National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

  1. Integrated experimental setup for angle resolved photoemission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Integrated experimental setup for angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy of transuranic materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Integrated experimental setup for...

  2. A tunable low-energy photon source for high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harter, John W.; Monkman, Eric J.; Shai, Daniel E.; Nie Yuefeng; Uchida, Masaki; Burganov, Bulat; Chatterjee, Shouvik; King, Philip D. C.; Shen, Kyle M.

    2012-11-15

    We describe a tunable low-energy photon source consisting of a laser-driven xenon plasma lamp coupled to a Czerny-Turner monochromator. The combined tunability, brightness, and narrow spectral bandwidth make this light source useful in laboratory-based high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy experiments. The source supplies photons with energies up to {approx}7 eV, delivering under typical conditions >10{sup 12} ph/s within a 10 meV spectral bandwidth, which is comparable to helium plasma lamps and many synchrotron beamlines. We first describe the lamp and monochromator system and then characterize its output, with attention to those parameters which are of interest for photoemission experiments. Finally, we present angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data using the light source and compare its performance to a conventional helium plasma lamp.

  3. Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer MoS2: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Jin, Wencan; Yeh, Po -Chun; Zaki, Nader; Zhang, Datong; Liou, Jonathan T.; Dadap, Jerry I.; Barinov, Alexey; Yablonskikh, Mikhail; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Sutter, Peter; et al

    2015-03-17

    We report the directly measured electronic structure of exfoliated monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) using micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Measurements of both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ elucidate the effects of interaction with a substrate. Thus, a suggested relaxation of the in-plane lattice constant is found for both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ crystals. For suspended MoS₂, a careful investigation of the measured uppermost valence band gives an effective mass at Γ¯ and Κ¯ of 2.00m₀ and 0.43m₀, respectively. We also measure an increase in the band linewidth from the midpoint of Γ¯Κ¯ to the vicinity of Κ¯ and briefly discussmore » its possible origin.« less

  4. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Studies of Quantum Materials (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Angle-Resolved Photoemission Studies of Quantum Materials Citation ... Cond. Mat. Phys. 3, 129, 2012 Research Org: SLAC National ...

  5. Electronic structure of Ce?RhIn?: A two-dimensional heavy-fermion system studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Jiang, Rui; Petrovic, C.; Mou, Daixing; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Xin; Yao, Yongxin; Ryu, Hyejin; Ho, Kai -Ming; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-04-01

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the 2D heavy fermion superconductor, Ce?RhIn?. The Fermi surface is rather complicated and consists of several hole and electron pockets with one of the sheets displaying strong nesting properties with a q-vector of (0.32, 0.32) ?/a. We do not observe kz dispersion of the Fermi sheets, which is consistent with the expected 2D character of the electronic structure. Comparison of the ARPES data to band structure calculations suggests that a localized picture of the f-electrons works best. While there is some agreement in the overall band dispersion and location of the Fermimoresheets, the model does not reproduce all observed bands and is not completely accurate for those it does. Our data paves the way for improving the band structure calculations and the general understanding of the transport and thermodynamical properties of this material.less

  6. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberger, H. Liu, H.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Gierz, I.; Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Travers, J. C.; Calegari, F.; Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T.; Cavalleri, A.

    2015-08-31

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  7. Electronic structure of Ce2RhIn8: A two-dimensional heavy-fermion system studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Jiang, Rui; Mou, Daixing; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Xin; Yao, Yongxin; Ryu, Hyejin; Petrovic, C.; Ho, Kai -Ming; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-04-01

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the 2D heavy fermion superconductor, Ce₂RhIn₈. The Fermi surface is rather complicated and consists of several hole and electron pockets with one of the sheets displaying strong nesting properties with a q-vector of (0.32, 0.32) π/a. We do not observe kz dispersion of the Fermi sheets, which is consistent with the expected 2D character of the electronic structure. Comparison of the ARPES data to band structure calculations suggests that a localized picture of the f-electrons works best. While there is some agreement in the overall band dispersion and location of the Fermimore » sheets, the model does not reproduce all observed bands and is not completely accurate for those it does. As a result, our data paves the way for improving the band structure calculations and the general understanding of the transport and thermodynamical properties of this material.« less

  8. Electronic structure of Ce2 RhIn8: A two-dimensional heavy-fermion system studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Jiang, Rui; Mou, Daixing; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Xin; Yao, Yongxin; Ryu, Hyejin; Petrovic, C.; Ho, Kai -Ming; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the two-dimensional (2D) heavy-fermion superconductor, Ce2 RhIn8. The Fermi surface is rather complicated and consists of several hole and electron pockets with one of the sheets displaying strong nesting properties with a q vector of (0.32, 0.32) π/a. We do not observe kz dispersion of the Fermi sheets, which is consistent with the expected 2D character of the electronic structure. Comparison of the ARPES data to band-structure calculations suggests that a localized picture of the f electrons works best. While there is some agreement in the overall band dispersionmore » and location of the Fermi sheets, the model does not reproduce all observed bands and is not completely accurate for those it does. Our data paves the way for improving the band-structure calculations and the general understanding of the transport and thermodynamical properties of this material.« less

  9. Angle-resolved environmental X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: A new laboratory setup for photoemission studies at pressures up to 0.4 Torr

    SciTech Connect

    Mangolini, F.; Wabiszewski, G. E.; Egberts, P.; Ahlund, J.; Backlund, K.; Karlsson, P. G.; Adiga, V. P.; Streller, F.; Wannberg, B.; Carpick, R. W.

    2012-09-15

    The paper presents the development and demonstrates the capabilities of a new laboratory-based environmental X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy system incorporating an electrostatic lens and able to acquire spectra up to 0.4 Torr. The incorporation of a two-dimensional detector provides imaging capabilities and allows the acquisition of angle-resolved data in parallel mode over an angular range of 14 Degree-Sign without tilting the sample. The sensitivity and energy resolution of the spectrometer have been investigated by analyzing a standard Ag foil both under high vacuum (10{sup -8} Torr) conditions and at elevated pressures of N{sub 2} (0.4 Torr). The possibility of acquiring angle-resolved data at different pressures has been demonstrated by analyzing a silicon/silicon dioxide (Si/SiO{sub 2}) sample. The collected angle-resolved spectra could be effectively used for the determination of the thickness of the native silicon oxide layer.

  10. Doping Dependence of the $(\\pi,\\pi)$ Shadow Band in La-Based Cuprates Studied by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z. X.

    2011-08-15

    The ({pi},{pi}) shadow band (SB) in La-based cuprate family (La214) was studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) over a wide doping range from x = 0.01 to x = 0.25. Unlike the well-studied case of the Bi-based cuprate family, an overall strong, monotonic doping dependence of the SB intensity at the Fermi level (E{sub F}) was observed. In contrast to a previous report for the presence of the SB only close to x = 1/8, we found it exists in a wide doping range, associated with a doping-independent ({pi},{pi}) wave vector but strongly doping-dependent intensity: It is the strongest at x {approx} 0.03 and systematically diminishes as the doping increases until it becomes negligible in the overdoped regime. This SB with the observed doping dependence of intensity can in principle be caused by the antiferromagnetic fluctuations or a particular form of low-temperature orthorhombic lattice distortion known to persist up to x {approx} 0.21 in the system, with both being weakened with increasing doping. However, a detailed binding energy dependent analysis of the SB at x = 0.07 does not appear to support the former interpretation, leaving the latter as a more plausible candidate, despite a challenge in quantitatively linking the doping dependences of the SB intensity and the magnitude of the lattice distortion. Our finding highlights the necessity of a careful and global consideration of the inherent structural complications for correctly understanding the cuprate Fermiology and its microscopic implication.

  11. Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy Studies of the Mott Insulator to Superconductor Evolution in Ca2-xNaxCuO2Cl2

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Kyle Michael; ,

    2005-09-02

    It is widely believed that many of the exotic physical properties of the high-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors arise from the proximity of these materials to the strongly correlated, antiferromagnetic Mott insulating state. Therefore, one of the fundamental questions in the field of high-temperature superconductivity is to understand the insulator-to-superconductor transition and precisely how the electronic structure of Mott insulator evolves as the first holes are doped into the system. This dissertation presents high-resolution, doping dependent angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) studies of the cuprate superconductor Ca{sub 2-x}Na{sub x}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, spanning from the undoped parent Mott insulator to a high-temperature superconductor with a T{sub c} of 22 K. A phenomenological model is proposed to explain how the spectral lineshape, the quasiparticle band dispersion, and the chemical potential all progress with doping in a logical and self-consistent framework. This model is based on Franck-Condon broadening observed in polaronic systems where strong electron-boson interactions cause the quasiparticle residue, Z, to be vanishingly small. Comparisons of the low-lying states to different electronic states in the valence band strongly suggest that the coupling of the photohole to the lattice (i.e. lattice polaron formation) is the dominant broadening mechanism for the lower Hubbard band states. Combining this polaronic framework with high-resolution ARPES measurements finally provides a resolution to the long-standing controversy over the behavior of the chemical potential in the high-T{sub c} cuprates. This scenario arises from replacing the conventional Fermi liquid quasiparticle interpretation of the features in the Mott insulator by a Franck-Condon model, allowing the reassignment of the position of the quasiparticle pole. As a function of hole doping, the chemical potential shifts smoothly into the valence band while spectral weight is transferred

  12. Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Riseborough, Peter S.; Gu, Genda; Gilbertson, Steve M.; Taylor, Antoinette; Rodriguez, George

    2015-10-12

    A hallmark in the cuprate family of high-temperature superconductors is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. In this regard, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has proven especially powerful, providing band structure information directly in energy-momentum space. Time-resolved ARPES (trARPES) holds great promise of adding ultrafast temporal information, in an attempt to identify different interaction channels in the time domain. Previous studies of the cuprates using trARPES were handicapped by the low probing energy which significantly limits the accessible momentum space. Using 20.15eV, 12 fs pulses we show for the first time the evolution of quasiparticles in the antinodal region of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and demonstrate thatmore » nonmonotonic relaxation dynamics dominates above a certain fluence threshold. The dynamics is heavily influenced by transient modification of the electron-phonon interaction and phase space restrictions, in severe contrast to the monotonic relaxation in the nodal and off-nodal regions.« less

  13. Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Riseborough, Peter S.; Gu, Genda; Gilbertson, Steve M.; Taylor, Antoinette; Rodriguez, George

    2015-10-12

    A hallmark in the cuprate family of high-temperature superconductors is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. In this regard, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has proven especially powerful, providing band structure information directly in energy-momentum space. Time-resolved ARPES (trARPES) holds great promise of adding ultrafast temporal information, in an attempt to identify different interaction channels in the time domain. Previous studies of the cuprates using trARPES were handicapped by the low probing energy which significantly limits the accessible momentum space. Using 20.15eV, 12 fs pulses we show for the first time the evolution of quasiparticles in the antinodal region of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and demonstrate thatmore »nonmonotonic relaxation dynamics dominates above a certain fluence threshold. The dynamics is heavily influenced by transient modification of the electron-phonon interaction and phase space restrictions, in severe contrast to the monotonic relaxation in the nodal and off-nodal regions.« less

  14. Design of a High Resolution and High Flux Beam line for VUV Angle-Resolved Photoemission at UVSOR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shin-ichi; Ito, Takahiro; Nakamura, Eiken; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro

    2007-01-19

    A high-energy-resolution angle-resolved photoemission beamline in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region has been designed for a 750 MeV synchrotron light source UVSOR-II. The beamline equips an APPLE-II-type undulator with the horizontally/vertically linear and right/left circular polarizations, a modified Wadsworth-type monochromator and a high-resolution photoelectron analyzer. The monochromator covers the photon energy range of 6 - 40 eV. The energy resolution (hv/{delta}hv) and the photon flux on samples are expected to be 2 x 104 and 1012 photons/sec at 10 eV, 4 x 104 and 5 x 1011 photons/sec at 20 eV, and 6 x 104 and 1011 photons/sec at 40 eV, respectively. The beamline provides the high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy less than 1 meV in the whole VUV energy range.

  15. SAMRAI: A novel variably polarized angle-resolved photoemission beamline in the VUV region at UVSOR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shin-Ichi; Ito, Takahiro; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro; Sakai, Masahiro; Nakamura, Eiken; Kondo, Naonori; Horigome, Toshio; Hayashi, Kenji; Goto, Tomohiro; Ejima, Takeo; Soda, Kazuo

    2010-05-15

    A novel variably polarized angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy beamline in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region has been installed at the UVSOR-II 750 MeV synchrotron light source. The beamline is equipped with a 3 m long APPLE-II type undulator with horizontally/vertically linear and right/left circular polarizations, a 10 m Wadsworth type monochromator covering a photon energy range of 6-43 eV, and a 200 mm radius hemispherical photoelectron analyzer with an electron lens of a {+-}18 deg. acceptance angle. Due to the low emittance of the UVSOR-II storage ring, the light source is regarded as an entrance slit, and the undulator light is directly led to a grating by two plane mirrors in the monochromator while maintaining a balance between high-energy resolution and high photon flux. The energy resolving power (h{nu}/{Delta}h{nu}) and photon flux of the monochromator are typically 1x10{sup 4} and 10{sup 12} photons/s, respectively, with a 100 {mu}m exit slit. The beamline is used for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with an energy resolution of a few meV covering the UV-to-VUV energy range.

  16. Simple surface structure determination from Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y. |; Shirley, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    The authors show by Fourier analyses of experimental data, with no further treatment, that the positions of all the strong peaks in Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) from adsorbed surfaces can be explicitly predicted from a trial structure with an accuracy of about {+-} 0.3 {angstrom} based on a single-scattering cluster model together with the concept of a strong backscattering cone, and without any additional analysis. This characteristic of ARPEFS Fourier transforms can be developed as a simple method for determining the structures of adsorbed surfaces to an accuracy of about {+-} 0.1 {angstrom}.

  17. Evidence of the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-04-01

    The authors present a unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level photoemission satellites by examining the satellite diffraction pattern in the Angle Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) mode. They show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. They present ARPEFS data for the carbon 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2xl)CO/Ni(110), nitrogen 1s from c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100), cobalt 1s from p(1x1)Co/Cu(100), and nickel 3p from clean nickel (111). The satellite peaks and tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature.

  18. High-harmonic XUV source for time- and angle-resolved photoemission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We present a laser-based apparatus for visible pumpXUV probe time- and angle-resolved ... from insulators (UOsub 2) and ultrafast pumpprobe processes in semiconductors (GaAs). ...

  19. Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Riseborough, Peter S.; Gu, Genda; Gilbertson, Steve M.; Taylor, Antoinette; Rodriguez, George

    2015-10-12

    A hallmark in the cuprate family of high-temperature superconductors is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. In this regard, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has proven especially powerful, providing band structure information directly in energy-momentum space. Time-resolved ARPES (trARPES) holds great promise of adding ultrafast temporal information, in an attempt to identify different interaction channels in the time domain. Previous studies of the cuprates using trARPES were handicapped by the low probing energy which significantly limits the accessible momentum space. Using 20.15eV, 12 fs pulses we show for the first time the evolution of quasiparticles in the antinodal region of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and demonstrate that nonmonotonic relaxation dynamics dominates above a certain fluence threshold. The dynamics is heavily influenced by transient modification of the electron-phonon interaction and phase space restrictions, in severe contrast to the monotonic relaxation in the nodal and off-nodal regions.

  20. Photoemission Spectroscopy at SRI2013

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Photoemission Spectroscopy at SRI2013 Workshop on Photoemission Spectroscopy: The Upcoming Decades Organizers: Alexei Fedorov (ALS) and Peter Johnson (BNL) Tuesday, June 18, 2013 *...

  1. A New Spin on Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Light Source; Jozwiak, Chris

    2008-12-18

    The electronic spin degree of freedom is of general fundamental importance to all matter. Understanding its complex roles and behavior in the solid state, particularly in highly correlated and magnetic materials, has grown increasingly desirable as technology demands advanced devices and materials based on ever stricter comprehension and control of the electron spin. However, direct and efficient spin dependent probes of electronic structure are currently lacking. Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) has become one of the most successful experimental tools for elucidating solid state electronic structures, bolstered bycontinual breakthroughs in efficient instrumentation. In contrast, spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has lagged behind due to a lack of similar instrumental advances. The power of photoemission spectroscopy and the pertinence of electronic spin in the current research climate combine to make breakthroughs in Spin and Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (SARPES) a high priority . This thesis details the development of a unique instrument for efficient SARPES and represents a radical departure from conventional methods. A custom designed spin polarimeter based on low energy exchange scattering is developed, with projected efficiency gains of two orders of magnitude over current state-of-the-art polarimeters. For energy analysis, the popular hemispherical analyzer is eschewed for a custom Time-of-Flight (TOF) analyzer offering an additional order of magnitude gain in efficiency. The combined instrument signifies the breakthrough needed to perform the high resolution SARPES experiments necessary for untangling the complex spin-dependent electronic structures central to today?s condensed matter physics.

  2. A high-order harmonic generation apparatus for time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Frietsch, B.; Gahl, C.; Teichmann, M.; Weinelt, M.; Carley, R.; Döbrich, K.; Schwarzkopf, O.; Wernet, Ph.

    2013-07-15

    We present a table top setup for time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate band structure dynamics of correlated materials driven far from equilibrium by femtosecond laser pulse excitation. With the electron-phonon equilibration time being in the order of 1–2 ps it is necessary to achieve sub-picosecond time resolution. Few techniques provide both the necessary time and energy resolution to map non-equilibrium states of the band structure. Laser-driven high-order harmonic generation is such a technique. In our experiment, a grating monochromator delivers tunable photon energies up to 40 eV. A photon energy bandwidth of 150 meV and a pulse duration of 100 fs FWHM allow us to cover the k-space necessary to map valence bands at different k{sub z} and detect outer core states.

  3. Effects of symmetry on circular and linear magnetic dichroism in angle-resolved photoemission spectra of Gd/Y (0001) and Fe-Ni//Cu (001)

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, K.W.; Tobin, J.G.; Schumann, F.O.; Willis, R.F.; Gammon, J.W.; Pappas, D.P.; Kortright, J.B.; Denlinger, J.D.; Rotenberg, E.; Warwick, A.; Smith, N.V.

    1997-03-26

    We have observed circular and linear magnetic dichroism in angle- resolved photoemission spectra of 50-monolayer Gd film grown on Y(0001) and 6-monolayer Fe-Ni alloy films grown on Cu(001). The 4f level of Gd and the Fe 3p level of the Fe-Ni alloy were measured. A different geometry was used for the magnetic circular dichroism than was used to measure the magnetic linear dichroism. The geometries were chosen so that the shape of the magnetic circular dichroism is predicted to be equal to the shape of the magnetic linear dichroism for four-fold symmetric Fe-Ni/Cu(001) but not for three-fold symmetric Gd/Y(0001). Experimental results are presented. In this paper we examine the effect of symmetry (experimental geometry and sample geometry) on magnetic linear and circular dichroism in angle- resolved photoemission. In particular we chose separate geometries for measuring magnetic circular and magnetic linear dichroism. The geometries were chosen such that samples with four-fold symmetry about the sample normal may have magnetic circular and magnetic linear dichroism of the same shape. But samples with three-fold symmetry should not exhibit circular and magnetic linear dichroism of the same shape. The samples studied are three-fold symmetric Gd films grown on Y(0001) and four-fold symmetric Fe-Ni alloy grown on Cu(001). After presenting the methods of the experiment, we briefly review parts of a model of magnetic dichroism developed by Venus and coworkers and our specialization and extension of it, particularly for FeNi/Cu(001). We then show the results of our measurements.

  4. Angle-resolved scattering spectroscopy of explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2012-04-01

    Investigation of angle-resolved scattering from solid explosives residues on a car door for non-contact sensing geometries. Illumination with a mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade laser tuning between 7 and 8 microns was detected both with a sensitive single point detector and a hyperspectral imaging camera. Spectral scattering phenomena were discussed and possibilities for hyperspectral imaging at large scattering angles were outlined.

  5. Adsorption site and structure determination of c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100) using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-04-01

    The authors have determined the atomic spatial structure of c(2x2) N2Ni(100) with Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the nitrogen 1s core level using monochromatized x-rays from beamline 6.1 at SSRL and beamline 9.3.2 at the ALS. The chemically shifted N 1s peak intensities were summed together to obtain ARPEFS curves for both nitrogen atoms in the molecule. They used a new, highly-optimized program based on the Rehr-Albers scattering matrix formalism to find the adsorption site and to quantitatively determine the bond-lengths. The nitrogen molecule stands upright at an atop site, with a N-Ni bond length of 2.25(1) {angstrom}, a N-N bond length of 1.10(7) {angstrom}, and a first layer Ni-Ni spacing of 1.76(4) {angstrom}. The shake-up peak shows an identical ARPEFS diffraction pattern, confirming its intrinsic nature and supporting a previous use of this feature to decompose the peak into contributions from the chemically inequivalent nitrogen atoms. Comparison to a previously published theoretical treatment of N-N-Ni and experimental structures of analogous adsorbate systems demonstrates the importance of adsorbate-adsorbate interactions in weakly chemisorbed systems.

  6. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of PrFeAsO0.7...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Nishi, I. ; Ishikado, M. ; Ideta, S. ; Malaeb, W. ; Yoshida, T. ; Fujimori, A. ; Kotani, Y. ; Kubota, M. ; Ono, K. ; Yi, M. ; Lu, D. H. ; Moore, R. ; Shen, Z.-X. ; Iyo, A. ...

  7. A study of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure as applied to the Ni 3p, Cu 3s, and Cu 3p core levels of the respective clean (111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, W.R.A.; Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.

    1997-04-01

    The first non-s initial state angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) study of clean surfaces for the purpose of further understanding the technique is reported. The surface structure sensitivity of ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces and to arbitrary initial states is studied using normal photoemission data taken from the Ni 3p core levels of a Ni(111) single crystal and the Cu 3s and the Cu 3p core-levels of a Cu(111) single crystal. The Fourier transforms of these clean surface data are dominated by backscattering. Unlike the s initial state data, the p initial state data show a peak in the Fourier transform corresponding to in-plane scattering from the six nearest-neighbors to the emitter. Evidence was seen for single-scattering events from in the same plane as the emitters and double-scattering events. Using a newly developed, multiple-scattering calculation program, ARPEFS data from clean surfaces and from p initial states can be modeled to high precision. Although there are many layers of emitters when measuring photoemission from a clean surface, test calculations show that the ARPEFS signal is dominated by photoemission from atoms in the first two crystal layers. Thus, ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces is sensitive to surface reconstruction. The known contraction of the first two Cu(111) layers is confirmed. The best-fit calculation for clean Ni(111) indicates an expansion of the first two layers. To better understand the ARPEFS technique, the authors studied s and non-s initial state photoemission from clean metal surfaces.

  8. Laser Focus World highlights Kaminski's home-grown ARPES spectroscopy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Focus World highlights Kaminski's home-grown ARPES spectroscopy system Laser Focus World senior editor Gail Overton wrote a story on angled-resolved photo-emission...

  9. Spatial structure determination of ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{degrees} and (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees}CO on Cu(111) using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-04-01

    The authors report a study of the spatial structure of ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{degrees} (low coverage) and (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees} (intermediate coverage) CO adsorbed on Cu(111), using the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) technique at beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source. The CO molecule adsorbs on an atop site for both adsorption phases. Full multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) calculations were used to extract the C-Cu. bond length and the first Cu-Cu layer spacing for each adsorption phase. The authors find that the C-Cu bond length remains unchanged with increasing coverage, but the 1st Cu-Cu layer spacing contracts at the intermediate coverage. They calculate the bending mode force constant in the (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees} phase to be K{sub {delta}} = 2.2 (1) x 10{sup {minus}12} dyne-cm/rad from their experimentally determined bond lengths combined with previously published infra-red absorption frequencies.

  10. Observation by resonant angle-resolved photoemission of a critical thickness for 2-dimensional electron gas formation in SrTiO{sub 3} embedded in GdTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Nemšák, S.; Conti, G.; Palsson, G. K.; Conlon, C.; Fadley, C. S.; Cho, S.; Rault, J. E.; Avila, J.; Asensio, M.-C.; Jackson, C. A.; Moetakef, P.; Janotti, A.; Bjaalie, L.; Himmetoglu, B.; Van de Walle, C. G.; Stemmer, S.; Balents, L.; Schneider, C. M.

    2015-12-07

    For certain conditions of layer thickness, the interface between GdTiO{sub 3} (GTO) and SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) in multilayer samples has been found to form a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with very interesting properties including high mobilities and ferromagnetism. We have here studied two trilayer samples of the form [2 nm GTO/1.0 or 1.5 unit cells STO/10 nm GTO] as grown on (001) (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(Sr{sub 2}AlTaO{sub 6}){sub 0.7}, with the STO layer thicknesses being at what has been suggested is the critical thickness for 2DEG formation. We have studied these with Ti-resonant angle-resolved and angle-integrated photoemission and find that the spectral feature in the spectra associated with the 2DEG is present in the 1.5 unit cell sample, but not in the 1.0 unit cell sample. We also observe through core-level spectra additional states in Ti and Sr, with the strength of a low-binding-energy state for Sr being associated with the appearance of the 2DEG, and we suggest it to have an origin in final-state core-hole screening.

  11. Invited Article: High resolution angle resolved photoemission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    94305 2 ; Zong, Alfred 3 ; Jefferson, C. Michael ; Merriam, Andrew J. 4 ; Moore, Robert G. ; Kirchmann, Patrick S. 1 + Show Author Affiliations SIMES, SLAC National ...

