National Laboratories, State Government, and the US Government participated in the exchange of ideas, results and future research plans. Representatives from six countries including France, Belgium, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, West Germany, and Brazil also participated by presenting papers. Fifty papers were presented and discussed in four formal sessions and two informal poster sessions. The presentations described current and future field testing plans, interpretation of field test data, environmental research, laboratory studies, modeling, and economics. All papers were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  12. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8. Average Number of Employees by State and Mine Type, 2015 and 2014 2015 2014 Percent Change Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Underground Surface Total Underground Surface Total Underground Surface Total Alabama 2,464 748 3,212 2,852 842 3,694 -13.6 -11.2 -13.0 Alaska - 113 113 - 120 120 - -5.8 -5.8 Arizona - 403 403 - 387 387 - 4.1 4.1 Arkansas 73 2 75 82 2 84 -11.0 - -10.7 Colorado 1,201 441 1,642 1,372 450 1,822 -12.5 -2.0 -9.9 Illinois 3,746 400 4,146 3,772 446 4,218 -0.7 -10.3 -1.7

  13. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Average Sales Price of Coal by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2015 (dollars per short ton) Mine Production Range (thousand short tons) Underground Surface Total Over 1,000 49.42 17.99 27.96 Over 500 to 1,000 62.01 53.33 57.87 Over 200 to 500 67.69 56.16 62.35 Over 100 to 200 71.12 58.03 63.43 Over 50 to 100 63.99 68.65 67.11 50 or Under 75.38 57.93 63.24 U.S. Total 52.20 21.47 31.83

  14. Annual bulletin of coal statistics for Europe-1983. [Europe, Canada, USA, USSR

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This is a series of statistical tables documenting the production, trade, and consumption of coal in Europe, Canada, the United States, and the Soviet Union. Balance sheets of solid forms of energy are provided for hard coal, patent fuel, and coke; and for brown coal, brown coal briquettes, and brown coal coke. Data are provided on hard coal mines and on brown coal mines for production, employment and productivity of labor. Other tables list imports of solid fuels by country, exports of solid fuels by country, and world production of solid fuels.

  15. MHD Coal-Fired Flow Facility. Quarterly/annual technical progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Dicks, J. B.; Chapman, J. N.; Crawford, L. W.

    1980-02-01

    In this Fourth Quarterly/Annual Report submitted under DOE contracts EX-76-C-01-1760 and DE-AC02-79ET10815, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) reports on significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, and development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) and the Research and Development Laboratory. Work on the CFFF progressed with only minor problems. Total construction activity for all site work presently awarded is nearly 98% complete. Water analysis shows that Woods Reservoir baseline conditions are within EPA or Tennessee drinking water standards. For the primary combustor, the vitiation heater and primary combustor fabrication drawings were completed and the nozzle design was completed. The drum module for the radiant slagging furnace was awarded. On the MHD Power Generator, development continued in several areas of advanced analysis including development of time-dependent models for use with the one-dimensional code. For seed regeneration, the tentative determination is that the Tomlinson Tampella is the most economically viable method. With regard to capped electrode erosion, investigations have shown that the major degradation of the cladding still present is at the leading edge of the capped anode. To alleviate this, plans are to hot work the noble metal in the bending operation. In resolving another problem, a system employing the modified line-reversal method has been assembled and successfully tested to measure absolute plasma temperatures.

  16. Chemical coal cleaning process and costs refinement for coal-water slurry manufacture. Semi-annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bhasin, A.K.; Berggren, M.H.; Smit, F.J.; Ames, L.B.; Ronzio, N.J.

    1985-03-01

    The Department of Energy, through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), has initiated a program to determine the feasibility and potential applications for direct firing of coal and coal-derived fuels in heat engines, specifically gas turbines and diesel engines. AMAX Extractive Research and Development, Inc. supplied METC with two lots of highly beneficiated coal slurry fuel for use in the Heat Engines programs. One of the lots was of ultra-clean coal-water slurry fuel (UCCSF) for which a two-stage caustic and acid leaching procedure was developed to chemically clean the coal. As a part of the contract, AMAX R and D developed a conceptual design and preliminary cost estimate for a commercial-scale process for UCCSF manufacture. The contract was extended to include the following objectives: define chemical cleaning and slurry preparation process conditions and costs more precisely; investigate methods to reduce the product cost; and determine the relationship, in dollars per million Btu, between product cost and fuel quality. Laboratory investigations have been carried out to define the chemical cleaning process conditions required to generate fuels containing from 0.17 to 1.0% ash. Capital and operating cost refinements are to be performed on the basis of the preferred process operating conditions identified during the laboratory investigations. Several such areas for cost reductions have been identified. Caustic strengths from 2 to 7% NaOH are currently anticipated while 25% NaOH was used as the basis for the preliminary cost estimate. In addition, leaching times for each of the process steps have been reduced to half or less of the times used for the preliminary cost estimate. Improvement of fuel quality has been achieved by use of a proprietary hot-water leaching step to reduce the residual alkali content to less than 250 ppM (Na/sub 2/O plus K/sub 2/O) on a dry coal basis. 2 refs., 3 figs., 24 tabs.

  17. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process. Annual technical progress report, January 1979-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    This report discusses the effects on SRC yields of seven process variables (reactor temperature, SRT, hydrogen partial pressure, recycle ash and coal concentrations, gas velocity and coal type) predicted by second-order regression models developed from a data base containing pilot plant data with both Kentucky and Powhatan coals. The only effect of coal type in the model is a shift in each yield by a constant factor. Although some differences were found between the models developed from the Kentucky data base (1) (which we call Kentucky models) and the pooled coal models, the general conclusions of the previous report are confirmed by the new models and the assumption of similar behavior of the two coals appears to be justified. In some respects the dependence of the yields (MAF coal basis) on variables such as pressure and temperature are clearer than in the previous models. The principal trends which emerge are discussed.

  18. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Production, 1949-2011 Total By Rank By Mining Method By Location 200 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Anthracite Lignite¹ Subbituminous Coal¹ ¹ Subbituminous coal and lignite are included in bituminous coal prior to 1969. Source: Table 7.2. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 300 600 900 1,200 1,500 Million Short Tons Bituminous Coal¹ 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 200 400 600 800 Million Short Tons 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 300 600

  19. Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Annual report, September 1992--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.

    1993-12-01

    The focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is primarily in the use of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies at the US Steel Fundamental Research Laboratories in Monroeville, PA, by E. T. Turkdogan indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt % ore + 25 wt % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) may be a viable alternative to zinc-based sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc hence it is not as likely to undergo depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron hence the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese at higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This Annual Topical Report documents progress in pelletizing and testing via thermo-gravimetric analysis of individual pellet formulations of manganese ore/ alumina combinations and also manganese carbonate/alumina with two binders, dextrin and bentonite. It includes the prior Quarterly Technical Reports which indicate that the manganese carbonate material, being of higher purity than the manganese ore, has a higher degree of sulfur capacity and more rapid absorption kinetics. A 2-inch fixed-bed reactor has been fabricated and is now ready for subjecting pellets to cyclic loading and regeneration.

  20. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S.

    1991-12-31

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

  1. Annual Energy Outlook 2017: Preliminary Results for Electricity, Coal, Nuclear and Renewables

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    : Preliminary Results for Electricity, Coal, Nuclear and Renewables For AEO2017 Working Group October 3, 2016 | Washington, D.C. By EIA, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear & Renewables Analysis 2 Last Name First Name Organization Last Name First Name Organization Last Name First Name Organization Last Name First Name Organization Adams Greg EIA Esber Salem paconsulting Marmon Greg woodmac Simpson Cynthia OCFO Alfaro Jose alphanr Evans Carolyn nscorp Mayes Fred EIA Slater-Thomps Nancy EIA

  2. H-coal pilot plant. Phase II. Construction. Phase III. Operation. Annual report No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-04

    At the request of DOE Oak Ridge, ASFI agreed to assume responsibility for completion of Plant construction in December, 1979, at which time Badger Plants' on-site work was ended. This construction effort consisted of electric heat tracing and insulation of piping and instrumentation. At the close of the reporting period the work was completed, or was projected to be completed, within the ASFI budgeted amounts and by dates that will not impact Plant operations. Engineering design solutions were completed for problems encountered with such equipment as the High Pressure Letdown Valves; Slurry Block Valves; Slurry Pumps; the Bowl Mill System; the Dowtherm System; and the Ebullating Pump. A Corrosion Monitoring Program was established. With the exception of Area 500, the Antisolvent Deashing Unit, all operating units were commissioned and operated during the reporting period. Coal was first introduced into the Plant on May 29, 1980, with coal operations continuing periodically through September 30, 1980. The longest continuous coal run was 119 hours. A total of 677 tons of Kentucky No. 11 Coal were processed during the reporting period. The problems encountered were mechanical, not process, in nature. Various Environmental and Health programs were implemented to assure worker safety and protection and to obtain data from Plant operations for scientific analysis. These comprehensive programs will contribute greatly in determining the acceptability of long term H-Coal Plant operations.

  3. Tenth annual coal preparation, utilization, and environmental control contractors conference: Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    Volume I contains papers presented at the following sessions: high efficiency preparation; advanced physical coal cleaning; superclean emission systems; air toxics and mercury measurement and control workshop; and mercury measurement and control workshop. Selected papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Ninth annual coal preparation, utilization, and environmental control contractors conference: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Papers are grouped under the following sessions: compliance technology; high-efficiency preparation; characterization; advanced technologies; alternative fuels; coal utilization; industrial/commercial combustor development; combustion; superclean emission systems; carbon dioxide recovery and reuse; air toxics and fine particulates; air toxics sampling and analysis workshop; and combined poster session. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Effects of effluents of coal combustion and gasification upon lung structure and function. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    The overall objective of the proposed research is to correlate both structural and functional alterations in cells and tissues of the lung brought about by exposure to fluidized bed combustion and fixed bed gasification effluents and reagent grade oxides of metals known to be associated with coal combustion gasification. Projected milestones are described. Progress during the first year in setting up aerosol exposure facilities, intratracheal instillations, pulmonary mechanics, and morphometric examinations is reported. (DMC)

  6. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process. Annual technical progress report, January 1979-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-01

    Part 3 consists of appendices 5, 6 and 7, which have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. They deal with regression analysis of pilot plant SRC-II yields to develop thermal response models of the process and the possibility of predicting yields from coal properties. The possibility of a runaway exothermal reaction under some operating conditions on the demonstration plant scale is also considered. (LTN)

  7. Trace element characterization of coal wastes. Fourth annual progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.; Bertino, J.P.; Jones, M.M.; Wagner, P.; Wanek, P.L.; Wangen, L.E.; Wewerka, E.M.

    1981-04-01

    In the past year assessment studies of low-sulfur coal wastes from the Appalachian Region have been continued. These included mineralogical and trace elemental analyses on these materials and studies of their weathering and leaching behavior. Although the concentrations of the acid-forming minerals (pyrite and marcasite) were very low, leachates were quite acid (pH < 3) with concomitant trace element (Al, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu) concentration elevation. As part of the overall assessment of the degree of environmental concern associated with acidic coal waste drainages, bioassay studies were performed. These revealed that coal wastes and their leachates are toxic to fresh water algae, fathead minnows, and one species of fresh-water flea. Laboratory experiments to identify control options for the coal wastes and their drainages have been focused on predisposal and codisposal treatments of the waste, with technical and economic evaluations being performed on the most promising options. One of the most promising control methods is pretreatment of the waste with a lime/limestone mixture; this produces a waste with no acid-forming tendencies for times up to several months, during which time it may be possible to dispose of the treated waste in a nonreactive environment. The cost of this option is comparable to that of the commonly used lime neutralization of the acid drainage. Other experiments have investigated, in considerable detail, the economic and environmental advantages and disadvantages of codisposing the wastes with 37 naturally occurring soils and industrial wastes. These methods look promising only under certain conditions, but are in general an order of magnitude less effective than existing controls or the lime/limestone disposal method.

  8. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, June 1991--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; When, C.S.

    1992-06-01

    This report covers the activity during the period from 2 June 1991 to 1 June 1992. The major areas of work include: the combustor sub-scale and full size testing, cleanup, coal fuel specification and processing, the Hot End Simulation rig and design of the engine parts required for use with the coal-fueled combustor island. To date Solar has demonstrated: Stable and efficient combustion burning coal-water mixtures using the Two Stage Slagging Combustor; Molten slag removal of over 97% using the slagging primary and the particulate removal impact separator; and on-site preparation of CWM is feasible. During the past year the following tasks were completed: The feasibility of on-site CWM preparation was demonstrated on the subscale TSSC. A water-cooled impactor was evaluated on the subscale TSSC; three tests were completed on the full size TSSC, the last one incorporating the PRIS; a total of 27 hours of operation on CWM at design temperature were accumulated using candle filters supplied by Refraction through Industrial Pump & Filter; a target fuel specification was established and a fuel cost model developed which can identify sensitivities of specification parameters; analyses of the effects of slag on refractory materials were conducted; and modifications continued on the Hot End Simulation Rig to allow extended test times.

  9. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process. Annual technical progress report, January 1979-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    A set of statistically designed experiments was used to study the effects of several important operating variables on coal liquefaction product yield structures. These studies used a Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor to provide a hydrodynamically well-defined system from which kinetic data could be extracted. An analysis of the data shows that product yield structures can be adequately represented by a correlative model. It was shown that second-order effects (interaction and squared terms) are necessary to provide a good model fit of the data throughout the range studied. Three reports were issued covering the SRC-II database and yields as functions of operating variables. The results agree well with the generally-held concepts of the SRC reaction process, i.e., liquid phase hydrogenolysis of liquid coal which is time-dependent, thermally activated, catalyzed by recycle ash, and reaction rate-controlled. Four reports were issued summarizing the comprehensive SRC reactor thermal response models and reporting the results of several studies made with the models. Analytical equipment for measuring SRC off-gas composition and simulated distillation of coal liquids and appropriate procedures have been established.

  10. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Thousand Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,520,230 169,653

  11. Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State,

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-exporting State. This Final 2008 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the Preliminary...

  12. Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State,

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-exporting State. This Final 2008 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the Preliminary...

  13. Coal Distribution Database, 2006

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is...

  14. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    7 Coal Mining Productivity Total, 1949-2011 By Mining Method, 2011 By Location, 2011 By Mining Method, 1 1949-2011 By Region and Mining Method, 2011 210 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Mississippi 1 For 1979 forward, includes all coal; prior to 1979, excludes anthracite. Note: Beginning in 2001, surface mining includes a small amount of refuse recovery. Source: Table 7.7. 2.68 15.98 East of the West of the 0 5 10 15 20 Short Tons per Employee Hour 1950 1960

  15. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment By Fuel and Equipment Type, 2010 Total Units by Equipment Type, 1985-2010² Coal Units by Equipment Type, Petroleum and Natural Gas Units 1985-2010² by Equipment Type, 1985-2010² 318 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Coal Units Petroleum and Natural Gas Units Particulate Collectors Thousand Megawatts 329 165 185 26 75 1 Particulate Collectors Cooling Towers Flue

  16. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Type of Heating in Occupied Housing Units, 1950 and 2009 By Fuel Type By Fuel Type, Share of Total 56 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Sum of components do not equal total due to independent rounding. 2 Liquefied petroleum gases. 3 Includes coal coke. 4 Kerosene, solar, and other. (s)=Less than 0.5. Source: Table 2.7. 57 38 8 6 2 (s) 1 11 (s) 9 1 4 14 2 Natural Gas Electricity Distillate Fuel Oil LPG² Wood Coal³ Other and None 0 20 40 60 Million Occupied

  17. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Value of Fossil Fuel Imports Total, 1949-2011 By Fuel, 1949-2011 By Fuel, 2011 80 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross domestic product implicit price defla- tors in Table D1. See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary. 2 See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 3 Natural gas, coal, and coal coke. Source: Table 3.7. Crude Oil 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 100 200 300 400 500 Billion Real (2005)

  18. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Value of Fossil Fuel Exports Total, 1949-2011 By Fuel, 1949-2011 By Fuel, 2011 82 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 104 16 7 2 Petroleum Coal Natural Gas Crude Oil 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Billion Nominal Dollars² 1 In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross domestic product implicit price defla- tors in Table D1. See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary. 2 See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 3 Natural gas, crude oil, and coal coke. Source:

  19. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Coal Mining Productivity Total, 1949-2011 By Mining Method, 2011 By Location, 2011 By Mining Method, 1 1949-2011 By Region and Mining Method, 2011 210 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Mississippi 1 For 1979 forward, includes all coal; prior to 1979, excludes anthracite. Note: Beginning in 2001, surface mining includes a small amount of refuse recovery. Source: Table 7.7. 2.68 15.98 East of the West of the 0 5 10 15 20 Short Tons per Employee Hour 1950 1960

  20. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Coal Prices Total, 1949-2011 By Type, 1949-2011 By Type, 2011 214 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 20 40 60 80 Real (2005) Dollars¹ per Short Ton 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 30 60 90 120 Real (2005) Dollars¹ per Short Ton 70.99 57.64 19.38 15.80 36.91 Anthracite Bituminous Lignite Subbituminous Total 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Nominal Dollars² per Short Ton Bituminous Coal Anthracite

  1. Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal. Semi-annual report, January--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    Summaries of progress on the following tasks are presented: Mixed waste treatment; Hot water extraction of nonpolar organic pollutant from soils; Aqueous phase thermal oxidation wastewater treatment; Review of results from comprehensive characterization of air toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants; Air toxic fine particulate control; Effectiveness of sorbents for trace elements; Catalyst for utilization of methane in selective catalytic reduction of NOx; Fuel utilization properties; Hot gas cleaning; PFBC; catalytic tar cracking; sulfur forms in coal; resid and bitumen desulfurization; biodesulfurization; diesel fuel desulfurization; stability issues; Sorbent carbon development; Evaluation of carbon products; Stable and supercritical chars; Briquette binders; Carbon molecular sieves; Coal char fuel evaporation canister sorbent; Development of a coal by-product classification protocol for utilization; Use of coal ash in recycled plastics and composite materials; Corrosion of advanced structural materials; Joining of advanced structural materials; Resource data evaluation; and the Usti and Labem (Czech Republic) coal-upgrading program.

  2. Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium. Annual report and selected publications, 1 July 1992--30 June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Dockter, B.A.; Eylands, K.E.; Hassett, D.J.; O`Leary, E.M.

    1994-04-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC, pronounced cars), formerly the Western Fly Ash Research, Development, and Data Center (WFARDDC), has continued fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research focused on promoting environmentally safe, economical use of coal combustion fly ash. The research tasks selected for the year included: (1) Coal Ash Properties Database Maintenance and Expansion, (2) Investigation of the High-Volume Use of Fly Ash for Flowable Backfill Applications, (3) Investigation of Hydrated Mineralogical Phases in Coal Combustion By-Products, (4) Comparison of Department of Transportation Specifications for Coal Ash Utilization, (5) Comparative Leaching Study of Coal Combustion By-Products and Competing Construction Materials, (6) Application of CCSEM for Coal Ash Characterization, (7) Determination of Types and Causes of Efflorescence in Regional Concrete Products, and (8) Sulfate Resistance of Fly Ash Concrete: A Literature Review and Evaluation of Research Priorities. The assembly of a database of information on coal fly ash has been a focus area for CARRC since its beginning in 1985. This year, CARRC members received an updated run time version of the Coal Ash Properties Database (CAPD) on computer disk for their use. The new, user-friendly database management format was developed over the year to facilitate the use of CAPD by members as well as CARRC researchers. It is anticipated that this direct access to CAPD by members as well as CARRC researchers. It is anticipated that this direct access to CAPD by members will be beneficial to each company`s utilization efforts, to CARRC, and to the coal ash industry in general. Many additions and improvements were made to CAPD during the year, and a three-year plan for computer database and modeling related to coal ash utilization was developed to guide both the database effort and the research effort.