  12. A high-efficiency spin-resolved photoemission spectrometer combining time-of-flight spectroscopy with exchange-scattering polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Jozwiak, Chris M.; Graff, Jeff; Lebedev, Gennadi; Andresen, Nord; Schmid, Andreas; Fedorov, Alexei; El Gabaly, Farid; Wan, Weishi; Lanzara, Alessandra; Hussain, Zahid

    2010-04-13

    We describe a spin-resolved electron spectrometer capable of uniquely efficient and high energy resolution measurements. Spin analysis is obtained through polarimetry based on low-energy exchange scattering from a ferromagnetic thin-film target. This approach can achieve a similar analyzing power (Sherman function) as state-of-the-art Mott scattering polarimeters, but with as much as 100 times improved efficiency due to increased reflectivity. Performance is further enhanced by integrating the polarimeter into a time-of-flight (TOF) based energy analysis scheme with a precise and flexible electrostatic lens system. The parallel acquisition of a range of electron kinetic energies afforded by the TOF approach results in an order of magnitude (or more) increase in efficiency compared to hemispherical analyzers. The lens system additionally features a 90 degrees bandpass filter, which by removing unwanted parts of the photoelectron distribution allows the TOF technique to be performed at low electron drift energy and high energy resolution within a wide range of experimental parameters. The spectrometer is ideally suited for high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES), and initial results are shown. The TOF approach makes the spectrometer especially ideal for time-resolved spin-ARPES experiments.

  13. A photoemission study of the diamond and the single crystal C{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jin

    1994-03-01

    This report studied the elctronic structure of diamond (100) and diamond/metal interface and C{sub 60}, using angle-resolved and core level photoemission. The C(100)-(2X1) surface electronic structure was studied using both core level and angle resolved valence band photoemission spectroscopy. The surface component of the C 1s core level spectrum agrees with theoretical existence of only symmetrical dimers. In the case of metal/diamond interfaces, core level and valence photoelectron spectroscopy and LEED studies WERE MADE OF B and Sb on diamond (100) and (111) surfaces. In the case of single-crystal C{sub 60}, photoemission spectra show sharp molecular features, indicating that the molecular orbitals are relatively undisturbed in solid C{sub 60}.

  14. Aspects of Electron-Phonon Self-Energy Revealed From Angle-Resolved...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; PHOTOEMISSION; SELF-ENERGY; EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY; ELECTRONS; PHONONS Other,OTHER Word Cloud More Like This Full Text ...

  15. TOF Electron Energy Analyzer for Spin and Angular Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Gennadi; Jozwiak, Chris; Andresen, Nord; Lanzara, Alessandra; Hussain, Zahid

    2008-07-09

    Current pulsed laser and synchrotron x-ray sources provide new opportunities for Time-Of- Flight (TOF) based photoemission spectroscopy to increase photoelectron energy resolution and efficiency compared to current standard techniques. The principals of photoelectron timing front formation, temporal aberration minimization, and optimization of electron beam transmission are presented. We have developed these concepts into a high resolution Electron Optical Scheme (EOS) of a TOF Electron Energy Analyzer (TOF-EEA) for photoemission spectroscopy. The EOS of the analyzer includes an electrostatic objective lens, three columns of transport lenses and a 90 degree energy band pass filter (BPF). The analyzer has two modes of operation: Spectrometer Mode (SM) with straight passage of electrons through the EOS undeflected by the BPF, allowing the entire spectrum to be measured, and Monochromator Mode (MM) in which the BPF defines a certain energy window inside the scope of the electron energy spectrum.

  16. Photoelectron spectroscopy and the dipole approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmers, O.; Hansen, D.L.; Wang, H.

    1997-04-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is a powerful technique because it directly probes, via the measurement of photoelectron kinetic energies, orbital and band structure in valence and core levels in a wide variety of samples. The technique becomes even more powerful when it is performed in an angle-resolved mode, where photoelectrons are distinguished not only by their kinetic energy, but by their direction of emission as well. Determining the probability of electron ejection as a function of angle probes the different quantum-mechanical channels available to a photoemission process, because it is sensitive to phase differences among the channels. As a result, angle-resolved photoemission has been used successfully for many years to provide stringent tests of the understanding of basic physical processes underlying gas-phase and solid-state interactions with radiation. One mainstay in the application of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is the well-known electric-dipole approximation for photon interactions. In this simplification, all higher-order terms, such as those due to electric-quadrupole and magnetic-dipole interactions, are neglected. As the photon energy increases, however, effects beyond the dipole approximation become important. To best determine the range of validity of the dipole approximation, photoemission measurements on a simple atomic system, neon, where extra-atomic effects cannot play a role, were performed at BL 8.0. The measurements show that deviations from {open_quotes}dipole{close_quotes} expectations in angle-resolved valence photoemission are observable for photon energies down to at least 0.25 keV, and are quite significant at energies around 1 keV. From these results, it is clear that non-dipole angular-distribution effects may need to be considered in any application of angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy that uses x-ray photons of energies as low as a few hundred eV.

  17. Photoemission spectroscopy study of the lanthanum lutetium oxide/silicon interface

    SciTech Connect

    Nichau, A.; Schnee, M.; Schubert, J.; Bernardy, P.; Hollaender, B.; Buca, D.; Mantl, S.; Besmehn, A.; Breuer, U.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Castro, G. R.; Muecklich, A.; Borany, J. von

    2013-04-21

    Rare earth oxides are promising candidates for future integration into nano-electronics. A key property of these oxides is their ability to form silicates in order to replace the interfacial layer in Si-based complementary metal-oxide field effect transistors. In this work a detailed study of lanthanum lutetium oxide based gate stacks is presented. Special attention is given to the silicate formation at temperatures typical for CMOS processing. The experimental analysis is based on hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy complemented by standard laboratory experiments as Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Homogenously distributed La silicate and Lu silicate at the Si interface are proven to form already during gate oxide deposition. During the thermal treatment Si atoms diffuse through the oxide layer towards the TiN metal gate. This mechanism is identified to be promoted via Lu-O bonds, whereby the diffusion of La was found to be less important.

  18. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Michael E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu; Schlaf, Rudy E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu

    2015-08-14

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru{sup 0}) and its oxide (RuO{sub 2}) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru{sup 0} and RuO{sub 2} films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO{sub 2} and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.{sup 0} An interface dipole of up to −0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO{sub 2}/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups.

  19. Low-energy electro- and photo-emission spectroscopy of GaN materials and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Piccardo, Marco; Weisbuch, Claude; Iveland, Justin; Nakamura, Shuji; Speck, James S.; Martinelli, Lucio Peretti, Jacques; Choi, Joo Won

    2015-03-21

    In hot-electron semiconductor devices, carrier transport extends over a wide range of conduction states, which often includes multiple satellite valleys. Electrical measurements can hardly give access to the transport processes over such a wide range without resorting to models and simulations. An alternative experimental approach however exists which is based on low-energy electron spectroscopy and provides, in a number of cases, very direct and selective information on hot-electron transport mechanisms. Recent results obtained in GaN crystals and devices by electron emission spectroscopy are discussed. Using near-band-gap photoemission, the energy position of the first satellite valley in wurtzite GaN is directly determined. By electro-emission spectroscopy, we show that the measurement of the electron spectrum emitted from a GaN p-n junction and InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) under electrical injection of carriers provides a direct observation of transport processes in these devices. In particular, at high injected current density, high-energy features appear in the electro-emission spectrum of the LEDs showing that Auger electrons are being generated in the active region. These measurements allow us identifying the microscopic mechanism responsible for droop which represents a major hurdle for widespread adoption of solid-state lighting.

  20. Angle Resolved Thermal Conductivity of CeCoIn5 along the Nodal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Angle Resolved Thermal Conductivity of CeCoIn5 along the Nodal Direction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Angle Resolved Thermal Conductivity of CeCoIn5 along the Nodal ...

  1. High-harmonic XUV source for time- and angle-resolved photoemission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Dakovski, Georgi L 1 ; Li, Yinwan 1 ; Durakiewicz, Tomasz 1 ; Rodriguez, George 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: ...

  2. Ultra-nonlocality in density functional theory for photo-emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Uimonen, A.-M.; Stefanucci, G.; INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati; European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility , Louvain-la Neuve ; Leeuwen, R. van; European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility , Louvain-la Neuve

    2014-05-14

    We derive an exact expression for the photocurrent of photo-emission spectroscopy using time-dependent current density functional theory (TDCDFT). This expression is given as an integral over the Kohn-Sham spectral function renormalized by effective potentials that depend on the exchange-correlation kernel of current density functional theory. We analyze in detail the physical content of this expression by making a connection between the density-functional expression and the diagrammatic expansion of the photocurrent within many-body perturbation theory. We further demonstrate that the density functional expression does not provide us with information on the kinetic energy distribution of the photo-electrons. Such information can, in principle, be obtained from TDCDFT by exactly modeling the experiment in which the photocurrent is split into energy contributions by means of an external electromagnetic field outside the sample, as is done in standard detectors. We find, however, that this procedure produces very nonlocal correlations between the exchange-correlation fields in the sample and the detector.

  3. Precision angle-resolved autoionization resonances in Ar and Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Berrah, N.; Langer, B.; Gorczyca, T.W.

    1997-04-01

    Theoretical work has shown that the electron angular distribution and the shape of the autoionization resonances are crucial to the understanding of certain types of electron-electron correlation. Autoionization resonances in Ne (Ar) result from the decay of the excited discrete state Ne{sup *} 2s2p{sup 6} np (Ar{sup *} 3s3p{sup 6} np) into the continuum state Ne{sup +} 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 5} + e{sup {minus}} (ks,kd) (Ar{sup +} 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5} + e{sup {minus}} (ks,kd)). Since the continuum can also be reached by direct photoionization, both paths add coherently, giving rise to interferences that produce the characteristic Beutler-Fano line shape. In this work, the authors report on quantitative angle-resolved electron spectrometry studies of (a) the Ne 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 2s2p{sup 6} np (n=3-5) autoionizing resonances and the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 2p{sup 4}3s3p doubly excited resonance, (b) the Ar 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 3s3p{sup 6} np (n=4-9) autoionization resonances and extended R-matrix calculations of the angular-distribution parameters for both Ne and Ar measurements. Their results are compared with previous theoretical work by Taylor.

  4. Electronic properties of Mn-phthalocyanine–C{sub 60} bulk heterojunctions: Combining photoemission and electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Friedrich; Lupulescu, Cosmin; Darlatt, Erik; Gottwald, Alexander; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2015-11-14

    The electronic properties of co-evaporated mixtures (blends) of manganese phthalocyanine and the fullerene C{sub 60} (MnPc:C{sub 60}) have been studied as a function of the concentration of the two constituents using two supplementary electron spectroscopic methods, photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in transmission. Our PES measurements provide a detailed picture of the electronic structure measured with different excitation energies as well as different mixing ratios between MnPc and C{sub 60}. Besides a relative energy shift, the occupied electronic states of the two materials remain essentially unchanged. The observed energy level alignment is different compared to that of the related CuPc:C{sub 60} bulk heterojunction. Moreover, the results from our EELS investigations show that, despite the rather small interface interaction, the MnPc related electronic excitation spectrum changes significantly by admixing C{sub 60} to MnPc thin films.

  5. Photoemission study of the electronic structure and charge density waves of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, S. Y.; Jiang, J.; Ye, Z. R.; Niu, X. H.; Song, Y.; Zhang, C. L.; Dai, P. C.; Xie, B. P.; Lai, X. C.; Feng, D. L.

    2015-04-30

    The electronic structure of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O single crystal is studied by photon energy and polarization dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The obtained band structure and Fermi surface agree well with the band structure calculation of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O in the non-magnetic state, which indicates that there is no magnetic order in Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O and the electronic correlation is weak. Polarization dependent ARPES results suggest the multi-band and multi-orbital nature of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O. Photon energy dependent ARPES results suggest that the electronic structure of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O is rather two-dimensional. Moreover, we find a density wave energy gap forms below the transition temperature and reaches 65 meV at 7 K, indicating that Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O is likely a weakly correlated CDW material in the strong electron-phonon interaction regime. (author)

  6. Low-energy inverse photoemission spectroscopy using a high-resolution grating spectrometer in the near ultraviolet range

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-15

    An inverse photoemission spectroscopy (IPES) apparatus using a Czerny-Turner grating spectrometer is demonstrated. Previous IPES instruments based on grating spectrometers used a concave grating and operated in the vacuum ultraviolet range. The reflectance of such gratings is lower than 20% and the aberration cannot be finely corrected leading to an energy resolution of up to 0.1 eV. In the present study, employing the low energy IPES regime [H. Yoshida, Chem. Phys. Lett. 539–540, 180 (2012)], incident electrons with a kinetic energy below 5 eV are used, while photon emission in the range of between 250 and 370 nm is analyzed with a 10-cm Czerny-Turner grating spectrometer. The signal intensity is at least 30 times higher than the previous apparatus. The resolution of photon detection is set at 0.07 eV though the ultimate resolution is one order of magnitude higher. The experiment is performed both by sweeping the electron energy (isochromat mode) and by simultaneously analyzing the photon of whole wavelength range (tunable photon energy mode)

  7. Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and supported monolayer MoS2: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy Title: Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer MoS2: Angle-resolved ...

  8. Electronic study of Al substituted La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} using photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Phase, D. M. Kumar, Manish Wadikar, A. D. Choudhary, R. J.

    2014-04-24

    Polycrystalline samples of La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}Mn{sub 1−X}Al{sub X}O{sub 3} (X=0, 0.05, 0.15) are prepared using solid state reaction route. Photoemission spectroscopy measurements were performed on these samples to investigate their electronic properties. Al shows 3+ oxidation state in both Al doped samples while no effect of Al doping is found on the core level spectrum of La 4d and Ca 2p orbitals and they were found in 3{sup +} and 2{sup +} oxidation state respectively in all the samples . Mn 2p core level photoemission measurements indicates that for 5% Al doped sample (lower doping) Al ions replaces the Mn{sup 3+} ions while they substitute Mn{sup 4+} in 15 % Al doped sample ((higher doping)

  9. Electron mean free path from angle-dependent photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmann, Maximilian; Miguel-Sánchez, Javier; West, Adam H. C.; Yoder, Bruce L.; Signorell, Ruth

    2015-06-14

    We propose angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles as an alternative way to determine the electron mean free path of low energy electrons in solid and liquid materials. The mean free path is obtained from fits of simulated photoemission images to experimental ones over a broad range of different aerosol particle sizes. The principal advantage of the aerosol approach is twofold. First, aerosol photoemission studies can be performed for many different materials, including liquids. Second, the size-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectrons can be exploited in addition to size-dependent changes in their kinetic energy. These finite size effects depend in different ways on the mean free path and thus provide more information on the mean free path than corresponding liquid jet, thin film, or bulk data. The present contribution is a proof of principle employing a simple model for the photoemission of electrons and preliminary experimental data for potassium chloride aerosol particles.

  10. Photoemission Study of the Rare Earth Intermetallic Compounds: RNi2Ge2 (R=Eu, Gd)

    SciTech Connect

    Jongik Park

    2004-12-19

    EuNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} and GdNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} are two members of the RT{sub 2}X{sub 2} (R = rare earth, T = transition metal and X = Si, Ge) family of intermetallic compounds, which has been studied since the early 1980s. These ternary rare-earth intermetallic compounds with the tetragonal ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure are known for their wide variety of magnetic properties, Extensive studies of the RT{sub 2}X{sub 2} series can be found in Refs [ 1,2,3]. The magnetic properties of the rare-earth nickel germanides RNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} were recently studied in more detail [4]. The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate the electronic structure (both valence band and shallow core levels) of single crystals of EuNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} and GdNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} and to check the assumptions that the f electrons are non-interacting and, consequently, the rigid-band model for these crystals would work [11], using synchrotron radiation because, to the best of our knowledge, no photoemission measurements on those have been reported. Photoemission spectroscopy has been widely used to study the detailed electronic structure of metals and alloys, and especially angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has proven to be a powerful technique for investigating Fermi surfaces (FSs) of single-crystal compounds.

  11. Conduction band offset at GeO{sub 2}/Ge interface determined by internal photoemission and charge-corrected x-ray photoelectron spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W. F.; Nishimula, T.; Nagashio, K.; Kita, K.; Toriumi, A.

    2013-03-11

    We report a consistent conduction band offset (CBO) at a GeO{sub 2}/Ge interface determined by internal photoemission spectroscopy (IPE) and charge-corrected X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). IPE results showed that the CBO value was larger than 1.5 eV irrespective of metal electrode and substrate type variance, while an accurate determination of valence band offset (VBO) by XPS requires a careful correction of differential charging phenomena. The VBO value was determined to be 3.60 {+-} 0.2 eV by XPS after charge correction, thus yielding a CBO (1.60 {+-} 0.2 eV) in excellent agreement with the IPE results. Such a large CBO (>1.5 eV) confirmed here is promising in terms of using GeO{sub 2} as a potential passivation layer for future Ge-based scaled CMOS devices.

  12. Scientific Cornerstones | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    depletion microscopies Spectroscopies and Elemental Analysis: Auger, Raman, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, ...

  13. Identifying ferroelectric phase and domain structure using angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K. L.; Huber, J. E.

    2014-03-24

    We used angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy (AR-PFM), vertical PFM (VPFM), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to provide a systematic interpretation of domain patterns in polycrystalline, near-morphotropic lead zirconate titanate. This material was used to illustrate the power of AR-PFM methods in resolving complex domain patterns where multiple phases may be present. AR-PFM was carried out with a 30° rotation interval, and the resulting data were analysed to identify the orientation of the underlying axis of piezoelectricity. The additional information provided by AR-PFM was studied, comparing its capabilities to those of 3-dimensional PFM, consisting of one VPFM image and two orthogonal lateral PFM (LPFM) images. We show that, in certain conditions, using AR-PFM can identify the phases present at the sub-grain scale. This was confirmed using VPFM and EBSD data. Furthermore, the method can discriminate laminated domain patterns that appear similar in VPFM and can reliably expose domain patterns that may not be seen in LPFM data from a single orientation, or even in 3D PFM data.

  14. Direct comparative study on the energy level alignments in unoccupied/occupied states of organic semiconductor/electrode interface by constructing in-situ photoemission spectroscopy and Ar gas cluster ion beam sputtering integrated analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Dong-Jin Chung, JaeGwan; Kim, Yongsu; Park, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Heon; Heo, Sung

    2014-10-21

    Through the installation of electron gun and photon detector, an in-situ photoemission and damage-free sputtering integrated analysis system is completely constructed. Therefore, this system enables to accurately characterize the energy level alignments including unoccupied/occupied molecular orbital (LUMO/HOMO) levels at interface region of organic semiconductor/electrode according to depth position. Based on Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy (UPS), Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy (IPES), and reflective electron energy loss spectroscopy, the occupied/unoccupied state of in-situ deposited Tris[4-(carbazol-9-yl)phenyl]amine (TCTA) organic semiconductors on Au (E{sub LUMO}: 2.51 eV and E{sub HOMO}: 1.35 eV) and Ti (E{sub LUMO}: 2.19 eV and E{sub HOMO}: 1.69 eV) electrodes are investigated, and the variation of energy level alignments according to work function of electrode (Au: 4.81 eV and Ti: 4.19 eV) is clearly verified. Subsequently, under the same analysis condition, the unoccupied/occupied states at bulk region of TCTA/Au structures are characterized using different Ar gas cluster ion beam (Ar GCIB) and Ar ion sputtering processes, respectively. While the Ar ion sputtering process critically distorts both occupied and unoccupied states in UPS/IPES spectra, the Ar GCIB sputtering process does not give rise to damage on them. Therefore, we clearly confirm that the in-situ photoemission spectroscopy in combination with Ar GCIB sputtering allows of investigating accurate energy level alignments at bulk/interface region as well as surface region of organic semiconductor/electrode structure.

  15. Influence of the contact potential and space-charge effect on the performance of a Stoffel-Johnson design electron source for inverse photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Maniraj, M.; Barman, Sudipta Roy

    2014-03-15

    By imaging the spatial intensity distribution of the electrons from a Stoffel-Johnson (SJ) type low energy electron source for inverse photoemission spectroscopy (IPES), we find that the focus is distorted when the beam current exceeds the limiting value due to space charge effect. The space charge effect and the contact potential difference suppress the beam current at low energies (<10 eV). In this work, we show that these limitations of the SJ source can be overcome by compensation of the contact potential difference between the cathode and the lens electrodes and an uniform well focused electron beam with the set kinetic energy can be obtained. The size of the electron beam is around 1 mm full width at half maximum over the whole energy range of 5 to 30 eV generally used for IPES. The compensation of the contact potential difference also enhances the beam current substantially at low energies (<10 eV) and uniform beam current is achieved for the whole energy range. We find that the drift in the electron beam position is sensitive to the lens electrode separation and it is about 1 mm over the whole energy range. By measuring the n = 1 image potential state on Cu(100), we show that the resolution is better when the cathode filament current is set to lower values.

  16. Multi-atom resonant photoemission and the development of next-generation software and high-speed detectors for electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, Alexander William

    2000-09-01

    This dissertation has involved the exploration of a new effect in photoelectron emission, multi-atom resonant photoemission (MARPE), as well as the development of new software, data analysis techniques, and detectors of general use in such research. We present experimental and theoretical results related to MARPE, in which the photoelectron intensity from a core level on one atom is influenced by a core-level absorption resonance on another. We point out that some of our and others prior experimental data has been strongly influenced by detector non-linearity and that the effects seen in new corrected data are smaller and of different form. Corrected data for the MnO(001) system with resonance between the O 1s and Mn 2p energy levels are found to be well described by an extension of well-known intraatomic resonant photoemission theory to the interatomic case, provided that interactions beyond the usual second-order Kramers-Heisenberg treatment are included. This theory is also found to simplify under certain conditions so as to yield results equivalent to a classical x-ray optical approach, with the latter providing an accurate and alternative, although less detailed and general, physical picture of these effects. Possible future applications of MARPE as a new probe of near-neighbor identities and bonding and its relationship to other known effects are also discussed. We also consider in detail specially written data acquisition software that has been used for most of the measurements reported here. This software has been used with an existing experimental system to develop the method of detector characterization and then data correction required for the work described above. The development of a next generation one-dimensional, high-speed, electron detector is also discussed. Our goal has been to design, build and test a prototype high-performance, one-dimensional pulse-counting detector that represents a significant advancement in detector technology and is well

  17. Photoemission study of the electronic structure and charge density waves of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Tan, S. Y.; Jiang, J.; Ye, Z. R.; Niu, X. H.; Song, Y.; Zhang, C. L.; Dai, P. C.; Xie, B. P.; Lai, X. C.; Feng, D. L.

    2015-04-30

    The electronic structure of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O single crystal is studied by photon energy and polarization dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The obtained band structure and Fermi surface agree well with the band structure calculation of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O in the non-magnetic state, which indicates that there is no magnetic order in Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O and the electronic correlation is weak. Polarization dependent ARPES results suggest the multi-band and multi-orbital nature of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O. Photon energy dependent ARPES results suggest that the electronic structure of Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O is rather two-dimensional. Moreover, we find a density wave energy gap forms below the transition temperature and reaches 65 meV atmore » 7 K, indicating that Na₂Ti₂Sb₂O is likely a weakly correlated CDW material in the strong electron-phonon interaction regime. (author)« less

  18. Electron-Phonon Coupling in High-Temperature CuprateSuperconductors as Revealed by Angle-resolved PhotoemissonSpectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.J.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.-X.

    2005-05-01

    We present an application programming interface (API) used to simplify application-level access to both data and semantic range query machinery where both data and search indices are stored and accessed using the HDF5 data model. While the APIs for HDF5 data access and FastBit indexing/query are rather complex, our API simplifies use of these powerful software technologies.

  19. CdS and Cd-Free Buffer Layers on Solution Phase Grown Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1- x)4 :Band Alignments and Electronic Structure Determined with Femtosecond Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, Richard; Barkhouse, Aaron; Wang, Wei; Yu, Luo; Shao, Xiaoyan; Mitzi, David; Hiroi, Homare; Sugimoto, Hiroki

    2013-12-02

    The heterojunctions formed between solution phase grown Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1- x)4(CZTS,Se) and a number of important buffer materials including CdS, ZnS, ZnO, and In2S3, were studied using femtosecond ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (fs-UPS) and photovoltage spectroscopy. With this approach we extract the magnitude and direction of the CZTS,Se band bending, locate the Fermi level within the band gaps of absorber and buffer and measure the absorber/buffer band offsets under flatband conditions. We will also discuss two-color pump/probe experiments in which the band bending in the buffer layer can be independently determined. Finally, studies of the bare CZTS,Se surface will be discussed including our observation of mid-gap Fermi level pinning and its relation to Voc limitations and bulk defects.

  20. A single centre water splitting dye complex adsorbed on rutile TiO{sub 2}(110): Photoemission, x-ray absorption, and optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, Matthew; Britton, Andrew J.; Handrup, Karsten; O'Shea, James N.; Reade, Thomas J.; Champness, Neil R.

    2011-09-21

    A single centre water splitting dye complex (aqua(2,2'-bipyridyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid)-(2,2':6',6''-terpyridine)Ruthenium(II)), along with a related complex ((2,2'-bipyridyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid)-(2,2':6',6''-terpyridine)chloride Ruthenium(II)), has been investigated using photoemission and compared to molecules with similar structures. Dye molecules were deposited in situ using ultra-high vacuum electrospray deposition, which allows for the deposition of thermally labile molecules, such as these dye molecules. Adsorption of the dye molecules on the rutile TiO{sub 2}(110) surface has been studied using core-level and valence photoemission. Core-level photoemission spectra reveal that each complex bonds to the surface via deprotonation of its carboxylic acid groups. A consideration of the energy level alignments reveals that both complexes are capable of charge transfer from the adsorbed molecules to the conduction band of the rutile TiO{sub 2} substrate.

  1. Optical spectroscopy study of the three-dimensional Dirac semimetal ZrTe5

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Chen, R. Y.; Gu, G. D.; Zhang, S. J.; Schneeloch, J. A.; Zhang, C.; Li, Q.; Wang, N. L.

    2015-08-05

    Three-dimensional (3D) topological Dirac materials have been under intensive study recently. The layered compound ZrTe5 has been suggested to be one such material as a result of transport and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments. Here, we perform infrared reflectivity measurements to investigate the underlying physics of this material. The derived optical conductivity increases linearly with frequency below normal interband transitions, which provides optical spectroscopic proof of a 3D Dirac semimetal. In addition, the plasma edge shifts dramatically to lower energy upon temperature cooling, which might be due to the shrinking of the lattice parameters. Additionally, an extremely sharp peak shows upmore » in the frequency-dependent optical conductivity, indicating the presence of a Van Hove singularity in the joint density of state.« less

  2. Optical spectroscopy study of the three-dimensional Dirac semimetal ZrTe5

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R. Y.; Gu, G. D.; Zhang, S. J.; Schneeloch, J. A.; Zhang, C.; Li, Q.; Wang, N. L.

    2015-08-05

    Three-dimensional (3D) topological Dirac materials have been under intensive study recently. The layered compound ZrTe5 has been suggested to be one such material as a result of transport and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments. Here, we perform infrared reflectivity measurements to investigate the underlying physics of this material. The derived optical conductivity increases linearly with frequency below normal interband transitions, which provides optical spectroscopic proof of a 3D Dirac semimetal. In addition, the plasma edge shifts dramatically to lower energy upon temperature cooling, which might be due to the shrinking of the lattice parameters. Additionally, an extremely sharp peak shows up in the frequency-dependent optical conductivity, indicating the presence of a Van Hove singularity in the joint density of state.

  3. X-ray Imaging Workshop

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    microscopy (PEEM), angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), coherent diffraction imaging, x-ray microscopy, micro-tomography, holographic imaging, and x-ray...

  4. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1...

  5. ALSNews Vol. 368

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    to view it ALS Science Briefs Discovery of Weyl Semimetals May Lead to Novel Future Spintronic Applications A team of researchers using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy...

  6. Rotatable spin-polarized electron source for inverse-photoemission experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stolwijk, S. D. Wortelen, H.; Schmidt, A. B.; Donath, M.

    2014-01-15

    We present a ROtatable Spin-polarized Electron source (ROSE) for the use in spin- and angle-resolved inverse-photoemission (SR-IPE) experiments. A key feature of the ROSE is a variable direction of the transversal electron beam polarization. As a result, the inverse-photoemission experiment becomes sensitive to two orthogonal in-plane polarization directions, and, for nonnormal electron incidence, to the out-of-plane polarization component. We characterize the ROSE and test its performance on the basis of SR-IPE experiments. Measurements on magnetized Ni films on W(110) serve as a reference to demonstrate the variable spin sensitivity. Moreover, investigations of the unoccupied spin-dependent surface electronic structure of Tl/Si(111) highlight the capability to analyze complex phenomena like spin rotations in momentum space. Essentially, the ROSE opens the way to further studies on complex spin-dependent effects in the field of surface magnetism and spin-orbit interaction at surfaces.

  7. Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    state in EuNi2P2. The angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data for the localized europium 4f6 final states in the rare-earth intermetallic compound EuNi2P2 might...

  8. Microsoft Word - Negative_compressibility

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    compressibility (NEC) in a three dimensional spin-orbit correlated metal (Sr 1-x La x ) 3 Ir 2 O 7 , utilizing the high-resolution angle- resolved photoemission spectroscopy...

  9. Beamline 10.0.1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    electron systems using angle-resolved photoemission of solids Experimental techniques Angle-resolved photoemission from solids Local contactspokesperson This e-mail address is...

  10. Polarity effects in the x-ray photoemission of ZnO and other wurtzite semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M. W.; Zemlyanov, D. Y.; Waterhouse, G. I. N.; Metson, J. B.; Veal, T. D.; McConville, C. F.; Durbin, S. M.

    2011-03-07

    Significant polarity-related effects were observed in the near-surface atomic composition and valence band electronic structure of ZnO single crystals, investigated by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy using both Al K{sub {alpha}} (1486.6 eV) and synchrotron radiation (150 to 1486 eV). In particular, photoemission from the lowest binding energy valence band states was found to be significantly more intense on the Zn-polar face compared to the O-polar face. This is a consistent effect that can be used as a simple, nondestructive indicator of crystallographic polarity in ZnO and other wurtzite semiconductors.

  11. Coherent and incoherent processes in resonant photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, M.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    In this contribution the authors present the distinction between coherent and incoherent processes in resonant photoemission. As a first step they determine whether an autoionization process is photoemission-like or Auger-like. The discussion is based on measurements for a weakly bonded adsorption system, Ar/Pt(111). This type of system is well adapted to investigate these effects since it yields distinctly shifted spectral features depending on the nature of the process. After this, the question of resonance photoemission in metallic systems is addressed. This is done in connection with measurements at the 2p edges for Ni metal. Ni has been one of the prototype systems for resonant photoemission. The resonances have been discussed in connection with the strong correlation and d-band localization effects in this system. Based on the results some general comments about the appearance of resonant effects in metallic systems are made.

  12. Time-resolved photoemission apparatus achieving sub-20-meV energy resolution and high stability

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Y.; Togashi, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Tanaka, M.; Kiss, T.; Otsu, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Shin, S.

    2014-12-15

    The paper describes a time- and angle-resolved photoemission apparatus consisting of a hemispherical analyzer and a pulsed laser source. We demonstrate 1.48-eV pump and 5.92-eV probe measurements at the ?10.5-meV and ?240-fs resolutions by use of fairly monochromatic 170-fs pulses delivered from a regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire laser system operating typically at 250 kHz. The apparatus is capable to resolve the optically filled superconducting peak in the unoccupied states of a cuprate superconductor, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+?}. A dataset recorded on Bi(111) surface is also presented. Technical descriptions include the followings: A simple procedure to fine-tune the spatio-temporal overlap of the pump-and-probe beams and their diameters; achieving a long-term stability of the system that enables a normalization-free dataset acquisition; changing the repetition rate by utilizing acoustic optical modulator and frequency-division circuit.

  13. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and High PressureX-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Studies of Adsorbate Structure,Composition and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions on A Model SingleCrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Montano, M.O.

    2006-05-12

    Our research focuses on taking advantage of the ability of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to operate at high-temperatures and high-pressures while still providing real-time atomic resolution images. We also utilize high-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HPXPS) to monitor systems under identical conditions thus giving us chemical information to compare and contrast with the structural and dynamic data provided by STM.

  14. A medium-energy photoemission and ab-initio investigation of cubic yttria-stabilised zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Cousland, G. P.; Cui, X. Y.; Smith, A. E.; Stampfl, C. M.; Wong, L.; Tayebjee, M.; Yu, D.; Triani, G.; Evans, P. J.; Ruppender, H.-J.; Jang, L.-Y.; Stampfl, A. P. J.

    2014-04-14

    Experimental and theoretical investigations into the electronic properties and structure of cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia are presented. Medium-energy x-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements have been carried out for material with a concentration of 8-9?mol.?% yttria. Resonant photoemission spectra are obtained for a range of photon energies that traverse the L2 absorption edge for both zirconium and yttrium. Through correlation with results from density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, based on structural models proposed in the literature, we assign photoemission peaks appearing in the spectra to core lines and Auger transitions. An analysis of the core level features enables the identification of shifts in the core level energies due to different local chemical environments of the constituent atoms. In general, each core line feature can be decomposed into three contributions, with associated energy shifts. Their identification with results of DFT calculations carried out for proposed atomic structures, lends support to these structural models. The experimental results indicate a multi-atom resonant photoemission effect between nearest-neighbour oxygen and yttrium atoms. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra for zirconium and yttrium are also presented, which correlate well with calculated Zr- and Y-4d electron partial density-of-states and with Auger electron peak area versus photon energy curve.

  15. Nitrogen termination of single crystal (100) diamond surface by radio frequency N{sub 2} plasma process: An in-situ x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and secondary electron emission studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, Maneesh E-mail: choffman@tx.technion.ac.il; Shasha, Michal; Michaelson, Shaul; Hoffman, Alon E-mail: choffman@tx.technion.ac.il

    2015-09-14

    In this letter, we report the electronic and chemical properties of nitrogen terminated (N-terminated) single crystal (100) diamond surface, which is a promising candidate for shallow NV{sup −} centers. N-termination is realized by an indirect RF nitrogen plasma process without inducing a large density of surface defects. Thermal stability and electronic property of N-terminated diamond surface are systematically investigated under well-controlled conditions by in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary electron emission. An increase in the low energy cut-off of the secondary electron energy distribution curve (EDC), with respect to a bare diamond surface, indicates a positive electron affinity of the N-terminated diamond. Exposure to atomic hydrogen results in reorganization of N-terminated diamond to H-terminated diamond, which exhibited a negative electron affinity surface. The change in intensity and spectral features of the secondary electron EDC of the N-terminated diamond is discussed.

  16. Xe and Ar nanobubbles in Al studied by photoemission spectroscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Xe and Ar bombardment is observed by low energy electron diffraction, but this does not ... Road, Indore 452001, Madhya Pradesh (India) (India) Publication Date: 2008-03-01 OSTI ...

  17. Direct surface magnetometry with photoemission magnetic x-ray dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Goodman, K.W.; Schumann, F.O.

    1997-04-01

    Element specific surface magnetometry remains a central goal of synchrotron radiation based studies of nanomagnetic structures. One appealing possibility is the combination of x-ray absorption dichroism measurements and the theoretical framework provided by the {open_quotes}sum rules.{close_quotes} Unfortunately, sum rule analysis are hampered by several limitations including delocalization of the final state, multi-electronic phenomena and the presence of surface dipoles. An alternative experiment, Magnetic X-Ray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy, holds out promise based upon its elemental specificity, surface sensitivity and high resolution. Computational simulations by Tamura et al. demonstrated the relationship between exchange and spin orbit splittings and experimental data of linear and circular dichroisms. Now the authors have developed an analytical framework which allows for the direct extraction of core level exchange splittings from circular and linear dichroic photoemission data. By extending a model initially proposed by Venus, it is possible to show a linear relation between normalized dichroism peaks in the experimental data and the underlying exchange splitting. Since it is reasonable to expect that exchange splittings and magnetic moments track together, this measurement thus becomes a powerful new tool for direct surface magnetometry, without recourse to time consuming and difficult spectral simulations. The theoretical derivation will be supported by high resolution linear and circular dichroism data collected at the Spectromicroscopy Facility of the Advanced Light Source.

  18. An In Situ Study of the Martensitic Transformation in Shape Memory Alloys Using Photoemission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Mingdong; Langford, Stephen C.; Dickinson, J. T.; Xiong, Gang; Droubay, Timothy C.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2007-04-15

    Thermally-induced martensitic phase transformations in polycrystalline CuZnAl and thin-film NiTiCu shape memory alloys were probed using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). Ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy shows a reversible change in the apparent work function during transformation, presumably due to the contrasting surface electronic structures of the martensite and austenite phases. In situ PEEM images provide information on the spatial distribution of these phases and the evolution of the surface microstructure during transformation. PEEM offers considerable potential for improving our understanding of martensitic transformations in shape memory alloys in real time.

  19. Multiatom Resonant Photoemission: Theory and Systematics

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Fadley, C.S.; Van Hove, M.A.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.

    1999-05-01

    A first-principles calculation of the recently discovered interatomic multiatom resonant photoemission (MARPE) effect is presented. In this phenomenon, core photoelectron intensities are enhanced when the photon energy is tuned to a core-level absorption edge of nonidentical neighboring atoms, thus enabling direct determination of near-neighbor atomic identities. Both the multiatom character of MARPE and retardation effects in the photon and electron interactions in the resonant channel are shown to be crucial. Measured peak-intensity enhancements of 40{percent} in MnO and spectral shapes similar to the corresponding x-ray absorption profiles are well reproduced by this theory. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Molecular photoemission studies using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Truesdale, C.M.

    1983-04-01

    The angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons were measured by electron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations to interpret the electronic behavior of photoionization for molecular systems.

  1. Electronic structure and the x-ray photoemission spectrum of the Kondo-dense compound UCu{sub 5}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Chelkowska, G.; Morkowski, J. A.; Szajek, A.; Troc, R.

    2001-08-15

    UCu{sub 5}Al belongs to a class of Kondo-dense compounds. The electronic structure has been studied by combining x-ray photoemission spectroscopy results with those obtained in the band structure calculation. The latter was carried out by using the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method in the atomic sphere approximation. Reasonable agreement between the experimental and calculated data has been achieved. A complex satellite structure observed in the core-level spectra may suggest that the uranium atoms have some mixed valence character, as is the case of other uranium heavy fermion systems.

  2. Electric Field Penetration in Au/Nb:SrTiO3 Schottky Junctions Probed by Bias-Dependent Internal Photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Hikita, Y.

    2011-08-15

    Electric field penetration into the metallic side of a Schottky junction is in principle a universal phenomenon, the magnitude of which increases with the semiconductor permittivity. Here, we quantitatively probe this effect using bias-dependent internal photoemission spectroscopy at the Schottky junction between a large dielectric permittivity semiconductor SrTiO{sub 3} and gold. A clear linear reduction of the barrier height with increasing interface electric field was observed, highlighting the importance of field penetration into the gold. The interfacial permittivity of SrTiO{sub 3} at the interface is reduced from the bulk value, reflecting intrinsic suppression at the interface.

  3. SSRL HEADLINES Jul 2001

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Jul, 2001 _____________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Complex Materials Research by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy: Challenging the Mystery of the High Tc Superconductivity 2000-2001 Experimental Run Highlights Stanford-Berkeley 2001 SR Summer School: A Successful Start to the First in a Series SSRL Well Represented at the American Crystallographic Association Meeting The Shutdown Clock is Ticking BL10

  4. X-ray photoemission electron microscopy for the study of semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Stammler, T.; Padmore, H.; Terminello, L.J.; Jankowski, A.F.; Stohr, J.; Diaz, J.; Cossy-Gantner, A.

    1998-03-01

    Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) using X-rays is a novel combination of two established materials analysis techniques--PEEM using UV light, and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. This combination allows the study of elemental composition and bonding structure of the sample by NEXAFS spectroscopy with a high spatial resolution given by the microscope. A simple, two lens, 10 kV operation voltage PEEM has been used at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley to study various problems including materials of interest for the semiconductor industry. In the present paper the authors give a short overview over the method and the instrument which was used, and describe in detail a number of applications. These applications include the study of the different phases of titanium disilicide, various phases of boron nitride, and the analysis of small particles. A brief outlook is given on possible new fields of application of the PEEM technique, and the development of new PEEM instruments.

  5. Design and Performance of the Cornell ERL DC Photoemission Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Smolenski, K.; Bazarov, I.; Dunham, B.; Li, H.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Ouzounov, D.; Sinclair, C.

    2009-08-04

    Cornell University is planning to build an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) X-ray facility. For an ERL, it is well known that the x-ray beam brightness for the users is mainly determined by the initial electron beam emittance provided by the injector. To address technical challenges of producing very low emittance beams at high average current as required for an ERL, Cornell University has proposed a prototype injector with 5-15 MeV beam energy, 100 mA maximum average current and 77 pC/bunch. In this article, we describe the design, construction and initial results for a DC photoemission gun now under operation.

  6. Accessing Phonon Polaritons in Hyperbolic Crystals by Angle-Resolved...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional ... Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My Library Send to Email Send to Email ...

  7. Revisiting Photoemission and Inverse Photoemission Spectra of Nickel Oxide from First Principles: Implications for Solar Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Alidoust, Nima; Toroker, Maytal; Carter, Emily A.

    2014-07-17

    We use two different ab initio quantum mechanics methods, complete active space self-consistent field theory applied to electrostatically embedded clusters and periodic many-body G?W? calculations, to reanalyze the states formed in nickel(II) oxide upon electron addition and ionization. In agreement with interpretations of earlier measurements, we find that the valence and conduction band edges consist of oxygen and nickel states, respectively. However, contrary to conventional wisdom, we find that the oxygen states of the valence band edge are localized whereas the nickel states at the conduction band edge are delocalized. We argue that these characteristics may lead to low electron-hole recombination and relatively efficient electron transport, which, coupled with band gap engineering, could produce higher solar energy conversion efficiency compared to that of other transition-metal oxides. Both methods find a photoemission/inverse-photoemission gap of 3.6-3.9 eV, in good agreement with the experimental range, lending credence to our analysis of the electronic structure of NiO.

  8. Resonant photoemission study of multiferroic LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} across three-dimensional to two-dimensional charge ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Patankar, S.; Choudhary, R. J.; Phase, D. M.

    2015-04-27

    Electronic structures modification of polycrystalline LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} across 3 dimensional to 2 dimensional charge ordering (CO) has been studied by resonance photoemission spectroscopy. Constant-initial-state spectra measured across 3p → 3d resonance energy indicate its charge transfer insulating behavior. Valance band spectra study shows states lying closer to the Fermi level are due to Fe{sup 2+} ions. As the temperature is varied from 3D to 2D CO state, a weight transfer of DOS from low binding energy to higher binding energy is observed which is attributed to the modification in the Fe-O hybridized states.

  9. Ultrafast Multiphoton Pump-probe Photoemission Excitation Pathways in Rutile TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Argondizzo, Adam; Cui, Xuefeng; Wang, Cong; Sun, Huijuan; Shang, Honghui; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2015-04-27

    We investigate the spectroscopy and photoinduced electron dynamics within the conduction band of reduced rutile TiO2(110) surface by multiphoton photoemission (mPP) spectroscopy with wavelength tunable ultrafast (!20 fs) laser pulse excitation. Tuning the mPP photon excitation energy between 2.9 and 4.6 eV reveals a nearly degenerate pair of new unoccupied states located at 2.73 ± 0.05 and 2.85 ± 0.05 eV above the Fermi level, which can be analyzed through the polarization and sample azimuthal orientation dependence of the mPP spectra. Based on the calculated electronic structure and optical transition moments, as well as related spectroscopic evidence, we assign these resonances to transitions between Ti 3d bands of nominally t2g and eg symmetry, which are split by crystal field. The initial states for the optical transition are the reduced Ti3+ states of t2g symmetry populated by formation oxygen vacancy defects, which exist within the band gap of TiO2. Furthermore,we studied the electron dynamics within the conduction band of TiO2 by three-dimensional time-resolved pump-probe interferometric mPP measurements. The spectroscopic and time-resolved studies reveal competition between 2PP and 3PP processes where the t2g-eg transitions in the 2PP process saturate, and are overtaken by the 3PP process initiated by the band-gap excitation from the valence band of TiO2.

  10. Two-Photon Photoemission Study of the Coverage-Dependent Electronic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Two-Photon Photoemission Study of the Coverage-Dependent Electronic Structure of Chemisorbed Alkali Atoms on a Ag(111) Surface ...

  11. Synchrotron x-ray photoemission study of soft x-ray processed ultrathin glycine-water ice films

    SciTech Connect

    Tzvetkov, George; Netzer, Falko P.

    2011-05-28

    Ultrathin glycine-water ice films have been prepared in ultrahigh vacuum by condensation of H{sub 2}O and glycine at 90 K on single crystalline alumina surfaces and processed by soft x-ray (610 eV) exposure for up to 60 min. The physicochemical changes in the films were monitored using synchrotron x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Two films with different amounts of H{sub 2}O have been considered in order to evaluate the influence of the water ice content on the radiation-induced effects. The analysis of C1s, N1s, and O1s spectral regions together with the changes in the valence band spectra indicates that amino acid degradation occurs fast mainly via decarboxylation and deamination of pristine molecules. Enrichment of the x-ray exposed surfaces with fragments with carbon atoms without strong electronegative substituents (C-C and C-H) is documented as well. In the thinner glycine-water ice film (six layers of glycine + six layers of water) the 3D ice suffers strongly from the x-rays and is largely removed from the sample. The rate of photodecomposition of glycine in this film is about 30% higher than for glycine in the thicker film (6 layers of glycine + 60 layers of water). The photoemission results suggest that the destruction of amino acid molecules is caused by the direct interaction with the radiation and that no chemical attack of glycine by the species released by water radiolysis is detected.

  12. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    as bandgap engineering. While bandgap engineering is the basis of semiconductor technology, it is only now being applied to graphene. Using angle-resolved photoemission...

  13. R&D carries story on Ames Lab fermion finding | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    R&D carries story on Ames Lab fermion finding R&D Magazine posted a story on Ames Laboratory researchers' discovery of a new type of Weyl semimetal, a material that opens the way for further study of Weyl fermions, a type of massless elementary particle hypothesized by high-energy particle theory and potentially useful for creating high-speed electronic circuits and quantum computers. A combination of angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), modelling, density functional theory

  14. Anisotropic scattering rate in Fe-substituted Bi2Sr2Ca(Cu1-xFex)2O8+δ

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Naamneh, M.; Lubashevsky, Y.; Lahoud, E.; Gu, G.; Kanigel, A.

    2015-05-27

    We measured the electronic structure of Fe substituted Bi2212 using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES). We find that the substitution does not change the momentum dependence of the superconducting gap but induces a very anisotropic enhancement of the scattering rate. A comparison of the effect of Fe substitution to that of Zn substitution suggests that the Fe reduces Tc so effectively because it supresses very strongly the coherence weight around the anti-nodes.

  15. Anisotropic scattering rate in Fe-substituted Bi2Sr2Ca(Cu1-xFex)2O8+δ

    SciTech Connect

    Naamneh, M.; Lubashevsky, Y.; Lahoud, E.; Gu, G.; Kanigel, A.

    2015-05-27

    We measured the electronic structure of Fe substituted Bi2212 using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES). We find that the substitution does not change the momentum dependence of the superconducting gap but induces a very anisotropic enhancement of the scattering rate. A comparison of the effect of Fe substitution to that of Zn substitution suggests that the Fe reduces Tc so effectively because it supresses very strongly the coherence weight around the anti-nodes.

  16. Enhanced magnetization at the Cr/MgO(001) interface

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, M.-A.; Bataille, A. M. Ott, F.; Wang, Q.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Bertran, F.; Le Fèvre, P.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Vlad, A.; Coati, A.; Garreau, Y.; Hauet, T.; Andrieu, S.; Gatel, C.

    2015-12-21

    We report on the magnetization at the Cr/MgO interface, which we studied through two complementary techniques: angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and polarized neutron reflectivity. We experimentally observe an enhanced interface magnetization at the interface, yet with values much smaller than the ones reported so far by theoretical and experimental studies on Cr(001) surfaces. Our findings cast some doubts on the interpretations on previous works and could be useful in antiferromagnetic spin torque studies.

  17. A combined droplet train and ambient pressure photoemission spectrometer for the investigation of liquid/vapor interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, David E.; Wong, Ed K.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2008-05-01

    We describe a combined ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy/droplet train apparatus for investigating the nature and heterogeneous chemistry of liquid/vapor interfaces. In this instrument a liquid droplet train with typical droplet diameters from 50...150 {micro}m is produced by a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG). The droplets are irradiated by soft X-rays (100...1500 eV) in front of the entrance aperture of a differentially pumped electrostatic lens system that transfers the emitted electrons into a conventional hemispherical electron analyzer. The photoemission experiments are performed at background pressures of up to several Torr, which allows the study of environmentally important liquid/vapor interfaces, in particular aqueous solutions, under equilibrium conditions. The exposure time of the droplet surface to the background gases prior to the XPS measurement can be varied, which will allow future kinetic measurements of gas uptake on liquid surfaces. As an example, a measurement of the surface composition of a {chi} = 0.21 aqueous methanol solution is presented. The concentration of methanol at the vapor/liquid interface is enhanced by a factor of about 3 over the bulk value, while the expected bulk value is recovered at depths larger than about 1.5 nm.

  18. Anomalous temperature dependence in valence band spectra: A resonant photoemission study of layered perovskite Sr{sub 2}CoO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Pankaj K.; Choudhary, R. J. Phase, D. M.

    2014-05-05

    Valence band spectra (VBS) and its modification across Curie temperature (T{sub C}) of Sr{sub 2}CoO{sub 4} thin film are studied using resonant photoemission spectroscopy. It is found that VBS mainly consists of hybridized states of Co-3d t{sub 2g}e{sub g} and O-2p; however, Co-3d e{sub g} states show its prominence only in the ferromagnetic temperature regime. Below T{sub C}, spectral weight transfer takes place anomalously from high binding energy (B.E.) region to low B.E. region, signifying the enhanced intermediate or low spin state Co{sup 4+} ions. It is suggested that spin-lattice coupling and many-body effects in Sr{sub 2}CoO{sub 4} derived from the strong electron correlations lead to such temperature dependence of VBS.

  19. Optimisation of NSLS-II Blade X-ray Beam Position Monitors: from Photoemission type to Diamond Detector

    SciTech Connect

    ILINSKI P.

    2012-07-10

    Optimisation of blade type x-ray beam position monitors (XBPM) was performed for NSLS-II undulator IVU20. Blade material, con and #64257;guration and operation principle was analysed in order to improve XBPM performance. Optimisation is based on calculation of the XBPM signal spatial distribution. Along with standard photoemission type XBPM a Diamond Detector Blades (DDB) were analysed as blades for XBPMs. DDB XBPMs can help to overcome drawbacks of the photoemission blade XBPMs.

  20. Momentum-resolved photoemission of the Kondo peak in an ordered Ce-containing alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, M.; Purdie, D.; Breuer, K.; Hengsberger, M.; Baer, Y.