  3. Genie Pro

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2004-05-15

    Genie Pro is a general purpose, interactive, adaptive tool for automatically labeling regions and finding objects in large amounts of image data. Genie Pro uses supervised learning techniques to search for spatio-spectral algorithms that are best able to match exaple labels provided by a user during a training session. After Genie Pro has discovered a useful algorithm, this algorith can then be applied to other similar types of image data, to label regions and objectsmore » similar to those provided during the training session. Genie Pro was originally developed for analyzing multispectral satellite data, but it works equally well with panchromatic (grayscale) and hyperspectral satellite data, aerial imagery, and various kinds of medical imagery. AS a rough guideline, Genie Pro can work with any imagery where the scene being imaged is all approximately at a constant distance fromt he imaging device, and so the scale of imagery is fixed. Applications for Genie Pro include: Crop and terrain type mapping, Road and river network mapping, Broad area search for vehicles and buildings, and Cancer identification in histological images.« less

  4. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Methane Emissions Total, 1980-2009 By Source, 2009 Energy Sources by Type 1980-2009 Agricultural Sources by Major Type, 1980-2009 310 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Chemical production, and iron and steel production. 2 Natural gas production, processing, and distribution. 3 Petroleum production, refining, and distribution. 4 Consumption of coal, petroleum, natural gas, and wood for heat or electricity. 5 Emissions from passenger cars, trucks, buses,

  5. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Nitrous Oxide Emissions Total, 1980-2009 By Source, 2009 Energy Sources by Type, 1980-2009 Agricultural Sources by Major Type, 1980-2009 312 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Adipic acid production (primarily for the manufacture of nylon fibers and plastics) and nitric acid production (primarily for fertilizers). 2 Emissions from passenger cars and trucks; air, rail, and marine transportation; and farm and construction equipment. 3 Consumption of coal,

  6. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    F1. Primary Energy Consumption and Delivered Total Energy, 2010 (Quadrillion Btu) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 347 Primary Energy Consumption by Source 1 Delivered Total Energy by Sector 8 1 Includes electricity net imports, not shown separately. 2 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 3 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 4 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke

  7. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Household End Uses: Fuel Types, Appliances, and Electronics Share of Households With Selected Appliances, 1980 and 2009 Space Heating by Main Fuel, 2009 Share of Households With Selected Electronics, 1997 and 2009 Air-Conditioning Equipment, 1980 and 2009 54 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Natural gas and electric. 2 Liquefied petroleum gases. 3 Includes kerosene. 4 Coal, solar, other fuel, or no heating equipment. 5 Video Cassette Recorder. 6 Digital Video

  8. Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies. First annual report, September 1, 1990--August 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiang-Huai

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surface reactivity of pyrite by using electrochemical, surface analysis, potentiometric and calorimetric titration, and surface hydrophobicity characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The products as well as their structure, the mechanisms and the kinetics of the oxidation of coal-pyrite surfaces and their interaction with various chemical reagents will be systematically studied and compared with that of mineral-pyrite and synthetic pyrite to determine the correlation between the surface reactivity of pyrite and the bulk chemical properties of pyrite and impurities. The surface chemical studies and the studies of floatability of coal-pyrite and the effect of various parameters such as grinding media and environment, aging under different atmospheres, etc. on thereof, are directed at identifying the causes and possible solutions of the pyrite rejection problems in coal cleaning.

  9. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Bruce G

    2006-09-29

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University has been successfully managing the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by Penn State, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. Base funding for the selected projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. At the annual funding meeting held in October 2003, ten projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten 2004 projects were completed during the previous annual reporting period and their final reports were submitted with the previous annual report (i.e., 10/01/04-09/30/05). The final report for the remaining project, which was submitted during this reporting

  10. Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Consumer...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation Home > Coal > Annual Coal Distribution > Coal Origin Map > Domestic Distribution by Origin: Alaska Data For: 2002...

  11. Annual Coal Report 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other ... in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. ...

  12. Annual Coal Distribution Tables

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1,104 - 1,104 Bulgaria 82 - 82 Egypt 518 - 518 Italy 115 - 115 Netherlands 56 83 139 Spain 412 84 496 Turkey 581 - 581 United Kingdom 654 - 654 Kentucky 2,130 - 2,130 Canada 920...

  13. Low-rank coal research annual report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1990 including quarterly report, April--June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    Research programs in the following areas are presented: control technology and coal preparation; advance research and technology development; combustion; liquefaction; and gasification. Sixteen projects are included. Selected items have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table A6. Approximate Heat Rates for Electricity, and Heat Content of Electricity, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Btu per Kilowatthour) Year Approximate Heat Rates 1 for Electricity Net Generation Heat Content 10 of Electricity 11 Fossil Fuels 2 Nuclear 8 Noncombustible Renewable Energy 7,9 Coal 3 Petroleum 4 Natural Gas 5 Total Fossil Fuels 6,7 1949 NA NA NA 15,033 - - 15,033 3,412 1950 NA NA NA 14,030 - - 14,030 3,412 1955 NA NA

  15. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 11.2b Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Commercial Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Electricity 7 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kerosene LPG 5 Motor Gasoline 6 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 8 Waste 9 Fuel Ethanol 10 Total 1949 148 19 16 3 2 7 NA 28 55 58 280 2 NA NA 2 1950 147 21 19 3 2 7 NA 33 66

  16. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 11.2d Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Transportation Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity 7 Total 2 Biomass 2 Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Jet Fuel LPG 5 Lubricants Motor Gasoline 6 Residual Fuel Oil Total Fuel Ethanol 8 Biodiesel Total 1949 161 NA 12 30 NA (s) 4 306 91 443 6 611 NA NA NA 1950 146 7

  17. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Value of Fossil Fuel Net Imports, 1949-2011 Value of Fossil Fuel Net Imports Value of Fossil Fuel Net Imports by Fuel 84 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross domestic product implicit price deflators in Table D1. See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Includes small amounts of coal coke. Note: Negative net imports indicate that the value of exports is greater than the value of imports. Source: Table

  18. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Fossil Fuel Production Prices Prices, 1949-2011 Fossil Fuel Composite Price,² Change From Previous Year, 1950-2011 68 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Fossil Fuel Composite Natural Gas Coal 1 In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross domestic product implicit price deflators in Table D1. See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Based on real prices in chained (2005) dollars. See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary. Source: Table 3.1. 1950

  19. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Coal Demonstrated Reserve Base, January 1, 2011 By Key State By Region West and East of the Mississippi By Mining Method By Rank 102 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Source: Table 4.8. 119 104 61 32 29 27 23 16 12 12 9 Montana Illinois Wyo- West Ken- Penn- Ohio Colo- Texas New Indiana 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Billion Short Tons 230 156 98 Western Interior Appalachian 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 Billion Short Tons ming Virginia tucky sylvania rado Mexico 257

  20. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Imports by Country of Origin Total, 2000-2011 By Country, 2011 By Selected Country, 2000-2011 204 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Note: Sum of components may not equal 100 percent due to independent rounding. Source: Table 7.4. 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 0 10 20 30 40 Million Short Tons Indonesia 10% Canada 9% Total 13.1 million short tons Canada 13% Colombia 73% Venezuela 6% Other 2% Indonesia 7% Colombia 2000 2001 2002

  1. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Exports by Country of Destination Total and Europe, 1960-2011 By Selected Country, 2011 By Selected Country, 1960-2011 206 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Source: Table 7.5. 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 25 50 75 100 125 Million Short Tons lands 10.8 8.7 6.9 6.9 6.8 5.6 4.8 Nether- Brazil United Japan Canada Italy Germany 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Million Short Tons Kingdom Total Europe 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005

  2. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    26 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.2c Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.2b; Billion Kilowatthours) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage 5 Renewable Energy Other 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 6 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 9 Wind Total Wood 7 Waste 8 Electricity-Only Plants 11

  3. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal 5 Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 1,995 415 569 NA

  4. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation by Sector, 2011 Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Wood and Waste U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 237 7.3 0.6 0.0 Electric Power Industrial² Commercial² 0 2 4 6 8 Trillion Cubic Feet -CHP¹ (ss) 1 Combined-heat-and-power plants. ² Combined-heat-and-power and electricity-only plants. (s)=Less than 0.5 million short tons. (ss)=Less than 0.05 trillion cubic feet. (sss)=Less than 0.5 million barrels.

  5. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu

  6. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants by Sector, 1989-2011 Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Wood and Waste 242 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Sources: Tables 8.6b and 8.6c. Electric Power Industrial 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0 200 400 600 800 Billion Cubic Feet Industrial Commercial Commercial 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0 5 10 15 20 Million Short Tons Electric Power

  7. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.6b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet

  8. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.11a Electric Net Summer Capacity: Total (All Sectors), Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.11b and 8.11d; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 NA NA NA NA 44.9 0.0 5 ( ) 18.5 (s)

  9. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.11c Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.11b; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 8 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 7 Wind Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Electricity-Only Plants 9 1989

  10. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Reference case Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table A15. Coal supply, disposition, and prices ...

  11. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, John; Schobert, Harold; Miller, Bruce G

    2006-03-01

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected 10 projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the various subcontractors on March 1, 2004.

  12. PanFunPro: Bacterial Pan-Genome Analysis Based on the Functional Profiles (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Lukjancenko, Oksana [Technical University of Denmark

    2013-01-25

    Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  13. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Bruce G

    2006-03-01

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected ten projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten projects have been completed and the final reports for these 2004 projects are attached. An annual funding meeting was held in November 2004 and the council selected

  14. Coal Market Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives and the conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the National Energy Modeling System's (NEMS) Coal Market Module (CMM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 (AEO2014). This report catalogues and describes the assumptions, methodology, estimation techniques, and source code of CMM's two submodules. These are the Coal Production Submodule (CPS) and the Coal Distribution Submodule (CDS).

  15. Quarterly Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Quarterly Coal Distribution Report Release Date: August 17, 2016 | Next Release Date: December 22, 2016 | full report The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal origin state, coal destination state, mode of transportation, and consuming sector. All quarterly data are preliminary and will be superseded by the release of the corresponding "Annual Coal Distribution Report." Highlights for the fourth quarter 2015: Total

  16. NEMS Modeling of Coal Plants

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    NEMS Modeling of Coal Plants Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewable Analysis Laura Martin June 14, 2016 Washington, DC 2 EMM Structure EFD ECP EFP ELD Laura Martin Washington, DC, June 14, 2016 Electricity Load and Demand Submodule Liquid Fuels Market Module Model inputs for coal plants 3 * Existing coal plants - plant specific inputs - Fixed and variable operating and maintenance costs, annual capital additions - Retrofit costs (capital and O&M) - FGD, DSI, SCR, SNCR, CCS, FF -

  17. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 1989 13 8 67 2 90 19 5 24 1 114 1990 21 9 80 4 114 18 6 25 (s) 138 1991 21 6 82 4 113 17 9 26 1 140 1992 28 6 102 5 140 17 8 25 2 167 1993 30 8 107 3 147 16 8 24

  18. Field study of disposed solid wastes from advanced coal processes. Annual technical progress report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) are funded to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for managing solid wastes produced by advanced coal combustion processes. This information will be developed by conducting several field studies on disposed wastes from these processes. Data will be collected to characterize these wastes and their interactions with the environments in which they are disposed. Three sites were selected for the field studies: Colorado Ute`s fluidized bed combustion (FBC) unit in Nucla, Colorado; Ohio Edison`s limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) retrofit in Lorain, Ohio; and Freeman United`s mine site in central Illinois with wastes supplied by the nearby Midwest Grain FBC unit. During the past year, field monitoring and sampling of the four landfill test cases constructed in 1989 and 1991 has continued. Option 1 of the contract was approved last year to add financing for the fifth test case at the Freeman United site. The construction of the Test Case 5 cells is scheduled to begin in November, 1992. Work during this past year has focused on obtaining data on the physical and chemical properties of the landfilled wastes, and on developing a conceptual framework for interpreting this information. Results to date indicate that hydration reactions within the landfilled wastes have had a major impact on the physical and chemical properties of the materials but these reactions largely ceased after the first year, and physical properties have changed little since then. Conditions in Colorado remained dry and no porewater samples were collected. In Ohio, hydration reactions and increases in the moisture content of the waste tied up much of the water initially infiltrating the test cells.

  19. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Semi-annual report, March 28, 1996--September 27, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.G.; Pisupati, S.V.; Scarone, A.W.

    1996-12-13

    The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), through an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal-Water Fuel Technology, with the aim of decreasing DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE. Activities this reporting period are summarized by phase. Phase I was completed on November 1, 1995. Work on Phase II focused on emissions reductions, coal beneficiation/preparation studies, and economic analyses of coal use. Emissions reductions investigations included continuing bench-scale tests to identify an NO{sub x} reduction catalyst which is appropriate for industrial boiler applications. In addition, installation of a ceramic filtering device on the demonstration boiler started. Also, a sodium bicarbonate duct injection system was procured for installation on the demonstration boiler. Work related to coal preparation and utilization, and the economic analysis was primarily focused on preparing the final report. Work in Phase III focused on coal preparation studies and economic analyses of coal use. Coal preparation studies were focused on continuing activities on particle size control, physical separations,surface-based separation processes, and dry processing. The economic study focused on community sensitivity to coal usage, regional/national economic impacts of new coal utilization technologies, and constructing a national energy portfolio.

  20. International Energy Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-14

    This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Prices are included for selected petroleum products. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu) and joules.

  1. Coal production, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-05

    Coal Production 1987 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. The data presented in this report were collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-275) as amended. The 1987 coal production and related data presented in this report were obtained from Form EIA-7A, ''Coal Production Report,'' from companies owning mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10,000 or more short tons of coal in 1987. This survey originated at the Bureau of Mines, US Department of the Interior. In 1977, the responsibility for taking the survey was transferred to the EIA under the Department of Energy Organization Act (P.L. 95-91). The data cover 3667 of the 4770 US coal mining operations active in 1987. These mining operations accounted for over 99 percent of total US coal production and represented 77 percent of all US coal mining operations in 1987. This issue is the 12th annual report published by EIA and continues the series formerly included as a chapter in the Minerals Yearbook published by the Bureau of Mines. This report also includes data for the demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States on January 1, 1988. This is the eighth annual summary on minable coal, pursuant to Section 801 of Public Law 95-620. 18 figs., 105 tabs.

  2. 2009 coal preparation buyer's guide

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-15

    The guide contains brief descriptions and contact details of 926 US companies supplying coal preparation equipment who exhibited at the 26th annual Coal Prep exhibition and conference, 28-30 April - May 2009, in Lexington, KY, USA. An index of categories of equipment available from the manufacturers is included.

  3. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Electric Power Annual

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Annual

  4. Annual Energy Review, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions.

  5. Word Pro - S2.lwp

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 By Selected End Use¹ By Energy Source 48 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Excludes inputs of unallocated energy sources (5,820 trillion Btu). 2 Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Excludes steam and hot water. 3 Excludes coal coke and breeze. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Natural gas liquids. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Source: Table 2.3. 3.3 1.7 0.7 0.2 0.2

  6. Coal mine methane global review

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    This is the second edition of the Coal Mine Methane Global Overview, updated in the summer of 2008. This document contains individual, comprehensive profiles that characterize the coal and coal mine methane sectors of 33 countries - 22 methane to market partners and an additional 11 coal-producing nations. The executive summary provides summary tables that include statistics on coal reserves, coal production, methane emissions, and CMM projects activity. An International Coal Mine Methane Projects Database accompanies this overview. It contains more detailed and comprehensive information on over two hundred CMM recovery and utilization projects around the world. Project information in the database is updated regularly. This document will be updated annually. Suggestions for updates and revisions can be submitted to the Administrative Support Group and will be incorporate into the document as appropriate.

  7. Word Pro - A

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    195 Table A5. Approximate Heat Content of Coal and Coal Coke (Million Btu per Short Ton) Coal Coal Coke Production a Waste Coal Supplied b Consumption Imports Exports Imports and Exports Residential and Commercial Sectors c Industrial Sector Electric Power Sector e,f Total Coke Plants Other d 1950 ........................ 25.090 NA 24.461 26.798 24.820 23.937 24.989 25.020 26.788 24.800 1955 ........................ 25.201 NA 24.373 26.794 24.821 24.056 24.982 25.000 26.907 24.800 1960

  8. Annual Coal Distribution Report 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. ...

  9. PRB Coal Users' Group grapples with supply chain challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Pettier, R.

    2007-06-15

    An account is given of issues addressed at the Powder River Basin Coal Users' Group annual meeting, held in conjunction with the Electric Power 2007 conference. Transportation, buying equipment for switching plants burn PRB coal, finding and fighting fires in a coal silo, and coal handling were amongst the topics discussed. 1 fig., 4 photos.

  10. U.S. Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2015 Domestic and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2015 (thousand short tons)

  11. Petroleum Data, Natural Gas Data, Coal Data, Macroeconomic Data, Petroleum Import Data

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-18

    Supplemental tables to the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2006 for petroleum, natural gas, coal, macroeconomic, and import data

  12. Coal Production 1990. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-12

    This report provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, and reserves to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. This report also includes data for the demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States on January 1, 1991. This is the 11th annual summary on minable coal, pursuant to Section 801 of Public Law 95-620, the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  13. Coal Markets

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Glossary FAQS Overview Data Coal Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting and mapping) Summary Prices Reserves Consumption Production Stocks Imports, exports ...

  14. Proximate analysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, C.J.; Rais, E.A.

    2009-02-15

    This lab experiment illustrates the use of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to perform proximate analysis on a series of coal samples of different rank. Peat and coke are also examined. A total of four exercises are described. These are dry exercises as students interpret previously recorded scans. The weight percent moisture, volatile matter, fixed carbon, and ash content are determined for each sample and comparisons are made. Proximate analysis is performed on a coal sample from a local electric utility. From the weight percent sulfur found in the coal (determined by a separate procedure the Eschka method) and the ash content, students calculate the quantity of sulfur dioxide emissions and ash produced annually by a large coal-fired electric power plant.

  15. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    in the United States, Selected Years, 1635-1945 (Quadrillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Electricity Net Imports Total Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Total...

  16. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solarphotovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP)...

  17. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    historical energy statistics. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity,...

  18. Model documentation coal market module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This report documents the approaches used in developing the Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95). This report catalogues and describes the assumptions, methodology, estimation techniques, and source code of the coal market module`s three submodules. These are the Coal Production Submodule (CPS), the Coal Export Submodule (CES), the Coal Expert Submodule (CES), and the Coal Distribution Submodule (CDS).

  19. Word Pro - S7

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Coal 1,344 1,241 797 516 27 Coal Natural Nuclear Renewable Petro- 0 500 1,000 1,500 J F MA ... Note: Data are for utility-scale facilities. Web Page: http:www.eia.govtotalenergy...

  20. Word Pro - S7

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Coal 1,344 1,241 797 516 27 Coal Natural Nuclear Renewable Petro- 0 500 1,000 1,500 J F MA ... Note: Data are for utility-scale facilities. Web Page: http:www.eia.govtotalenergy...

  1. Temperature, velocity, and species profile measurements for reburning in a pulverized, entrained flow, coal combustor. Semi-annual report, April 30, 1996--October 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tree, D.R.

    1996-10-31

    The capability of LDA measurements for future reburning experiments has now been demonstrated. Measurements of mean and turbulent gas and particle velocity have been obtained using Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) in the near burner and quart region of the pulverized coal reactor. The mean and turbulent velocity at the burner outlet, or top of the quart were obtained under non-reacting conditions in order to obtain realistic boundary conditions for comprehensive combustion modeling. Also, under cold flow it was determined that little error occurred in measuring mean velocities with LDA using pulverized coal as the seed particle. Thus, for mean velocities, coal particle and gas velocities were similar. Coal particle velocity profiles were obtained at three swirls and three axial locations. Gas species, and temperature maps for the reactor have now also been completed at three swirl settings in addition to the LDA data. Gas species obtained include CO, CO 2, O{sub 2} and NO. Calibration of the HCN and NH{sub 3} measurement has been successfully completed but no measurements in the reactor have been obtained. The design and fabrication of fuel and air injectors to be used for reburning are complete. The injectors have not yet been tested.

  2. Annual Employee Giving campaign underway

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Annual Benefits Statement, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Annual Benefits Statement, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Annual Benefits Statement, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Annual Benefits Statement, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (205.77 KB) More Documents & Publications Medgate, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Electronic Document Management System PIA, BechtelJacobs Company, LLC Oracle Financials PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC

    current Coal Distribution Report

  3. AL PRO | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search Name: AL-PRO Place: Grossheide, Lower Saxony, Germany Zip: 26532 Sector: Wind energy Product: AL-PRO is an inndependent expert office for wind forecasts, wind...

  4. Word Pro - S4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gas Note 1. Natural Gas Production. Final annual data are from the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Natural Gas Annual (NGA). Data for the two most recent months ...

  5. Word Pro - S7

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... "Annual Report of International Electrical ExportImport Data." 1989: DOE, Fossil Energy, Form FE-781R, "Annual Report of International Electrical ExportImport Data." 1990-2000: ...

  6. Word Pro - S1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    a Primary Energy Imports and Exports (Quadrillion Btu) Imports by Source, 1949-2015 Exports by Source, 1949-2015 Imports by Source, Monthly Exports by Major Source, Monthly a Coal, coal coke, biofuels, and electricity. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. b Includes coal coke. Sources: Tables 1.4a and 1.4b. 8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 0 5 10 15 20 25

  7. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Thousand Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Commercial Sector 8 1989 2,320 1,542 637 - 804 5,303 37 (s) 5 1 43 9 3 2 3 17

  8. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Table 4.8 Coal Demonstrated Reserve Base, January 1, 2011 (Billion Short Tons) Region and State Anthracite Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite Total Underground Surface Underground Surface Underground Surface Surface 1 Underground Surface Total Appalachian .............................................. 4.0 3.3 68.2 21.9 0.0 0.0 1.1 72.1 26.3 98.4 Alabama ................................................... .0 .0 .9 2.1 .0 .0 1.1 .9 3.1 4.0 Kentucky, Eastern

  9. HyPRO Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    HyPRO Model (Strategic Analysis, Inc.) Objectives Provide a modeling tool to develop an understanding of how the hydrogen production infrastructure might evolve in the United States and determine the factors that will drive infrastructure development. Key Attributes & Strengths HyPRO provides a transparent enumeration of production, delivery and dispensing costs for comparison of different options. It also provides a graphical projection of production, delivery and dispensing infrastructure

  10. ProMat

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2008-06-12

    ProMAT is a software tool for statistically analyzing data from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay microarray experiments. The software estimates standard curves, sample protein concentrations and their uncertainties for multiple assays. ProMAT generates a set of comprehensive figures for assessing results and diagnosing process quality. The tool is available for Windows or Mac, and is distributed as open-source Java and R code

  11. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Sources: * 1949-1975-Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Coke and Coal Chemicals" chapter. * 1976-1980-U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Report, Coke and ...