    1997-11-01

    A comparison of uv-photoemission spectra recorded from the surface alloys Pt(111)({radical}(3){times}{radical}(3))R30{degree}Ce and Pt(111)(2{times}2)La allows the contribution from the 4f electrons to be seen easily. The valence-band structure of these two surfaces is very similar, and the most obvious 4f contribution in high-resolution photoemission spectra of the Ce-containing alloy is the tail of the Kondo peak cut at E{sub F}. Within the limits of our measurement, no dispersion of this feature in the occupied regime is detected. The Kondo peak displays a marked intensity dependence on the emission angle, suggesting that hybridization is present in only a limited part of reciprocal space. The temperature dependence of this near-E{sub F} feature supports this interpretation. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Interference of spin states in resonant photoemission induced by circularly polarized light from magnetized Gd

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, N.; Khalil, T.; Pohl, M.; Uphues, T.; Heinzmann, U.; Polcik, M.; Rader, O.; Heigl, F.; Starke, K.; Fritzsche, S.; Kabachnik, N. M.

    2006-10-15

    We have observed the spin-state interference by measuring the photoelectron spin polarization in the resonant preedge 4d{yields}4f photoemission from magnetized Gd. The photoemission is induced by circularly polarized light which determines one preferential direction of electron spin orientation due to polarization transfer and spin-orbit interaction. Another direction perpendicular to the first one is determined by the target electron spin orientation connected with the target magnetization. We have measured the component of spin polarization perpendicular to those two directions which can only appear due to spin-state interference which implies coherence of the spin states produced by the two mechanisms of the photoelectron spin polarization.

  2. A sample holder with integrated laser optics for an ELMITEC photoemission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Gierster, L.; Pape, L.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.

    2015-02-15

    We present a new sample holder compatible with ELMITEC Photoemission Electron Microscopes (PEEMs) containing an optical lens and a mirror. With the integrated optical elements, a laser beam is focused from the back side of the sample at normal incidence, yielding a minimum spot size of about 1 μm. This opens up new possibilities for local laser excitations in PEEM experiments such as imaging all-optical magnetization switching at a small length scale.

  3. X-ray photoemission analysis of chemically modified TlBr surfaces for improved radiation detectors

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Nelson, A. J.; Voss, L. F.; Beck, P. R.; Graff, R. T.; Conway, A. M.; Nikolic, R. J.; Payne, S. A.; Lee, J. -S.; Kim, H.; Cirignano, L.; et al

    2013-01-12

    We subjected device-grade TlBr to various chemical treatments used in room temperature radiation detector fabrication to determine the resulting surface composition and electronic structure. As-polished TlBr was treated separately with HCl, SOCl2, Br:MeOH and HF solutions. High-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and Tl 4f, Br 3d, Cl 2p and S 2p core lines were used to evaluate surface chemistry and shallow heterojunction formation. Surface chemistry and valence band electronic structure were correlated with the goal of optimizing the long-term stability and radiation response.

  4. An ultrafast electron microscope gun driven by two-photon photoemission from a nanotip cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Bormann, Reiner; Strauch, Stefanie; Schäfer, Sascha Ropers, Claus

    2015-11-07

    We experimentally and numerically investigate the performance of an advanced ultrafast electron source, based on two-photon photoemission from a tungsten needle cathode incorporated in an electron microscope gun geometry. Emission properties are characterized as a function of the electrostatic gun settings, and operating conditions leading to laser-triggered electron beams of very low emittance (below 20 nm mrad) are identified. The results highlight the excellent suitability of optically driven nano-cathodes for the further development of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy.

  5. Solar energy conversion via hot electron internal photoemission in metallic nanostructures: Efficiency estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Leenheer, Andrew J.; Narang, Prineha; Atwater, Harry A.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2014-04-07

    Collection of hot electrons generated by the efficient absorption of light in metallic nanostructures, in contact with semiconductor substrates can provide a basis for the construction of solar energy-conversion devices. Herein, we evaluate theoretically the energy-conversion efficiency of systems that rely on internal photoemission processes at metal-semiconductor Schottky-barrier diodes. In this theory, the current-voltage characteristics are given by the internal photoemission yield as well as by the thermionic dark current over a varied-energy barrier height. The Fowler model, in all cases, predicts solar energy-conversion efficiencies of <1% for such systems. However, relaxation of the assumptions regarding constraints on the escape cone and momentum conservation at the interface yields solar energy-conversion efficiencies as high as 1%10%, under some assumed (albeit optimistic) operating conditions. Under these conditions, the energy-conversion efficiency is mainly limited by the thermionic dark current, the distribution of hot electron energies, and hot-electron momentum considerations.

  6. Ultrahigh-spatial-resolution chemical and magnetic imaging by laser-based photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, Toshiyuki Kotani, Yoshinori; Shin, Shik

    2015-02-15

    We report the first experiments carried out on a new chemical and magnetic imaging system, which combines the high spatial resolution of a photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) with a continuous-wave deep-ultraviolet laser. Threshold photoemission is sensitive to the chemical and magnetic structures of the surface of materials. The spatial resolution of PEEM is limited by space charging when using pulsed photon sources as well as aberrations in the electron optics. We show that the use of a continuous-wave laser enabled us to overcome such a limit by suppressing the space-charge effect, allowing us to obtain a resolution of approximately 2.6 nm. With this system, we demonstrated the imaging of surface reconstruction domains on Si(001) by linear dichroism with normal incidence of the laser beam. We also succeeded in magnetic imaging of thin films with the use of magnetic circular dichroism near the Fermi level. The unique features of the ultraviolet laser will give us fast switching of the incident angles and polarizations of the photon source, which will be useful for the characterization of antiferromagnetic materials as well as ferromagnetic materials.

  7. Real time cumulant approach for charge-transfer satellites in x-ray photoemission spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kas, Joshua J.; Vila, Fernando D.; Rehr, John J.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2015-03-01

    X-ray photoemission spectra generally exhibit satellite features in addition to quasi-particle peaks due to many-body excitations which have been of considerable theoretical and experimental interest. However, the satellites attributed to charge-transfer (CT) excitations in correlated materials have proved difficult to calculate from first principles. Here we report a real-time, real-space approach for such calculations based on a cumulant representation of the core-hole Green’s function and time-dependent density functional theory. This approach also yields an interpretation of CT satellites in terms of a complex oscillatory, transient response to a suddenly created core hole. Illustrative results for TiO2 and NiO are in good agreement with experiment.

  8. Imaging and characterization of conducting ferroelectric domain walls by photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schaab, J.; Meier, D.; Krug, I. P.; Nickel, F.; Gottlob, D. M.; Doğanay, H.; Schneider, C. M.; Cano, A.; Hentschel, M.; Yan, Z.; Bourret, E.; Ramesh, R.

    2014-06-09

    High-resolution X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM) is a well-established method for imaging ferroelectric domain structures. Here, we expand the scope of application of X-PEEM and demonstrate its capability for imaging and investigating domain walls in ferroelectrics with high spatial resolution. Using ErMnO{sub 3} as test system, we show that ferroelectric domain walls can be visualized based on photo-induced charging effects and local variations in their electronic conductance can be mapped by analyzing the energy distribution of photoelectrons. Our results open the door for non-destructive, contact-free, and element-specific studies of the electronic and chemical structure at domain walls in ferroelectrics.

  9. Magnetic x-ray linear dichroism in resonant and non-resonant Gd 4f photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S.; Gammon, W.J.; Pappas, D.P.

    1997-04-01

    The enhancement of the magnetic linear dichroism in resonant 4f photoemission (MLDRPE) is studied from a 50 monolayer film of Gd/Y(0001). The ALS at beamline 7.0.1 provided the source of linearly polarized x-rays used in this study. The polarized light was incident at an angle of 30 degrees relative to the film plane, and the sample magnetization was perpendicular to the photon polarization. The linear dichroism of the 4f core levels is measured as the photon energy is tuned through the 4d-4f resonance. The authors find that the MLDRPE asymmetry is strongest at the resonance. Near the threshold the asymmetry has several features which are out of phase with the fine structure of the total yield.

  10. Electronic band structure imaging of three layer twisted graphene on single crystal Cu(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Marquez Velasco, J.; Department of Physics, National Technical University of Athens, Athens ; Kelaidis, N.; Xenogiannopoulou, E.; Tsoutsou, D.; Tsipas, P.; Speliotis, Th.; Pilatos, G.; Likodimos, V.; Falaras, P.; Dimoulas, A.; Raptis, Y. S.

    2013-11-18

    Few layer graphene (FLG) is grown on single crystal Cu(111) by Chemical Vapor Deposition, and the electronic valence band structure is imaged by Angle-Resolved Photo-Emission Spectroscopy. It is found that graphene essentially grows polycrystalline. Three nearly ideal Dirac cones are observed along the Cu ?{sup }K{sup } direction in k-space, attributed to the presence of ?4 twisted three layer graphene with negligible interlayer coupling. The number of layers and the stacking order are compatible with Raman data analysis demonstrating the complementarity of the two techniques for a more accurate characterization of FLG.

  11. Nearly Perfect Fluidity in a High Temperature Superconductor

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Rameau, J. D.; Reber, T. J.; Yang, H. -B.; Akhanjee, S.; Gu, G. D.; Johnson, P. D.; Campbell, S.

    2014-10-13

    Perfect fluids are characterized as having the smallest ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, η/s, consistent with quantum uncertainty and causality. So far, nearly perfect fluids have only been observed in the quark-gluon plasma and in unitary atomic Fermi gases, exotic systems that are amongst the hottest and coldest objects in the known universe, respectively. We use angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure the temperature dependence of an electronic analog of η/s in an optimally doped cuprate high-temperature superconductor, finding it too is a nearly perfect fluid around, and above, its superconducting transition temperature Tc.

  12. Nearly Perfect Fluidity in a High Temperature Superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Rameau, J. D.; Reber, T. J.; Yang, H. -B.; Akhanjee, S.; Gu, G. D.; Johnson, P. D.; Campbell, S.

    2014-10-13

    Perfect fluids are characterized as having the smallest ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, η/s, consistent with quantum uncertainty and causality. So far, nearly perfect fluids have only been observed in the quark-gluon plasma and in unitary atomic Fermi gases, exotic systems that are amongst the hottest and coldest objects in the known universe, respectively. We use angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure the temperature dependence of an electronic analog of η/s in an optimally doped cuprate high-temperature superconductor, finding it too is a nearly perfect fluid around, and above, its superconducting transition temperature Tc.

  13. Isotope effect on electron-phonon interaction in the multiband superconductor MgB2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Mou, Daixiang; Manni, Soham; Taufour, Valentin; Wu, Yun; Huang, Lunan; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kaminski, Adam

    2016-04-07

    We investigate the effect of isotope substitution on the electron-phonon interaction in the multiband superconductor MgB2 using tunable laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The kink structure around 70 meV in the σ band, which is caused by electron coupling to the E2g phonon mode, is shifted to higher binding energy by ~3.5 meV in Mg10B2 and the shift is not affected by superconducting transition. Furthermore, these results serve as the benchmark for investigations of isotope effects in known, unconventional superconductors and newly discovered superconductors where the origin of pairing is unknown.

  14. High Tc Superconductivity

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    by C. Kim (SSRL), D. H. Lu (Stanford), K. M. Shen (Stanford) and Z.-X. Shen (Stanford/SSRL) Extensive research efforts to study the novel electronic properties of high-Tc superconductors and their related materials by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy at a recently commissioned Beam Line 5-4 (led by Z.-X. Shen) continue to be successful, producing many important results. These results, which are highlighted by five articles recently published in Physical Review Letters and one in

  15. Angle Resolved Thermal Conductivity of CeCoIn5 along the Nodal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Movshovich, Roman 1 ; Kim, Duk Young 1 ; Lin, Shizeng 1 ; Weickert, Franziska 2 ; Bauer, Eric Dietzgen 1 ; Ronning, Filip 1 ; Thompson, Joe David 1 + Show ...

  16. Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (IOM-CNR), Sede di Perugia, co Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy) Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Universit di Ferrara, ...

  17. Beamline 12.0.1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    resolution 10 microns Spot size at sample 80 x 100 microns Detectors Scienta SES-100 (angle-resolved photoemission), R3000, R4000 Sample format UHV-compatible solids Sample...

  18. A New Gap-Opening Mechanism in a Triple-Band Metal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The measured energy bands of indium atomic wires in the metallic state (left) and in the ... of indium wires on silicon with the soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission endstation ...

  19. Two-photon Photoemission of Organic Semiconductor Molecules on Ag(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Aram; Yang, Aram

    2008-05-15

    Angle- and time-resolved two-photon photoemission (2PPE) was used to study systems of organic semiconductors on Ag(111). The 2PPE studies focused on electronic behavior specific to interfaces and ultrathin films. Electron time dynamics and band dispersions were characterized for ultrathin films of a prototypical n-type planar aromatic hydrocarbon, PTCDA, and representatives from a family of p-type oligothiophenes.In PTCDA, electronic behavior was correlated with film morphology and growth modes. Within a fewmonolayers of the interface, image potential states and a LUMO+1 state were detected. The degree to which the LUMO+1 state exhibited a band mass less than a free electron mass depended on the crystallinity of the layer. Similarly, image potential states were measured to have free electron-like effective masses on ordered surfaces, and the effective masses increased with disorder within the thin film. Electron lifetimes were correlated with film growth modes, such that the lifetimes of electrons excited into systems created by layer-by-layer, amorphous film growth increased by orders of magnitude by only a few monolayers from the surface. Conversely, the decay dynamics of electrons in Stranski-Krastanov systems were limited by interaction with the exposed wetting layer, which limited the barrier to decay back into the metal.Oligothiophenes including monothiophene, quaterthiophene, and sexithiophene were deposited on Ag(111), and their electronic energy levels and effective masses were studied as a function of oligothiophene length. The energy gap between HOMO and LUMO decreased with increasing chain length, but effective mass was found to depend on domains from high- or low-temperature growth conditions rather than chain length. In addition, the geometry of the molecule on the surface, e.g., tilted or planar, substantially affected the electronic structure.

  20. Magnetic circular dichroism in x-ray absorption and core-level photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Waddill, G.D.; Gouder, T.H.; Colmenares, C.A.; Pappas, D.P.

    1993-03-17

    Here is reported observation of magnetic circular dichroism in both x-ray absorption and core-level photoemission of ultra thin magnetic films using circularly polarized x-rays. Iron films (1--4 ML) grown on a Cu(001) substrate at 150 K and magnetized perpendicular to the surface show dramatic changes in the L{sub 2,3} branching ratio for different x-ray polarizations. For linearly-polarized x-rays perpendicular to the magnetic axis of the sample the branching ratio was 0.75. For films {ge} 2 ML, this ratio varied from 0.64 to 0.85 for photon spin parallel and anti-parallel, respectively, to the magnetic axis. This effect was observed either by changing the x-ray helicity for a fixed magnetic axis, or by reversing the magnetic axis for a fixed x-ray helicity. Our observation can be analyzed within a simple one-electron picture, if the raw branching ratios are no so that the linear value becomes statistical Furthermore, warming the films to {approximately}300 K eliminated this effect, indicating a loss of magnetization in the film over a temperature range of {approximately}30 K. Finally, reversing the relative orientation of the photon spin and the magnetic axis from parallel to anti-parallel allowed measurement of the exchange splitting of the Fe 2p and 3p core levels which were found to be 0.3 eV and 0.2 eV. respectively. These results are consistent with earlier studies, but the use of off-plane circularly-polarized x-rays from a bending magnet monochromator offers {approximately}2 orders of magnitude greater intensity than typical spin-polarization measurements. Finally, we have performed preliminary x-ray absorption studies of UFe{sub 2}, demonstrating the feasibilty of MCD measurements in 5f as well as 3d materials.

  1. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Angela, M.; Anniyev, T.; Beye, M.; Coffee, R.; Föhlisch, A.; Gladh, J.; Kaya, S.; Katayama, T.; Krupin, O.; Nilsson, A.; Nordlund, D.; Schlotter, W. F.; Sellberg, J. A.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Turner, J. J.; Öström, H.; Ogasawara, H.; Wolf, M.; Wurth, W.

    2015-03-01

    Vacuum space charge-induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse.

  2. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Dell'Angela, M.; Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste; Anniyev, T.; Beye, M.; Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie, Berlin; Coffee, R.; Fhlisch, A.; Universitt Potsdam,; Gladh, J.; Kaya, S.; et al

    2015-03-01

    Vacuum space charge induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse.

  3. Domain imaging on multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3}(001) by linear and circular dichroism in threshold photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, Anke; Christl, Maik; Chiang, Cheng-Tien; Alexe, Marin; Widdra, Wolf

    2015-12-14

    We demonstrate ferroelectric domain imaging at BiFeO{sub 3}(001) single crystal surfaces with laser-based threshold photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM). Work function differences and linear dichroism allow for the identification of the eight independent ferroelectric domain configurations in the PEEM images. There, the determined domain structure is consistent with piezoresponse force microscopy of the sample surface and can also be related to the circular dichroic PEEM images. Our results provide a method for efficient mapping of complex ferroelectric domains with laser-excited PEEM and may allow lab-based time-resolved studies of the domain dynamics in the future.

  4. Untangling the contributions of image charge and laser profile for optimal photoemission of high-brightness electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Portman, J.; Zhang, H.; Makino, K.; Ruan, C. Y.; Berz, M.; Duxbury, P. M.

    2014-11-07

    Using our model for the simulation of photoemission of high brightness electron beams, we investigate the virtual cathode physics and the limits to spatio-temporal and spectroscopic resolution originating from the image charge on the surface and from the profile of the exciting laser pulse. By contrasting the effect of varying surface properties (leading to expanding or pinned image charge), laser profiles (Gaussian, uniform, and elliptical), and aspect ratios (pancake- and cigar-like) under different extraction field strengths and numbers of generated electrons, we quantify the effect of these experimental parameters on macroscopic pulse properties such as emittance, brightness (4D and 6D), coherence length, and energy spread. Based on our results, we outline optimal conditions of pulse generation for ultrafast electron microscope systems that take into account constraints on the number of generated electrons and on the required time resolution.

  5. Direct observation of bias-dependence potential distribution in metal/HfO{sub 2} gate stack structures by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under device operation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Chikyo, T.

    2014-01-28

    Although gate stack structures with high-k materials have been extensively investigated, there are some issues to be solved for the formation of high quality gate stack structures. In the present study, we employed hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in operating devices. This method allows us to investigate bias dependent electronic states, while keeping device structures intact. Using this method, we have investigated electronic states and potential distribution in gate metal/HfO{sub 2} gate stack structures under device operation. Analysis of the core levels shifts as a function of the bias voltage indicated that a potential drop occurred at the Pt/HfO{sub 2} interface for a Pt/HfO{sub 2} gate structure, while a potential gradient was not observed at the Ru/HfO{sub 2} interface for a Ru/HfO{sub 2} gate structure. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that a thicker SiO{sub 2} layer was formed at the Pt/HfO{sub 2} interface, indicating that the origin of potential drop at Pt/HfO{sub 2} interface is formation of the thick SiO{sub 2} layer at the interface. The formation of the thick SiO{sub 2} layer at the metal/high-k interface might concern the Fermi level pinning, which is observed in metal/high-k gate stack structures.

  6. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency and the like, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  7. Heterodyne laser spectroscopy system

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, Richard W.; Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Story, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    A heterodyne laser spectroscopy system utilizes laser heterodyne techniques for purposes of laser isotope separation spectroscopy, vapor diagnostics, processing of precise laser frequency offsets from a reference frequency, and provides spectral analysis of a laser beam.

  8. Metal-Insulator Photocathode Heterojunction for Directed Electron Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Droubay, Timothy C.; Chambers, Scott A.; Joly, Alan G.; Hess, Wayne P.; Nemeth, Karoly; Harkay, Katherine C.; Spentzouris, Linda

    2014-02-14

    New photocathode materials capable of producing intense and directed electron pulses are needed for development of next generation light sources and dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Ideal photocathodes should have high photoemission quantum efficiency (QE) and be capable of delivering collimated and well-shaped pulses of consistent charge under high-field operating conditions. High-brightness and low-intrinsic emittance electron pulses have been predicted for hybrid metal-insulator photocathode designs constructed from three to four monolayer MgO films on atomically flat silver. Here we use angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm directional photoemission and a large increase in QE under ultraviolet laser excitation of an ultrathin MgO film on Ag(001). We observe new low-binding energy photoemission, not seen for Ag(001), and greater electron emission in the normal direction. Under 4.66 eV laser excitation, the photoemission quantum efficiency of the MgO/Ag(001) hybrid photocathode is a factor of seven greater than that for clean Ag(001).

  9. Near-ambient X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and kinetic approach to the mechanism of carbon monoxide oxidation over lanthanum substituted cobaltites

    SciTech Connect

    Hueso, J. L.; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Cabalerro, Alfonso; Gonzalez-Elipe, Agustin Rodriguez; Mun, Bongjin Simon; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-07-31

    We have studied the oxidation of carbon monoxide over a lanthanum substituted perovskite (La0.5Sr0.5CoO3-d) catalyst prepared by spray pyrolysis. Under the assumption of a first-order kinetics mechanism for CO, it has been found that the activation energy barrier of the reaction changes from 80 to 40 kJ mol-1 at a threshold temperature of ca. 320 oC. In situ XPS near-ambient pressure ( 0.2 torr) shows that the gas phase oxygen concentration over the sample decreases sharply at ca. 300 oC. These two observations suggest that the oxidation of CO undergoes a change of mechanism at temperatures higher than 300 oC.

  10. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    been seen in several materials using high-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The anisotropic nature of this coupling can be seen directly because the...

  11. Beamline 10.0.1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectroscopy of Solids Scientific disciplines: Strongly correlated electron systems, magnetism Endstations: High energy resolution spectrometer (HERS) Spin- and angle-resolved...

  12. Photoluminescence Spectroscopy | Photovoltaic Research | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Photoluminescence Spectroscopy Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy is a contactless, nondestructive method to probe the electronic structure of materials. Our capabilities include: ...

  13. Revisiting Photoemission and Inverse Photoemission Spectra of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    obtain a copy of this journal article from the publisher. Find in Google Scholar Find in Google Scholar Search WorldCat Search WorldCat to find libraries that may hold this journal

  14. Momentum-space electronic structures and charge orders of the high-temperature superconductors Ca2-xNaxCuO₂Cl₂ and Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O8+δ

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Meng, Jian-Qiao; Brunner, M.; Kim, K.-H.; Lee, H.-G.; Lee, S.-I.; Wen, J. S.; Xu, Z. J.; Gu, G. D.; Gweon, G.-H.

    2011-08-24

    We study the electronic structure of Ca2-xNaxCuO₂Cl₂ and Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O8+δ samples in a wide range of doping, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, with emphasis on the Fermi surface (FS) in the near antinodal region. The “nesting wave vector,” i.e., the wave vector that connects two nearly flat pieces of the FS in the antinodal region, reveals a universal monotonic decrease in magnitude as a function of doping. Comparing our results to the charge order recently observed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we conclude that the FS nesting and the charge order pattern seen in STS do not have a direct relationship. Therefore,more » the charge order likely arises due to strong-correlation physics rather than FS nesting physics« less

  15. Discovery of an unconventional charge density wave at the surface of K0.9Mo6O17

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Mou, Daixiang; Sapkota, Aashish; Kung, H. -H.; Krapivin, Viktor; Wu, Yun; Kreyssig, A.; Zhou, Xingjiang; Goldman, A. I.; Blumberg, G.; Flint, Rebecca; et al

    2016-05-13

    In this study, we use angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, and x-ray scattering to reveal an unusual electronically mediated charge density wave (CDW) in K0.9Mo6O17. Not only does K0.9Mo6O17 lack signatures of electron-phonon coupling, but it also hosts an extraordinary surface CDW, with TS_CDW = 220 K nearly twice that of the bulk CDW, TB_CDW = 115 K. While the bulk CDW has a BCS-like gap of 12 meV, the surface gap is 10 times larger and well in the strong coupling regime. Strong coupling behavior combined with the absence of signatures of strong electron-phononmore » coupling indicates that the CDW is likely mediated by electronic interactions enhanced by low dimensionality.« less

  16. Momentum-space electronic structures and charge orders of the high-temperature superconductors Ca2-xNaxCuO₂Cl₂ and Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O8+δ

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Meng, Jian-Qiao; Brunner, M.; Kim, K.-H.; Lee, H.-G.; Lee, S.-I.; Wen, J. S.; Xu, Z. J.; Gu, G. D.; Gweon, G.-H.

    2011-08-24

    We study the electronic structure of Ca2-xNaxCuO₂Cl₂ and Bi₂Sr₂CaCu₂O8+δ samples in a wide range of doping, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, with emphasis on the Fermi surface (FS) in the near antinodal region. The “nesting wave vector,” i.e., the wave vector that connects two nearly flat pieces of the FS in the antinodal region, reveals a universal monotonic decrease in magnitude as a function of doping. Comparing our results to the charge order recently observed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we conclude that the FS nesting and the charge order pattern seen in STS do not have a direct relationship. Therefore,more »the charge order likely arises due to strong-correlation physics rather than FS nesting physics« less

  17. Electronic structure of a superconducting topological insulator Sr-doped Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Han, C. Q.; Chen, W. J.; Zhu, Fengfeng; Yao, Meng-Yu; Li, H.; Li, Z. J.; Wang, M.; Gao, Bo F.; Guan, D. D.; Liu, Canhua; Qian, Dong Jia, Jin-Feng; Gao, C. L.

    2015-10-26

    Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, the atomic and low energy electronic structure of the Sr-doped superconducting topological insulators (Sr{sub x}Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}) was studied. Scanning tunneling microscopy shows that most of the Sr atoms are not in the van der Waals gap. After Sr doping, the Fermi level was found to move further upwards when compared with the parent compound Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, which is consistent with the low carrier density in this system. The topological surface state was clearly observed, and the position of the Dirac point was determined in all doped samples. The surface state is well separated from the bulk conduction bands in the momentum space. The persistence of separated topological surface state combined with small Fermi energy makes this superconducting material a very promising candidate for the time reversal invariant topological superconductor.

  18. Exploring the Limits of the Dipole Approximation with Angle-Resolved Electron Time-of-Flight Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Laidman, S.; Pangilinan, J.; Guillemin, R.; Yu, S.U.; Ohrwall, G.; Lindle, D.; Hemmers, O.

    2002-01-01

    Understanding the electronic structure of atoms and molecules is fundamental in determining their basic properties as well as the interactions that occur with different particles such as light. One such interaction is single photoionization; a process in which a photon collides with an atom or molecule and an electron with a certain kinetic energy is emitted, leaving behind a residual ion. Theoretical models of electronic structures use the dipole approximation to simplify x-ray interactions by assuming that the electromagnetic field of the radiation, expressed as a Taylor-series expansion, can be simplified by using only the first term. It has been known for some time that the dipole approximation becomes inaccurate at high photon energies, but the threshold at which this discrepancy begins is ambiguous. In order to enhance our understanding of these limitations, we measured the electron emissions of nitrogen. Beamline 8.0.1 at the Advanced Light Source was used with an electron Time-of-Flight (TOF) end station, which measures the time required for electrons emitted to travel a fixed distance. Data were collected over a broad range of photon energies (413 - 664 eV) using five analyzers rotated to 15 chamber angles. Preliminary analysis indicates that these results confirm the breakdown of the dipole approximation at photon energies well below 1 keV and that this breakdown is greatly enhanced in molecules just above the core-level ionization threshold. As a result, new theoretical models must be made that use higher order terms that were previously truncated.

  19. Surface electronic structure of GaAs(110) studied by Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bartynski, R.A.; Garrison, K.; Jensen, E.; Hulbert, S.L.; Weinert, M.

    1990-12-31

    We have used Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy to study the M{sub 4,5}VV Auger spectra of GaAs(110). Using this technique, the Ga and As spectra can be separated and studied independently. The lineshape of the As-M{sub 4,5}VV measured in coincidence with the As 3d photoemission line differs significantly from the conventional Auger spectrum. We attribute this to the surface electronic properties of the system. In addition, we have found that the ss-component of the As spectrum is more intense than expected based on calculations using atomic matrix elements. The Ga-M{sub 4,5}VV spectrum, of which only the pp-component is observed, agrees well with that expected from an independent electron model. A first principles electronic structure calculation of a 5-layer GaAs(110) slab has been performed to aid in the interpretation of the Auger spectra.

  20. Surface electronic structure of GaAs(110) studied by Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bartynski, R.A.; Garrison, K. ); Jensen, E. . Dept. of Physics); Hulbert, S.L.; Weinert, M. )

    1990-01-01

    We have used Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy to study the M{sub 4,5}VV Auger spectra of GaAs(110). Using this technique, the Ga and As spectra can be separated and studied independently. The lineshape of the As-M{sub 4,5}VV measured in coincidence with the As 3d photoemission line differs significantly from the conventional Auger spectrum. We attribute this to the surface electronic properties of the system. In addition, we have found that the ss-component of the As spectrum is more intense than expected based on calculations using atomic matrix elements. The Ga-M{sub 4,5}VV spectrum, of which only the pp-component is observed, agrees well with that expected from an independent electron model. A first principles electronic structure calculation of a 5-layer GaAs(110) slab has been performed to aid in the interpretation of the Auger spectra.

  1. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-09-28

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles inside a bunch is one of the most importance collective effects in beam dynamics, becoming even more significant as the energy of the particle beam is lowered to accommodate analytical and low-Z material imaging purposes such as in the time resolved Ultrafast Electron Microscope (UEM) development currently underway at Michigan State University. In addition, space charge effects are the key limiting factor in the development of ultrafast atomic resolution electron imaging and diffraction technologies and are also correlated with an irreversible growth in rms beam emittance due to fluctuating components of the nonlinear electron dynamics. In the short pulse regime used in the UEM, space charge effects also lead to virtual cathode formation in which the negative charge of the electrons emitted at earlier times, combined with the attractive surface field, hinders further emission of particles and causes a degradation of the pulse properties. Space charge and virtual cathode effects and their remediation are core issues for the development of the next generation of high-brightness UEMs. Since the analytical models are only applicable for special cases, numerical simulations, in addition to experiments, are usually necessary to accurately understand the space charge effect. In this paper we will introduce a grid-free differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm, which calculates the 3D space charge field for n charged particles in arbitrary distribution with an efficiency of O(n), and the implementation of the algorithm to a simulation code for space charge dominated photoemission processes.

  2. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    None, None

    2015-09-28

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles inside a bunch is one of the most importance collective effects in beam dynamics, becoming even more significant as the energy of the particle beam is lowered to accommodate analytical and low-Z material imaging purposes such as in the time resolved Ultrafast Electron Microscope (UEM) development currently underway at Michigan State University. In addition, space charge effects are the key limiting factor in the development of ultrafast atomic resolution electron imaging and diffraction technologies and are also correlated with an irreversible growth in rms beam emittance due to fluctuating components of the nonlinear electron dynamics.more » In the short pulse regime used in the UEM, space charge effects also lead to virtual cathode formation in which the negative charge of the electrons emitted at earlier times, combined with the attractive surface field, hinders further emission of particles and causes a degradation of the pulse properties. Space charge and virtual cathode effects and their remediation are core issues for the development of the next generation of high-brightness UEMs. Since the analytical models are only applicable for special cases, numerical simulations, in addition to experiments, are usually necessary to accurately understand the space charge effect. In this paper we will introduce a grid-free differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm, which calculates the 3D space charge field for n charged particles in arbitrary distribution with an efficiency of O(n), and the implementation of the algorithm to a simulation code for space charge dominated photoemission processes.« less

  3. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  4. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Reflectance Spectroscopy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Photoluminescence Spectroscopy Minority-Carrier Lifetime Spectroscopy Fourier-Transform Infrared & Raman Spectroscopy Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Capacitance Techniques Scanning ...

  5. Synchronization and Characterization of an Ultra-Short Laser for Photoemission and Electron-Beam Diagnostics Studies at a Radio Frequency Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Timothy; Ruan, Jinhao; Piot, Philippe; Lumpkin, Alex; ,

    2012-03-01

    A commercially-available titanium-sapphire laser system has recently been installed at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector laboratory in support of photoemission and electron beam diagnostics studies. The laser system is synchronized to both the 1.3-GHz master oscillator and a 1-Hz signal use to trigger the radiofrequency system and instrumentation acquisition. The synchronization scheme and performance are detailed. Long-term temporal and intensity drifts are identified and actively suppressed to within 1 ps and 1.5%, respectively. Measurement and optimization of the laser's temporal profile are accomplished using frequency-resolved optical gating.

  6. Nonlinear Laser Spectroscopy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Nonlinear optical techniques investigated in this program include time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, degenerate four-wave mixing, coherent 1D and 2D imaging ...

  7. PROTON RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    PROTON RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY 32 8 IN - DUFEI FANG - -. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory 1987 ....' Proton Resonance Spectroscopy in 32S by Fang Dufei This research was perfonned at Triangle U nversities Nuclear Laboratory as a part of a joint collaboration between TUNL and Fudan University Supervisors: Prof. E. G. Bilpuch, Duke University Prof. G. E. Mitchell, North Carolina State University Prof. Yang Fujia, Fudan University Dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the

  8. Experimental Realization of a Three-Dimensional Topological Insulator, Bi 2Te3

    SciTech Connect

    Siemons, W.

    2010-02-24

    Three-dimensional topological insulators are a new state of quantum matter with a bulk gap and odd number of relativistic Dirac fermions on the surface. By investigating the surface state of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the surface state consists of a single nondegenerate Dirac cone. Furthermore, with appropriate hole doping, the Fermi level can be tuned to intersect only the surface states, indicating a full energy gap for the bulk states. Our results establish that Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} is a simple model system for the three-dimensional topological insulator with a single Dirac cone on the surface. The large bulk gap of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} also points to promising potential for high-temperature spintronics applications.

  9. Effects of aluminum on epitaxial graphene grown on C-face SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Chao Johansson, Leif I.; Hultman, Lars; Virojanadara, Chariya; Niu, Yuran

    2015-05-21

    The effects of Al layers deposited on graphene grown on C-face SiC substrates are investigated before and after subsequent annealing using low energy electron diffraction (LEED), photoelectron spectroscopy, and angle resolved photoemission. As-deposited layers appear inert. Annealing at a temperature of about 400?C initiates migration of Al through the graphene into the graphene/SiC interface. Further annealing at temperatures from 500?C to 700?C induces formation of an ordered compound, producing a two domain ?7??7R19 LEED pattern and significant changes in the core level spectra that suggest formation of an Al-Si-C compound. Decomposition of this compound starts after annealing at 800?C, and at 1000?C, Al is no longer possible to detect at the surface. On Si-face graphene, deposited Al layers did not form such an Al-Si-C compound, and Al was still detectable after annealing above 1000?C.

  10. Single Dirac Cone Topological Surface State and Unusual Thermoelectric Property of Compounds from a New Topological Insulator Family

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y

    2011-08-18

    Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) study on TlBiTe2 and TlBiSe2 from a Thallium-based III-V-VI2 ternary chalcogenides family revealed a single surface Dirac cone at the center of the Brillouin zone for both compounds. For TlBiSe{sub 2}, the large bulk gap ({approx} 200meV) makes it a topological insulator with better mechanical properties than the previous binary 3D topological insualtor family. For TlBiTe{sub 2}, the observed negative bulk gap indicates it as a semi-metal, rather than a narrow gap semi-conductor as conventionally believed; this semi-metality naturally explains its mysteriously small thermoelectric figure of merit comparing to other compounds in the family. Finally, the unique band structures of TlBiTe{sub 2} also suggests it as a candidate for topological superconductors.

  11. Momentum dependence of the superconducting gap and in-gap states in MgB2 multiband superconductor

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Mou, Daixiang; Jiang, Rui; Taufour, Valentin; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-06-29

    We use tunable laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the electronic structure of the multiband superconductor MgB2. These results form the baseline for detailed studies of superconductivity in multiband systems. We find that the magnitude of the superconducting gap on both σ bands follows a BCS-like variation with temperature with Δ0 ~ 7meV. Furthermore, the value of the gap is isotropic within experimental uncertainty and in agreement with a pure s-wave pairing symmetry. We observe in-gap states confined to kF of the σ band that occur at some locations of the sample surface. As a result, the energy of thismore » excitation, ~ 3 meV, was found to be somewhat larger than the previously reported gap on π Fermi sheet and therefore we cannot exclude the possibility of interband scattering as its origin.« less

  12. Formation of Gapless Fermi Arcs and Fingerprints of Order in the Pseudogap State of Cuprate Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Takeshi; Palczewski, Ari; Hamaya, Yoichiro; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Wen, J. S.; Xu, Z. J.; Gu, Genda; Kaminski, Adam

    2013-10-08

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and a new quantitative approach based on the partial density of states to study properties of seemingly disconnected portions of the Fermi surface (FS) that are present in the pseudogap state of cuprates called Fermi arcs. We find that the normal state FS collapses very abruptly into Fermi arcs at the pseudogap temperature (T*). Surprisingly, the length of the Fermi arcs remains constant over an extended temperature range between (T*) and Tpair, consistent with the presence of an ordered state below T*. These arcs collapse again at the temperature below which pair formation occurs (Tpair) either to a point or a very short arc, whose length is limited by our experimental resolution. The tips of the arcs span between points defining a set of wave vectors in momentum space, which are the fingerprints of the ordered state that causes the pseudogap.

  13. Formation of Gapless Fermi Arcs and Fingerprints of Order in the Pseudogap State of Cuprate Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Takeshi; Palczewski, Ari D.; Hamaya, Yoichiro; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Wen, J. S.; Gu, Genda; Kaminski, Adam

    2013-10-11

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and a new quantitative approach based on the partial density of states to study properties of seemingly disconnected portions of the Fermi surface (FS) that are present in the pseudogap state of cuprates called Fermi arcs. We find that the normal state FS collapses very abruptly into Fermi arcs at the pseudogap temperature (T?). Surprisingly, the length of the Fermi arcs remains constant over an extended temperature range between T? and Tpair, consistent with the presence of an ordered state below T?. These arcs collapse again at the temperature below which pair formation occurs (Tpair) either to a point or a very short arc, whose length is limited by our experimental resolution. The tips of the arcs span between points defining a set of wave vectors in momentum space, which are the fingerprints of the ordered state that causes the pseudogap.

  14. Strong interaction between electrons and collective excitations in the multiband superconductor MgB2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Mou, Daixiang; Jiang, Rui; Taufour, Valentin; Flint, Rebecca; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Wen, J. S.; Xu, Z. J.; Gu, Genda; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-04-08

    We use a tunable laser angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the electronic properties of the prototypical multiband BCS superconductor MgB2. Our data reveal a strong renormalization of the dispersion (kink) at ~65meV, which is caused by the coupling of electrons to the E2g phonon mode. In contrast to cuprates, the 65 meV kink in MgB2 does not change significantly across Tc. More interestingly, we observe strong coupling to a second, lower energy collective mode at a binding energy of 10 meV. As a result, this excitation vanishes above Tc and is likely a signature of the elusive Leggett mode.

  15. Tuning the Dirac point to the Fermi level in the ternary topological insulator (Bi{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kellner, Jens Liebmann, Marcus; Morgenstern, Markus; Eschbach, Markus; Młyńczak, Ewa; Plucinski, Lukasz; Schneider, Claus M.; Kampmeier, Jörn; Lanius, Martin; Mussler, Gregor; Holländer, Bernhard; Grützmacher, Detlev

    2015-12-21

    In order to stabilize Majorana excitations within vortices of proximity induced topological superconductors, it is mandatory that the Dirac point matches the Fermi level rather exactly, such that the conventionally confined states within the vortex are well separated from the Majorana-type excitation. Here, we show by angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy that (Bi{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films with x = 0.94 prepared by molecular beam epitaxy and transferred in ultrahigh vacuum from the molecular beam epitaxy system to the photoemission setup match this condition. The Dirac point is within 10 meV around the Fermi level, and we do not observe any bulk bands intersecting the Fermi level.

  16. Inequivalence of single-particle and population lifetimes in a cuprate superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuolong; Sobota, J. A.; Leuenberger, D.; He, Y.; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Eisaki, H.; Kirchmann, P. S.; Shen, Z. -X.

    2015-06-15

    We study optimally doped Bi-2212 (Tc=96 K) using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Energy-resolved population lifetimes are extracted and compared with single-particle lifetimes measured by equilibrium photoemission. The population lifetimes deviate from the single-particle lifetimes in the low excitation limit by 1–2 orders of magnitude. Fundamental considerations of electron scattering unveil that these two lifetimes are in general distinct, yet for systems with only electron-phonon scattering they should converge in the low-temperature, low-fluence limit. As a result, the qualitative disparity in our data, even in this limit, suggests that scattering channels beyond electron-phonon interactions play a significant role in the electron dynamics of cuprate superconductors.

  17. Electronic structure reconstruction across the antiferromagnetic transition in TaFe₁̣₂₃Te₃ spin ladder

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Min; Wang, Li -Min; Peng, Rui; Ge, Qing -Qin; Chen, Fei; Ye, Zi -Rong; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Su -Di; Xia, Miao; Liu, Rong -Hua; Arita, M.; Shimada, K.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.; Matsunami, M.; Kimura, S.; Shi, Ming; Chen, Xian -Hui; Yin, Wei -Guo; Ku, Wei; Xie, Bin -Ping; Feng, Dong -Lai

    2015-02-01

    With angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we studied the electronic structure of TaFe₁̣₂₃Te₃, a two-leg spin ladder compound with a novel antiferromagnetic ground state. Quasi-two-dimensional Fermi surface is observed, with sizable inter-ladder hopping. Moreover, instead of observing an energy gap at the Fermi surface in the antiferromagnetic state, we observed the shifts of various bands. Combining these observations with density-functional-theory calculations, we propose that the large scale reconstruction of the electronic structure, caused by the interactions between coexisting itinerant electrons and local moments, is most likely the driving force of the magnetic transition. Thus TaFe₁̣₂₃Te₃ serves as a simpler platform that contains similar ingredients as the parent compounds of iron-based superconductors.

  18. Critical parameters of superconducting materials and structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Dykes, J.W.; Mosley, W.D.; Chaiken, A.; Ralls, K.; Radousky, H.

    1995-02-01

    We report here the completion of a one year project to investigate the synthesis, electronic structure, defect structure, and physical transport properties of high temperature superconducting oxide materials. During the course of this project we produced some of the finest samples of single crystal detwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, and stoichiometrically perfect (Ba,K)BiO{sub 3}. We deduced the Fermi surface of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, (La,Sr){sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, and (Ba,K)BiO{sub 3} through the recording of the electron momentum density in these materials as measured by positron annihilation spectroscopy and angle resolved photoemission. We also performed extensive studies on Pr substituted (Y,Pr)Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} so as to further understand the origin of the electron pairing leading to superconductivity.

  19. Magnetic x-ray linear dichroism of ultrathin Fe-Ni alloy films

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, F.O.; Willis, R.F.; Goodman, K.W.

    1997-04-01

    The authors have studied the magnetic structure of ultrathin Fe-Ni alloy films as a function of Fe concentration by measuring the linear dichroism of the 3p-core levels in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The alloy films, grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on Cu(001) surfaces, were fcc and approximately four monolayers thick. The intensity of the Fe dichroism varied with Fe concentration, with larger dichroisms at lower Fe concentrations. The implication of these results to an ultrathin film analogue of the bulk Invar effect in Fe-Ni alloys will be discussed. These measurements were performed at the Spectromicroscopy Facility (Beamline 7.0.1) of the Advanced Light Source.

  20. Electronic structure reconstruction across the antiferromagnetic transition in TaFe₁̣₂₃Te₃ spin ladder

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Xu, Min; Wang, Li -Min; Peng, Rui; Ge, Qing -Qin; Chen, Fei; Ye, Zi -Rong; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Su -Di; Xia, Miao; Liu, Rong -Hua; et al

    2015-02-01

    With angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we studied the electronic structure of TaFe₁̣₂₃Te₃, a two-leg spin ladder compound with a novel antiferromagnetic ground state. Quasi-two-dimensional Fermi surface is observed, with sizable inter-ladder hopping. Moreover, instead of observing an energy gap at the Fermi surface in the antiferromagnetic state, we observed the shifts of various bands. Combining these observations with density-functional-theory calculations, we propose that the large scale reconstruction of the electronic structure, caused by the interactions between coexisting itinerant electrons and local moments, is most likely the driving force of the magnetic transition. Thus TaFe₁̣₂₃Te₃ serves as a simpler platform that containsmore » similar ingredients as the parent compounds of iron-based superconductors.« less

  1. Study of Ho-doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulator thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S. E.; Collins-McIntyre, L. J.; Zhang, S. L.; Chen, Y. L.; Hesjedal, T.; Baker, A. A.; Figueroa, A. I.; Laan, G. van der; Kellock, A. J.; Pushp, A.; Parkin, S. S. P.; Harris, J. S.

    2015-11-02

    Breaking time-reversal symmetry through magnetic doping of topological insulators has been identified as a key strategy for unlocking exotic physical states. Here, we report the growth of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films doped with the highest magnetic moment element Ho. Diffraction studies demonstrate high quality films for up to 21% Ho incorporation. Superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry reveals paramagnetism down to 2 K with an effective magnetic moment of ∼5 μ{sub B}/Ho. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy shows that the topological surface state remains intact with Ho doping, consistent with the material's paramagnetic state. The large saturation moment achieved makes these films useful for incorporation into heterostructures, whereby magnetic order can be introduced via interfacial coupling.

  2. Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}; as-deposited amorphous, crystalline, and laser-reamorphized

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Jan H. Tominaga, Junji; Fons, Paul; Kolobov, Alex V.; Ueda, Shigenori; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Ishimaru, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Keisuke

    2014-02-10

    We have investigated the electronic structure of as-deposited, crystalline, and laser-reamorphized Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} using high resolution, hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. A shift in the Fermi level as well as a broadening of the spectral features in the valence band and the Ge 3d level between the amorphous and crystalline state is observed. Upon amorphization, Ge 3d and Sb 4d spectra show a surprisingly small breaking of resonant bonds and changes in the bonding character as evidenced by the very similar density of states in all cases.

  3. PROTON RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    as a i i . : lJIiaSJ :ShUiI,,:;II. Iii II; PROTON RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY IN 29p LAWRENCE H. JAMES Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory Department of Physics North Carolina State University 1989 - - .. - .. - .. Abstract James, Lawrence Hoy Proton Resonance Spectroscopy in 29 p (Under the direc- tion of Gary E. Mitchell) Proton elastic scattering on 28Si was measured with good beam energy resolution in the proton energy range Ep=1.4 to E =3.75 MeV, and proton inelastic scattering on p 28Si

  4. Electric field and temperature dependence of dielectric permittivity in strontium titanate investigated by a photoemission study on Pt/SrTiO{sub 3}:Nb junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Sakyo; Okushi, Hideyo; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Adachi, Yutaka; Ohsawa, Takeo; Haneda, Hajime; Ueda, Shigenori; Ando, Akira; Ohashi, Naoki

    2015-05-11

    Schottky junctions made from platinum and niobium-doped strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}:Nb) were investigated by hard X-ray photoemission (HXPES) and through a band bending behavior simulation using a phenomenological model, which assumes a decrease in dielectric constant due to an electric field. Thus, we confirmed that the observed HXPES spectra at relatively high temperatures, e.g., >250?K, were well simulated using this phenomenological model. In contrast, it was inferred that the model was not appropriate for junction behavior at lower temperatures, e.g., <150?K. Therefore, a reconstruction of the phenomenological model is necessary to adequately explain the dielectric properties of SrTiO{sub 3}.

  5. Element-specific study of epitaxial NiO/Ag/CoO/Fe films grown on vicinal Ag(001) using photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Y.; Li, J.; Tan, A.; Jin, E.; Son, J.; Park, J. S.; Doran, A.; Young, A. T.; Scholl, A.; Arenholz, E.; Wu, J.; Hwang, C.; Zhao, H. W.; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2011-01-10

    NiO/Ag/CoO/Fe single crystalline films are grown epitaxially on a vicinal Ag(001) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy and investigated by photoemission electron microscopy. We find that after zero-field cooling, the in-plane Fe magnetization switches from parallel to perpendicular direction of the atomic steps of the vicinal surface at thinner CoO thickness but remains in its original direction parallel to the steps at thicker CoO thickness. CoO and NiO domain imaging result shows that both CoO/Fe and NiO/CoO spins are perpendicularly coupled, suggesting that the Fe magnetization switching may be associated with the rotatable-frozen spin transition of the CoO film.

  6. Effect of Cl{sub 2}- and HBr-based inductively coupled plasma etching on InP surface composition analyzed using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchoule, S.; Vallier, L.; Patriarche, G.; Chevolleau, T.; Cardinaud, C.

    2012-05-15

    A Cl{sub 2}-HBr-O{sub 2}/Ar inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching process has been adapted for the processing of InP-based heterostructures in a 300-mm diameter CMOS etching tool. Smooth and anisotropic InP etching is obtained at moderate etch rate ({approx}600 nm/min). Ex situ x-ray energy dispersive analysis of the etched sidewalls shows that the etching anisotropy is obtained through a SiO{sub x} passivation mechanism. The stoichiometry of the etched surface is analyzed in situ using angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is observed that Cl{sub 2}-based ICP etching results in a significantly P-rich surface. The phosphorous layer identified on the top surface is estimated to be {approx}1-1.3-nm thick. On the other hand InP etching in HBr/Ar plasma results in a more stoichiometric surface. In contrast to the etched sidewalls, the etched surface is free from oxides with negligible traces of silicon. Exposure to ambient air of the samples submitted to Cl{sub 2}-based chemistry results in the complete oxidation of the P-rich top layer. It is concluded that a post-etch treatment or a pure HBr plasma step may be necessary after Cl{sub 2}-based ICP etching for the recovery of the InP material.

  7. SRNL Ultrafast Spectroscopy Materials Characterization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    SRNL Ultrafast Spectroscopy Materials Characterization Dr. Scott McWhorter SRNL EERE Program Manager Hydrogen Storage Lab Meeting November 4-5, 2015 Background * Spontaneous Raman Spectroscopy * Spectroscopic technique for molecular characterization of materials. * Similar to infrared spectroscopy. * Inelastic interaction between photon/molecule - 1 photon in a million undergoes inelastic scattering * Weak signal - Long integration times - Fluorescence can overcome the signal - Slow imaging

  8. Electronic structure and relaxation dynamics in a superconducting topological material

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Neupane, Madhab; Ishida, Yukiaki; Sankar, Raman; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Sanchez, Daniel S.; Belopolski, Ilya; Xu, Su-Yang; Alidoust, Nasser; Hosen, M. Mofazzel; Shin, Shik; et al

    2016-03-03

    Topological superconductors host new states of quantum matter which show a pairing gap in the bulk and gapless surface states providing a platform to realize Majorana fermions. Recently, alkaline-earth metal Sr intercalated Bi2Se3 has been reported to show superconductivity with a Tc~3K and a large shielding fraction. Here we report systematic normal state electronic structure studies of Sr0.06Bi2Se3 (Tc~2.5K) by performing photoemission spectroscopy. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we observe a quantum well confined two-dimensional (2D) state coexisting with a topological surface state in Sr0.06Bi2Se3. Furthermore, our time-resolved ARPES reveals the relaxation dynamics showing different decay mechanism between the excitedmore » topological surface states and the two-dimensional states. Our experimental observation is understood by considering the intra-band scattering for topological surface states and an additional electron phonon scattering for the 2D states, which is responsible for the superconductivity. Our first-principles calculations agree with the more effective scattering and a shorter lifetime of the 2D states. In conclusion, our results will be helpful in understanding low temperature superconducting states of these topological materials.« less

  9. (Resonance ionization spectroscopy)

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.P.