  12. Word Pro - S7

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total g Coal c Petro- leum d Natural Gas e Other Gases h Hydro- electric Power i Biomass ... and 5,024 million kilowatthours in 2015. h Blast furnace gas, and other manufactured ...

  13. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Years 1975-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year Coal Natural Gas 1 Petroleum Electricity Purchased Steam and Other 6 Total Aviation Gasoline Fuel Oil 2 Jet Fuel LPG 3 and Other 4 Motor...

  14. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Includes Adjustment for Fossil Fuel Equivalence. See "Primary Energy Consumption" in Glossary. 2 Includes electricity sales to each sector in addition to Primary Energy consumed in the sector. 3 Small amounts of coal consumed for transportation are reported as industrial sector consumption. Includes net imports of s upplemental liquids and coal coke. 4 Calculated as the primary energy consumed by the electric power sector minus the energy content of electricity retail sales. 26,784

  15. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    47 Table 2.2 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 (Trillion Btu ) NAICS 1 Code Manufacturing Group Coal Coal Coke and Breeze 2 Natural Gas Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 3 and NGL 4 Residual Fuel Oil Net Electricity 5 Other 6 Shipments of Energy Sources 7 Total 8 311 Food ................................................................................. 147 1 638 16 3 26 251 105 (s) 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products ..................................... 20 0 41 1 1 3 30 11 -0

  16. American coal imports 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Kolojeski

    2007-09-15

    As 2007 ends, the US coal industry passes two major milestones - the ending of the Synfuel tax break, affecting over 100M st annually, and the imposition of tighter and much more expensive safety measures, particularly in deep mines. Both of these issues, arriving at a time of wretched steam coal price levels, promise to result in a major shake up in the Central Appalachian mining sector. The report utilizes a microeconomic regional approach to determine whether either of these two schools of thought have any validity. Transport, infrastructure, competing fuels and regional issues are examined in detail and this forecasts estimates coal demand and imports on a region by region basis for the years 2010 and 2015. Some of the major highlights of the forecast are: Import growth will be driven by steam coal demand in the eastern and southern US; Transport will continue to be the key driver - we believe that inland rail rates will deter imports from being railed far inland and that the great majority of imports will be delivered directly by vessel, barge or truck to end users; Colombian coal will be the overwhelmingly dominant supply source and possesses a costs structure to enable it to compete with US-produced coal in any market conditions; Most of the growth will come from existing power plants - increasing capacity utilization at existing import facilities and other plants making investments to add imports to the supply portfolio - the growth is not dependent upon a lot of new coal fired capacity being built. Contents of the report are: Key US market dynamics; International supply dynamics; Structure of the US coal import market; and Geographic analysis.

  17. NETL: Coal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Gasification Systems | Advanced Combustion | Coal & Coal-Biomass to Liquids | Solid Oxide Fuel Cells | Turbines | sCO2 Technology CO2 Capture CO2 Capture NETL's CO2 Capture Program ...

  18. Coal pump

    DOEpatents

    Bonin, John H.; Meyer, John W.; Daniel, Jr., Arnold D.

    1983-01-01

    A device for pressurizing pulverized coal and circulating a carrier gas is disclosed. This device has utility in a coal gasification process and eliminates the need for a separate collection hopper and eliminates the separate compressor.

  19. Conversion of Coal Mine Gas to ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... BECOME TOO GREAT WATER KNOCKOUT FIELD COMPRESSOR ... FROM GOV AT MARKETING ENGINEERING Dia (in) SHELTER FOR LNG ... Mines 2008) o >1,000' deep o >12' seam o Annual coal ...

  20. University Coal Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    University Coal Research University Coal Research Universities frequently win Fossil Energy research competitions or join with private companies to submit successful research proposals. Today approximately 16 percent of the Office of Fossil Energy's annual R&D funding goes to academic institutions. The University Coal Research Program Universities have traditionally fared well in the Energy Department's open competitions for federal research grants and contracts. In 1979, however, the

  1. EIA -Quarterly Coal Distribution

    Annual Energy Outlook

    - Coal Distribution Home > Coal> Quarterly Coal Distribution Back Issues Quarterly Coal Distribution Archives Release Date: March 9, 2016 Next Release Date: May 2016 The Quarterly ...

  2. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 Table A2. Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum Production, Imports, and Exports, Selected Years, 1949-2011...

  3. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 General Services Administration. 2 Health and Human Services. 3 National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 4 See Table 1.11...

  4. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... monthly and annual data. * See http:www.eia.govpetroleum for related information. ... 1976-Federal Energy Administration (FEA), Form FEA-96, "Monthly Cost Allocation ...

  5. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Average Productivity 122 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 1 United States excluding Alaska and Hawaii. Note: Crude oil includes lease condensate. ...

  6. Coal Markets

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Markets | Archive Coal Markets Weekly production Dollars per short ton Dollars per mmbtu Average weekly coal commodity spot prices dollars per short ton Week ending Week ago change Central Appalachia 12,500 Btu, 1.2 SO2 Northern Appalachia 13,000 Btu, < 3.0 SO2 Illinois Basin 11,800 Btu, 5.0 SO2 Powder River Basin 8,800 Btu, 0.8 SO2 Uinta Basin 11,700 Btu, 0.8 SO2 Source: With permission, SNL Energy Note: Coal prices shown reflect those of relatively high-Btu coal selected in each region

  7. One-hundredth coal report of Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The 1981 annual report of the Illinois Department of Mines and Minerals tabulates data on levels of coal production, labor and employment in coal industry, and mechanization in the industry. The report reflects an unprecedented safety record achieved during 1981 with no mine-related fatalities reported.

  8. Temperature, velocity and species profile measurements for reburning in a pulverized, entrained flow, coal combustor. Semi-annual report, October 30, 1995--April 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tree, D.R.; Eatough, C.

    1996-04-01

    Data for mean velocity and temperature have been obtained over a baseline matrix operating conditions for pulverized coal without reburning. The data show the reactor to be symmetrical about the axial centerline. Effluent NO{sub x} data have been seen to correlate with measured and modeled results of flow patterns within the reactor. At low swirl the fuel jet creates a downward flow at the centerline with some upward recirculation at the perimeter of the reactor near the walls. This recirculation pattern reverses as swirl is increased, changing the flame from a long toroidal shape to a flat annulus. The NO{sub x} data show a local minimum at a swirl number of 1.0 which may be primarily the result of the direction and magnitude of the recirculation zone. Gas species and coal char burnout data have begun but have not yet been completed. Velocity data and modeling results have been used in the process of validating the comprehensive combustion code and in designing the reburning hardware. The details concerning storing and delivering the reburning fuel (natural gas) have been completed and the fabrication of the hardware is underway.

  9. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and 11.5c; Thousand Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,573,566 218,384 145,399 363 5,590 1,943,302 14,469 1 984 39 15,493 7,281 495

  10. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Table 7.2 Coal Production, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year Rank Mining Method Location Total 1 Bituminous Coal 1 Subbituminous Coal Lignite Anthracite 1 Underground Surface 1 East of the Mississippi 1 West of the Mississippi 1 1949 437.9 2 ( ) 2 ( ) 42.7 358.9 121.7 444.2 36.4 480.6 1950 516.3 2 ( ) 2 ( ) 44.1 421.0 139.4 524.4 36.0 560.4 1955 464.6 2 ( ) 2 ( ) 26.2 358.0 132.9 464.2 26.6 490.8 1960 415.5 2 ( ) 2 ( ) 18.8 292.6 141.7 413.0 21.3 434.3 1965 512.1 2 ( ) 2 ( )

  11. Friedmann Talks Climate, CCS at National Coal Council Meeting

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The coal industry must move aggressively to adapt to the new realities brought about by climate change. That’s the message that Deputy Assistant Secretary for Clean Coal Dr. Julio Friedmann delivered in a keynote address at the 30th annual meeting of the National Coal Council May 14 in Washington, DC.

  12. Word Pro - S1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Monthly Energy Review October 2016 Table 1.4a Primary Energy Imports by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Imports Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas Petroleum Biofuels c Electricity Total Crude Oil a Petroleum Products b Total 1950 Total ...................... 0.009 0.011 0.000 1.056 0.830 1.886 NA 0.007 1.913 1955 Total ...................... .008 .003 .011 1.691 1.061 2.752 NA .016 2.790 1960 Total ...................... .007 .003 .161 2.196 1.802 3.999 NA .018 4.188 1965 Total ...................... .005 .002

  13. Word Pro - S1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) By Source, a 1949-2015 By Source, a Monthly Total, January-July By Source, a July 2016 a Small quantities of net imports of coal coke and electricity are not shown. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. Source: Table 1.3. 6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 0 15 30 45 Petroleum Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Electric

  14. Word Pro - S1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    b Primary Energy Net Imports (Quadrillion Btu) Total, 1949-2015 By Major Source, 1949-2015 Total, Monthly By Major Source, Monthly U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 9 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Natural Gas Crude Oil a Petroleum Products b Coal Crude Oil a 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 0 -5 Petroleum Products b Coal Natural Gas J

  15. Word Pro - S6

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Coal Figure 6.1 Coal (Million Short Tons) Overview, 1949-2015 Consumption by Sector, 1949-2015 Overview, Monthly Electric Power Sector Consumption, Monthly 96 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 2014 20 15 2016 Electric Power Consumption J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 100 Net Exports 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 a Includes

  16. Word Pro - S7

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Table 7.3c Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Commercial and Industrial Sectors (Subset of Table 7.3a) Commercial Sector a Industrial Sector b Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Biomass Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Other Gases g Biomass Other i Waste f Wood h Waste f Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1990 Total .................... 417 953 28 15 10,740

  17. Word Pro - S7

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    19 Table 7.4c Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors (Subset of Table 7.4a) Commercial Sector a Industrial Sector b Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Biomass Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Other Gases g Biomass Other i Waste f Wood h Waste f Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1990 Total

  18. Word Pro - S7

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    21 Table 7.5 Stocks of Coal and Petroleum: Electric Power Sector Coal a Petroleum Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e,f Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels 1950 Year ............................. 31,842 NA NA NA NA 10,201 1955 Year ............................. 41,391 NA NA NA NA 13,671 1960 Year ............................. 51,735 NA NA NA NA 19,572 1965 Year ............................. 54,525 NA NA NA NA

  19. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Table 11.2c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Industrial Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal Coal Coke Net Imports Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity 8 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kero- sene LPG 5 Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline 6 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other 7 Total Wood 9 Waste 10 Fuel Ethanol 11 Total 1949 500 -1 166 41 18 3 3 16 8 95 25 209 120 995 44 NA NA 44 1950 531 (s) 184 51 20 4 3 18 8 110

  20. Word Pro - S12

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Natural Gas 2014 2015 2016 2,297 2,231 2,102 2014 2015 2016 0 800 1,600 2,400 3,200 a Excludes emissions from biomass energy consumption. b Includes coal coke net imports. Web ...

  1. Pelletization of fine coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.S.

    1995-12-31

    Coal is one of the most abundant energy resources in the US with nearly 800 million tons of it being mined annually. Process and environmental demands for low-ash, low-sulfur coals and economic constraints for high productivity are leading the coal industry to use such modern mining methods as longwall mining and such newer coal processing techniques as froth flotation, oil agglomeration, chemical cleaning and synthetic fuel production. All these processes are faced with one common problem area--fine coals. Dealing effectively with these fine coals during handling, storage, transportation, and/or processing continues to be a challenge facing the industry. Agglomeration by the unit operation of pelletization consists of tumbling moist fines in drums or discs. Past experimental work and limited commercial practice have shown that pelletization can alleviate the problems associated with fine coals. However, it was recognized that there exists a serious need for delineating the fundamental principles of fine coal pelletization. Accordingly, a research program has been carried involving four specific topics: (i) experimental investigation of coal pelletization kinetics, (ii) understanding the surface principles of coal pelletization, (iii) modeling of coal pelletization processes, and (iv) simulation of fine coal pelletization circuits. This report summarizes the major findings and provides relevant details of the research effort.

  2. Illinois Clean Coal Institute 2005 annual report. Final technical report for the period September 1st, 2004, through August 31, 2005 on projects funded by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity

    SciTech Connect

    2005-11-08

    This final technical report contains the abstracts and executive summaries of projects funded through the Illinois Clean Coal Institute solicitation entitled 'Request for proposals No. 04-1(ICCI/RFP04-1)'. Support of these projects is by the Office of Coal Development and Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity. The projects fall into the following categories: advanced coal mining technologies; coal preparation and coal production business practice; management of coal combustion byproducts; commercialization and technology transfer. Final project extensions are also recorded.

  3. Model documentation Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-30

    This report documents objectives and conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Coal Market Module (CMM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook 1996 (AEO96). This report catalogues and describes the assumptions, methodology, estimation techniques, and source code of CMM`s three submodules: Coal Production Submodule, Coal Export Submodule, and Coal Distribution Submodule.

  4. Annual Reports - SRSCRO

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    reports Annual Reports Annual Report 2015 Annual Report 2014 Annual Report 2013 Annual Report 2012 Annual Report 2011 Annual Report 2010 Annual Report 2009 Annual Report 2008...

  5. Energy Pro USA | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Pro USA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Energy Pro USA Place: Chesterfield, Missouri Zip: MO 63017 Product: Energy Pro funds and implements demand side energy savings programs to...

  6. Word Pro - S6

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Census Bureau Annual Survey of Manufactures or Census of Manufactures. For 1978 and 1979, monthly estimates were derived from data reported on Forms EIA-3 and 100 U.S. Energy ...

  7. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Offshore Wind Resources U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 111 Notes: * Data are annual average wind speed at 90 meters. * m/s = meters per second. * mph = miles per hour. Web Page: For related information, see http://www.nrel.gov/gis/maps.html. Source: This map was created by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the Department of Energy (January 10, 2011

  8. Quarterly coal report, April--June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-02

    The Quarterly Coal Report provides comprehensive information about US coal production, exports, imports, receipts, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. This issue presents detailed quarterly data for April 1990 through June 1990, aggregated quarterly historical data for 1982 through the second quarter of 1990, and aggregated annual historical data for 1960 through 1989 and projected data for selected years from 1995 through 2010. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the United States, historical information and forecasts have been integrated in this report. 7 figs., 37 tabs.

  9. Word Pro - S6

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Table 6.1 Coal Overview (Thousand Short Tons) Production a Waste Coal Supplied b Trade Stock Change d,e Losses and Unaccounted for e,f Consumption Imports Exports Net Imports c 1950 Total .................... 560,388 NA 365 29,360 -28,995 27,829 9,462 494,102 1955 Total .................... 490,838 NA 337 54,429 -54,092 -3,974 -6,292 447,012 1960 Total .................... 434,329 NA 262 37,981 -37,719 -3,194 1,722 398,081 1965 Total .................... 526,954 NA 184 51,032 -50,848 1,897

  10. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3 Table 2.1d Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year Primary Consumption 1 Electricity Retail Sales 11 Electrical System Energy Losses 12 Total Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy 2 Total Primary Coal Coal Coke Net Imports Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4,5 Total Hydroelectric Power 6 Geothermal 7 Solar/PV 8 Wind 9 Biomass 10 Total 1949 5,433 -7 3,188 3,475 12,090 76 NA NA NA 468 544 12,633 418 1,672 14,724 1950 5,781 1 3,546 3,960 13,288 69 NA NA NA 532

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Table 3.5 Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by Source, 1970-2010 (Million Dollars 1 ) Year Primary Energy 2 Electric Power Sector 11,12 Retail Electricity 13 Total Energy 10,14 Coal Coal Coke Net Imports 3 Natural Gas 4 Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass 9 Total 10 Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel 5 LPG 6 Motor Gasoline 7 Residual Fuel Oil Other 8 Total 1970 4,630 -75 10,891 6,253 1,441 2,395 31,596 2,046 4,172 47,904 44 438 63,872 -4,357 23,345 82,860 1971 4,902 -40 12,065 6,890 1,582 2,483

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Table 3.7 Value of Fossil Fuel Imports, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Billion Dollars) Year Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas Crude Oil 1 Petroleum Products 2 Total Nominal 3 Real 4 Nominal 3 Real 4 Nominal 3 Real 4 Nominal 3 Real 4 Nominal 3 Real 4 Nominal 3 Real 4 1949 (s) 0.02 (s) 0.03 0.00 0.00 0.30 2.10 0.14 0.95 0.45 3.09 1950 (s) .02 .01 .04 .00 .00 .37 2.52 .21 R 1.46 .59 4.04 1955 (s) .02 (s) .01 (s) .01 .65 R 3.94 .44 2.66 1.10 6.64 1960 (s) .01 (s) .01 .03 .15 .90 4.81 .73 3.93 1.66 R 8.91

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Table 3.8 Value of Fossil Fuel Exports, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Billion Dollars) Year Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas Crude Oil Petroleum Products 1 Total Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 1949 0.30 2.05 0.01 0.06 (s) 0.01 0.10 0.68 0.46 R 3.18 0.87 R 5.98 1950 .27 1.84 .01 .04 (s) .02 .10 .70 .39 2.69 .78 R 5.29 1955 .48 2.92 .01 .05 .01 .04 .04 .23 .60 3.61 1.14 R 6.85 1960 .35 1.90 .01 .04 (s) .02 .01 .04 .47 2.51 .84 4.51

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Table 3.9 Value of Fossil Fuel Net Imports, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Billion Dollars) Year Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas Crude Oil Petroleum Products 1 Total Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 1949 -0.29 R -2.03 (s) -0.03 (s) -0.01 0.21 1.42 -0.32 -2.24 -0.42 -2.89 1950 -.27 -1.82 (s) -.01 (s) -.02 .27 1.82 -.18 -1.23 -.18 -1.26 1955 -.48 R -2.90 -.01 -.04 -.01 -.03 .62 3.71 -.16 -.95 -.04 -.22 1960 -.35 -1.89 -.01 -.03 .02 .13

  15. Coals and coal requirements for the COREX process

    SciTech Connect

    Heckmann, H.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of non met coals for production of liquid hot metal was the motivation for the development of the COREX Process by VAI/DVAI during the 70`s. Like the conventional ironmaking route (coke oven/blast furnace) it is based on coal as source of energy and reduction medium. However, in difference to blast furnace, coal can be used directly without the necessary prestep of cokemaking. Coking ability of coals therefore is no prerequisite of suitability. Meanwhile the COREX Process is on its way to become established in ironmaking industry. COREX Plants at ISCOR, Pretoria/South Africa and POSCO Pohang/Korea, being in operation and those which will be started up during the next years comprise already an annual coal consumption capacity of approx. 5 Mio. tonnes mtr., which is a magnitude attracting the interest of industrial coal suppliers. The increasing importance of COREX as a comparable new technology forms also a demand for information regarding process requirements for raw material, especially coal, which is intended to be met here.

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Appendix D Table D1. Estimated Primary Energy Consumption in the United States, Selected Years, 1635-1945 (Quadrillion Btu) Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Electricity Net Imports b Total Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Total Wood a 1635 .............. NA - - - - NA - - (s) (s) - - (s) 1645 .............. NA - - - - NA - - 0.001 0.001 - - 0.001 1655 .............. NA - - - - NA - - .002 .002 - - .002 1665 .............. NA - - - - NA - - .005 .005 - -

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 Table A6. Approximate Heat Rates for Electricity, and Heat Content of Electricity (Btu per Kilowatthour) Approximate Heat Rates a for Electricity Net Generation Heat Content j of Electricity k Fossil Fuels b Nuclear h Noncombustible Renewable Energy g,i Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Total Fossil Fuels f,g 1950 .............................. NA NA NA 14,030 - - 14,030 3,412 1955 .............................. NA NA

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    49 Table 2.3 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by End Use, 2006 End-Use Category Net Electricity 1 Residual Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 2 and NGL 3 Natural Gas Coal 4 Total 5 Million Kilowatthours Million Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Million Short Tons Indirect End Use (Boiler Fuel) ......................................... 12,109 21 4 2 2,059 25 - - Conventional Boiler Use ............................................. 12,109 11 3 2 1,245 6 - - CHP 6

  19. Coal Transportation Rate Sensitivity Analysis

    Reports and Publications

    2005-01-01

    On December 21, 2004, the Surface Transportation Board (STB) requested that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) analyze the impact of changes in coal transportation rates on projected levels of electric power sector energy use and emissions. Specifically, the STB requested an analysis of changes in national and regional coal consumption and emissions resulting from adjustments in railroad transportation rates for Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) coal using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). However, because NEMS operates at a relatively aggregate regional level and does not represent the costs of transporting coal over specific rail lines, this analysis reports on the impacts of interregional changes in transportation rates from those used in the Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005) reference case.

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Table 7.9 Coal Prices, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Short Ton) Year Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite 1 Anthracite Total Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 1949 4 4.90 4,R 33.80 4 ( ) 4 ( ) 2.37 R 16.35 8.90 R 61.38 5.24 R 36.14 1950 4 4.86 4,R 33.16 4 ( ) 4 ( ) 2.41 R 16.44 9.34 R 63.73 5.19 R 35.41 1955 4 4.51 4,R 27.17 4 ( ) 4 ( ) 2.38 R 14.34 8.00 R 48.19 4.69 R 28.25 1960 4 4.71 4,R 25.31 4 ( ) 4 ( ) 2.29 R 12.30 8.01 R

  1. Rend Lake College celebrates the opening of a new coal miner training facility

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-09-15

    The Coal Miner Training Center at Rend Lake College recently hosted the Illinois Mining Institute's annual conference and a regional mine rescue competition. The article gives an outline of the coal miner training and refresher course offered. 3 photos.