    1990-10-11

    J. P. Young attended the Fifth International Symposium on Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy and presented an invited oral presentation on research he and coworkers had carried out in applying diode lasers to resonance ionization mass spectrometry. A summary of the conference is given along with an assessment of some of the presentations that the author found of interest. Young also visited Professor Marassi at the University of Camerino to present a seminar and discuss mutual interests in a new molten salt research project of the author. Some of the studies at Camerino are described. Ideas concerning the author's research that came from private discussions are also presented here.

  10. Theoretical Studies of Magnetic Systems. Final Report, August 1, 1994 - November 30, 1997

    DOE R&D Accomplishments

    Gor`kov, L. P.; Novotny, M. A.; Schrieffer, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    During the grant period the authors have studied five areas of research: (1) low dimensional ferrimagnets; (2) lattice effects in the mixed valence problem; (3) spin compensation in the one dimensional Kondo lattice; (4) the interaction of quasi particles in short coherence length superconductors; and (5) novel effects in angle resolved photoemission spectra from nearly antiferromagnetic materials. Progress in each area is summarized.

  11. Array-based photoacoustic spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Autrey, S. Thomas; Posakony, Gerald J.; Chen, Yu

    2005-03-22

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous or sequential, rapid analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. A photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array including a body having at least three recesses or affinity masses connected thereto is used in conjunction with a photoacoustic spectroscopy system. At least one acoustic detector is positioned near the recesses or affinity masses for detection of acoustic waves emitted from species of interest within the recesses or affinity masses.

  12. Reflectance Spectroscopy | Photovoltaic Research | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Reflectance Spectroscopy In a fraction of a second, the photovoltaic (PV) Reflectometer measures the reflectance spectrum of a wafer or cell that is dimensionally within 6 in. 6 ...

  13. Design and development of a probe-based multiplexed multi-species absorption spectroscopy sensor for characterizing transient gas-parameter distributions in the intake systems of I.C. engines

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Jatana, Gurneesh; Geckler, Sam; Koeberlein, David; Partridge, William

    2016-09-01

    We designed and developed a 4-probe multiplexed multi-species absorption spectroscopy sensor system for gas property measurements on the intake side of commercial multi-cylinder internal-combustion (I.C.) engines; the resulting cycle- and cylinder-resolved concentration, temperature and pressure measurements are applicable for assessing spatial and temporal variations in the recirculated exhaust gas (EGR) distribution at various locations along the intake gas path, which in turn is relevant to assessing cylinder charge uniformity, control strategies, and CFD models. Furthermore, the diagnostic is based on absorption spectroscopy and includes an H2O absorption system (utilizing a 1.39 m distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser) for measuring gasmore » temperature, pressure, and H2O concentration, and a CO2 absorption system (utilizing a 2.7 m DFB laser) for measuring CO2 concentration. The various lasers, optical components and detectors were housed in an instrument box, and the 1.39- m and 2.7- m lasers were guided to and from the engine-mounted probes via optical fibers and hollow waveguides, respectively. The 5kHz measurement bandwidth allows for near-crank angle resolved measurements, with a resolution of 1.2 crank angle degrees at 1000 RPM. Our use of compact stainless steel measurement probes enables simultaneous multi-point measurements at various locations on the engine with minimal changes to the base engine hardware; in addition to resolving large-scale spatial variations via simultaneous multi-probe measurements, local spatial gradients can be resolved by translating individual probes. Along with details of various sensor design features and performance, we also demonstrate validation of the spectral parameters of the associated CO2 absorption transitions using both a multi-pass heated cell and the sensor probes.« less

  14. Soliton absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kalashnikov, V. L.; Sorokin, E.

    2010-03-15

    We analyze optical soliton propagation in the presence of weak absorption lines with much narrower linewidths as compared to the soliton spectrum width by using a perturbation analysis technique based on an integral representation in the spectral domain. The stable soliton acquires a spectral modulation that follows the associated index of refraction of the absorber. The model can be applied to ordinary soliton propagation and to an absorber inside a passively mode-locked laser. In the latter case, a comparison with water vapor absorption in a femtosecond Cr:ZnSe laser yields a very good agreement with experiment. Compared to the conventional absorption measurements in a cell of the same length, the signal is increased by an order of magnitude. The obtained analytical expressions allow further improvement in the sensitivity and spectroscopic accuracy, which makes soliton absorption spectroscopy a promising measurement technique.

  15. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert

    1991-01-01

    A resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method provides a unique characterization of an object for use in distinguishing similar objects having physical differences greater than a predetermined tolerance. A resonant response spectrum is obtained for a reference object by placing excitation and detection transducers at any accessible location on the object. The spectrum is analyzed to determine the number of resonant response peaks in a predetermined frequency interval. The distribution of the resonance frequencies is then characterized in a manner effective to form a unique signature of the object. In one characterization, a small frequency interval is defined and stepped though the spectrum frequency range. Subsequent objects are similarly characterized where the characterizations serve as signatures effective to distinguish objects that differ from the reference object by more than the predetermined tolerance.

  16. The light meson spectroscopy program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Elton S.

    2014-06-01

    Recent discoveries of a number of unexpected new charmomium-like meson states at the BaBar and Belle B-factories have demonstrated how little is still known about meson spectroscopy. In this talk we will review recent highlights of the light quark spectroscopy from collider and fixed target experiments.

  17. Probing hot-electron effects in wide area plasmonic surfaces using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ayas, Sencer; Cupallari, Andi; Dana, Aykutlu

    2014-12-01

    Plasmon enhanced hot carrier formation in metallic nanostructures increasingly attracts attention due to potential applications in photodetection, photocatalysis, and solar energy conversion. Here, hot-electron effects in nanoscale metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structures are investigated using a non-contact X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy based technique using continuous wave X-ray and laser excitations. The effects are observed through shifts of the binding energy of the top metal layer upon excitation with lasers of 445, 532, and 650?nm wavelength. The shifts are polarization dependent for plasmonic MIM grating structures fabricated by electron beam lithography. Wide area plasmonic MIM surfaces fabricated using a lithography free route by the dewetting of evaporated Ag on HfO{sub 2} exhibit polarization independent optical absorption and surface photovoltage. Using a simple model and making several assumptions about the magnitude of the photoemission current, the responsivity and external quantum efficiency of wide area plasmonic MIM surfaces are estimated as 500?nA/W and 11 10{sup ?6} for 445?nm illumination.

  18. ESC FY2002 Annual Report: Synchrotron-Radiation-Based Photoelectron Spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Chung, B W; Schulze, R K; Shuh, D K

    2002-10-04

    Despite recent intensive experimental effort, the electronic structure of Pu, particularly {delta}-Pu, remains ill defined. An evaluation of our previous synchrotron-radiation-based investigation of {alpha}-Pu and {delta}-Pu has lead to a new paradigm for the interpretation of photoemission spectra of U, Np, {alpha}-Pu, {delta}-Pu and Am. This approach is founded upon a model in which spin and spin-orbit splittings are included in the picture of the 5f states and upon the observation of chiral/spin-dependent effects in non-magnetic systems. By extending a quantitative model developed for the interpretation of core level spectroscopy in magnetic systems, it is possible to predict the contributions of the individual component states within the 5-f manifold. This has lead to a remarkable agreement between the results of the model and the previously collected spectra of U, Np, Pu and Am, particularly {delta}-Pu, and to a prediction of what we might expect to see in future spin-resolving experiments.

  19. Quantifying electronic correlation strength in a complex oxide: a combined DMFT and ARPES study of LaNiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Nowadnick, E. A.; Ruf, J. P.; Park, H.; King, P. D. C.; Schlom, D. G.; Shen, K. M.; Millis, A. J.

    2015-12-07

    The electronic correlation strength is a basic quantity that characterizes the physical properties of materials such as transition metal oxides. Determining correlation strengths requires both precise definitions and a careful comparison between experiment and theory. In this paper, we define the correlation strength via the magnitude of the electron self-energy near the Fermi level. For the case of LaNiO3, we obtain both the experimental and theoretical mass enhancements m/m by considering high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements and density functional+dynamical mean field theory (DFT+DMFT) calculations.We use valence-band photoemission data to constrain the free parameters in the theory and demonstrate a quantitative agreement between the experiment and theory when both the realistic crystal structure and strong electronic correlations are taken into account. In addition, by considering DFT+DMFT calculations on epitaxially strained LaNiO3, we find a strain-induced evolution of m/m in qualitative agreement with trends derived from optics experiments. These results provide a benchmark for the accuracy of the DFT+DMFT theoretical approach, and can serve as a test case when considering other complex materials. By establishing the level of accuracy of the theory, this work also will enable better quantitative predictions when engineering new emergent properties in nickelate heterostructures.

  20. Direct spectroscopic evidence for completely filled Cu 3d shell in BaCu₂As₂ and α – BaCu₂Sb₂

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Wu, S. F.; Richard, P.; van Roekeghem, A.; Nie, S. M.; Miao, H.; Xu, N.; Qian, T.; Saparov, B.; Fang, Z.; Biermann, S.; et al

    2015-06-08

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to extract the band dispersion and the Fermi surface of BaCu₂As₂ and α - BaCu₂Sb₂. While the Cu 3d bands in both materials are located around 3.5 eV below the Fermi level, the low-energy photoemission intensity mainly comes from As 4p states, suggesting a completely filled Cu 3d shell. The splitting of the As 3d core levels and the lack of pronounced three-dimensionality in the measured band structure of BaCu₂As₂ indicate a surface state likely induced by the cleavage of this material in the collapsed tetragonal phase, which is consistent with our observation of amore » Cu⁺¹ oxidation state. However, the observation of Cu states at similar energy in α - BaCu₂Sb₂ without the pnictide-pnictide interlayer bonding characteristic of the collapsed tetragonal phase suggests that the short interlayer distance in BaCu₂As₂ follows from the stability of the Cu⁺¹ rather than the other way around. Our results confirm the prediction that BaCu₂As₂ is an sp metal with weak electronic correlations.« less

  1. Direct spectroscopic evidence for completely filled Cu 3d shell in BaCu₂As₂ and α – BaCu₂Sb₂

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S. F.; Richard, P.; van Roekeghem, A.; Nie, S. M.; Miao, H.; Xu, N.; Qian, T.; Saparov, B.; Fang, Z.; Biermann, S.; Sefat, Athena S.; Ding, H.

    2015-06-08

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to extract the band dispersion and the Fermi surface of BaCu₂As₂ and α - BaCu₂Sb₂. While the Cu 3d bands in both materials are located around 3.5 eV below the Fermi level, the low-energy photoemission intensity mainly comes from As 4p states, suggesting a completely filled Cu 3d shell. The splitting of the As 3d core levels and the lack of pronounced three-dimensionality in the measured band structure of BaCu₂As₂ indicate a surface state likely induced by the cleavage of this material in the collapsed tetragonal phase, which is consistent with our observation of a Cu⁺¹ oxidation state. However, the observation of Cu states at similar energy in α - BaCu₂Sb₂ without the pnictide-pnictide interlayer bonding characteristic of the collapsed tetragonal phase suggests that the short interlayer distance in BaCu₂As₂ follows from the stability of the Cu⁺¹ rather than the other way around. Our results confirm the prediction that BaCu₂As₂ is an sp metal with weak electronic correlations.

  2. SMB, X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    include X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES), Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS), High Energy Resolution Fluorescence Detection (HERFD) and X-ray Raman Spectroscopy (XRS). ...

  3. Laser Induced Spectroscopy - Energy Innovation Portal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Induced Spectroscopy Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary INL's Laser Induced Spectroscopy technology detects and measures ...

  4. Cavity-Enhanced Transient Absorption Spectroscopy: Ultrafast...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Cavity-Enhanced Transient Absorption Spectroscopy: Ultrafast Spectroscopy goes Ultra-Sensitive Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A...

  5. Detection of subsurface core-level shifts in Si 2p core-level photoemission from Si(111)-(1x1):As

    SciTech Connect

    Paggel, J.J.; Hasselblatt, M.; Horn, K.

    1997-04-01

    The (7 x 7) reconstruction of the Si(111) surface arises from a lowering energy through the reduction of the number of dangling bonds. This reconstruction can be removed by the adsorption of atoms such as hydrogen which saturate the dangling bonds, or by the incorporation of atoms, such as arsenic which, because of the additional electron it possesses, can form three bonds and a nonreactive lone pair orbital from the remaining two electrons. Core and valence level photoemission and ion scattering data have shown that the As atoms replace the top silicon atoms. Previous core level spectra were interpreted in terms of a bulk and a single surface doublet. The authors present results demonstrate that the core level spectrum contains two more lines. The authors assign these to subsurface silicon layers which also experience changes in the charge distribution when a silicon atom is replaced by an arsenic atom. Subsurface core level shifts are not unexpected since the modifications of the electronic structure and/or of photohole screening are likely to decay into the bulk and not just to affect the top-most substrate atoms. The detection of subsurface components suggests that the adsorption of arsenic leads to charge flow also in the second double layer of the Si(111) surface. In view of the difference in atomic radius between As and Si, it was suggested that the (1 x 1): As surface is strained. The presence of charge rearrangement up to the second double layer implies that the atomic coordinates also exhibit deviations from their ideal Si(111) counterparts, which might be detected through a LEED I/V or photoelectron diffraction analysis.

  6. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.; Xie, J.

    1999-06-15

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). 6 figs.

  7. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.; Xie, Jinchun

    1999-01-01

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS).

  8. Angle-resolved study of Ar 2p{sub 1/2,3/2}{sup -1} ns,d resonant Auger decay

    SciTech Connect

    Farhat, A.; Humphrey, M.; Langer, B.

    1997-04-01

    The Auger decay of core excited states in rare gases has been subject to rather intense investigation over a number of years due to its complex nature. The authors have measured the intensity distributions and angular distributions ({beta} parameters) for the Auger decay spectra following each of the 2p{sub 1/2,3/2} {r_arrow} 4s, 3d, 4d resonant excitations in argon. This report presents their result only for the angular distributions ({beta} parameters) of the 2p{sub 1/2}{sup {minus}1}4s resonance.

  9. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  10. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  11. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  12. Nitrogen doping of chemical vapor deposition grown graphene on 4H-SiC (0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, J. M.; Binder, J.; Wysmo?ek, A.; D?browski, P.; Strupi?ski, W.; Kopciuszy?ski, M.; Ja?ochowski, M.; Klusek, Z.

    2014-06-21

    We present optical, electrical, and structural properties of nitrogen-doped graphene grown on the Si face of 4H-SiC (0001) by chemical vapor deposition method using propane as the carbon precursor and N{sub 2} as the nitrogen source. The incorporation of nitrogen in the carbon lattice was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy shows carrier behavior characteristic for massless Dirac fermions and confirms the presence of a graphene monolayer in the investigated nitrogen-doped samples. The structural and electronic properties of the material were investigated by Raman spectroscopy. A systematical analysis of the graphene Raman spectra, including D, G, and 2D bands, was performed. In the case of nitrogen-doped samples, an electron concentration on the order of 510 10{sup 12}?cm{sup ?2} was estimated based upon Raman and Hall effect measurements and no clear dependence of the carrier concentration on nitrogen concentration used during growth was observed. This high electron concentration can be interpreted as both due to the presence of nitrogen in graphitic-like positions of the graphene lattice as well as to the interaction with the substrate. A greater intensity of the Raman D band and increased inhomogeneity, as well as decreased electron mobility, observed for nitrogen-doped samples, indicate the formation of defects and a modification of the growth process induced by nitrogen doping.

  13. Analytical Spectroscopy - Energy Innovation Portal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Find More Like This Return to Search Analytical Spectroscopy Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary The use of lasers has become increasingly widespread, especially for manufacturing products and material analysis. Recently, laser desorption (LD) techniques for mass spectrometry have attracted attention because it produces intact molecular ions, avoids surface charging issues, and allows tuning of

  14. Superconducting order parameter in nonmagnetic borocarbides RNi₂B₂C (R=Y, Lu) probed by point-contact Andreev reflection spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Lu, X.; Park, W. K.; Yeo, S.; Oh, K.-H.; Lee, S.-I.; Bud’ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Greene, L. H.

    2011-03-25

    We report on the measurements of the superconducting order parameter in the nonmagnetic borocarbides LuNi₂B₂C and YNi₂B₂C. Andreev conductance spectra are obtained from nanoscale metallic junctions on single crystal surfaces prepared along three major crystallographic orientations: [001], [110], and [100]. The gap values extracted by the single-gap Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk model follow the theoretical predictions as a function of temperature and magnetic field and exhibit a small anisotropy with no indication of proposed gap nodes along the [100] and [010] directions. These observations are robust and reproducible among all the measurements on two different sets of LuNi₂B₂C crystals and one set ofmore » YNi₂B₂C crystals. We suggest that the possible gap nodes in the [100] direction may be masked by two effects: different gap anisotropy across multiple Fermi surfaces, as reported in the recent photoemission spectroscopy, and the large tunneling cone. Our results provide a consistent picture of the superconducting gap structure in these materials, addressing the controversy particularly in the reported results of point-contact Andreev reflection spectroscopy.« less

  15. SMB, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Absorption Spectroscopy X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a well-established technique for simultaneous local geometric and electronic structure determination of a metalloprotein active site. XAS is element specific and sample state agnostic, making it ideal for dilute biological solutions. SSRL has three hard x-ray and two tender x-ray biological spectroscopy beamlines, together covering 2-30 KeV. The beamlines are equipped with specialized instrumentation,

  16. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Midinfrared Internal Exciton Transitions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Midinfrared ... Carbon Nanotubes Citation Details In-Document ... Carbon Nanotubes We report a femtosecond midinfrared ...

  17. Spectroscopy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    New Spectroscopic Technique Reveals the Dynamics of Operating Battery Electrodes Ultrafast Transformations in Superionic Nanocrystals A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable ...

  18. Spectroscopy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    correlations in solids, atoms, and ions; and to the study of reaction pathways in chemical dynamics. At the lowest end of this energy range (below 1 eV) we have infrared,...

  19. Spectroscopy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    method is element-, oxidation-state-, and symmetry-specific. It is a primary tool in the characterization of new and promising materials. It is also used in the elucidation of...

  20. Twofold enhancement of the hidden-order/large-moment antiferromagnetic phase boundary in the URu2-xFexSi₂ system

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Kanchanavatee, N.; Janoschek, M.; Baumbach, R. E.; Hamlin, J. J.; Zocco, D. A.; Huang, K.; Maple, M. B.

    2011-12-16

    Electrical resistivity, specific heat, and magnetization measurements on URu2-xFexSi₂ reveal a twofold enhancement of the “hidden-order” (HO)/large-moment antiferromagnetic (LMAFM) phase boundary T₀(x). The T₀(Pch) curve, obtained by converting x to “chemical pressure” Pch, is strikingly similar to the T₀(P) curve, where P is applied pressure, for URu₂Si₂ both exhibit a “kink” at 1.5 GPa and a maximum at ~7 GPa. This similarity suggests that the HO-LMAFM transition at 1.5 GPa in URu₂Si₂ occurs at x ≈ 0.2 (Pch≈1.5 GPa) in URu2-xFexSi₂. URu2-xFexSi₂ provides an opportunity for studying the HO and LMAFM phases with methods that probe the electronic structure [e.g.,more » scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and point-contact spectroscopy (PCS)] but cannot be used under pressure.« less

  1. Development of MEMS photoacoustic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Eichenfield, Matthew S.; Griffin, Benjamin; Harvey, Heidi Alyssa; Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Langlois, Eric; Resnick, Paul James; Shaw, Michael J.; Young, Ian; Givler, Richard C.; Reinke, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    After years in the field, many materials suffer degradation, off-gassing, and chemical changes causing build-up of measurable chemical atmospheres. Stand-alone embedded chemical sensors are typically limited in specificity, require electrical lines, and/or calibration drift makes data reliability questionable. Along with size, these "Achilles' heels" have prevented incorporation of gas sensing into sealed, hazardous locations which would highly benefit from in-situ analysis. We report on development of an all-optical, mid-IR, fiber-optic based MEMS Photoacoustic Spectroscopy solution to address these limitations. Concurrent modeling and computational simulation are used to guide hardware design and implementation.

  2. Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Hamby, David M.

    2010-03-23

    A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: NMR Spectroscopy Facility: Homepage

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    NMR Spectroscopy Facility Home SANDIA MS&E HOME NMR Facilities Publications Poster Gallery Past Group Members Positions Group Photo Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy Facility Introduction The Sandia National Laboratories NMR Spectroscopy Facility maintains both high resolution solution and solid state capabilities for the characterization of chemical structure, reaction kinetics, morphologies and dynamic properties for a wide range of materials. Our research includes the

  4. Photoacoustic Microcantilevers for Spectroscopy - Energy Innovation...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to obtain an infrared spectrum of absorption, emission, photoconductivity or Raman scattering of a solid, liquid or gas More ...

  5. SMB, X-Ray Spectroscopy & Imaging

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Home » X-Ray Spectroscopy & Imaging X-Ray Spectroscopy & Imaging SSRL has five hard X-ray Spectroscopy beamlines and three Microfocus Imaging beamlines dedicated to Biological and Biomedical research funded by the NIH and DOE-BER. The SMB group supports and develops technical instrumentation and theoretical methods for state-of-the-art tender and hard X-ray spectroscopy and EXAFS studies on metalloproteins, cofactors and metals in medicine. The SMB group has also contributed to the

  6. Spectroscopy and Imaging in Translational Biomedical Research...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectroscopy and Imaging in Translational Biomedical Research and Systems Biology October ... This is vital for model validation and refinement in computational systems biology against ...

  7. Combining Feedback Absorption Spectroscopy, Amplified Resonance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Automotive Emissions Combining Feedback Absorption Spectroscopy, Amplified Resonance and Low Pressure Sampling for the Measurement of Nitrogen-Containing Compounds in Automotive ...

  8. Optical sensing based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Buckley, Steven G.; Gharavi, Mohammadreza; Borchers; Marco

    2011-06-28

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for using Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy measurements to optically monitor gas media such as gases in gas combustion chambers.

  9. Direct and quantitative broadband absorptance spectroscopy with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Direct and quantitative broadband absorptance spectroscopy with multilayer ... DOE Contract Number: FG02-02ER45977 Resource Type: Patent Research Org: Massachusetts ...

  10. Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    heating in diamond anvil cells Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil ...

  11. Material and Doping Dependence of the Nodal and Antinodal Dispersion Renormalizations in Single- and Multilayer Cuprates

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Johnston, S.; Lee, W. S.; Chen, Y.; Nowadnick, E. A.; Moritz, B.; Shen, Z.-X.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2010-01-01

    We presenmore » t a review of bosonic renormalization effects on electronic carriers observed from angle-resolved photoemission spectra in the cuprates. Specifically, we discuss the viewpoint that these renormalizations represent coupling of the electrons to the lattice and review how materials dependence, such as the number of Cu O 2 layers, and doping dependence can be understood straightforwardly in terms of several aspects of electron-phonon coupling in layered correlated materials.« less

  12. Photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessels and photoacoustic spectroscopy methods for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Amonette, James E.; Autrey, S. Thomas; Foster-Mills, Nancy S.

    2006-02-14

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous or sequential, rapid analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. Particularly, a photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel including a vessel body having multiple sample cells connected thereto is disclosed. At least one acoustic detector is acoustically positioned near the sample cells. Methods for analyzing the multiple samples in the sample array vessels using photoacoustic spectroscopy are provided.

  13. Photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel and photoacoustic spectroscopy method for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Amonette, James E.; Autrey, S. Thomas; Foster-Mills, Nancy S.; Green, David

    2005-03-29

    Methods and apparatus for analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. Particularly, a photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel including a vessel body having multiple sample cells connected thereto is disclosed. At least one acoustic detector is acoustically coupled with the vessel body. Methods for analyzing the multiple samples in the sample array vessels using photoacoustic spectroscopy are provided.