  2. International energy annual 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The International Energy Annual presents information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu). Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Data are provided on crude oil refining capacity and electricity installed capacity by type. Prices are included for selected crude oils and for refined petroleum products in selected countries. Population and Gross Domestic Product data are also provided.

  3. Coal production, 1986. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-28

    Coal Production 1986 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. The data presented in this report were collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Aministration Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-275) as amended. The 1986 coal production and related data presented in this report were obtained from companies owning mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10,000 or more short tons of coal in 1986. This survey originated at the Bureau of Mines, US Department of the Interior. This report also includes updated data for the demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States on both January 1, 1986 and January 1, 1987. This is the seventh annual summry on minable coal, pursuant to Sec. 801 of Public Law 95-620. 18 figs., 105 tabs.

  4. EIA's Energy in Brief: What is the role of coal in the United States?

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    What is the role of coal in the United States? Last Updated: January 19, 2016 The United States has the world's largest estimated recoverable reserves of coal, and it is a net exporter of coal. In 2014, U.S. coal mines produced about 1 billion short tons of coal, the first increase in annual coal output in three years. More than 90% of the coal produced in the United States was used by U.S. power plants to generate electricity. Although coal has been the largest source of electricity generation

  5. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    SciTech Connect

    Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

    2009-07-01

    likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. If coal to chemicals capacity reaches 70 million tonnes and coal-to-liquids capacity reaches 60 million tonnes, coal feedstock requirements would add an additional 450 million tonnes by 2025. Even with more efficient growth among these drivers, China's annual coal demand is expected to reach 3.9 to 4.3 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not reversed China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Substitution is a matter of scale: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth of 200 million tonnes would require 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas (compared to 2007 growth of 13 BCM), 48 GW of nuclear (compared to 2007 growth of 2 GW), or 86 GW of hydropower capacity (compared to 2007 growth of 16 GW). Ongoing dependence on coal reduces China's ability to mitigate carbon dioxide emissions growth. If coal demand remains on a high growth path, carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion alone would exceed total US energy-related carbon emissions by 2010. Within China's coal-dominated energy system, domestic transportation has emerged as the largest bottleneck for coal industry growth and is likely to remain a constraint to further expansion. China has a low proportion of high-quality reserves, but is producing its best coal first. Declining quality will further strain production and transport capacity. Furthermore, transporting coal to users has overloaded the train system and dramatically increased truck use, raising transportation oil demand. Growing international imports have helped to offset domestic transport bottlenecks. In the long term, import demand is likely to exceed 200 million tonnes by 2025, significantly impacting regional markets.

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Solar Thermal Collector Shipments by Type, Price, and Trade Total Shipments, 1974-2009 Trade, 1978-2009 Price of Total Shipments, 1986-2009 Number of U.S. Manufacturers by Type of Collector, 1974-2009 Average Annual Shipments per Manufacturer, 1974-2009 292 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Collectors that generally operate in the temperature range of 140 degrees Fahrenheit

  7. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Concentrating Solar Resources 108 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Notes: * Annual average direct normal solar resource data are shown. * kWh/m 2 /Day = kilowatthours per square meter per day. Web Page: For related information, see http://www.nrel.gov/gis/maps.html. Sources: This map was created by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the Department of Energy (October 20, 2008). The data for Hawaii and the 48 contiguous States are a 10-kilometer (km)

  8. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Photovoltaic Solar Resources U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 109 Notes: * Annual average solar resource data are shown for a tilt=latitude collector. * kWh/m 2 /Day = kilowatthours per square meter per day. Web Page: For related information, see http://www.nrel.gov/gis/maps.html. Sources: This map was created by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the Depart- ment of Energy (October 20, 2008). The data for Hawaii and the 48 contiguous States are a

  9. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Onshore Wind Resources 110 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Notes: * Data are annual average wind speed at 80 meters. * m/s = meters per second. Web Page: For related information, see http://www.nrel.gov/gis/maps.html. Sources: This map was created by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the Department of Energy (April 1, 2011). Wind resource estimates developed by AWS Truepower, LLC for windNavigator®. See http://www.windnavigator.com and

  10. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Strategic Petroleum Reserve, 1977-2011 End-of-Year Stocks in SPR Crude Oil Imports for SPR¹ SPR as Share of Domestic Stocks SPR Stocks as Days of Petroleum Net Imports² 158 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Imported by SPR and imported by others for SPR. 2 Derived by dividing end-of-year SPR stocks by annual average daily net imports of all petroleum. Note: SPR=Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Source: Table 5.17. 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 200 400 600

  11. US coal production and related data, 1986-1988. Data file

    SciTech Connect

    Balthasar, N.C.; Swann, T.C.; Young, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    The file contains comprehensive annual U.S. coal production and related data for 1986-1988 on coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, daily productive capacity, reserves and stocks. Data are obtained annually from Form EIA-7A, Coal Production Report, a survey of companies owning and/or operating mining operations that produced, processed or prepared coal in the U.S. Each year the data are published in the Energy Information Administration's Coal Production Report (DOE/EIA-0118). The file is updated annually.

  12. Word Pro - S1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Primary Energy Production (Quadrillion Btu) By Source, 1949-2015 By Source, Monthly Total, January-July By Source, July 2016 a Natural gas plant liquids. Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. Source: Table 1.2. 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 2014 2015 2016 Renewable Energy Crude Oil and NGPL a Nuclear Electric Power Coal Natural Gas Crude Oil and NGPL a Renewable Energy Nuclear Electric Power 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975

  13. Word Pro - S12

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 Table 12.5 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Transportation Sector (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide a ) Coal Natural Gas b Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity f Total g Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil c Jet Fuel LPG d Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline e Residual Fuel Oil Total 1973 Total ........................ (s) 39 6 163 152 3 6 886 57 1,273 2 1,315 1975 Total ........................ (s) 32 5 155

  14. Word Pro - S2

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) By Major Source, 1949-2015 By Major Source, Monthly Total, January-July By Major Source, July 2016 . 38 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 2014 2015 2016 Nuclear Electric Power Natural Gas Petroleum Renewable Energy Coal Renewable Energy Natural Gas 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Table 2.6 Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy b Elec- tricity Net Imports f Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum Total Hydro- electric Power d Geo- thermal Solar e Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total ...................... 2,199 651 472 3,322 0 1,346 NA NA NA 5 1,351 6 4,679 1955 Total ...................... 3,458 1,194 471 5,123 0 1,322 NA NA NA 3 1,325 14 6,461 1960 Total ......................

  16. Word Pro - S2

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Table 2.2 Residential Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Electricity Retail Sales e Electrical System Energy Losses f Total Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy b Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum Total Geo- thermal Solar d Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................... 1,261 1,240 1,322 3,824 NA NA 1,006 1,006 4,829 246 913 5,989 1955 Total .................... 867 2,198 1,767 4,833 NA NA 775 775 5,608 438 1,232 7,278 1960 Total .................... 585 3,212

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Table 2.3 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Elec- tricity Retail Sales g Electrical System Energy Losses h Total Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy b Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum d Total Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal Solar f Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................... 1,542 401 872 2,815 NA NA NA NA 19 19 2,834 225 834 3,893 1955 Total .................... 801 651 1,095 2,547 NA NA NA NA 15 15 2,561 350 984 3,895 1960 Total

  18. Word Pro - S2

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Table 2.4 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Elec- tricity Retail Sales h Electrical System Energy Losses i Total e Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy b Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum d Total e Hydro- electric Power f Geo- thermal Solar g Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................... 5,781 3,546 3,960 13,288 69 NA NA NA 532 602 13,890 500 1,852 16,241 1955 Total .................... 5,620 4,701 5,123 15,434 38 NA NA NA 631 669 16,103 887

  19. Word Pro - S6

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 Table 6.2 Coal Consumption by Sector (Thousand Short Tons) End-Use Sectors Electric Power Sector e,f Total Resi- dential Commercial Industrial Trans- portation CHP a Other b Total Coke Plants Other Industrial Total CHP c Non-CHP d Total 1950 Total .................... 51,562 g ( ) 63,021 63,021 104,014 h ( ) 120,623 120,623 224,637 63,011 91,871 494,102 1955 Total .................... 35,590 g ( ) 32,852 32,852 107,743

  20. Word Pro - S7

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 Table 7.3b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector (Subset of Table 7.3a) Coal a Petroleum Natural Gas f Other Gases g Biomass Other j Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e Wood h Waste i Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1950 Total .................... 91,871

  1. Word Pro - S7

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Table 7.4a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors) (Sum of Tables 7.4b and 7.4c) Coal a Petroleum Natural Gas f Other Gases g Biomass Other j Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e Wood h Waste i Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1950 Total .................... 91,871 5,423 69,998 NA NA 75,421 629 NA 5 NA NA 1955

  2. Word Pro - S7

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 Table 7.4b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector (Subset of Table 7.4a) Coal a Petroleum Natural Gas f Other Gases g Biomass Other j Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e Wood h Waste i Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1950 Total

  3. Word Pro - S7

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Table 7.2a Electricity Net Generation: Total (All Sectors) (Sum of Tables 7.2b and 7.2c; Million Kilowatthours) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage e Renewable Energy Total j Coal a Petro- leum b Natural Gas c Other Gases d Conven- tional Hydro- electric Power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar i Wind Wood g Waste h 1950 Total .............. 154,520 33,734 44,559 NA 0 f ( ) 100,885 390 NA NA NA NA 334,088 1955 Total .............. 301,363 37,138 95,285 NA 0 f ( )

  4. Word Pro - S7

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation Coal by Sector, 1989-2015 Petroleum by Sector, 1989-2015 Natural Gas by Sector, 1989-2015 Other Gases b by Sector, 1989-2015 Wood by Sector, 1989-2015 Waste by Sector, 1989-2015 112 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 Commercial Industrial Electric Power Electric Power Industrial Industrial Total a Total a 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 0.0 0.3 0.6 0.9 1.2 Billion Short Tons Total a

  5. Word Pro - S7

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Table 7.3a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Total (All Sectors) (Sum of Tables 7.3b and 7.3c) Coal a Petroleum Natural Gas f Other Gases g Biomass Other j Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e Wood h Waste i Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1950 Total .................... 91,871 5,423 69,998 NA NA 75,421 629 NA 5 NA NA 1955 Total ....................

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Table 11.6 Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment, 1985-2010 (Megawatts) Year Coal Petroleum and Natural Gas Total 1 Particulate Collectors Cooling Towers Flue Gas Desulfurization (Scrubbers) Total 2 Particulate Collectors Cooling Towers Flue Gas Desulfurization (Scrubbers) Total 2 Particulate Collectors Cooling Towers Flue Gas Desulfurization (Scrubbers) Total 2 1985 302,056 120,591 56,955 304,706 36,054 28,895 65 62,371 338,110

  7. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Table 11.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal 3 Natural Gas 4 Petroleum Total 2,9 Biomass 2 Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil 5 Jet Fuel Kero- sene LPG 6 Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline 7 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other 8 Total Wood 10 Waste 11 Fuel Ethanol 12 Bio- diesel Total 1949 1,118 270 12 140 NA 42 13 7 329 8 244 25 820 2,207 145 NA NA NA 145 1950 1,152 313 14 168 NA 48 16 9

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Table 11.2a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Residential Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Electricity 5 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kerosene Liquefied Petroleum Gases Total Wood 6 Total 6 1949 121 55 51 21 7 80 66 321 99 99 1950 120 66 61 25 9 95 69 350 94 94 1955 83 117 87 27 13 127 110 436 73 73 1960 56 170 115 26 19 160 156 542 59 59 1965 34 214 125 24 24 174 223 644 44 44 1970

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Table 11.2e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Geo- thermal Non- Biomass Waste 5 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Total 1949 187 30 2 NA 30 33 NA NA 250 1 NA 1 1950 206 35 2 NA 35 37 NA NA 278 1 NA 1 1955 324 63 2 NA 35 37 NA NA 424 (s) NA (s) 1960 396 95 2 NA 42 43 NA NA 535 (s) NA (s) 1965 546

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table 1.13 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Agency and Source, Fiscal Years 2003, 2010, and 2011 (Trillion Btu) Resource and Fiscal Years Agriculture Defense Energy GSA 1 HHS 2 Interior Justice NASA 3 Postal Service Trans- portation Veterans Affairs Other 4 Total Coal 2003 ..................................... (s) 15.4 2.0 0.0 (s) (s) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 17.7 2010 ..................................... (s) 15.5 4.5 .0 0.0 0.0 .0 .0 (s) .0 .1 .0 20.1 2011 P

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Table 1.14 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and American Indian Lands, Fiscal Years 2003-2011 Fiscal Year 7 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Natural Gas Plant Liquids 1 Natural Gas 2 Coal 3 Total Fossil Fuels 4 Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Sales 5,6 Sales as Share of Total U.S. Production Million Barrels Quadrillion

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table 1.15 Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels, Selected Years, 1980-2011 Year Petroleum Products Natural Gas 4 Coal Total Percent of Total Energy Consumption Asphalt and Road Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1 Lubricants Petro- chemical Feedstocks 2 Petroleum Coke Special Naphthas Other 3 Total Physical Units 5 1980 145 230 58 253 R 14 37 58 R 795 639 2.4 - - - - 1985 156 R 278 53 144 R 16 30 41 R 719 500 1.1 - - - - 1990 176 R 373 60 199 20 20 39 R 887 R 567 .6 - - - - 1991 162 R 426 53 203 17 17

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Commercial Sector 10 1989 9 7 18 1 36 - 1 2 9 - - - 12 - - - 47 1990 9 6 28 1 45 - 1 2

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.6b and 8.6c) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Trillion Btu 1989 16,510 1,410 16,357

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    45 Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Trillion Btu

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    59 Table 8.11b Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 NA NA NA NA 44.9 0.0 5 ( ) 18.5 (s) 10 ( ) NA NA NA 18.5 NA 63.4 1950 NA NA NA NA 50.0 .0 5 ( ) 19.2 (s) 10 (

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    61 Table 8.11d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Million Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 8 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 7 Wind Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Commercial Sector 9 1989 0.3 0.2 0.6 - 1.0 - - (s) (s) 0.2 - - - 0.2 - 1.2 1990 .3 .2 .7 - 1.2 - - (s)

  18. Outlook and Challenges for Chinese Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Aden, Nathaniel T.; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina

    2008-06-20

    China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. The rapid growth of coal demand since 2001 has created deepening strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about supply security. Although China's coal is 'plentiful,' published academic and policy analyses indicate that peak production will likely occur between 2016 and 2029. Given the current economic growth trajectory, domestic production constraints will lead to a coal gap that is not likely to be filled with imports. Urbanization, heavy industry growth, and increasing per-capita consumption are the primary drivers of rising coal usage. In 2006, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement accounted for 71% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units could save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand. If China follows Japan, steel production would peak by 2015; cement is likely to follow a similar trajectory. A fourth wedge of future coal consumption is likely to come from the burgeoning coal-liquefaction and chemicals industries. New demand from coal-to-liquids and coal-to-chemicals may add 450 million tonnes of coal demand by 2025. Efficient growth among these drivers indicates that China's annual coal demand will reach 4.2 to 4.7 billion tonnes by 2025. Central government support for nuclear and renewable energy has not been able to reduce China's growing dependence on coal for primary energy. Few substitution options exist: offsetting one year of recent coal demand growth would require over 107 billion cubic meters of natural gas, 48 GW of nuclear, or 86 GW of hydropower capacity. While these alternatives will continue to grow, the scale of development using existing technologies will be insufficient to substitute significant coal demand before 2025. The central role of heavy industry in GDP growth and the difficulty of substituting other fuels suggest that coal consumption is inextricably entwined with

  19. Coal Market Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    power generation, industrial steam generation, coal-to-liquids production, coal coke manufacturing, residentialcommercial consumption, and coal exports) within the CMM. By...

  20. Coal Distribution Database, 2008

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Processing Coal Plants and Commercial and Institutional Coal Users" and Form EIA-7A, "Coal Production and Preparation Report." Appendix A Assigning Missing Data to EIA-923...

  1. Coal Fleet Aging Meeting

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Director, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis FROM: Coal and ... capital cost adder based on the age and type of unit (coal, oilgas steam, and nuclear). ...

  2. International energy annual 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar, and wind electric power, biofuels energy for the US, and biofuels electric power for Brazil. New in the 1996 edition are estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of petroleum and coal, and the consumption and flaring of natural gas. 72 tabs.

  3. Analysis of Heat Rate Improvement Potential at Coal-Fired Power...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Analysis Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear and Renewables Analysis Prepared by: ... 2008) using the RS Means Construction Facilities Cost Data - 28th annual edition ...

  4. AEO2011: World Total Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Coal Flows By Importing Regions and Exporting Countries This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report...

  5. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 By Energy Source By North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code 6 46 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Liquefied petroleum gases. 2 Natural gas liquids. 3 See "Breeze" in Glossary. 4 Includes all other types of energy that respondents indicated were consumed or allocated. 5 Energy sources produced onsite from the use of other energy sources but sold or trans- ferred to another

  6. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2 Natural Gas Production Gross Withdrawals and Dry Gas Production, 1949-2011 Production Flow, 2011 (Trillion Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals by Well Type, 2011 180 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Dry Gas Production 1 Volume reduction resulting from the removal of natural gas plant liquids, which are trans- ferred to petroleum supply. 2 Includes natural gas gross withdrawals from coalbed wells and shale gas wells. Source: Table 6.2. Gross Withdrawals 1950 1960

  7. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Solar Thermal Collector Domestic Shipments by Market Sector, End-Use, and Type, 2009 End Use Market Sector Type of Collector End Use by Type of Collector 294 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Combined space and water heating. 2 Space heating, combined heating, and space cooling. 3 Collectors that generally operate at temperatures below 110 degrees Fahrenheit. 4 Collectors that generally operate in the temperature range of 140 degrees Fahrenheit to 180 degrees

  8. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Introduction This year, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has examined different ways to represent energy consumption in the Annual Energy Review (AER). This examination centered on two methods for representing related aspects of energy consumption and losses. The first is an alternative method for deriving the energy content of noncombustible renewable resources, which has been implemented in AER 2010 (Table 1.3). The second is a new representation of delivered total energy and

  9. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 By Energy Source By North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code 6 46 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Liquefied petroleum gases. 2 Natural gas liquids. 3 See "Breeze" in Glossary. 4 Includes all other types of energy that respondents indicated were consumed or allocated. 5 Energy sources produced onsite from the use of other energy sources but sold or trans- ferred to another

  10. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Household Energy Consumption Household Energy Consumpton by Census Region, Selected Years, 1978-2009¹ Household Energy Consumption by Source, 2009 Energy Consumption per Household, Selected Years, 1978-2009¹ Energy Consumption per Household, by Census Region, 2009 50 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 For years not shown, there are no data available. 2 Liquefied petroleum gases. Notes: * Data include natural gas, electricity, distillate fuel oil, kerosene,

  11. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures Household Energy Consumption by End Use, Selected Years, Household Energy Expenditures, Selected Years, 1978-2005¹ 1978-2005¹ Household Energy Consumption for Space Heating by Fuel 2005 Appliances, Electronics, and Lighting Expenditures, Selected Years, 1978-2005¹ 52 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 For years not shown, there are no data available. 2 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal

  12. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure Indicators, Selected Years, 1979-2003 Buildings by Energy Source Used Consumption Consumption per Square Foot Square Footage per Building by Expenditures Expenditures Per Square Foot Energy Source Used 62 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Electricity only; excludes electrical system energy losses. 2 Distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, and kerosene. 3 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See

  13. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Cumulative Production and Proved Reserves, 1977-2010 Crude Oil Natural Gas (Dry) Cumulative Production and Proved Reserves, Indexed 90 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Notes: * Data are at end of year. * Crude oil includes lease condensate. Source: Table 4.2. Natural Gas (Dry) Cumulative Production Crude Oil Cumulative Production Natural Gas (Dry) Proved Reserves Crude Oil Proved Reserves 1977 1980 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001

  14. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    a Petroleum and Other Liquids Overview Overview, 1949-2011 Overview, 2011 Production, 1949-2011 Production and Net Imports, Share of Estimated Consumption, 1949-2011 118 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Note: Production includes production of crude oil (including lease condensate), natural gas plant liquids, fuel ethanol (minus denaturant), and biodiesel; and processing gain. Source: Table 5.1a. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 Million Barrels

  15. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Natural Gas Production Gross Withdrawals and Dry Gas Production, 1949-2011 Production Flow, 2011 (Trillion Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals by Well Type, 2011 180 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Dry Gas Production 1 Volume reduction resulting from the removal of natural gas plant liquids, which are trans- ferred to petroleum supply. 2 Includes natural gas gross withdrawals from coalbed wells and shale gas wells. Source: Table 6.2. Gross Withdrawals 1950 1960

  16. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 Total (All Sectors) by Source, 2011 By Sector, 1989-2011 By Sector, 2011 228 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources,

  17. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Consumption for Electricity Generation By Major Category, 1949-2011 By Major Fuel, 2011 By Major Source, 1949-2011 By Sector, 1989-2011 232 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Conventional hydroelectric power. 2 Geothermal, other gases, electricity net imports, solar thermal and photovoltaic energy, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic

  18. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    b Electric Net Summer Capacity by Sector Total (All Sectors) and Sectors, 1989-2011 Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 Commercial Sector, 2011 Industrial Sector, 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 257 1 Conventional hydroelectric power, solar/PV, wood, wind, blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels, batteries, chemicals, hydro- gen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, and miscellaneous

  19. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Programs Actual Peakload Reductions Total, 1989-2010 Actual Peakload Reductions, 2010 Energy Savings, 1989-2010 Electric Utility Costs,¹ 1989-2010 266 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Program costs consist of all costs associated with providing the various Demand-Side Management (DSM) programs or measures. The costs of DSM programs fall into these major categories: customer rebates/incentives,

  20. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2b Electricity Net Generation by Sector By Sector, 2011 Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 Industrial and Commercial Sectors, 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 223 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived

  1. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Note. Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from the combustion of biomass to produce energy are excluded from the total energy-related CO 2 emissions reported in the Annual Energy Review Section 11, but appear separately in Tables 11.1-11.2e. According to current international convention (see the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's "2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inven- tories"), carbon

  2. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum and Natural Gas Plant Liquids Asphalt. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) adopted the thermal conversion factor of 6.636 million British thermal units (Btu) per barrel as estimated by the Bureau of Mines and first published in the Petroleum Statement, Annual, 1956. Aviation Gasoline. EIA adopted the thermal conversion factor of 5.048 million Btu per barrel as adopted by the Bureau of Mines from the Texas Eastern Transmission Corporation

  3. Word Pro - S1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy a Total Coal b Natural Gas (Dry) Crude Oil c NGPL d Total Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal Solar Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................. 14.060 6.233 11.447 0.823 32.563 0.000 1.415 NA NA NA 1.562 2.978 35.540 1955 Total .................. 12.370 9.345 14.410 1.240 37.364 .000 1.360 NA NA NA 1.424 2.784 40.148 1960 Total .................. 10.817 12.656 14.935

  4. Word Pro - S1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy a Total f Coal Natural Gas b Petro- leum c Total d Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal Solar Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................... 12.347 5.968 13.315 31.632 0.000 1.415 NA NA NA 1.562 2.978 34.616 1955 Total .................... 11.167 8.998 17.255 37.410 .000 1.360 NA NA NA 1.424 2.784 40.208 1960 Total .................... 9.838 12.385 19.919 42.137 .006

  5. Word Pro - S2

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Table 2.8 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Source, Fiscal Years (Trillion Btu) Fiscal Year a Coal Natural Gas b Petroleum Other Mobility Fuels f Elec- tricity Purchased Steam and Other g Total Aviation Gasoline Fuel Oil c Jet Fuel LPG d Motor Gasoline e Total 1975 .............. 77.9 166.2 22.0 376.0 707.4 5.6 63.2 1,174.2 0.0 141.5 5.1 1,565.0 1976 .............. 71.3 151.8 11.6 329.7 610.0 4.7 60.4 1,016.4 .0 139.3 4.6 1,383.4 1977 .............. 68.4 141.2 8.8 348.5 619.2 4.1 61.4

  6. Word Pro - S2

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial Sector Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) By Major Source, 1949-2015 By Major Source, Monthly Total, January-July By Major Source, July 2016 32 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 0 1 2 3 4 5 Electricity a Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Renewable Energy 2014 2015 2016 J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 Natural Gas

  7. Word Pro - S2

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Industrial Sector Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) By Major Source, 1949-2015 By Major Source, Monthly Total, January-July By Major Source, July 2016 34 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 Coal 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 0 3 6 9 12 Natural Gas Petroleum Electricity a Renewable Energy J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 Natural Gas Petroleum

  8. Word Pro - S6

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Coal (Million Short Tons) Overview, 1949-2015 Consumption by Sector, 1949-2015 Overview, Monthly Electric Power Sector Consumption, Monthly 96 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 2014 20 15 2016 Electric Power Consumption J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 100 Net Exports 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 a Includes combined-heat-and-power

  9. Word Pro - S6

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Table 6.3 Coal Stocks by Sector (Thousand Short Tons) Producers and Distributors End-Use Sectors Electric Power Sector c,d Total Residential a and Commercial Industrial Total Coke Plants Other b Total 1950 Year ..................... NA 2,462 16,809 26,182 42,991 45,453 31,842 77,295 1955 Year ..................... NA 998 13,422 15,880 29,302 30,300 41,391 71,691 1960 Year ..................... NA 666 11,122 11,637 22,759 23,425 51,735 75,160 1965 Year ..................... NA 353 10,640 13,122

  10. Word Pro - S9

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Table 9.9 Cost of Fossil-Fuel Receipts at Electric Generating Plants (Dollars a per Million Btu, Including Taxes) Coal Petroleum Natural Gas e All Fossil Fuels f Residual Fuel Oil b Distillate Fuel Oil c Petroleum Coke Total d 1973 Average .................... 0.41 0.79 NA NA 0.80 0.34 0.48 1975 Average .................... .81 2.01 NA NA 2.02 .75 1.04 1980 Average .................... 1.35 4.27 NA NA 4.35 2.20 1.93 1985 Average .................... 1.65 4.24 NA NA 4.32 3.44 2.09 1990 Average

  11. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    27 Table 8.2d Electricity Net Generation: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.2a; Billion Kilowatthours) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- themal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Commercial Sector 10 1989 0.7 0.6 2.2 0.1 3.6 - - 0.1 0.1 0.5 - - - 0.7 - 4.3 1990 .8 .6 3.3 .1 4.8 - -

  12. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Table 11.3 Methane Emissions, 1980-2009 (Million Metric Tons of Methane) Year Energy Sources Waste Management Agricultural Sources Industrial Processes 9 Total 5 Coal Mining Natural Gas Systems 1 Petroleum Systems 2 Mobile Com- bustion 3 Stationary Com- bustion 4 Total 5 Landfills Waste- water Treatment 6 Total 5 Enteric Fermen- tation 7 Animal Waste 8 Rice Cultivation Crop Residue Burning Total 5 1980 3.06 4.42 NA 0.28 0.45 8.20 10.52 0.52 11.04 5.47 2.87 0.48 0.04 8.86 0.17 28.27 1981 2.81

  13. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Table 2.7 Type of Heating in Occupied Housing Units, Selected Years, 1950-2009 Year Coal 1 Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene Liquefied Petroleum Gases Natural Gas Electricity Wood Solar Other 2 None 3 Total Million Occupied Housing Units 1950 14.48 9.46 4 ( ) 0.98 11.12 0.28 4.17 NA 0.77 1.57 42.83 1960 6.46 17.16 4 ( ) 2.69 22.85 .93 2.24 NA .22 .48 53.02 1970 1.82 16.47 4 ( ) 3.81 35.01 4.88 .79 NA .27 .40 63.45 1973 .80 17.24 4 ( ) 4.42 38.46 7.21 .60 NA .15 .45 69.34 1975 .57 16.30 4 ( ) 4.15

  14. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Table 3.6 Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Million Dollars 1 ) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Natural Gas 2 Petroleum Retail Electricity 3 Total 4 Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Retail Electricity 3 Total 6,7 Coal Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Biomass 8 Retail Electricity 3 Total 7,9 Petroleum 5 Total 7,10 1970 5,272 4,186 10,352 20,112 1,844 1,440 7,319 10,678 2,082 2,625 6,069 366 5,624 16,691 35,327 35,379 1971 5,702 4,367 11,589 21,934

  15. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    69 Table 3.1 Fossil Fuel Production Prices, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Million Btu) Year Coal 1 Natural Gas 2 Crude Oil 3 Fossil Fuel Composite 4 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Percent Change 7 1949 0.21 1.45 0.05 0.37 0.44 3.02 0.26 1.81 - - 1950 .21 1.41 .06 .43 .43 R 2.95 .26 1.74 -3.6 1955 .19 1.12 .09 .54 .48 2.88 .27 R 1.63 -3.6 1960 .19 1.04 .13 .68 .50 2.67 .28 1.52 -2.3 1965 .18 .92 .15 .73 .49 R 2.47 .28 1.39 -1.5 1970 .27 1.09 .15 .63

  16. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Table 3.3 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by Source, 1970-2010 (Dollars 1 per Million Btu) Year Primary Energy 2 Electric Power Sector 11,12 Retail Electricity 13 Total Energy 9,10,14 Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass 8 Total 9,10 Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel 4 LPG 5 Motor Gasoline 6 Residual Fuel Oil Other 7 Total 1970 0.38 0.59 1.16 0.73 1.43 2.85 0.42 1.38 1.71 0.18 1.29 1.08 0.32 4.98 1.65 1971 .42 .63 1.22 .77 1.46 2.90 .58 1.45 1.78 .18 1.31 1.15 .38 5.30 1.76 1972

  17. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Table 3.4 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Dollars 1 per Million Btu) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Natural Gas 2 Petroleum Retail Electricity 3 Total 4 Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Retail Electricity 3 Total 6,7 Coal Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Biomass 8 Retail Electricity 3 Total 7,9 Petroleum 5 Total 7,10 1970 1.06 1.54 6.51 2.10 0.75 R 0.90 6.09 1.97 0.45 0.38 0.98 1.59 2.99 0.84 2.31 2.31 1971 1.12 1.59 6.80 2.24 .80 1.02 6.44 2.15 .50

  18. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Table 7.4 Coal Imports by Country of Origin, 2000-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year Australia New Zealand Canada Mexico Colombia Venezuela China India Indonesia Europe South Africa Other Total Norway Poland Russia Ukraine United Kingdom Other Total 2000 0.2 0.0 1.9 (s) 7.6 2.0 (s) (s) 0.7 0.0 0.0 (s) 0.0 (s) 0.0 (s) 0.0 (s) 12.5 2001 .3 (s) 2.6 (s) 11.2 3.3 .1 (s) .9 (s) .5 .2 .0 .1 (s) .8 .4 .1 19.8 2002 .8 .0 2.1 (s) 9.2 3.3 .1 (s) 1.0 .0 .1 .1 .0 (s) (s) .2 .1 (s) 16.9 2003 .3 .1 2.1 .0 15.5

  19. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    11 Table 7.7 Coal Mining Productivity, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Short Tons per Employee Hour 1 ) Year Mining Method Location Total 2 Underground Surface 2 East of the Mississippi West of the Mississippi Underground Surface 2 Total 2 Underground Surface 2 Total 2 1949 3 0.68 3 1.92 NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.72 1950 3 .72 3 1.96 NA NA NA NA NA NA .76 1955 3 1.04 3 2.65 NA NA NA NA NA NA 1.14 1960 3 1.33 3 2.91 NA NA NA NA NA NA 1.52 1965 3 1.75 3 4.10 NA NA NA NA NA NA 2.09 1970 3 1.72 3 4.53 NA NA NA

  20. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    29 Table 8.3a Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.3b and 8.3c; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 1989 323 96 462 93 973 546 30 577 39 1,589 1990 363 127 538 141 1,168 651 36 687 40 1,896 1991 352 112 547 148 1,159 623 37 660 44 1,863 1992 367 117 592 160 1,236 658 40 698 42 1,976 1993 373 129 604 142 1,248 668 45 713

  1. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Commercial Sector 8 1989 14 4 10 (s) 27 (s) 10 10 - 38 1990 15 5 16 (s) 36 (s) 10 11 - 46 1995 17 3 29 - 48 (s) 15 15 (s) 63 1996 20 3 33 R - 55 1 17 18 - 73 1997 22 4 40 (s) 66 1 19 20 - 86 1998 20 5

  2. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Table 8.4a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.4b and 8.4c; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal 5 Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 1,995 415 569 NA 2,979 0 1,425 6 NA NA NA NA 1,431 NA 5 4,415 1950 2,199 472 651

  3. Word Pro - S2.lwp

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solarphotovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP)...

  4. Regional population and employment adjustments to rising coal production. [USA

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, P.R.

    1983-11-01

    Annual U.S. coal production rose by nearly 17 percent in the years following the oil crisis of 1973. This increase induced slight gains in population in the Nation's 289 coal counties but greater gains in employment--both in coal mining and in other industries. Coal counties in the West increased production and employment more than those in the Interior and East. Increased coal mining caused employment to expand in secondary industries (contract construction, transportation, finance), but had little effect on agriculture (employment down) and manufacturing (employment up slightly).

  5. Keystone coal industry manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The 1994 Keystone Coal Industry Manual is presented. Keystone has served as the one industry reference authority for the many diverse organizations concerned with the supply and utilization of coal in the USA and Canada. Through the continuing efforts of coal producers, buyers, users, sellers, and equipment designers and manufacturers, the coal industry supplies an abundant and economical fuel that is indispensable in meeting the expanding energy needs of North America. The manual is divided into the following sections: coal sales companies, coal export, transportation of coal, consumer directories, coal associations and groups, consulting and financial firms, buyers guide, industry statistics and ownership, coal preparation, coal mine directory, and coal seams.

  6. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Estimated Number of Alternative-Fueled Vehicles in Use and Alternative Fuel Consumption Vehicles in Use, 1995-2010 Vehicles in Use by Fuel Type, 2010 Fuel Consumption, 5 1995-2010 Fuel Consumption by Type, 2010 290 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Ethanol, 85 percent (E85). Includes only those E85 vehicles believed to be used as alternative-fueled vehicles, primarily fleet-operated vehicles; excludes other vehicles with E85- fueling capability. 2 Liquefied

  7. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments, Trade, and Prices Number of U.S. Companies Reporting Shipments, 1982-2010 Total Shipments, 1982-2010 Trade, Modules Only, 1996-2010 Prices, 1989-2010 296 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Note: Shipments are for domestic and export shipments, and may include imports that subsequently were shipped to domestic or foreign customers. Source:

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 U.S. Shipments of Photovoltaic Modules Only by Sector and End Use, 2010 By End Use By Sector 298 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 See "Electric Power Grid" in Glossary. 2 Photovoltaic modules that are connected to the electric power grid, and whose output is fed directly into the grid. 3 Photovoltaic modules that are connected to the electric power grid, and whose output is consumed mainly onsite. 4 Photovoltaic modules that are not connected to

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output Emissions by Type of Generating Unit, 2010 Emissions by Sector, 1989-2010 314 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 5.0 (s) 0.2 0.2 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Million Metric Tons of Gas Sulfur Dioxide ¹ For carbon dioxide: municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources; tire-derived fuel, and geothermal. For sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides: blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption Total¹ 1949-2011 Economic Growth and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1949-2011 By Major Source, 1949-2011 By Biomass¹ Source, 2011 302 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 ¹ Carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy consumption are excluded from total emissions. See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section. 2 Metric tons of carbon dioxide can be

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Agency and Source, Fiscal Years 2003, 2010, and 2011 By Agency By Source 28 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Includes small amount of renewable energy; see Table 1.13, footnote 8. 2 Natural gas, plus a small amount of supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Chilled water, renewable energy, and other fuels reported as used in facilities. 4 Distillate fuel oil and residual fuel oil. 5 Includes ethanol blended into motor gasoline. 6

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and American Indian Lands Total, Fiscal Years¹ 2003-2011 Federal and American Indian Lands Fossil Fuels Sales as Share of Total U.S. Fossil Fuels Production, Fiscal Years¹ 2003-2011 By Source, Fiscal Years¹ 2003-2011 Federal and American Indian Lands Fossil Fuels Sales as Share of Total U.S. Fossil Fuels Production, By Source, Fiscal Year¹ 2011 30 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 ¹ The U.S. Government's fiscal

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels Total, 1980-2011 As Share of Total Energy Consumption, 1980-2011 By Fuel, 2011 By Petroleum Product, 2011 32 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Liquefied petroleum gases and pentanes plus are aggregated to avoid disclosure of proprie- tary information. 2 Distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, waxes, and miscellaneous products. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Note: See Note 2, "Non-Combustion Use of Fossil

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source By Survey Year, 1979-2003 By Census Region, 2003 60 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Electricity only; excludes electrical system energy losses. 2 Distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, and kerosene. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Q=Data withheld because either the relative standard error was greater than 50 percent or fewer than 20 buildings were sampled. Note: See Appendix C for map of Census regions.

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End Use, 2003 By End Use By Principal Building Activity 64 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1,340 481 436 381 167 156 88 69 24 418 Lighting Cooling Ventilation Refrigeration Space Computers Water Office Cooking Other¹ 0 500 1,000 1,500 Trillion Btu Heating Heating Equipment and Storage Assembly 733 719 371 248 244 235 217 208 167 149 267 Mercantile Office Education Health Care Warehouse Lodging Food Service Food

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by Source Total Energy, 1970-2010 By Energy Type, 2010 Expenditures³ by Energy Type, Indexed, 1970-2010 By Petroleum Product, 2010 76 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Wood and wood-derived fuels, and biomass waste; excludes fuel ethanol and biodiesel. 3 Based on nominal dollars. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Asphalt and road oil,

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 2010 By Sector Residential Sector by Major Source² Commercial Sector by Major Source³ Industrial Sector by Major Source 4 78 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 561 250 216 178 Transportation Residential Industrial Commercial 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Billion Dollars¹ 167 54 27 Retail Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum 0 50 100 150 200 Billion Dollars¹ 106 63 37 7 3 Petroleum Retail Electricity

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Value of Fossil Fuel Production, Imports, and Exports Overview, 1949-2011 Production by Fuel, 1949-2011 Overview, 2011 70 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Production 1 In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross domestic product implicit price defla- tors in Table D1. See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary. 2 See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Sources: Tables 3.2, 3.7, and 3.8. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 175

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by Source Total Energy, 1970-2010 By Energy Type, 2010 Prices³ by Energy Type, Indexed, 1970-2010 By Petroleum Product, 2010 72 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Fuel Oil Gasoline 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Wood and wood-derived fuels, and biomass waste; excludes fuel ethanol and biodiesel. Prior to 2001, also includes non-biomass waste. 3 Based on nominal dollars.

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 2010 By Sector Residential Sector by Major Source Commercial Sector by Major Source Industrial Sector by Major Source 74 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 22.40 21.00 20.90 12.04 Residential Transportation Commercial Industrial 0 5 10 15 20 25 Dollars¹ per Million Btu 33.81 23.46 11.13 Retail Petroleum Natural 0 10 20 30 40 Dollars¹ per Million Btu Gas Electricity 19.89 17.58 6.25 3.96 2.74 Retail Petroleum

  1. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory and Development Wells Total Wells Drilled, 1949-2010 Total Wells Drilled by Type, 1949-2010 Successful Wells, 1949-2010 Wells Drilled, 2010 Footage Drilled, 2010 Average Depth, 2010 96 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Data are for exploratory and development wells combined. Sources: Tables 4.5-4.7. Total¹ 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 25 50 75 100 Thousand Wells 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Exploratory Wells, 1949-2010 Exploratory Wells Drilled by Well Type Exploratory Footage Drilled by Well Type Exploratory Wells Average Depth, All Wells Exploratory Wells Average Depth by Well Type 98 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Note: These graphs depict exploratory wells only; see Figure 4.5 for all wells and Figure 4.7 for development wells only. Source: Table 4.6. Dry Holes 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 3 6 9 12 15

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Crude Oil and Natural Gas Development Wells, 1949-2010 Development Wells Drilled by Well Type Development Footage Drilled by Well Type Development Wells Average Depth, All Wells Development Wells Average Depth by Well Type 100 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Note: These graphs depict development wells only; see Figure 4.5 for all wells and Figure 4.6 for exploratory wells only. Source: Table 4.7. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 10 20 30 40 50 Thousand

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Uranium Exploration and Development Drilling Total Holes Drilled, 1958-2011¹ Holes Drilled, Selected Years Total Footage Drilled, 1949-2011¹ Footage Drilled, Selected Years 104 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 In 2002 and 2003, data are withheld to avoid disclosure. Source: Table 4.9. 19 10 9 2 1 5 8 28 18 2 0 5 1961 1971 1981 1991 2001 2011 0 10 20 30 Thousands Exploration Development 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Thousands 3 4

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Technically Recoverable Crude Oil and Natural Gas Resource Estimates, 2009 Crude Oil and Lease Condensate, Total Technically Dry Natural Gas, Total Technically Recoverable Resources Recoverable Resources Crude Oil and Lease Condensate by Type Dry Natural Gas by Type 88 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 58% 25% 18% 48 States¹ Onshore 48 States¹ Offshore Alaska 20% 13% 13% 54% 48 States¹ Onshore 48 States¹ Offshore Gas Alaska Tight Gas, Shale Gas, and Coalbed

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves Total, 1949-2010 By Type, 2010 By Type, 1949-2010 92 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 COE=crude oil equivalent. ² To the extent that lease condensate is measured or estimated it is included in "Natural Gas Liquids"; otherwise, lease condensate is included in "Crude Oil." Notes: * Data are at end of year. * API=American Petroleum Institute. AGA=American Gas Association.