  14. Electronic structure of the heavy-fermion caged compound Ce3Pd20X6(X=Si,Ge) studied by density functional theory and photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Schwier, Eike F.; Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya; Tsujii, Naohito; Jarrige, Ignace; Jiang, Jian; Hayashi, Hirokazu; Iwasawa, Hideaki; Namatame, Hirofumi; et al

    2015-03-30

    The electronic structure of Ce₃Pd₂₀X₆ (X = Si, Ge) has been studied using detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculations and high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) measurements. The orbital decomposition of the electronic structure by DFT calculations indicates that Ce atoms at the (8c) site surrounded by 16 Pd atoms have a more localized nature and a tendency to be magnetic. Ce atoms in the (4a) site surrounded by 12 Pd and 6 X atoms, on the other, show only a negligible magnetic moment. In the photoemission valence-band spectra we observe a strong f⁰ (Ce⁴⁺) component with a small fraction of f¹more » (Ce³⁺) component. The spectral weight of f¹ component near the Fermi level Ce₃Pd₂₀Si₆ is stronger than that for Ce₃Pd₂₀Ge₆ at the 4d-4f resonance, suggesting stronger c-f hybridization in the former. This may hint to the origin of the large electronic specific coefficient of Ce₃Pd₂₀Si₆ compared to Ce₃Pd₂₀Ge₆.« less

  15. Electronic structure of the heavy-fermion caged compound Ce?Pd??X? (X = Si, Ge) studied by density functional theory and photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Jarrige, Ignace; Schwier, Eike F.; Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya; Tsujii, Naohito; Jiang, Jian; Hayashi, Hirokazu; Iwasawa, Hideaki; Namatame, Hirofumi; et al

    2015-03-30

    The electronic structure of Ce?Pd??X? (X = Si, Ge) has been studied using detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculations and high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) measurements. The orbital decomposition of the electronic structure by DFT calculations indicates that Ce atoms at the (8c) site surrounded by 16 Pd atoms have a more localized nature and a tendency to be magnetic. Ce atoms in the (4a) site surrounded by 12 Pd and 6 X atoms, on the other, show only a negligible magnetic moment. In the photoemission valence-band spectra we observe a strong f? (Ce??) component with a small fraction of fmore(Ce?) component. The spectral weight of f component near the Fermi level Ce?Pd??Si? is stronger than that for Ce?Pd??Ge? at the 4d-4f resonance, suggesting stronger c-f hybridization in the former. This may hint to the origin of the large electronic specific coefficient of Ce?Pd??Si? compared to Ce?Pd??Ge?.less

  16. Method and apparatus for optoacoustic spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Amer, Nabil M.

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus that significantly increases the sensitivity and flexibility of laser optoacoustic spectroscopy, with reduced size. With the method, it no longer is necessary to limit the use of laser optoacoustic spectroscopy to species whose absorption must match available laser radiation. Instead, "doping" with a relatively small amount of an optically absorbing gas yields optoacoustic signatures of nonabsorbing materials (gases, liquids, solids, and aerosols), thus significantly increasing the sensitivity and flexibility of optoacoustic spectroscopy. Several applications of this method are demonstated and/or suggested.

  17. Many-body ab-initio diffusion quantum Monte Carlo applied to the strongly correlated oxide NiO

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Mitra, Chandrima; Krogel, Jaron T.; Santana, Juan A.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2015-10-28

    We present a many-body diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) study of the bulk and defect properties of NiO. We find excellent agreement with experimental values, within 0.3%, 0.6%, and 3.5% for the lattice constant, cohesive energy, and bulk modulus, respectively. The quasiparticle bandgap was also computed, and the DMC result of 4.72 (0.17) eV compares well with the experimental value of 4.3 eV. Furthermore, DMC calculations of excited states at the L, Z, and the gamma point of the Brillouin zone reveal a flat upper valence band for NiO, in good agreement with Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy results. To studymore » defect properties, we evaluated the formation energies of the neutral and charged vacancies of oxygen and nickel in NiO. A formation energy of 7.2 (0.15) eV was found for the oxygen vacancy under oxygen rich conditions. For the Ni vacancy, we obtained a formation energy of 3.2 (0.15) eV under Ni rich conditions. These results confirm that NiO occurs as a p-type material with the dominant intrinsic vacancy defect being Ni vacancy.« less

  18. Interfacial mode coupling as the origin of the enhancement of Tc in FeSe films on SrTiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. J.; Schmitt, F. T.; Moore, R. G.; Johnston, S.; Cui, Y. -T.; Li, W.; Yi, M.; Liu, Z. K.; Hashimoto, M.; Zhang, Y.; Lu, D. H.; Devereaux, T. P.; Lee, D. -H.; Shen, Z. -X.; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2014-11-12

    Films of iron selenide (FeSe) one unit cell thick grown on strontium titanate (SrTiO3 or STO) substrates have recently shown superconducting energy gaps opening at temperatures close to the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K), which is a record for the iron-based superconductors. The gap opening temperature usually sets the superconducting transition temperature Tc, as the gap signals the formation of Cooper pairs, the bound electron states responsible for superconductivity. To understand why Cooper pairs form at such high temperatures, we examine the role of the SrTiO3 substrate. Here we report high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy results that reveal an unexpected characteristic of the single-unit-cell FeSe/SrTiO3 system: shake-off bands suggesting the presence of bosonic modes, most probably oxygen optical phonons in SrTiO3, which couple to the FeSe electrons with only a small momentum transfer. Such interfacial coupling assists superconductivity in most channels, including those mediated by spin fluctuations. Our calculations suggest that this coupling is responsible for raising the superconducting gap opening temperature in single-unit-cell FeSe/SrTiO3.

  19. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M.; Chen, R.; Ishikawa, J. J.; Moon, E. -G.; Yamamoto, T.; Ota, Y.; Malaeb, W.; Kanai, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Ishida, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Matsunami, M.; Kimura, S.; Inami, N.; Ono, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Nakatsuji, S.; Balents, L.; Shin, S.

    2015-12-07

    We report that strong spin–orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin–orbit and strong electron–electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour is predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Lastly, our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states.

  20. Strong topological metal material with multiple Dirac cones

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ji, Huiwen; Valla, T.; Pletikosic, I.; Gibson, Q. D.; Sahasrabudhe, Girija; Cava, R. J.

    2016-01-25

    We report a new, cleavable, strong topological metal, Zr2Te2P, which has the same tetradymite-type crystal structure as the topological insulator Bi2Te2Se. Instead of being a semiconductor, however, Zr2Te2P is metallic with a pseudogap between 0.2 and 0.7 eV above the Fermi energy (EF). Inside this pseudogap, two Dirac dispersions are predicted: one is a surface-originated Dirac cone protected by time-reversal symmetry (TRS), while the other is a bulk-originated and slightly gapped Dirac cone with a largely linear dispersion over a 2 eV energy range. A third surface TRS-protected Dirac cone is predicted, and observed using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, making Zr2Te2Pmore » the first system, to our knowledge, to realize TRS-protected Dirac cones at M¯ points. The high anisotropy of this Dirac cone is similar to the one in the hypothetical Dirac semimetal BiO2. As a result, we propose that if EF can be tuned into the pseudogap where the Dirac dispersions exist, it may be possible to observe ultrahigh carrier mobility and large magnetoresistance in this material.« less

  1. Monolayer PtSe 2 , a New Semiconducting Transition-Metal-Dichalcogenide, Epitaxially Grown by Direct Selenization of Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yeliang; Li, Linfei; Yao, Wei; Song, Shiru; Sun, J. T.; Pan, Jinbo; Ren, Xiao; Li, Chen; Okunishi, Eiji; Wang, Yu-Qi; Wang, Eryin; Shao, Yan; Zhang, Y. Y.; Yang, Hai-tao; Schwier, Eike F.; Iwasawa, Hideaki; Shimada, Kenya; Taniguchi, Masaki; Cheng, Zhaohua; Zhou, Shuyun; Du, Shixuan; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2015-05-21

    For single-layer transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) receive significant attention due to their intriguing physical properties for both fundamental research and potential applications in electronics, optoelectronics, spintronics, catalysis, and so on. Here, we demonstrate the epitaxial growth of high-quality single-crystal, monolayer platinum diselenide (PtSe2), a new member of the layered TMDs family, by a single step of direct selenization of a Pt(111) substrate. We found that a combination of atomic-resolution experimental characterizations and first-principle theoretic calculations reveals the atomic structure of the monolayer PtSe2/Pt(111). Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements confirm for the first time the semiconducting electronic structure of monolayer PtSe2 (in contrast to its semimetallic bulk counterpart). The photocatalytic activity of monolayer PtSe2 film is evaluated by a methylene-blue photodegradation experiment, demonstrating its practical application as a promising photocatalyst. Moreover, circular polarization calculations predict that monolayer PtSe2 has also potential applications in valleytronics.

  2. Persistent order due to transiently enhanced nesting in an electronically excited charge density wave

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Rettig, L.; Cortés, R.; Chu, J. -H.; Fisher, I. R.; Schmitt, F.; Moore, R. G.; Shen, Z. -X.; Kirchmann, P. S.; Wolf, M.; Bovensiepen, U.

    2016-01-25

    Non-equilibrium conditions may lead to novel properties of materials with broken symmetry ground states not accessible in equilibrium as vividly demonstrated by non-linearly driven mid-infrared active phonon excitation. Potential energy surfaces of electronically excited states also allow to direct nuclear motion, but relaxation of the excess energy typically excites fluctuations leading to a reduced or even vanishing order parameter as characterized by an electronic energy gap. Here, using femtosecond time-and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we demonstrate a tendency towards transient stabilization of a charge density wave after near-infrared excitation, counteracting the suppression of order in the non-equilibrium state. Analysis of themore » dynamic electronic structure reveals a remaining energy gap in a highly excited transient state. In conclusion, our observation can be explained by a competition between fluctuations in the electronically excited state, which tend to reduce order, and transiently enhanced Fermi surface nesting stabilizing the order.« less

  3. Particle-Hole Symmetry Breaking in the Pseudogap State of Bi2201

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, M.; He, R.-H.; Tanaka, K.; Testaud, J.P.; Meevasana1, W.; Moore, R.G.; Lu, D.H.; Yao, H.; Yoshida, Y.; Eisaki, H.; Devereaux, T.P.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.-X.; /SIMES, Stanford /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2011-08-19

    In conventional superconductors, a gap exists in the energy absorption spectrum only below the transition temperature (T{sub c}), corresponding to the energy price to pay for breaking a Cooper pair of electrons. In high-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors above T{sub c}, an energy gap called the pseudogap exists, and is controversially attributed either to pre-formed superconducting pairs, which would exhibit particle-hole symmetry, or to competing phases which would typically break it. Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) studies suggest that the pseudogap stems from lattice translational symmetry breaking and is associated with a different characteristic spectrum for adding or removing electrons (particle-hole asymmetry). However, no signature of either spatial or energy symmetry breaking of the pseudogap has previously been observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Here we report ARPES data from Bi2201 which reveals both particle-hole symmetry breaking and dramatic spectral broadening indicative of spatial symmetry breaking without long range order, upon crossing through T* into the pseudogap state. This symmetry breaking is found in the dominant region of the momentum space for the pseudogap, around the so-called anti-node near the Brillouin zone boundary. Our finding supports the STM conclusion that the pseudogap state is a broken-symmetry state that is distinct from homogeneous superconductivity.

  4. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scatteringmore » creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.« less

  5. Monolayer PtSe 2 , a New Semiconducting Transition-Metal-Dichalcogenide, Epitaxially Grown by Direct Selenization of Pt

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Wang, Yeliang; Li, Linfei; Yao, Wei; Song, Shiru; Sun, J. T.; Pan, Jinbo; Ren, Xiao; Li, Chen; Okunishi, Eiji; Wang, Yu-Qi; et al

    2015-05-21

    For single-layer transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) receive significant attention due to their intriguing physical properties for both fundamental research and potential applications in electronics, optoelectronics, spintronics, catalysis, and so on. Here, we demonstrate the epitaxial growth of high-quality single-crystal, monolayer platinum diselenide (PtSe2), a new member of the layered TMDs family, by a single step of direct selenization of a Pt(111) substrate. We found that a combination of atomic-resolution experimental characterizations and first-principle theoretic calculations reveals the atomic structure of the monolayer PtSe2/Pt(111). Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements confirm for the first time the semiconducting electronic structure of monolayer PtSe2 (in contrastmore » to its semimetallic bulk counterpart). The photocatalytic activity of monolayer PtSe2 film is evaluated by a methylene-blue photodegradation experiment, demonstrating its practical application as a promising photocatalyst. Moreover, circular polarization calculations predict that monolayer PtSe2 has also potential applications in valleytronics.« less

  6. Many-body ab initio diffusion quantum Monte Carlo applied to the strongly correlated oxide NiO

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, Chandrima; Krogel, Jaron T.; Santana, Juan A.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2015-10-28

    We present a many-body diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) study of the bulk and defect properties of NiO. We find excellent agreement with experimental values, within 0.3%, 0.6%, and 3.5% for the lattice constant, cohesive energy, and bulk modulus, respectively. The quasiparticle bandgap was also computed, and the DMC result of 4.72 (0.17) eV compares well with the experimental value of 4.3 eV. Furthermore, DMC calculations of excited states at the L, Z, and the gamma point of the Brillouin zone reveal a flat upper valence band for NiO, in good agreement with Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy results. To study defect properties, we evaluated the formation energies of the neutral and charged vacancies of oxygen and nickel in NiO. A formation energy of 7.2 (0.15) eV was found for the oxygen vacancy under oxygen rich conditions. For the Ni vacancy, we obtained a formation energy of 3.2 (0.15) eV under Ni rich conditions. Lastly, these results confirm that NiO occurs as a p-type material with the dominant intrinsic vacancy defect being Ni vacancy. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  7. Observation of universal strong orbital-dependent correlation effects in iron chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, M.; Liu, Z. -K.; Zhang, Y.; Yu, R.; Zhu, J. -X.; Lee, J. J.; Moore, R. G.; Schmitt, F. T.; Li, W.; Riggs, S. C.; Chu, J. -H.; Lv, B.; Hu, J.; Hashimoto, M.; Mo, S. -K.; Hussain, Z.; Mao, Z. Q.; Chu, C. W.; Fisher, I. R.; Si, Q.; Shen, Z. -X.; Lu, D. H.

    2015-07-23

    Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide superconductors. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure three representative iron chalcogenides, FeTe0.56Se0.44, monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 and K0.76Fe1.72Se2. We show that these superconductors are all strongly correlated, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic state to a phase where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. As a result, these observations establish that iron chalcogenides display universal orbital-selective strong correlations that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase, hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors.

  8. Observation of universal strong orbital-dependent correlation effects in iron chalcogenides

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yi, M.; Liu, Z. -K.; Zhang, Y.; Yu, R.; Zhu, J. -X.; Lee, J. J.; Moore, R. G.; Schmitt, F. T.; Li, W.; Riggs, S. C.; et al

    2015-07-23

    Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide superconductors. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure three representative iron chalcogenides, FeTe0.56Se0.44, monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 and K0.76Fe1.72Se2. We show that these superconductors are all strongly correlated, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic state to a phasemore » where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. As a result, these observations establish that iron chalcogenides display universal orbital-selective strong correlations that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase, hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors.« less

  9. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scattering creates artificial Fermi arcs for Tc ? T ? Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.

  10. Observation of the chiral magnetic effect in ZrTe₅

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qiang; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Zhang, Cheng; Huang, Yuan; Pletikosic, I.; Fedorov, A. V.; Zhong, R. D.; Schneeloch, J. A.; Gu, G. D.; Valla, T.

    2015-02-08

    The chiral magnetic effect is the generation of electric current induced by chirality imbalance in the presence of magnetic field. It is a macroscopic manifestation of the quantum anomaly in relativistic field theory of chiral fermions (massless spin 1/2 particles with a definite projection of spin on momentum) – a dramatic phenomenon arising from a collective motion of particles and antiparticles in the Dirac sea. The recent discovery of Dirac semimetals with chiral quasi-particles opens a fascinating possibility to study this phenomenon in condensed matter experiments. Here we report on the first observation of chiral magnetic effect through the measurement of magneto-transport in zirconium pentatelluride, ZrTe₅. Our angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments show that this material’s electronic structure is consistent with a 3D Dirac semimetal. We observe a large negative magnetoresistance when magnetic field is parallel with the current. The measured quadratic field dependence of the magnetoconductance is a clear indication of the chiral magnetic effect. Furthermore, the observed phenomenon stems from the effective transmutation of Dirac semimetal into a Weyl semimetal induced by the parallel electric and magnetic fields that represent a topologically nontrivial gauge field background.

  11. Correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale crystallographic orientation of monolayer graphene

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Choi, Jin Sik; Chang, Young Jun; Woo, Sungjong; Son, Young-Woo; Park, Yeonggu; Lee, Mi Jung; Byun, Ik-Su; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Choon-Gi; Bostwick, Aaron; et al

    2014-12-01

    Deformation normal to the surface is intrinsic in two-dimensional materials due to phononic thermal fluctuations at finite temperatures. Graphene's negative thermal expansion coefficient is generally explained by such an intrinsic property. Recently, friction measurements on graphene exfoliated on a silicon oxide surface revealed an anomalous anisotropy whose origin was believed to be the formation of ripple domains. Here, we uncover the atomistic origin of the observed friction domains using a cantilever torsion microscopy in conjunction with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We experimentally demonstrate that ripples on graphene are formed along the zigzag direction of the hexagonal lattice. The formation of zigzagmore » directional ripple is consistent with our theoretical model that takes account of the atomic-scale bending stiffness of carbon-carbon bonds and the interaction of graphene with the substrate. Lastly, the correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale arrangement of exfoliated monolayer graphene is first discovered and suggests a practical tool for measuring lattice orientation of graphene.« less

  12. Correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale crystallographic orientation of monolayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jin Sik; Chang, Young Jun; Woo, Sungjong; Son, Young-Woo; Park, Yeonggu; Lee, Mi Jung; Byun, Ik-Su; Kim, Jin-Soo; Choi, Choon-Gi; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Park, Bae Ho

    2014-12-01

    Deformation normal to the surface is intrinsic in two-dimensional materials due to phononic thermal fluctuations at finite temperatures. Graphene's negative thermal expansion coefficient is generally explained by such an intrinsic property. Recently, friction measurements on graphene exfoliated on a silicon oxide surface revealed an anomalous anisotropy whose origin was believed to be the formation of ripple domains. Here, we uncover the atomistic origin of the observed friction domains using a cantilever torsion microscopy in conjunction with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We experimentally demonstrate that ripples on graphene are formed along the zigzag direction of the hexagonal lattice. The formation of zigzag directional ripple is consistent with our theoretical model that takes account of the atomic-scale bending stiffness of carbon-carbon bonds and the interaction of graphene with the substrate. Lastly, the correlation between micrometer-scale ripple alignment and atomic-scale arrangement of exfoliated monolayer graphene is first discovered and suggests a practical tool for measuring lattice orientation of graphene.

  13. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M.; Chen, R.; Ishikawa, J. J.; Moon, E. -G.; Yamamoto, T.; Ota, Y.; Malaeb, W.; Kanai, H.; Nakashima, Y.; et al

    2015-12-07

    We report that strong spin–orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin–orbit and strong electron–electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour ismore » predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Lastly, our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states.« less

  14. Electronic Reconstruction through the Structural and Magnetic Transitions in Detwinned NaFeAs

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, M.; Lu, D.H.; Moore, R.G.; Kihou, K; Lee, C-H; Iyo, A.; Eisaki, H.; Yoshida, T; Fujimori, A; Shen, Z-X

    2012-05-25

    We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study twinned and detwinned iron pnictide compound NaFeAs. Distinct signatures of electronic reconstruction are observed to occur at the structural (T{sub S}) and magnetic (T{sub SDW}) transitions. At T{sub S}, C{sub 4} rotational symmetry is broken in the form of an anisotropic shift of the orthogonal d{sub xz} and d{sub yz} bands. The magnitude of this orbital anisotropy rapidly develops to near completion upon approaching T{sub SDW}, at which temperature band folding occurs via the antiferromagnetic ordering wave vector. Interestingly, the anisotropic band shift onsetting at T{sub S} develops in such a way to enhance the nesting conditions in the C{sub 2} symmetric state, hence is intimately correlated with the long range collinear AFM order. Furthermore, the similar behaviors of the electronic reconstruction in NaFeAs and Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} suggests that this rapid development of large orbital anisotropy between T{sub S} and T{sub SDW} is likely a general feature of the electronic nematic phase in the iron pnictides, and the associated orbital fluctuations may play an important role in determining the ground state properties.

  15. Atomic and electronic structures of single-layer FeSe on SrTiO3(001): The role of oxygen deficiency

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Bang, Junhyeok; Li, Zhi; Sun, Y. Y.; Samanta, Amit; Zhang, Y. Y.; Zhang, Wenhao; Wang, Lili; Chen, X.; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Q.-K.; et al

    2013-06-06

    Using first-principles calculation, we propose an interface structure for single triple-layer FeSe on the SrTiO3(001) surface, a high-Tc superconductor found recently. The key component of this structure is the oxygen deficiency on the top layer of the SrTiO3 substrate, as a result of Se etching used in preparing the high-Tc samples. The O vacancies strongly bind the FeSe triple layer to the substrate giving rise to a (2×1) reconstruction, as observed by scanning tunneling microscopy. The enhanced binding correlates to the significant increase of Tc observed in experiment. The O vacancies also serve as the source of electron doping, whichmore » modifies the Fermi surface of the first FeSe layer by filling the hole pocket near the center of the surface Brillouin zone, as suggested from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurement.« less

  16. Topological crystalline insulator Pb{sub x}Sn{sub 1-x}Te thin films on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) with tunable Fermi levels

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hua; Liu, Jun-Wei; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Wu, Rui; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Duan, Wen-Hui; Chen, Xi Xue, Qi-Kun; Yan, Chen-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Dong; Wang, Li-Li; He, Ke; Ma, Xu-Cun

    2014-05-01

    In this letter, we report a systematic study of topological crystalline insulator Pb{sub x}Sn{sub 1-x}Te (0 < x < 1) thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on SrTiO{sub 3}(001). Two domains of Pb{sub x}Sn{sub 1-x}Te thin films with intersecting angle of ? ? 45 were confirmed by reflection high energy diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). ARPES study of Pb{sub x}Sn{sub 1-x}Te thin films demonstrated that the Fermi level of PbTe could be tuned by altering the temperature of substrate whereas SnTe cannot. An M-shaped valance band structure was observed only in SnTe but PbTe is in a topological trivial state with a large gap. In addition, co-evaporation of SnTe and PbTe results in an equivalent variation of Pb concentration as well as the Fermi level of Pb{sub x}Sn{sub 1-x}Te thin films.

  17. Observation of the chiral magnetic effect in ZrTe₅

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Li, Qiang; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Zhang, Cheng; Huang, Yuan; Pletikosic, I.; Fedorov, A. V.; Zhong, R. D.; Schneeloch, J. A.; Gu, G. D.; Valla, T.

    2015-02-08

    The chiral magnetic effect is the generation of electric current induced by chirality imbalance in the presence of magnetic field. It is a macroscopic manifestation of the quantum anomaly in relativistic field theory of chiral fermions (massless spin 1/2 particles with a definite projection of spin on momentum) – a dramatic phenomenon arising from a collective motion of particles and antiparticles in the Dirac sea. The recent discovery of Dirac semimetals with chiral quasi-particles opens a fascinating possibility to study this phenomenon in condensed matter experiments. Here we report on the first observation of chiral magnetic effect through the measurementmore » of magneto-transport in zirconium pentatelluride, ZrTe₅. Our angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments show that this material’s electronic structure is consistent with a 3D Dirac semimetal. We observe a large negative magnetoresistance when magnetic field is parallel with the current. The measured quadratic field dependence of the magnetoconductance is a clear indication of the chiral magnetic effect. Furthermore, the observed phenomenon stems from the effective transmutation of Dirac semimetal into a Weyl semimetal induced by the parallel electric and magnetic fields that represent a topologically nontrivial gauge field background.« less

  18. Charge density wave transition in single-layer titanium diselenide

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Chen, P.; Chan, Y. -H.; Fang, X. -Y.; Zhang, Y.; Chou, M. Y.; Mo, S. -K.; Hussain, Z.; Fedorov, A. -V.; Chiang, T. -C.

    2015-11-16

    A single molecular layer of titanium diselenide (TiSe2) is a promising material for advanced electronics beyond graphene--a strong focus of current research. Such molecular layers are at the quantum limit of device miniaturization and can show enhanced electronic effects not realizable in thick films. We show that single-layer TiSe2 exhibits a charge density wave (CDW) transition at critical temperature TC=232±5 K, which is higher than the bulk TC=200±5 K. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements reveal a small absolute bandgap at room temperature, which grows wider with decreasing temperature T below TC in conjunction with the emergence of (2 × 2) ordering.more » The results are rationalized in terms of first-principles calculations, symmetry breaking and phonon entropy effects. The behavior of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) gap implies a mean-field CDW order in the single layer and an anisotropic CDW order in the bulk.« less

  19. Dirac node arcs in PtSn4

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Wu, Yun; Wang, Lin -Lin; Mun, Eundeok; Johnson, D. D.; Mou, Daixiang; Huang, Lunan; Lee, Yongbin; Bud’ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kaminski, Adam

    2016-04-04

    In topological quantum materials1,2,3 the conduction and valence bands are connected at points or along lines in the momentum space. A number of studies have demonstrated that several materials are indeed Dirac/Weyl semimetals4,5,6,7,8. However, there is still no experimental confirmation of materials with line nodes, in which the Dirac nodes form closed loops in the momentum space2,3. Here we report the discovery of a novel topological structure—Dirac node arcs—in the ultrahigh magnetoresistive material PtSn4 using laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data and density functional theory calculations. Unlike the closed loops of line nodes, the Dirac node arc structure arises owing tomore » the surface states and resembles the Dirac dispersion in graphene that is extended along a short line in the momentum space. Here, we propose that this reported Dirac node arc structure is a novel topological state that provides an exciting platform for studying the exotic properties of Dirac fermions.« less

  20. Atomic and electronic structures of single-layer FeSe on SrTiO3(001): The role of oxygen deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Junhyeok; Li, Zhi; Sun, Y. Y.; Samanta, Amit; Zhang, Y. Y.; Zhang, Wenhao; Wang, Lili; Chen, X.; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Q.-K.; Zhang, S. B.

    2013-06-06

    Using first-principles calculation, we propose an interface structure for single triple-layer FeSe on the SrTiO3(001) surface, a high-Tc superconductor found recently. The key component of this structure is the oxygen deficiency on the top layer of the SrTiO3 substrate, as a result of Se etching used in preparing the high-Tc samples. The O vacancies strongly bind the FeSe triple layer to the substrate giving rise to a (21) reconstruction, as observed by scanning tunneling microscopy. The enhanced binding correlates to the significant increase of Tc observed in experiment. The O vacancies also serve as the source of electron doping, which modifies the Fermi surface of the first FeSe layer by filling the hole pocket near the center of the surface Brillouin zone, as suggested from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurement.