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Petroleum Exports by Country of Destination Total Exports and Exports to Canada and Mexico, 1960-2011 By Selected Country, 1960-2011 By Selected Country, 2011 130 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Source: Table 5.6. Total Exports Japan 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Thousand Barrels per Day Exports to Canada and Mexico 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, 1960-2011 Total, OPEC, and Non-OPEC By Selected Country Total Net Imports as Share of Consumption Net Imports From OPEC 132 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Note: OPEC=Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. Source: Table 5.7. OPEC Non-OPEC Saudi Arabia Canada and Mexico 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Million Barrels per Day 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Refinery Capacity and Utilization, 1949-2011 Number of Operable Refineries Utilization Capacity 136 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 ¹ Operable refineries capacity on January 1. Source: Table 5.9. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 100 200 300 400 Total Units 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 20 40 60 80 100 Percent 1955 1965 1975 1985 1995 2005 0 5 10 15 20 Million Barrels per Day Capacity¹ Unused Capacity Gross Input to Distillation Units

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Total, 1949-2011 By Product, 2011 By Selected Product, 1949-2011 138 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Source: Table 5.10. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 Thousand Barrels per Day 909 618 295 208 152 Ethane Propane Pentanes Isobutane Normal 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 Thousand Barrels per Day Plus Butane Isobutane Normal Butane Propane 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales, 1984-2010 Total by Fuel Distillate Fuel Oil by Selected End Use Residual Fuel Oil by Major End Use Kerosene by Major End Use 154 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Source: Table 5.15. On-Highway Diesel Commercial Railroad 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 4 5 Million Barrels per Day Residential Distillate Fuel Oil 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Million Barrels per Day Kerosene Residual Fuel Oil Vessel

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Crude Oil Domestic First Purchase Prices U.S. Average Prices, 1949-2011 Alaska North Slope, California, and Texas 1977-2011 160 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross domestic product implicit price defla- tors in Table D1. See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary. 2 See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 3 Alaska North Slope. Source: Table 5.18. Real¹ Nominal² 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Value of Crude Oil Imports Total, 1973-2011 Totals, 2011 By Selected Country, 2011 164 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Note: OPEC=Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. Source: Table 5.20. 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 Billion Dollars¹ 335 170 165 73 Total Non-OPEC OPEC Persian Gulf 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 Billion Dollars¹

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Crude Oil Refiner Acquisition Costs, 1968-2011 Summary Composite Costs Domestic Costs Imported Costs 166 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 In chained (2005) dollars, calculated by using gross domestic product implicit price defla- tors in Table D1. See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary. Source: Table 5.21. 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Nominal Dollars¹ per Barrel

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Refiner Sales Prices for Selected Petroleum Products, 1995-2011 To Resellers To End Users 168 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Source: Table 5.22. Residual Fuel Oil 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 Dollars¹ per Gallon, Excluding Taxes Motor Gasoline Residual Fuel Oil Motor Gasoline No. 2 Distillate Propane 1996 1998 2000 2002

  16. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 All Sellers Sales Prices for Selected Petroleum Products, 2010 Motor Gasoline, Selected Grades Distillate Fuel Oil, Residual Fuel Oil, and Propane 170 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Includes oxygenated motor gasoline. 3 > 15 and <= 500 parts per million. 4 > 500 parts per million. - - = Not applicable. Note: Data are preliminary. Source: Table 5.23. 2.32 2.29

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 5.1a Petroleum and Other Liquids Overview, Selected Years, 1949-2011 Year Production 1 Production as Share of Estimated Consumption Net Imports 2 Net Imports as Share of Estimated Consumption Balancing Item 3 Estimated Consumption 4 Thousand Barrels per Day Percent Thousand Barrels per Day Percent Thousand Barrels per Day 1949 5,475 95.0 318 5.5 -30 5,763 1950 5,908 91.5 545 8.4 5 6,458 1955 7,611 90.0 880 10.4 -37 8,455

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Natural Gas Well Productivity, 1960-2011 Gross Withdrawals by Location Number of Producing Wells Gross Withdrawals by State and Federal Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Well Average Productivity 184 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Trillion Cubic Feet (Cumulative) 1 Through 1996, includes gross withdrawals in Federal offshore areas of the Gulf of Mexico;

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Coke Overview Production and Consumption, 1949-2011 Overview, 2011 Trade 212 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Source: Table 7.8. 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 20 40 60 80 Million Short Tons Consumption Production 15.4 1.4 1.0 15.8 Production Imports Exports Consumption 0 5 10 15 20 Million Short Tons 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 2 4 6 8 Million Short Tons Imports Exports

  20. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    a Electric Net Summer Capacity, Total (All Sectors) Total, 1949-2011 By Major Category, 2011 By Source, 2011 256 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Total 1 Conventional and pumped storage. 2 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels, batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, and miscellaneous technologies. Source: Table 8.11a. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200

  1. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period U.S.¹ Summer Peak Load,² All Interconnections, 1986-2011 Summer Capacity Margin, 1996-2011 U.S.¹ Summer Peak Load² by NERC³ Regional Assessment Area, 2011 262 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 United States excluding Alaska and Hawaii. 2 See "Noncoincident Peak Load" in Glossary. 3 See "North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC)" in Glossary. Notes: *

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    b Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Winter Peak Period U.S.¹ Winter Peak Load,² All Interconnections, 1986-2011 Winter Capacity Margin, 1996-2011 U.S.¹ Winter Peak Load² by NERC³ Regional Assessment Area, 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 263 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Gigawatts 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Percent 48 47 5 79 131 154 41 52 107 FRCC NPCC

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.12a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period, 1986-2011 (Megawatts, Except as Noted) Year Noncoincident Peak Load 1 by North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) 2 Regional Assessment Area Capacity Margin 21 (percent) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT 4 Western Inter- connection All Inter- connections FRCC 5 NPCC 6 Balance of Eastern Region 3 ECAR 7,8 MAAC 8,9 MAIN 8,10 MAPP 11

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nuclear Generating Units Operable Units, 1 1957-2011 Nuclear Net Summer Capacity Change, 1950-2011 Status of All Nuclear Generating Units, 2011 Permanent Shutdowns by Year, 1955-2011 270 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Units holding full-power operating licenses, or equivalent permission to operate, at the end of the year. Note: Data are at end of year. Sources: Tables 9.1 and 8.11a. 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 -4 0 4 8

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Uranium Overview Production and Trade, 1949-2011 Production and Trade, 2011 Inventories, End of Year 1981-2011 Average Prices, 1981-2011 274 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Purchased Imports Purchased Imports Domestic Purchases 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Note: See "Uranium Oxide" in Glossary. Source: Table 9.3. 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 25 50 75 Million Pounds Uranium Oxide Export

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Table 3.2 Value of Fossil Fuel Production, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Billion Dollars) Year Coal 1 Natural Gas 2 Crude Oil 3,4 Total Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 1949 2.52 R 17.37 0.33 2.24 4.68 R 32.27 7.52 R 51.88 1950 2.91 R 19.84 .44 3.00 4.95 R 33.80 8.30 R 56.64 1955 2.30 R 13.87 .94 5.67 6.88 R 41.45 10.12 R 60.99 1960 2.10 R 11.27 1.79 9.61 7.42 R 39.84 11.30 R 60.72 1965 2.40 R 12.03 2.57 R 12.87 8.15 R 40.86 13.11 R 65.76 1970 3.88 R 15.96 3.73

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    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    07 Table 7.5 Coal Exports by Country of Destination, Selected Years, 1960-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year Canada Brazil Europe Japan Other 3 Total Belgium 1 Denmark France Germany 2 Italy Nether- lands Spain Turkey United Kingdom Other 3 Total 1960 12.8 1.1 1.1 0.1 0.8 4.6 4.9 2.8 0.3 NA - 2.4 17.1 5.6 1.3 38.0 1965 16.3 1.2 2.2 (s) 2.1 4.7 9.0 3.4 1.4 NA (s) 2.3 25.1 7.5 .9 51.0 1966 16.5 1.7 1.8 (s) 1.6 4.9 7.8 3.2 1.2 NA (s) 2.5 23.1 7.8 1.0 50.1 1967 15.8 1.7 1.4 - 2.1 4.7 5.9 2.2 1.0 NA -

  8. PRB Coal Users' Group enjoys growing interest in its concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Rahm, R.

    2008-07-15

    A review is given of some of the topics discussed at the PRB Coal Users' Group annual meeting, including combustion dusts and a new session on conveyor belts. 7 figs.

  9. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    State-Level Energy Consumption Estimates and Estimated Consumption per Capita, 2010 Consumption Consumption per Capita 14 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 TX CA FL LA IL OH PA NY GA IN MI NC VA NJ TN WA KY AL MO MN WI SC OK CO IA MD AZ MA MS KS AR OR NE UT CT WV NM NV AK WY ID ND ME MT SD NH HI DE RI DC VT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 0 2 4 6 8 10

  10. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Table 5.9 Refinery Capacity and Utilization, Selected Years, 1949-2011 Year Operable Refineries 1 Operable Refineries Capacity Gross Input to Distillation Units 3 Utilization 4 On January 1 Annual Average 2 Number Thousand Barrels per Calendar Day Thousand Barrels per Day Percent 1949 336 6,231 NA 5,556 89.2 1950 320 6,223 NA 5,980 92.5 1955 296 8,386 NA 7,820 92.2 1960 309 9,843 NA 8,439 85.1 1965 293 10,420 NA 9,557 91.8 1970 276 12,021 NA 11,517 92.6 1975 279 14,961 NA 12,902 85.5 1976 276

  11. Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2003 (Volume 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2003-12-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The report addresses the roles of the programs, implementation, funding and costs, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  12. Clean Coal Technology Programs: Completed Projects (Volume 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2003-12-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The report addresses the roles of the programs, implementation, funding and costs, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  13. Pulverized coal injection at Hoogovens

    SciTech Connect

    Paramanathan, B.K.; Toxopeus, H.L

    1994-12-31

    The Armco/Babcock and Wilcox-type Pulverized Coal Injection (PCI) System, installed at Hoogovens Ijmuiden in 1982/83, consists of two pulverizing lines, each of 30 t/h capacity. Due to the increased demand for pulverized fuel to the Blast Furnaces (Nos. 6 and 7), the PCI system has been revised extensively such that the grinding capacity has been increased, thereby achieving a higher average injection rate to both Blast Furnaces of some 140 kg/THM. The use of soft and dry coals, coupled to modifications to the System, has resulted in an annual consumption of pulverized coal of more than 750,000 tons, some 80% more than that envisaged initially. The installation operates very successfully, downtime having been minimal over the years. Several trials, at high rates of coal injection, have been carried out in the past. The most recent trials, performed over a period of nine months in 1992, showed that smooth and stable Blast Furnace operation was possible even with very high rates of pulverized coal injection (more than 200 kg/THM).

  14. Model documentation coal market module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This report documents the objectives and the conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the Coal Production Submodule (CPS). It provides a description of the CPS for model analysts and the public. The Coal Market Module provides annual forecasts of prices, production, and consumption of coal.

  15. DC Pro Software Tool Suite

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-01

    This fact sheet describes how DOE's Data Center Energy Profiler (DC Pro) Software Tool Suite and other resources can help U.S. companies identify ways to improve the efficiency of their data centers.

  16. Quarterly Coal Report, April-June 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-18

    The Quarterly Coal Report provides comprehensive information about coal production, exports, imports, receipts, consumption, and stocks in the United States. The data presented in this report were collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-275) as amended. This issue shows detailed quarterly data for April-June 1985, aggregated quarterly historical and projected data for 1980 through 1986, and aggregated annual historical and projected data for 1960 through 1995. All data for 1984 and previous years are final. All 1985 data are preliminary and subject to revision. During the first and second quarters of 1985, the US coal industry continued to return to normal operations after the threat of a strike by US coal miners in 1984. For the first 6 months of 1985 the industry showed the following developments: Coal production was only 2.4% less than in the same period of 1984, when it reached a record January-June total. Coal exports were 10.0% higher than their 1984 level for the same time period. The United States imported 52.3% more coal than it did in the first 6 months of 1984, chiefly from Colombia. Domestic coal consumption reached a record-setting level for January-June, 3.6% greater than the previous record in 1984.

  17. Microbial solubilization of coal

    DOEpatents

    Strandberg, G.W.; Lewis, S.N.

    1988-01-21

    The present invention relates to a cell-free preparation and process for the microbial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products. More specifically, the present invention relates to bacterial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products and a cell-free bacterial byproduct useful for solubilizing coal. 5 tabs.

  18. Clean coal

    SciTech Connect

    Liang-Shih Fan; Fanxing Li

    2006-07-15

    The article describes the physics-based techniques that are helping in clean coal conversion processes. The major challenge is to find a cost- effective way to remove carbon dioxide from the flue gas of power plants. One industrially proven method is to dissolve CO{sub 2} in the solvent monoethanolamine (MEA) at a temperature of 38{sup o}C and then release it from the solvent in another unit when heated to 150{sup o}C. This produces CO{sub 2} ready for sequestration. Research is in progress with alternative solvents that require less energy. Another technique is to use enriched oxygen in place of air in the combustion process which produces CO{sub 2} ready for sequestration. A process that is more attractive from an energy management viewpoint is to gasify coal so that it is partially oxidized, producing a fuel while consuming significantly less oxygen. Several IGCC schemes are in operation which produce syngas for use as a feedstock, in addition to electricity and hydrogen. These schemes are costly as they require an air separation unit. Novel approaches to coal gasification based on 'membrane separation' or chemical looping could reduce the costs significantly while effectively capturing carbon dioxide. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 photo.

  19. Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Schindler, Harvey D.; Chen, James M.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a coal liquefaction process using two stages. The first stage liquefies the coal and maximizes the product while the second stage hydrocracks the remainder of the coal liquid to produce solvent.

  20. By Coal Destination State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Destination State ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal

  1. By Coal Origin State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Origin State ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal

  2. Coal and Coal-Biomass to Liquids

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    and Coal-Biomass to Liquids Turning coal into liquid fuels like gasoline, diesel and jet fuel, with biomass to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, is the main goal of the Coal and Coal-Biomass to Liquids program. The program also aims to reduce the cost of these low-emission fuels, and will take advantage of carbon capture and sequestration technologies to further reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Other Coal and Coal-Biomass to Liquids (C&CBTL) Program Activities: The C&CBTL Program

  3. Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-17

    The Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 1993 is a companion document to the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 1993 (AEO). Supplement tables provide the regional projections underlying the national data and projections in the AEO. The domestic coal, electric power, commercial nuclear power, end-use consumption, and end-use price tables present AEO forecasts at the 10 Federal Region level. World coal tables provide data and projections on international flows of steam coal and metallurgical coal, and the oil and gas tables provide the AEO oil and gas supply forecasts by Oil and Gas Supply Regions and by source of supply. All tables refer to cases presented in the AEO, which provides a range of projections for energy markets through 2010.

  4. Annual Energy Outlook 2016

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2016 (AEO2016) was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.gov, 202/586-2222), Assistant Administrator of Energy Analysis; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@ eia.gov, 202/586-1284), Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team, O ce of Integrated and International Energy Analysis; James R. Diefenderfer (jim.diefenderfer@eia.gov, 202/586-2432), Director, O ce of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables

  5. By Coal Origin State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  6. By Coal Origin State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 4th Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  7. By Coal Destination State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  8. By Coal Origin State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  9. By Coal Destination State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 4th Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  10. By Coal Destination State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  11. By Coal Origin State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 4th Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  12. By Coal Origin State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  13. By Coal Origin State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  14. By Coal Destination State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 4th Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  15. By Coal Origin State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  16. Coal Distribution Database, 2006

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables...

  17. By Coal Destination State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  18. By Coal Origin State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State...

  19. By Coal Destination State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  20. By Coal Destination State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  1. By Coal Destination State

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State...

  2. Annual Energy Review 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Seiferlein, Katherine E.

    2008-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....”

  3. Coal liquefaction

    DOEpatents

    Schindler, Harvey D.

    1985-01-01

    In a two-stage liquefaction wherein coal, hydrogen and liquefaction solvent are contacted in a first thermal liquefaction zone, followed by recovery of an essentially ash free liquid and a pumpable stream of insoluble material, which includes 850.degree. F.+ liquid, with the essentially ash free liquid then being further upgraded in a second liquefaction zone, the liquefaction solvent for the first stage includes the pumpable stream of insoluble material from the first liquefaction stage, and 850.degree. F.+ liquid from the second liquefaction stage.

  4. Coal operators prepare for a prosperous new year

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-01-15

    Results are given of the Coal Age 2008 annual Forecast Survey of 17 coal mining executives which reinforces that 2008 could be a very good year. Coal operators are planning to invest in new equipment, development and new coal mine start-ups, based on a number of demand- and supply-side fundamentals. 71% of those surveyed thought coal production in 2008 would increase from 2007 levels and US exports are expected to climb due to the weak dollar. If the tax credit on synfuels expires on 31 December 2007 production of coal synfuel will likely cease. Asked about expensive planned purchases, companies answers ranged from $80,000 for an underground scoop to $500 m for a new mine installation. However, most producers admit they will not be able to operate at full capacity. 7 figs.

  5. Coal Data Browser

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... Petroleum Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Electricity Hydropower Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel Wind Geothermal Solar ...

  6. Coal production 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-22

    Coal Production 1988 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. This report also includes data for the demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States on January 1, 1989. 5 figs., 45 tabs.

  7. Coal | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Coal Coal Coal Coal is the largest domestically produced source of energy in America and is used to generate a significant chunk of our nation's electricity. The Energy Department is working to develop technologies that make coal cleaner, so we can ensure it plays a part in our clean energy future. The Department is also investing in development of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies, also referred to as carbon capture, utilization and sequestration. Featured FE-Supported

  8. AgPro | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: AgPro Place: Massena, New York Product: Operator of biodiesel plant based on soy. References: AgPro1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

  9. Si Pro AS | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Pro AS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Si Pro AS Place: Glomfjord, Norway Zip: 8161 Product: Silicon recycler with facility in Singapore. Coordinates: 66.807991, 13.97315...

  10. Coal data: A reference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This report, Coal Data: A Reference, summarizes basic information on the mining and use of coal, an important source of energy in the US. This report is written for a general audience. The goal is to cover basic material and strike a reasonable compromise between overly generalized statements and detailed analyses. The section ``Supplemental Figures and Tables`` contains statistics, graphs, maps, and other illustrations that show trends, patterns, geographic locations, and similar coal-related information. The section ``Coal Terminology and Related Information`` provides additional information about terms mentioned in the text and introduces some new terms. The last edition of Coal Data: A Reference was published in 1991. The present edition contains updated data as well as expanded reviews and additional information. Added to the text are discussions of coal quality, coal prices, unions, and strikes. The appendix has been expanded to provide statistics on a variety of additional topics, such as: trends in coal production and royalties from Federal and Indian coal leases, hours worked and earnings for coal mine employment, railroad coal shipments and revenues, waterborne coal traffic, coal export loading terminals, utility coal combustion byproducts, and trace elements in coal. The information in this report has been gleaned mainly from the sources in the bibliography. The reader interested in going beyond the scope of this report should consult these sources. The statistics are largely from reports published by the Energy Information Administration.

  11. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management ...

  12. Collateral Duties for Program Records Official (PRO) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Program Records Official (PRO) Collateral Duties for Program Records Official (PRO) GUIDANCE - Collateral Duties for PRO FINAL 141224.pdf (222.88 KB) More Documents & Publications ...

  13. Utilization of coal mine ventilation exhaust as combustion air in gas-fired turbines for electric and/or mechanical power generation. Semi-annual topical report, June 1995--August 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Methane emitted during underground coal mining operations is a hazard that is dealt with by diluting the methane with fresh air and exhausting the contaminated air to the atmosphere. Unfortunately this waste stream may contain more than 60% of the methane resource from the coal, and in the atmosphere the methane acts as a greenhouse gas with an effect about 24.5 times greater than CO{sub 2}. Though the waste stream is too dilute for normal recovery processes, it can be used as combustion air for a turbine-generator, thereby reducing the turbine fuel requirements while reducing emissions. Preliminary analysis indicates that such a system, built using standard equipment, is economically and environmentally attractive, and has potential for worldwide application.

  14. Coal production 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-07

    Coal Production 1985 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. All data presented in this report, except the total production table presented in the Highlights section, and the demonstrated reserve base data presented in Appendix A, were obtained from form EIA-7A, ''Coal Production Report,'' from companies owning mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10,000 or more short tons of coal in 1985. The data cover 4105 of the 5477 US coal mining operations active in 1985. These mining operations accounted for 99.4% of total US coal production and represented 74.9% of all US coal mining operations in 1985. This report also includes data for the demonstrated reserve vase of coal in the US on January 1, 1985.

  15. Word Pro - S2.lwp

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2012 (Quadrillion Btu) 1 Does not include biofuels that have been blended with petroleum-biofuels are included in "Renewable Energy." 2 Excludes supplemental gaseous fuels. 3 Includes less than 0.1 quadrillion Btu of coal coke net imports. 4 Conventional hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar/photovoltaic, wind, and biomass. 5 Includes industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and industrial electricity-only plants. 6 Includes commercial

  16. Coal feed lock

    DOEpatents

    Pinkel, I. Irving

    1978-01-01

    A coal feed lock is provided for dispensing coal to a high pressure gas producer with nominal loss of high pressure gas. The coal feed lock comprises a rotor member with a diametral bore therethrough. A hydraulically activated piston is slidably mounted in the bore. With the feed lock in a charging position, coal is delivered to the bore and then the rotor member is rotated to a discharging position so as to communicate with the gas producer. The piston pushes the coal into the gas producer. The rotor member is then rotated to the charging position to receive the next load of coal.

  17. Upgraded Coal Interest Group

    SciTech Connect

    Evan Hughes

    2009-01-08

    The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

  18. Pelletization of fine coals

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.S.

    1991-09-01

    The present research project attempts to provide a basis to determine the pelletizability of fine coals, to ascertain the role of additives and binders and to establish a basis for binder selection. Currently, there are no established techniques for determining the quality of coal pellets. Our research is intended to develop a series of tests on coal pellets to measure their storage characteristics, transportability, ease of gasification and rate of combustion. Information developed from this research should be valuable for making knowledgeable decisions for on-time plant design, occasional binder selection and frequent process control during the pelletization of coal fines. During the last quarter, we continued the batch pelletization studies on Upper Freeport coal. The results as presented in that last quarterly report (April 1991) indicated that the surface conditions on the coal particle influenced the pelletizing growth rates. For example, a fresh (run of mine) sample of coal will display different pelletizing growth kinetics than a weathered sample of the same coal. Since coal is a heterogeneous material, the oxidized product of coal is equally variable. We found it to be logistically difficult to consistently produce large quantities of artificially oxidized coal for experimental purposes and as such we have used a naturally weathered coal. We have plans to oxidize coals under controlled oxidizing conditions and be able to establish their pelletizing behavior. The next phase of experiments were directed to study the effect of surface modification, introduced during the coal cleaning steps, on pelletizing kinetics. Accordingly, we initiated studies with two additives commonly used during the flotation of coal: dextrin (coal depressant) and dodecane (coal collector).

  19. International energy annual 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-23

    The International Energy Annual presents current data and trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in more than 190 countries, dependencies, and area of special sovereignty. Also included are prices on crude oil, petroleum products, natural gas, electricity, and coal in selected countries. (VC)

  20. Coal combustion products 2007 production and use report

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-01

    The American Coal Ash Association's 2007 Annual Coal Combustion Products (CCP) are derived from data from more than 170 power plants. The amount of CCPs used was 40.55%, a decrease of 2.88% from 2006, attributed to reduced fuel burn and a decrease in demand in the building industry. Figures are given for the production of fly ash, flue gas desulfurization gypsum, bottom ash, FBC ash and boiler slag. The article summarises results of the survey. 1 ref., 1 tab.

  1. International perspectives on coal preparation

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The report consists of the vugraphs from the presentations which covered the following topics: Summaries of the US Department of Energy`s coal preparation research programs; Preparation trends in Russia; South African coal preparation developments; Trends in hard coal preparation in Germany; Application of coal preparation technology to oil sands extraction; Developments in coal preparation in China; and Coal preparation in Australia.

  2. Cermet composite thermal spray coatings for erosion and corrosion protection in combustion environments of advanced coal-fired boilers. Semi-annual technical progress report, February 1996--July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Banovic, S.W.; Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1996-08-01

    Present coal-fired boiler environments remain hostile to the materials of choice since corrosion and erosion can be a serious problem in certain regions of the boiler. Recently, the Clean Air Act Amendment is requiring electric power plants to reduce NO{sub x}, emissions to the environment. To reduce NO{sub x}, emissions, new low NO{sub x}, combustors are utilized which burn fuel with a substoichiometric amount of oxygen (i.e., low oxygen partial pressure). In these low NO{sub x} environments, H{sub 2}S gas is a major source of sulfur. Due to the sulfidation process, corrosion rates in reducing parts of boilers have increased significantly and existing boiler tube materials do not always provide adequate corrosion resistance. Combined attack due to corrosion and erosion is a concern because of the significantly increased operating costs which result in material failures. One method to combat corrosion and erosion in coal-fired boilers is to apply coatings to the components subjected to aggressive environments. Thermal spray coatings, a cermet composite comprised of hard ceramic phases of oxide and/or carbide in a metal binder, have been used with some success as a solution to the corrosion and erosion problems in boilers. However, little is known on the effect of the volume fraction, size, and shape of the hard ceramic phase on the erosion and corrosion resistance of the thermally sprayed coatings. It is the objective of this research to investigate metal matrix composite (cermet) coatings in order to determine the optimum ceramic/metal combination that will give the best erosion and corrosion resistance in new advanced coal-fired boilers.

  3. Coal Distribution Database, 2008

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4Q 2009 April 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 4Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal...

  4. Coal Distribution Database, 2008

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3Q 2009 February 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 3Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal...

  5. Coal Production 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-29

    Coal Production 1992 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In 1992, there were 3,439 active coal mining operations made up of all mines, preparation plants, and refuse operations. The data in Table 1 cover the 2,746 mines that produced coal, regardless of the amount of production, except for bituminous refuse mines. Tables 2 through 33 include data from the 2,852 mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10 thousand or more short tons of coal during the period, except for bituminous refuse, and includes preparation plants with 5 thousand or more employee hours. These mining operations accounted for over 99 percent of total US coal production and represented 83 percent of all US coal mining operations in 1992.

  6. Microbial solubilization of coal

    DOEpatents

    Strandberg, Gerald W.; Lewis, Susan N.

    1990-01-01

    This invention deals with the solubilization of coal using species of Streptomyces. Also disclosed is an extracellular component from a species of Streptomyces, said component being able to solubilize coal.

  7. Indonesian coal mining

    SciTech Connect

    2008-11-15

    The article examines the opportunities and challenges facing the Indonesian coal mining industry and how the coal producers, government and wider Indonesian society are working to overcome them. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Chemicals from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Harold A. Wittcoff; Bryan G. Reuben; Jeffrey S. Plotkin

    2004-12-01

    This chapter contains sections titled: Chemicals from Coke Oven Distillate; The Fischer-Tropsch Reaction; Coal Hydrogenation; Substitute Natural Gas (SNG); Synthesis Gas Technology; Calcium Carbide; Coal and the Environment; and Notes and References

  9. Coal gasification apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Charles K.

    1982-01-01

    Coal hydrogenation vessel has hydrogen heating passages extending vertically through its wall and opening into its interior.

  10. Method for fluorinating coal

    DOEpatents

    Huston, John L.; Scott, Robert G.; Studier, Martin H.

    1978-01-01

    Coal is fluorinated by contact with fluorine gas at low pressure. After pial fluorination, when the reaction rate has slowed, the pressure is slowly increased until fluorination is complete, forming a solid fluorinated coal of approximate composition CF.sub.1.55 H.sub.0.15. The fluorinated coal and a solid distillate resulting from vacuum pyrolysis of the fluorinated coal are useful as an internal standard for mass spectrometric unit mass assignments from about 100 to over 1500.

  11. Coal Fleet Aging Meeting

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7, 2016 MEMORANDUM TO: Dr. Ian Mead Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis Jim Diefenderfer Director, Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis FROM: Coal and Uranium Analysis Team SUBJECT: Notes from the Coal Fleet Aging Meeting held on June 14, 2016 Attendees (36) *Indicates attendance via WebEx. 2 Framing the question This adjunct meeting of the AEO Coal Working Group (CWG) was held as a follow up to the previous Future Operating and Maintenance Considerations for the

  12. NETL: Coal Gasification Systems

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Gasification Systems Coal Gasification is a process that can turn coal into clean power, chemicals, hydrogen and transportation fuels, and can be used to capture the carbon from the coal for storage or for enhanced oil recovery. To better understand the basic concepts behind Gasification, watch this short video: What is Gasification? The Gasification Systems Program is developing advanced technologies to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of producing coal syngas. Click on the Graphic

  13. Flash hydrogenation of coal

    DOEpatents

    Manowitz, Bernard; Steinberg, Meyer; Sheehan, Thomas V.; Winsche, Warren E.; Raseman, Chad J.

    1976-01-01

    A process for the hydrogenation of coal comprising the contacting of powdered coal with hydrogen in a rotating fluidized bed reactor. A rotating fluidized bed reactor suitable for use in this process is also disclosed. The coal residence time in the reactor is limited to less than 5 seconds while the hydrogen contact time is not in excess of 0.2 seconds.

  14. Coal production 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    Coal Production 1989 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. 7 figs., 43 tabs.

  15. Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-26

    Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. Coal within a revised energy perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Darmstadter, J.

    2006-07-15

    The author considers the use of coal within a revised energy perspective, focusing on the factors that will drive which fuels are used to generate electricity going forward. He looks at the world markets for fossil fuels and the difficulties of predicting oil and natural gas supply and prices, as demonstrated by the variability in projections from one year to another in the EIA's Annual Energy Outlook. 4 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Coal recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Good, Robert J.; Badgujar, Mohan

    1992-01-01

    A method for the beneficiation of coal by selective agglomeration and the beneficiated coal product thereof is disclosed wherein coal, comprising impurities, is comminuted to a particle size sufficient to allow impurities contained therein to disperse in water, an aqueous slurry is formed with the comminuted coal particles, treated with a compound, such as a polysaccharide and/or disaccharide, to increase the relative hydrophilicity of hydrophilic components, and thereafter the slurry is treated with sufficient liquid agglomerant to form a coagulum comprising reduced impurity coal.

  18. Coal Data: A reference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-26

    The purpose of Coal Data: A Reference is to provide basic information on the mining and use of coal, an important source of energy in the United States. The report is written for a general audience. The goal is to cover basic material and strike a reasonable compromise between overly generalized statements and detailed analyses. The section ``Coal Terminology and Related Information`` provides additional information about terms mentioned in the text and introduces new terms. Topics covered are US coal deposits, resources and reserves, mining, production, employment and productivity, health and safety, preparation, transportation, supply and stocks, use, coal, the environment, and more. (VC)

  19. Model documentation, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the objectives and the conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the National Energy Modeling System`s (NEMS) Coal Market Module (CMM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98). This report catalogues and describes the assumptions, methodology, estimation techniques, and source code of CMM`s two submodules. These are the Coal Production Submodule (CPS) and the Coal Distribution Submodule (CDS). CMM provides annual forecasts of prices, production, and consumption of coal for NEMS. In general, the CDS integrates the supply inputs from the CPS to satisfy demands for coal from exogenous demand models. The international area of the CDS forecasts annual world coal trade flows from major supply to major demand regions and provides annual forecasts of US coal exports for input to NEMS. Specifically, the CDS receives minemouth prices produced by the CPS, demand and other exogenous inputs from other NEMS components, and provides delivered coal prices and quantities to the NEMS economic sectors and regions.

  20. Pro Corn LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Pro-Corn LLC Place: Preston, Minnesota Zip: 55965 Product: Minnesotan farmer owned bioethanol production company. Coordinates: 47.526531, -121.936019 Show Map Loading map......

  1. Pro Ventum International | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pro Ventum International Place: Forchheim, Germany Zip: 79362 Sector: Wind energy Product: German-based developer of wind power...

  2. ProEco Energy | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Place: South Dakota Product: US South Dakota-based company specializing ethanol refinery project development. References: ProEco Energy1 This article is a stub. You can...

  3. Win pro energy group | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    energy group Place: Berlin, Berlin, Germany Zip: 12165 Sector: Renewable Energy, Solar, Wind energy Product: Win:pro offers location search, development, implementation,...

  4. ProForm | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Spreadsheet ComplexityEase of Use: Simple Website: poet.lbl.govProform Cost: Free References: ProForm1 Related Tools General Equilibrium Modeling Package (GEMPACK)...

  5. ProLogis | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Name: ProLogis Place: Aurora, Colorado Zip: 80011 Sector: Services Product: Provider of distribution facilities and services. Coordinates: 39.325162, -79.54975 Show Map...

  6. Task 2.3 -- Review and assessment of results from the comprehensive characterization of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants. Semi-annual report, January 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.J.

    1997-08-01

    To help meet the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a project entitled ``Comprehensive Characterization of Toxic Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants.`` The Energy and Environmental Research Center was contracted to review reports discussing air toxic emissions from eight power plants as Phase 1 of the project. Additional field tests were planned as Phase 2 and are under way. The objective of the project is to provide an independent review of reports produced from the air toxic emissions study, evaluate the scientific validity of the conclusions, identify significant correlations between emissions and fuel or process parameters, compare the data with available results from Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studies, make recommendations for future studies, and complete a combined report that summarizes Phase 1, Phase 2, and EPRI findings.

  7. Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents

    DOEpatents

    Tarrer, Arthur R.; Shridharani, Ketan G.

    1983-01-01

    A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260.degree. C. to 315.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275.degree. C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350.degree. C.

  8. 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Publication and Product Library

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review, held on June 7-11, 2010, in Washington, DC. It covers the program areas of hydrogen pro

  9. Microbial solubilization of coals

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Stewart, D.L.; Thomas, B.L.; McCulloch, M.; Wilson, B.W.; Bean, R.M.

    1988-11-01

    Microbial solubilization of coal may serve as a first step in a process to convert low-rank coals or coal-derived products to other fuels or products. For solubilization of coal to be an economically viable technology, a mechanistic understanding of the process is essential. Leonardite, a highly oxidized, low-rank coal, has been solubilized by the intact microorganism, cell-free filtrate, and cell-free enzyme of /ital Coriolus versicolor/. A spectrophotometric conversion assay was developed to quantify the amount of biosolubilized coal. In addition, a bituminous coal, Illinois No. 6, was solubilized by a species of /ital Penicillium/, but only after the coal had been preoxidized in air. Model compounds containing coal-related functionalities have been incubated with the leonardite-degrading fungus, its cell-free filtrate, and purified enzyme. The amount of degradation was determined by gas chromatography and the degradation products were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. We have also separated the cell-free filtrate of /ital C. versicolor/ into a <10,000 MW and >10,000 MW fraction by ultrafiltration techniques. Most of the coal biosolubilization activity is contained in the <10,000 MW fraction while the model compound degradation occurs in the >10,000 MW fraction. The >10,000 MW fraction appears to contain an enzyme with laccase-like activity. 10 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Coal sector profile

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-05

    Coal is our largest domestic energy resource with recoverable reserves estimated at 268 billion short tons or 5.896 quads Btu equivalent. This is approximately 95 percent of US fossil energy resources. It is relatively inexpensive to mine, and on a per Btu basis it is generally much less costly to produce than other energy sources. Its chief drawbacks are the environmental, health and safety concerns that must be addressed in its production and consumption. Historically, coal has played a major role in US energy markets. Coal fueled the railroads, heated the homes, powered the factories. and provided the raw materials for steel-making. In 1920, coal supplied over three times the amount of energy of oil, gas, and hydro combined. From 1920 until the mid 1970s, coal production remained fairly constant at 400 to 600 million short tons a year. Rapid increases in overall energy demands, which began during and after World War II were mostly met by oil and gas. By the mid 1940s, coal represented only half of total energy consumption in the US. In fact, post-war coal production, which had risen in support of the war effort and the postwar Marshall plan, decreased approximately 25 percent between 1945 and 1960. Coal demand in the post-war era up until the 1970s was characterized by increasing coal use by the electric utilities but decreasing coal use in many other markets (e.g., rail transportation). The oil price shocks of the 1970s, combined with natural gas shortages and problems with nuclear power, returned coal to a position of prominence. The greatly expanded use of coal was seen as a key building block in US energy strategies of the 1970s. Coal production increased from 613 million short tons per year in 1970 to 950 million short tons in 1988, up over 50 percent.

  11. Annual Energy Review 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Fichman, Barbara T.

    2012-09-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, and renewable energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding the content of the AER and other EIA publications.

  12. Electric power annual 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

  13. Annual Energy Review 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Seiferlein, Katherine E.

    2005-08-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the AER and in other EIA publications.

  14. Annual Energy Review 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Seiferlein, Katherine E.

    2006-07-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the AER and in other EIA publications.

  15. Annual Energy Review 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Fichman, Barbara T.

    2010-08-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding the content of the AER and other EIA publications.

  16. Annual Energy Review 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Seiferlein, Katherine E.

    2007-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....” The AER is intended for use by Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, energy analysts, and the general public. EIA welcomes suggestions from readers regarding data series in the AER and in other EIA publications.

  17. Word Pro - S4.lwp

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Uranium Reserves, 2008 By State Total Reserves 106 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Alaska, California, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Virginia, and Washington. Notes: * See "Uranium Oxide" in Glossary. * Data are at end of year. Source: Table 4.10. Forward-Cost Category (dollars¹ per pound) 539 1,227 $50 or Less $100 or Less 0 500 1,000 1,500 Million Pounds

  18. Coal combustion products (CCPs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Coal combustion products (CCPs) are solid materials produced when coal is burned to generate electricity. Since coal provides the largest segment of U.S. electricity generation (45 percent in 2010), finding a sustainable solution for CCPs is an important environmental challenge. When properly managed, CCPs offer society environmental and economic benefits without harm to public health and safety. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has made an

  19. Pulverized coal fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Rini, Michael J.; Towle, David P.

    1992-01-01

    A pulverized coal fuel injector contains an acceleration section to improve the uniformity of a coal-air mixture to be burned. An integral splitter is provided which divides the coal-air mixture into a number separate streams or jets, and a center body directs the streams at a controlled angle into the primary zone of a burner. The injector provides for flame shaping and the control of NO/NO.sub.2 formation.

  20. Integrated coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Effron, Edward

    1978-01-01

    In a process for the liquefaction of coal in which coal liquids containing phenols and other oxygenated compounds are produced during the liquefaction step and later hydrogenated, oxygenated compounds are removed from at least part of the coal liquids in the naphtha and gas oil boiling range prior to the hydrogenation step and employed as a feed stream for the manufacture of a synthesis gas or for other purposes.

  1. Coal and Coal-Biomass to Liquids FAQs

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... For further information, see: Coal and Coal-Biomass to Liquids. For additional information: Gasifipedia is a gasification resource that includes history, state-of-the art ...

  2. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2002-07-30

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results. Also includes Power Plant Improvement Initiative Projects.

  3. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2001-04-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  4. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2000-04-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  5. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    1999-03-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  6. US coal market softens

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2007-01-15

    The operators table some near term expansion plans, meanwhile long-term fundamentals look strong. This is one of the findings of the Coal Age Forecast 2007 survey of readers predictions on production and consumption of coal and attitudes in the coal industry. 50% of respondents expected product levels in 2007 to be higher than in 2006 and 50% described the attitude in the coal industry to be more optimistic in 2007 than in 2006. Most expenditure is anticipated on going on new equipment but levels of expenditure will be less than in 2006. 7 figs.

  7. Rail Coal Transportation Rates

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Recurring Reserves Stocks All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud Data For: 2001 Next Release Date: October 2003 U. S. Coal-Producing Districts...

  8. Coal liquefaction quenching process

    DOEpatents

    Thorogood, Robert M.; Yeh, Chung-Liang; Donath, Ernest E.

    1983-01-01

    There is described an improved coal liquefaction quenching process which prevents the formation of coke with a minimum reduction of thermal efficiency of the coal liquefaction process. In the process, the rapid cooling of the liquid/solid products of the coal liquefaction reaction is performed without the cooling of the associated vapor stream to thereby prevent formation of coke and the occurrence of retrograde reactions. The rapid cooling is achieved by recycling a subcooled portion of the liquid/solid mixture to the lower section of a phase separator that separates the vapor from the liquid/solid products leaving the coal reactor.

  9. Coal | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Assuming no additional constraints on CO2 emissions, coal remains the largest source of electricity generation in the AEO2011 Reference case because of continued reliance on...

  10. Coal Distribution Database, 2006

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    TF RailroadVesselShip Fuel It is also noted that Destination State code of "X Export" indicates movements to foreign destinations. 1 68 Domestic Coal Distribution...

  11. WCI Case for Coal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    and storage, and the production of hydrogen from coal, ... countries, global energy consumption will continue to ... Other fuels will have to provide the great bulk of the ...

  12. By Coal Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook

    California (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total...

  13. British coal privatization procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The form in which British Coal is to be privatized has finally been announced. Offers are to be invited for the operating underground and opencast mines which will be grouped into five regionally based companies. Additionally, offers will be invited for a number of collieries which are currently under care and maintenance. The five Regional Coal Companies to be formed are Central North, which will comprise the assets in the Yorkshire and Durham coalfields, including the five collieries in the Selby Complex; Central South, which will contain the assets located in the Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire, Derbyshire, and Warwickshire coalfields; North East, which has four opencast sites, Scotland, which has nine operating open-cast sites and a single underground mine, Longannet; and South Wales with its nine operating opencast sites. Tower colliery, the last underground mine in South Wales, was finally put on care and maintenance on April 20, 1994. Details of the five Regional Coal Companies are given. A new public sector body, the Coal Authority will be set up to which all British Coal's title to unworked coal and coal mines will be transferred. All the relevant property rights and liabilities of British Coal will be transferred into the Regional Coal Companies prior to their sun.

  14. Balancing coal pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, D.; Kirkenir, B.

    2009-11-15

    Balancing coal flow to the burners to optimise combustion by using real-time measurement systems (such as microwave mass measurement) is discussed. 3 figs.

  15. Coal Market Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    The use of coals with sub- optimal characteristics carries with it penalties in operating efficiency, maintenance cost, and system reliability. Such penalties range from the...

  16. Coal Gasification Report

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... (Btu) coal "that is combined with wind and other renewable sources, ... The Kentucky Pioneer EIS notes that "noise levels inside the turbine buildings would be very high, ...

  17. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  18. Task 2.3 - Review and Assessment of Results from the Comprehensive Characterization of Toxic Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants: Semi-annual report, July 1-December 31, 1996.

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, S.R.

    1997-12-31

    The air toxic emission data from Phase I were summarized and evaluated in the final Phase I summary report, published in September 1996 and available for distribution in October 1996. Data from Phase I were presented at the Center for Air Toxic Metals annual review meeting at the Energy {ampersand} Environmental Research Center in October 1996. The objective of the project was to provide. an independent review of the Phase I data, evaluate the scientific validity of the conclusions, identify significant correlations between emissions and fuel or process parameters, compare the data with available data from EPRI studies, make recommendations for future studies, and complete a combined report that summarizes Phase I, Phase II, and EPRI findings.

  19. BERLinPro Booster Cavity Design, Fabrication and Test Plans ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BERLinPro Booster Cavity Design, Fabrication and Test Plans Citation Details In-Document Search Title: BERLinPro Booster Cavity Design, Fabrication and Test Plans The bERLinPro ...

  20. ProLogis France IX EURL | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    ProLogis France IX EURL Jump to: navigation, search Name: ProLogis France IX EURL Place: Aulnay-Sous-Bois Cedex, France Zip: 93614 Product: French subsidiary of ProLogis, a...

  1. EA-155 ProMark | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    EA-155 ProMark Order authorizing ProMark Energy, Inc to export electric energy to Canada. EA-155 ProMark (46.89 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-196-A Minnesota Power, Sales ...

  2. Clean coal technologies market potential

    SciTech Connect

    Drazga, B.

    2007-01-30

    Looking at the growing popularity of these technologies and of this industry, the report presents an in-depth analysis of all the various technologies involved in cleaning coal and protecting the environment. It analyzes upcoming and present day technologies such as gasification, combustion, and others. It looks at the various technological aspects, economic aspects, and the various programs involved in promoting these emerging green technologies. Contents: Industry background; What is coal?; Historical background of coal; Composition of coal; Types of coal; Environmental effects of coal; Managing wastes from coal; Introduction to clean coal; What is clean coal?; Byproducts of clean coal; Uses of clean coal; Support and opposition; Price of clean coal; Examining clean coal technologies; Coal washing; Advanced pollution control systems; Advanced power generating systems; Pulverized coal combustion (PCC); Carbon capture and storage; Capture and separation of carbon dioxide; Storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide; Economics and research and development; Industry initiatives; Clean Coal Power Initiative; Clean Coal Technology Program; Coal21; Outlook; Case Studies.

  3. NEMS Modeling of Coal Plants

    Annual Energy Outlook

    NEMS Modeling of Coal Plants Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewable Analysis ... oil and gas steam plants, and 23 for nuclear plants regardless of age - Beyond 30 ...

  4. Coal resources of Kyrgyzstan

    SciTech Connect

    Landis, E.R.; Bostick, N.H.; Gluskoter, H.J.; Johnson, E.A.; Harrison, C.D.; Huber, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    The rugged, mountainous country of Kyrgyzstan contains about one-half of the known coal resources of central Asia (a geographic and economic region that also includes Uzbekistan, Tadjikistan and Turkmenistan). Coal of Jurassic age is present in eight regions in Kyrgyzstan in at least 64 different named localities. Significant coal occurrences of about the same age are present in the central Asian countries of Kazakhstan, China, and Russia. Separation of the coal-bearing rocks into individual deposits results more than earth movements before and during formation of the present-day mountains and basins of the country than from deposition in separate basins.Separation was further abetted by deep erosion and removal of the coal-bearing rocks from many areas, followed by covering of the remaining coal-bearing rocks by sands and gravels of Cenozoic age. The total resources of coal in Kyrgyzstan have been reported as about 30 billion tons. In some of the reported localities, the coal resources are known and adequately explored. In other parts of the republic, the coal resources are inadequately understood or largely unexplored. The resource and reserve inventory of Kyrgyzstan is at best incomplete; for some purposes, such as short-term local and long-range national planning, it may be inadequate. Less than 8% of the total estimated resources are categorized as recoverable reserves, and the amount that is economically recoverable is unknown. The coal is largely of subbituminous and high-volatile C bituminous rank, most has low and medium ash and sulfur contents, and coals of higher rank (some with coking qualities) are present in one region. It is recommended that appropriate analyses and tests be made during planning for utilization.

  5. DOE/IG Annual Performance Report FY 2008, Annual Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    DOEIG Annual Performance Report FY 2008, Annual Performance Plan FY 2009 DOEIG Annual Performance Report FY 2008, Annual Performance Plan FY 2009 DOEIG Annual Performance Report ...

  6. Petroleum Marketing Annual Archives

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Petrolem Reports Petroleum Marketing Annual Archives The Petroleum Marketing Annual was discontinued in 2010. Choose the year from the archive Petroleum Marketing Annual you wish...

  7. Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Hill; Kenneth Nemeth; Gary Garrett; Kimberly Sams

    2009-01-31

    The Southern States Energy Board's (SSEB) 'Regional Effort to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies' program began on June 1, 2003, and was completed on January 31, 2009. The project proved beneficial in providing state decision-makers with information that assisted them in removing barriers or implementing incentives to deploy clean coal technologies. This was accomplished through two specific tasks: (1) domestic energy security and diversity; and (2) the energy-water interface. Milestones accomplished during the project period are: (1) Presentations to Annual Meetings of SSEB Members, Associate Member Meetings, and the Gasification Technologies Council. (2) Energy: Water reports - (A) Regional Efforts to Deploy Clean Coal Technologies: Impacts and Implications for Water Supply and Quality. June 2004. (B) Energy-Water Interface Challenges: Coal Bed Methane and Mine Pool Water Characterization in the Southern States Region. 2004. (C) Freshwater Availability and Constraints on Thermoelectric Power Generation in the Southeast U.S. June 2008. (3) Blackwater Interactive Tabletop Exercise - Decatur, Georgia April 2007. (4) Blackwater Report: Blackwater: Energy and Water Interdependency Issues: Best Practices and Lessons Learned. August 2007. (5) Blackwater Report: BLACKWATER: Energy Water Interdependency Issues REPORT SUMMARY. April 2008.

  8. Current trends in coal combustion product (CCPs) production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, B.

    1998-12-31

    CCPs (Coal Combustion Products) are engineering materials that are similar in use to virgin, processed and manufactured materials. CCPs are produced when coal is burned in a boiler to generate electricity. The four types of CCPs produced by electric utility boilers are fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag and FGD (Flue Gas Desulfurization) material. CCPs rank behind only sand and gravel, and crushed stone as a produced mineral commodity, and rank ahead of Portland cement and iron ore. In 1997, 55% of the electricity was produced by coal fired electric utilities. This number is projected to remain fairly constant to the year 2015. Almost 90% of the coal used in the United States, is burned to generate electricity. During 1997, 898.5 million metric tons (870 million short tons) of coal were burned by electric utilities to generate electricity. As a result, over 95 million tons (105 million short tons) of CCPs were generated by the electric utilities. This figure promises to increase in the future, owing mostly to the anticipated rise in FGD material generation. The American Coal Ash Association, Inc. (ACAA) is a trade association representing the CCP Industry. ACAA promotes the use in CCPs in numerous applications that are technically sound, commercially competitive and environmentally safe. The data presented in this paper has been taken from the Annual Survey of CCP production and use by ACAA. ACAA conducts an annual voluntary, confidential, survey of US coal fired electric utilities to gather data about the production and use of CCPs. In 1997, the survey data collected accounts for approximately 80% of the coal burned by electric utilities. Information from previous ACAA surveys or US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) data were used to estimate CCP production and use for utilities that did not respond to the survey. None of the data used was older than 1995.

  9. Method for coal liquefaction

    DOEpatents

    Wiser, Wendell H.; Oblad, Alex G.; Shabtai, Joseph S.

    1994-01-01

    A process is disclosed for coal liquefaction in which minute particles of coal in intimate contact with a hydrogenation catalyst and hydrogen arc reacted for a very short time at a temperature in excess of 400.degree. C. at a pressure of at least 1500 psi to yield over 50% liquids with a liquid to gaseous hydrocarbon ratio in excess of 8:1.

  10. Mechanochemical hydrogenation of coal

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T.; Smol, Robert; Farber, Gerald; Naphtali, Leonard M.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenation of coal is improved through the use of a mechanical force to reduce the size of the particulate coal simultaneously with the introduction of gaseous hydrogen, or other hydrogen donor composition. Such hydrogen in the presence of elemental tin during this one-step size reduction-hydrogenation further improves the yield of the liquid hydrocarbon product.

  11. Coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Norman L.; Moon, William G.; Prudich, Michael E.

    1983-01-01

    A C.sub.5 -900.degree. F. (C.sub.5 -482.degree. C.) liquid yield greater than 50 weight percent MAF feed coal is obtained in a coal liquefaction process wherein a selected combination of higher hydrogen partial pressure, longer slurry residence time and increased recycle ash content of the feed slurry are controlled within defined ranges.

  12. Coal. [Great Plains Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The status of various research projects related to coal is considered: gasification (approximately 30 processes) and in-situ gasification. Methanol production, retrofitting internal combustion engines to stratified charge engines, methanation (Conoco), direct reduction of iron ores, water resources, etc. Approximately 200 specific projects related to coal are considered with respect to present status. (LTN)

  13. Dry piston coal feeder

    DOEpatents

    Hathaway, Thomas J.; Bell, Jr., Harold S.

    1979-01-01

    This invention provides a solids feeder for feeding dry coal to a pressurized gasifier at elevated temperatures substantially without losing gas from the gasifier by providing a lock having a double-acting piston that feeds the coals into the gasifier, traps the gas from escaping, and expels the trapped gas back into the gasifier.

  14. Pro Sol Energia SA | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Sol Energia SA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pro Sol Energia SA Place: Algarrobo-Costa (Malaga), Spain Zip: E-29750 Sector: Solar Product: Develops and builds solar power...

  15. State coal profiles, January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-02

    The purpose of State Coal Profiles is to provide basic information about the deposits, production, and use of coal in each of the 27 States with coal production in 1992. Although considerable information on coal has been published on a national level, there is a lack of a uniform overview for the individual States. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. While focusing on coal output, State Coal Profiles shows that the coal-producing States are major users of coal, together accounting for about three-fourths of total US coal consumption in 1992. Each coal-producing State is profiled with a description of its coal deposits and a discussion of the development of its coal industry. Estimates of coal reserves in 1992 are categorized by mining method and sulfur content. Trends, patterns, and other information concerning production, number of mines, miners, productivity, mine price of coal, disposition, and consumption of coal are detailed in statistical tables for selected years from 1980 through 1992. In addition, coal`s contribution to the State`s estimated total energy consumption is given for 1991, the latest year for which data are available. A US summary of all data is provided for comparing individual States with the Nation as a whole. Sources of information are given at the end of the tables.

  16. Coal in China

    SciTech Connect

    Minchener, A.J.

    2005-07-01

    The article gives an overview of the production and use of coal in China, for power generation and in other sectors. Coal use for power generation was 850 million tonnes in 2003 and 800 million tonnes in the non-power sector. The majority of power will continue to be produced from coal, with a trend towards new larger pulverised coal fired units and introduction of circulating fluidised bed combustors. Stricter regulations are forcing introduction of improved pollution control technologies. It seems likely that China will need international finance to supplement private and state investment to carry out a programme to develop and apply clean coal technologies. The author concludes that there is evidence of a market economy being established but there is a need to resolve inconsistencies with the planned aspects of the economy and that additional policies are needed in certain sectors to achieve sustainable development. 1 ref., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Underground Coal Thermal Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.; Deo, M.; Eddings, E.; Sarofim, A.; Gueishen, K.; Hradisky, M.; Kelly, K.; Mandalaparty, P.; Zhang, H.

    2012-01-11

    The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coal's carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO2 sequestration.

  18. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Y.N.; Crooker, S.C.; Kitchell, J.P.; Nochur, S.V.

    1991-05-16

    The overall objective of this program was to investigate the feasibility of an enzymatic desulfurization process specifically intended for organic sulfur removal from coal. Toward that end, a series of specific objectives were defined: (1) establish the feasibility of (bio)oxidative pretreatment followed by biochemical sulfate cleavage for representative sulfur-containing model compounds and coals using commercially-available enzymes; (2) investigate the potential for the isolation and selective use of enzyme preparations from coal-utilizing microbial systems for desulfurization of sulfur-containing model compounds and coals; and (3) develop a conceptual design and economic analysis of a process for enzymatic removal of organic sulfur from coal. Within the scope of this program, it was proposed to carry out a portion of each of these efforts concurrently. (VC)

  19. Apparatus and method for feeding coal into a coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Bissett, Larry A.; Friggens, Gary R.; McGee, James P.

    1979-01-01

    This invention is directed to a system for feeding coal into a gasifier operating at high pressures. A coal-water slurry is pumped to the desired pressure and then the coal is "dried" prior to feeding the coal into the gasifier by contacting the slurry with superheated steam in an entrained bed dryer for vaporizing the water in the slurry.

  20. Figure F8. Coal demand regions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2016 Regional maps Figure F8. Coal demand regions Figure F7. Coal Demand Regions CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP Region Content Region Code NY,PA,NJ VA,NC,SC GA,FL IN,IL,MI,WI Region Content Region Code 14. CU 13. MT 16. PC 15. ZN 12. WS 11. C2 9. AM 5. GF 8. KT 4. S2 7. EN 6. OH 2. YP

  1. Coal in a changing climate

    SciTech Connect

    Lashof, D.A.; Delano, D.; Devine, J.

    2007-02-15

    The NRDC analysis examines the changing climate for coal production and use in the United States and China, the world's two largest producers and consumers of coal. The authors say that the current coal fuel cycle is among the most destructive activities on earth, placing an unacceptable burden on public health and the environment. There is no such thing as 'clean coal.' Our highest priorities must be to avoid increased reliance on coal and to accelerate the transition to an energy future based on efficient use of renewable resources. Energy efficiency and renewable energy resources are technically capable of meeting the demands for energy services in countries that rely on coal. However, more than 500 conventional coal-fired power plants are expected in China in the next eight years alone, and more than 100 are under development in the United States. Because it is very likely that significant coal use will continue during the transition to renewables, it is important that we also take the necessary steps to minimize the destructive effects of coal use. That requires the U.S. and China to take steps now to end destructive mining practices and to apply state of the art pollution controls, including CO{sub 2} control systems, to sources that use coal. Contents of the report are: Introduction; Background (Coal Production; Coal Use); The Toll from Coal (Environmental Effects of Coal Production; Environmental Effects of Coal Transportation); Environmental Effects of Coal Use (Air Pollutants; Other Pollutants; Environmental Effects of Coal Use in China); What Is the Future for Coal? (Reducing Fossil Fuel Dependence; Reducing the Impacts of Coal Production; Reducing Damage From Coal Use; Global Warming and Coal); and Conclusion. 2 tabs.

  2. Annual Training Plan Template

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Annual Training Plan Template is used by an organization's training POC to draft their organization's annual training plan.

  3. Coal market momentum converts skeptics

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2006-01-15

    Tight supplies, soaring natural gas prices and an improving economy bode well for coal. Coal Age presents it 'Forecast 2006' a survey of 200 US coal industry executives. Questions asked included predicted production levels, attitudes, expenditure on coal mining, and rating of factors of importance. 7 figs.

  4. Environmentally conscious coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Hickmott, D.D.; Brown, L.F.; Currier, R.P.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to evaluate the environmental impacts of home-scale coal combustion on the Navajo Reservation and develop strategies to reduce adverse health effects associated with home-scale coal combustion. Principal accomplishments of this project were: (1) determination of the metal and gaseous emissions of a representative stove on the Navajo Reservation; (2) recognition of cyclic gaseous emissions in combustion in home-scale combustors; (3) `back of the envelope` calculation that home-scale coal combustion may impact Navajo health; and (4) identification that improved coal stoves require the ability to burn diverse feedstocks (coal, wood, biomass). Ultimately the results of Navajo home-scale coal combustion studies will be extended to the Developing World, particularly China, where a significant number (> 150 million) of households continue to heat their homes with low-grade coal.

  5. Coal leasing and taxation. Coal policy paper

    SciTech Connect

    Brody, S.E.; DeVries, A.H.

    1981-01-01

    The paper presents background information on current and proposed approaches to coal leasing and taxation, at both the State and federal levels. In addition, it discusses both the governmental objectives and probable economic effects of various combinations of leasing and taxation policies.

  6. Annual Energy Outlook 2014: Electricity Working Group Meeting-72413

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Electricity Analysis Team Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis Office of Energy Analysis Annual Energy Outlook 2014: Electricity Working Group Meeting July 24, 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Reference Case: Key Changes 2 Electricity Analysis Team, July 24th, 2013 * Environmental Rules - Updates to NEMS modeling of MATS - RGGI cap tightened to reflect February 2013 MOU * Enhancements - Reserve margins and capacity payments - Spinning and operating reserves - Operations

  7. Coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, C.H.

    1986-02-11

    A process is described for the liquefaction of coal wherein raw feed coal is dissolved in recycle solvent with a slurry containing recycle coal minerals in the presence of added hydrogen at elevated temperature and pressure. The highest boiling distillable dissolved liquid fraction is obtained from a vacuum distillation zone and is entirely recycled to extinction. Lower boiling distillable dissolved liquid is removed in vapor phase from the dissolver zone and passed without purification and essentially without reduction in pressure to a catalytic hydrogenation zone where it is converted to an essentially colorless liquid product boiling in the transportation fuel range. 1 fig.

  8. Aqueous coal slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Berggren, M.H.; Smit, F.J.; Swanson, W.W.

    1989-10-30

    A principal object of the invention is the provision of an aqueous coal slurry containing a dispersant, which is of low-cost and which contains very low or no levels of sodium, potassium, sulfur and other contaminants. In connection with the foregoing object, it is an object of the invention to provide an aqueous slurry containing coal and dextrin as a dispersant and to provide a method of preparing an aqueous coal slurry which includes the step of adding an effective amount of dextrin as a dispersant. The invention consists of certain novel features and a combination of parts hereinafter fully described, and particularly pointed out in the appended claims. 6 tabs.

  9. Underground gasification of coal

    DOEpatents

    Pasini, III, Joseph; Overbey, Jr., William K.; Komar, Charles A.

    1976-01-20

    There is disclosed a method for the gasification of coal in situ which comprises drilling at least one well or borehole from the earth's surface so that the well or borehole enters the coalbed or seam horizontally and intersects the coalbed in a direction normal to its major natural fracture system, initiating burning of the coal with the introduction of a combustion-supporting gas such as air to convert the coal in situ to a heating gas of relatively high calorific value and recovering the gas. In a further embodiment the recovered gas may be used to drive one or more generators for the production of electricity.

  10. Coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Charles H.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of coal wherein raw feed coal is dissolved in recycle solvent with a slurry containing recycle coal minerals in the presence of added hydrogen at elevated temperature and pressure. The highest boiling distillable dissolved liquid fraction is obtained from a vacuum distillation zone and is entirely recycled to extinction. Lower boiling distillable dissolved liquid is removed in vapor phase from the dissolver zone and passed without purification and essentially without reduction in pressure to a catalytic hydrogenation zone where it is converted to an essentially colorless liquid product boiling in the transportation fuel range.

  11. Chapter 4 - Coal

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Chapter 4 Coal Overview In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, coal remains the second-largest energy source worldwide- behind petroleum and other liquids-until 2030. From 2030 through 2040, it is the third-largest energy source, behind both liquid fuels and natural gas. World coal consumption increases from 2012 to 2040 at an average rate of 0.6%/year, from 153 quadrillion Btu in 2012 to 169

  12. DOE - Fossil Energy: Coal Mining and Transportation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Mining Fossil Energy Study Guides Coal Mining and Transportation Coal Miners - One type of mining, called "longwall mining", uses a rotating blade to shear coal away from the ...

  13. Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Magazine

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Magazine Current Edition: Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Quarterly News, Vol. 2, Issue 3 (April 2016) Archived Editions: Coal ...

  14. Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ... (Washington, DC, September 25, 2014), Table 6.1, Coal Production and Waste Coal Supplied

  15. Puda Coal Inc | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Puda Coal Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Puda Coal, Inc Place: Taiyuan, Shaanxi Province, China Product: Specializes in coal preparation by applying a water jig washing...

  16. Annual Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    09 THROUGH 09/30/2010 The following Annual Freedom of Information Act report covers the Period 10/01/2009, through 09/30/2010, as required by 5 U.S.C. 552. I. BASIC INFORMATION REGARDING REPORT 1. Kevin T. Hagerty, Director Office of Information Resources, MA-90 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 Alexander Morris, FOIA Officer Sheila Jeter, FOIA/Privacy Act Specialist FOIA Office, MA-90 Office of Information Resources U.S. Department of Energy

  17. Coal markets squeeze producers

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, M.

    2005-12-01

    Supply/demand fundamentals seem poised to keep prices of competing fossil fuels high, which could cushion coal prices, but increased mining and transportation costs may squeeze producer profits. Are markets ready for more volatility?

  18. COAL & POWER SYSTEMS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The low- Btu combustion work supports ex- panding the fuel flexibility of gas turbines by developing the capabil- ity to operate on gases derived from gasification of coal, biomass...

  19. Delineating coal market regions

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, B.D.; Pyrdol, J.J.

    1986-04-01

    This study addresses the delineation of US coal market regions and their evolution since the 1973 Arab oil embargo. Dichotomizing into compliance (low sulfur) and high sulfur coal deliveries, market regions are generated for 1973, 1977, and 1983. Focus is restricted to steam coal shipments to electric utilities, which currently account for over 80% of the total domestic market. A two-stage method is used. First, cluster analyses are performed on the origin-destination shipments data to generate baseline regions. This is followed by multiple regression analyses on CIF delivered price data for 1983. Sensitivity analysis on the configuration of the regions is also conducted, and some thoughts on the behavior of coal markets conclude the paper. 37 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Aqueous coal slurry

    DOEpatents

    Berggren, Mark H. (Golden, CO); Smit, Francis J. (Arvada, CO); Swanson, Wilbur W. (Golden, CO)

    1993-01-01

    An aqueous slurry containing coal and dextrin as a dispersant. The slurry, in addition to containing dextrin, may contain a conventional dispersant or, alternatively, a pH controlling reagent.