  1. Latent instabilities in metallic LaNiO₃ films by strain control of Fermi-surface topology

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Hyang Keun; Hyun, Seung Ill; Moreschini, Luca; Kim, Hyeong -Do; Chang, Young Jun; Sohn, Chang Hee; Jeong, Da Woon; Sinn, Soobin; Kim, Yong Su; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Shim, Ji Hoon; Noh, Tae Won

    2015-03-04

    Strain control is one of the most promising avenues to search for new emergent phenomena in transition metal-oxide films. Here, we investigate the strain-induced changes of electronic structures in strongly correlated LaNiO₃ (LNO) films, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and the dynamical mean-field theory. The strongly renormalized eg-orbital bands are systematically rearranged by misfit strain to change its fermiology. As tensile strain increases, the hole pocket centered at the A point elongates along the kz-axis and seems to become open, thus changing Fermi-surface (FS) topology from three- to quasi-two-dimensional. Concomitantly, the FS shape becomes flattened to enhance FS nesting. A FS superstructure withQ₁ = (1/2,1/2,1/2) appears in all LNO films, while a tensile-strained LNO film has an additional Q₂ = (1/4,1/4,1/4) modulation, indicating that some instabilities are present in metallic LNO films. Charge disproportionation and spin-density-wave fluctuations observed in other nickelates might be their most probable origins

  2. Sn-doped Bi1.1Sb0.9Te2S bulk crystal topological insulator with excellent properties

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    S. K. Kushwaha; Pletikosic, I.; Liang, T.; Gyenis, A.; Lapidus, S. H.; Tian, Y.; Zhao, H.; Burch, K. S.; Lin, Jingjing; Wang, Wudi; et al

    2016-04-27

    A long-standing issue in topological insulator research has been to find a bulk single crystal material that provides a high quality platform for characterizing topological surface states without interference from bulk electronic states. This material would ideally be a bulk insulator, have a surface state Dirac point energy well isolated from the bulk valence and conduction bands, display quantum oscillations from the surface state electrons, and be growable as large, high quality bulk single crystals. Here we show that this materials obstacle is overcome by bulk crystals of lightly Sn-doped Bi1.1Sb0.9Te2S grown by the Vertical Bridgeman method. We characterize Sn-BSTSmore » via angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, transport studies, X-ray diffraction, and Raman scattering. We present this material as a high quality topological insulator that can be reliably grown as bulk single crystals and thus studied by many researchers interested in topological surface states.« less

  3. Theoretical approach to resonant inelastic x-ray scattering in iron-based superconductors at the energy scale of the superconducting gap

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Marra, Pasquale; van den Brink, Jeroen; Sykora, Steffen

    2016-05-06

    Here, we develop a phenomenological theory to predict the characteristic features of the momentumdependent scattering amplitude in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the energy scale of the superconducting gap in iron-based super-conductors. Taking into account all relevant orbital states as well as their specific content along the Fermi surface we evaluate the charge and spin dynamical structure factors for the compounds LaOFeAs and LiFeAs, based on tight-binding models which are fully consistent with recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data. We find a characteristic intensity redistribution between charge and spin dynamical structure factors which discriminates between sign-reversing and sign-preserving quasiparticlemore » excitations. Consequently, our results show that RIXS spectra can distinguish between s± and s++ wave gap functions in the singlet pairing case. In addition, we find that an analogous intensity redistribution at small momenta can reveal the presence of a chiral p-wave triplet pairing.« less

  4. Importance of the Fermi-surface topology to the superconducting state of the electron-doped pnictide Ba(Fe1-xCox)₂As₂

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Liu, Chang; Palczewski, A. D.; Dhaka, R. S.; Kondo, Takeshi; Fernandes, R. M.; Mun, E. D.; Hodovanets, H.; Thaler, A. N.; Schmalian, J.; Bud’ko, S. L.; et al

    2011-07-25

    We used angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and thermoelectric power to study the poorly explored, highly overdoped side of the phase diagram of Ba(Fe1-xCox)₂As₂ high-temperature superconductor. Our data demonstrate that several Lifshitz transitions—topological changes of the Fermi surface—occur for large x. The central hole barrel changes to ellipsoids that are centered at Z at x~0.11 and subsequently disappear around x~0.2; changes in thermoelectric power occur at similar x values. Tc decreases and goes to zero around x~0.15—between the two Lifshitz transitions. Beyond x=0.2 the central pocket becomes electron-like and superconductivity does not exist. Our observations reveal the importance of the underlying Fermiologymore » in electron-doped iron arsenides. We speculate that a likely necessary condition for superconductivity in these materials is the presence of the central hole pockets rather than nesting between central and corner pockets.« less

  5. Temperature-induced Lifshitz transition in WTe2

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yun; Jo, Na Hyun; Ochi, Masayuki; Huang, Lunan; Mou, Daixiang; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, P. C.; Trivedi, Nandini; Arita, Ryotaro; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we use ultrahigh resolution, tunable, vacuum ultraviolet laser-based, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), temperature- and field-dependent resistivity, and thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements to study the electronic properties of WTe2, a compound that manifests exceptionally large, temperature-dependent magnetoresistance. The Fermi surface consists of two pairs of electron and two pairs of hole pockets along the X–Γ–X direction. Using detailed ARPES temperature scans, we find a rare example of a temperature-induced Lifshitz transition at T≃160 K, associated with the complete disappearance of the hole pockets. Our electronic structure calculations show a clear and substantial shift of the chemical potential μ(T) due to the semimetal nature of this material driven by modest changes in temperature. This change of Fermi surface topology is also corroborated by the temperature dependence of the TEP that shows a change of slope at T≈175 K and a breakdown of Kohler’s rule in the 70–140 K range. Our results and the mechanisms driving the Lifshitz transition and transport anomalies are relevant to other systems, such as pnictides, 3D Dirac semimetals, and Weyl semimetals.

  6. Temperature-induced Lifshitz transition in WTe2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Wu, Yun; Jo, Na Hyun; Ochi, Masayuki; Huang, Lunan; Mou, Daixiang; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, P. C.; Trivedi, Nandini; Arita, Ryotaro; Kaminski, Adam

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we use ultrahigh resolution, tunable, vacuum ultraviolet laser-based, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), temperature- and field-dependent resistivity, and thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements to study the electronic properties of WTe2, a compound that manifests exceptionally large, temperature-dependent magnetoresistance. The Fermi surface consists of two pairs of electron and two pairs of hole pockets along the X–Γ–X direction. Using detailed ARPES temperature scans, we find a rare example of a temperature-induced Lifshitz transition at T≃160 K, associated with the complete disappearance of the hole pockets. Our electronic structure calculations show a clear and substantial shift of the chemical potential μ(T)more » due to the semimetal nature of this material driven by modest changes in temperature. This change of Fermi surface topology is also corroborated by the temperature dependence of the TEP that shows a change of slope at T≈175 K and a breakdown of Kohler’s rule in the 70–140 K range. Our results and the mechanisms driving the Lifshitz transition and transport anomalies are relevant to other systems, such as pnictides, 3D Dirac semimetals, and Weyl semimetals.« less

  7. Charge density wave transition in single-layer titanium diselenide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Chan, Y. -H.; Fang, X. -Y.; Zhang, Y.; Chou, M. Y.; Mo, S. -K.; Hussain, Z.; Fedorov, A. -V.; Chiang, T. -C.

    2015-11-16

    A single molecular layer of titanium diselenide (TiSe2) is a promising material for advanced electronics beyond graphene--a strong focus of current research. Such molecular layers are at the quantum limit of device miniaturization and can show enhanced electronic effects not realizable in thick films. We show that single-layer TiSe2 exhibits a charge density wave (CDW) transition at critical temperature TC=232±5 K, which is higher than the bulk TC=200±5 K. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements reveal a small absolute bandgap at room temperature, which grows wider with decreasing temperature T below TC in conjunction with the emergence of (2 × 2) ordering. The results are rationalized in terms of first-principles calculations, symmetry breaking and phonon entropy effects. The behavior of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) gap implies a mean-field CDW order in the single layer and an anisotropic CDW order in the bulk.

  8. Latent instabilities in metallic LaNiO₃ films by strain control of Fermi-surface topology

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yoo, Hyang Keun; Hyun, Seung Ill; Moreschini, Luca; Kim, Hyeong -Do; Chang, Young Jun; Sohn, Chang Hee; Jeong, Da Woon; Sinn, Soobin; Kim, Yong Su; Bostwick, Aaron; et al

    2015-03-04

    Strain control is one of the most promising avenues to search for new emergent phenomena in transition metal-oxide films. Here, we investigate the strain-induced changes of electronic structures in strongly correlated LaNiO₃ (LNO) films, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and the dynamical mean-field theory. The strongly renormalized eg-orbital bands are systematically rearranged by misfit strain to change its fermiology. As tensile strain increases, the hole pocket centered at the A point elongates along the kz-axis and seems to become open, thus changing Fermi-surface (FS) topology from three- to quasi-two-dimensional. Concomitantly, the FS shape becomes flattened to enhance FS nesting. A FSmore » superstructure withQ₁ = (1/2,1/2,1/2) appears in all LNO films, while a tensile-strained LNO film has an additional Q₂ = (1/4,1/4,1/4) modulation, indicating that some instabilities are present in metallic LNO films. Charge disproportionation and spin-density-wave fluctuations observed in other nickelates might be their most probable origins« less

  9. Electronic structure, surface doping, and optical response in epitaxial WSe2 thin films

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yi; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Jin, Chenhao; Shi, Su -Fei; Bradley, Aaron J.; Martin-Recio, Ana; Ryu, Hyejin; Kim, Jonghwan; Tang, Shujie; Kim, Yeongkwan; et al

    2016-03-14

    High quality WSe2 films have been grown on bilayer graphene (BLG) with layer-by-layer control of thickness using molecular beam epitaxy. The combination of angle-resolved photoemission, scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, and optical absorption measurements reveal the atomic and electronic structures evolution and optical response of WSe2/BLG. We observe that a bilayer of WSe2 is a direct bandgap semiconductor, when integrated in a BLG-based heterostructure, thus shifting the direct–indirect band gap crossover to trilayer WSe2. In the monolayer limit, WSe2 shows a spin-splitting of 475 meV in the valence band at the K point, the largest value observed among all the MX2 (Mmore » = Mo, W; X = S, Se) materials. The exciton binding energy of monolayer-WSe2/BLG is found to be 0.21 eV, a value that is orders of magnitude larger than that of conventional three-dimensional semiconductors, yet small as compared to other two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogennides (TMDCs) semiconductors. Lastly, our finding regarding the overall modification of the electronic structure by an alkali metal surface electron doping opens a route to further control the electronic properties of TMDCs.« less

  10. Spectroscopic evidence for a type II Weyl semimetallic state in MoTe2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Huang, Lunan; McCormick, Timothy M.; Ochi, Masayuki; Zhao, Zhiying; Suzuki, Michi -To; Arita, Ryotaro; Wu, Yun; Mou, Daixiang; Cao, Huibo; Yan, Jiaqiang; et al

    2016-07-11

    In a type I Dirac or Weyl semimetal, the low-energy states are squeezed to a single point in momentum space when the chemical potential μ is tuned precisely to the Dirac/Weyl point1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. Recently, a type II Weyl semimetal was predicted to exist, where the Weyl states connect hole and electron bands, separated by an indirect gap7, 8, 9, 10. This leads to unusual energy states, where hole and electron pockets touch at the Weyl point. Here we present the discovery of a type II topological Weyl semimetal state in pure MoTe2, where two sets ofmore » Weyl points (W±2 , W±3) exist at the touching points of electron and hole pockets and are located at different binding energies above EF. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, modelling, density functional theory and calculations of Berry curvature, we identify the Weyl points and demonstrate that they are connected by different sets of Fermi arcs for each of the two surface terminations. We also find new surface ‘track states’ that form closed loops and are unique to type II Weyl semimetals. Lastly, this material provides an exciting, new platform to study the properties of Weyl fermions.« less

  11. Raman spectroscopy in hot compressed hydrogen and nitrogen -...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Raman spectroscopy in hot compressed hydrogen and nitrogen - implications for the intramolecular potential Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Raman spectroscopy in hot...

  12. Operando Raman and Theoretical Vibration Spectroscopy of Non...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Operando Raman and Theoretical Vibration Spectroscopy of Non-PGM Catalysts Operando Raman and Theoretical Vibration Spectroscopy of Non-PGM Catalysts Presentation about ...

  13. S3TEC Spectroscopy Meeting | Solid State Solar Thermal Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectroscopy Meeting Meeting Friday Apr 29, 2016 2:00pm Event Contact: schuberm@mit.edu Monthly S3TEC spectroscopy

  14. SPIE international conference on Raman and luminescence spectroscopy in technology

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, J.E.; Adar, F.

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on subjects including Raman spectroscopy of semiconductors, Raman and Infrared spectroscopy of thin films, and Raman scattering from tungsten silicide thin films.

  15. Standoff Spectroscopy Using a Conditioned Target Identifies Hazardous...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Standoff Spectroscopy Using a Conditioned Target Identifies Hazardous Materials at a ... It combines tunable infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy techniques to target ...

  16. First Principles Calculations (and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials) First Principles Calculations (and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials) 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program ...

  17. First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle ...

  18. Nano-focused Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (nBIS) Determinatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spectroscopy (nBIS) Determination of the Unoccupied Electronic Structure of Pu Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nano-focused Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy ...

  19. First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program ...

  20. Updated Spitzer emission spectroscopy of bright transiting hot...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Updated Spitzer emission spectroscopy of bright transiting hot Jupiter HD 189733b Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Updated Spitzer emission spectroscopy of bright...

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy of water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.

    1994-12-01

    The second order nonlinear optical processes of second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are powerful and versatile tools for studying all kinds of surfaces. They possess unusual surface sensitivity due to the symmetry properties of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The technique of infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) is particularly attractive because it offers a viable way to do vibrational spectroscopy on any surfaces accessible to light with submonolayer sensitivity. In this thesis, the author applies SFG to study a number of important water interfaces. At the air/water interface, hydrophobic solid/water and liquid/water interfaces, it was found that approximately 25% of surface water molecules have one of their hydrogen pointing away from the liquid water. The large number of unsatisfied hydrogen bonds contributes significantly to the large interfacial energy of the hydrophobic surfaces. At the hydrophilic fused quartz/water interface and a fatty acid monolayer covered water surface, the structure and orientation of surface water molecules are controlled by the hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the surface OH groups and the electrostatic interaction with the surface field from the ionization of surface groups. A change of pH value in the bulk water can significantly change the relative importance of the two interactions and cause a drastic change in orientation of the surface water molecules. SFG has also been applied to study the tribological response of some model lubricant films. Monolayers of Langmuir-Blodgett films were found to disorder orientationaly under mildly high pressure and recover promptly upon removal of the applied pressure.

  2. Research in Neutron Velocity Spectroscopy. Final Report

    DOE R&D Accomplishments

    Rainwater, J.

    1976-10-13

    A brief summary of papers published since the last progress report (June 1974) is presented. The research represents contributions to neutron resonance spectroscopy below 100 keV. (SDF)

  3. Minority Carrier Lifetime Spectroscopy | Photovoltaic Research | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Minority Carrier Lifetime Spectroscopy Minority-carrier lifetime spectroscopy is a method to study the recombination processes of materials optically or electronically. It examines the return of photoexcited carriers back to equilibrium as a function of time and provides a measure of the "lifetime" of the excess carriers. This is accomplished with varying levels of volume excitation and sample temperatures of 4 to 300 K. One optical detection technique called time-correlated

  4. Raman spectroscopy at the tritium laboratory Karlsruhe

    SciTech Connect

    Schloesser, M.; Bornschein, B.; Fischer, S.; Kassel, F.; Rupp, S.; Sturm, M.; James, T.M.; Telle, H.H.

    2015-03-15

    Raman spectroscopy is employed successfully for analysis of hydrogen isotopologues at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). Raman spectroscopy is based on the inelastic scattering of photons off molecules. Energy is transferred to the molecules as rotational/vibrational excitation being characteristic for each type of molecule. Thus, qualitative analysis is possible from the Raman shifted light, while quantitative information can be obtained from the signal intensities. After years of research and development, the technique is now well-advanced providing fast (< 10 s), precise (< 0.1%) and true (< 3%) compositional analysis of gas mixtures of hydrogen isotopologues. In this paper, we summarize the recent achievements in the further development on this technique, and the various applications for which it is used at TLK. Raman spectroscopy has evolved as a versatile, highly accurate key method for quantitative analysis complementing the port-folio of analytic techniques at the TLK.

  5. A Brief History of Spectroscopy on EBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P

    2007-02-28

    In the autumn of 1986, the first electron beam ion trap, EBIT, was put into service as a light source for the spectroscopy of highly charged ions. On the occasion of the twentieth anniversary of EBIT, we review its early uses for spectroscopy, from the first measurements of x rays from L-shell xenon ions in 1986 to its conversion to SuperEBIT in 1992 and rebirth as EBIT-I in 2001. Together with their sibling, EBIT-II, these machines have been used at Livermore to perform a multitude of seminal studies of the physics of highly charged ions.

  6. Nanoparticles and nanowires: synchrotron spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, T.K.

    2008-08-11

    This paper reviews the research in nanomaterials conducted in our laboratory in the last decade using conventional and synchrotron radiation techniques. While preparative and conventional characterisation techniques are described, emphasis is placed on the analysis of nanomaterials using synchrotron radiation. Materials of primary interests are metal nanoparticles and semiconductor nanowires and nanoribbons. Synchrotron techniques based on absorption spectroscopy such as X-ray absorption fine structures (XAFS), which includes X-ray absorption near edge structures (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structures (EXFAS), and de-excitation spectroscopy, including X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL), time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence (TRXEOL) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) are described. We show that the tunability, brightness, polarisation and time structure of synchrotron radiation are providing unprecedented capabilities for nanomaterials analysis. Synchrotron studies of prototype systems such as gold nanoparticles, 1-D nanowires of group IV materials, C, Si and Ge as well as nanodiamond, and compound semiconductors, ZnS, CdS, ZnO and related materials are used to illustrate the power and unique capabilities of synchrotron spectroscopy in the characterisation of local structure, electronic structure and optical properties of nanomaterials.

  7. Spectroscopy and decays of charm and bottom

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-10-01

    After a brief review of the quark model, we discuss our present knowledge of the spectroscopy of charm and bottom mesons and baryons. We go on to review the lifetimes, semileptonic, and purely leptonic decays of these particles. We conclude with a brief discussion B and D mixing and rare decays.

  8. Noise spectroscopy of an optical microresonator

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, G. G.

    2013-05-15

    The noise spectrum is calculated for the intensity of light transmitted through an optical microresonator whose thickness experiences thermal oscillations. The noise spectrum reveals a maximum at the frequency of an acoustic mode localized in the optical microresonator and depends on the size of the illuminated region. The noise intensity estimates show that it can be detected by the modern noise spectroscopy technique.

  9. Results and Frontiers in Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K.Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration (LHPC) baryon spectroscopy effort is reviewed. To date the LHPC has performed exploratory Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying spectrum of Nucleon and Delta baryons. These calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by obtaining the masses of an unprecedented number of excited states with definite quantum numbers. Future work of the project is outlined.

  10. Results and Frontiers in Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Lichtl, Adam C.; Mathur, Nilmani; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration (LHPC) baryon spectroscopy effort is reviewed. To date the LHPC has performed exploratory Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying spectrum of Nucleon and Delta baryons. These calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by obtaining the masses of an unprecedented number of excited states with definite quantum numbers. Future work of the project is outlined.

  11. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species

    SciTech Connect

    Clouthier, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

  12. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  13. An instrument for the investigation of actinides with spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.-W.; Tobin, J. G.; Chung, B. W.

    2011-01-01

    A new system for spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy has been built and commissioned at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the investigation of the electronic structure of the actinides.Actinide materials are very toxic and radioactive and therefore cannot be brought to most general user facilities for spectroscopic studies. The technical details of the new system and preliminary data obtained therein will be presented and discussed.

  14. S3TEC Spectroscopy Meeting | Solid State Solar Thermal Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    S3TEC Spectroscopy Meeting Meeting Friday May 27, 2016 2:00pm Event Contact: schuberm@mit.edu Monthly S3TEC spectroscopy meeting News Events Event Archives

  15. Radiative Bottomonium Spectroscopy at the Y(2, 3S) Resonances...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radiative Bottomonium Spectroscopy at the Y(2, 3S) Resonances at BaBar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Radiative Bottomonium Spectroscopy at the Y(2, 3S) Resonances at ...

  16. Trace Explosive Detection using Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Adam R; Van Neste, Charles W; Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George; Finot, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Satisfying the conditions of high sensitivity and high selectivity using portable sensors that are also reversible is a challenge. Miniature sensors such as microcantilevers offer high sensitivity but suffer from poor selectivity due to the lack of sufficiently selective receptors. Although many of the mass deployable spectroscopic techniques provide high selectivity, they do not have high sensitivity. Here, we show that this challenge can be overcome by combining photothermal spectroscopy on a bimaterial microcantilever with the mass induced change in the cantilever's resonance frequency. Detection using adsorption-induced resonant frequency shift together with photothermal deflection spectroscopy shows extremely high selectivity with a subnanogram limit of detection for vapor phase adsorbed explosives, such as pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  17. Meson Spectroscopy At Jlab At 12 Gev

    SciTech Connect

    Fegan, Stuart

    2014-12-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab will enable a new generation of experiments in hadronic nuclear physics, seeking to address fundamental questions in our understanding of QCD. The existence of exotic states, suggested by both quark models and lattice calculations, would allow gluonic degrees of freedom to be explored, and may help explain the role played by gluons in the QCD interaction. This article will review the meson spectroscopy program being planned at the lab following the 12 GeV upgrade, utilising real and quasi-real photon beams in two of the lab's four experimental halls, whose distinct capabilities will enable an extensive set of spectroscopy experiments to be performed at the same facility.

  18. (Resonance ionization spectroscopy and its applications)

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, J.M.

    1990-10-11

    The Fifth International Symposium in Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy and Its Applications was attended. The Joint Research Centre of the European Communities at Ispra, Italy was also visited. The traveler presented an invited talk, chaired a meeting session and gave an impromptu presentation on how current laser technology limits the development of commercial instrumentation based upon Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy. The conference was truely international with scientists from 19 countries and less than 1/4 from the US. The meeting also provided a health mixture of experimentalists and theoreticians. Technical developments reported included the use of electric field ionization from laser prepared Rydberg states as a way to reduce background signals and commercial development of an optical parametric oscillator for replacing pulsed dye laser. A speaker from the Soviet Union suggested their willingness to market hardware they have developed based upon the resonance ionization technique.

  19. Computational Spectroscopy of Heterogeneous Interfaces | Argonne Leadership

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Facility Complex interfaces between nanoparticles and a solvent Complex interfaces between nanoparticles and a solvent. N. Brawand, University of Chicago Computational Spectroscopy of Heterogeneous Interfaces PI Name: Giulia Galli PI Email: gagalli@uchicago.edu Institution: University of Chicago Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 150 Million Year: 2016 Research Domain: Materials Science The interfaces between solids, nanoparticles and liquids play a fundamental

  20. Spectroscopy by frequency-entangled photon pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Yabushita, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2004-01-01

    Quantum spectroscopy was performed using the frequency-entangled broadband photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion. An absorptive sample was placed in front of the idler photon detector, and the frequency of signal photons was resolved by a diffraction grating. The absorption spectrum of the sample was measured by counting the coincidences, and the result is in agreement with the one measured by a conventional spectrophotometer with a classical light source.

  1. Spin noise spectroscopy of ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, H.; Berski, F.; Hbner, J.; Oestreich, M.; Balocchi, A.; Marie, X.; Mansur-Al-Suleiman, M.; Bakin, A.; Waag, A.

    2013-12-04

    We investigate the thermal equilibrium dynamics of electron spins bound to donors in nanoporous ZnO by optical spin noise spectroscopy. The spin noise spectra reveal two noise contributions: A weak spin noise signal from undisturbed localized donor electrons with a dephasing time of 24 ns due to hyperfine interaction and a strong spin noise signal with a spin dephasing time of 5 ns which we attribute to localized donor electrons which interact with lattice defects.

  2. Method and apparatus for time dispersive spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Tarver, III, Edward E.; Siems, William F.

    2003-06-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for time dispersive spectroscopy. In particular, a modulated flow of ionized molecules of a sample are introduced into a drift region of an ion spectrometer. The ions are subsequently detected by an ion detector to produce an ion detection signal. The ion detection signal can be modulated to obtain a signal useful in assaying the chemical constituents of the sample.

  3. Standoff spectroscopy using a conditioned target

    DOEpatents

    Van Neste, Charles W.; Morales-Rodriguez, Marissa E.; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-12-20

    A system and method are disclosed for standoff spectroscopy of molecules (e.g. from a residue) on a surface from a distance. A source emits radiation that modifies or conditions the residue, such as through photodecomposition. A spectral generating source measures a spectrum of the residue before and after the residue is exposed to the radiation from that source. The two spectra are compared to produce a distinct identification of the residues on the surface or identify certain properties of the residue.

  4. Threshold photodetachment spectroscopy of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kitsopoulos, T.N.

    1991-12-01

    This thesis is concerned with the development and application of high resolution threshold photodetachment spectroscopy of negative ions. Chapter I deals with the principles of our photodetachment technique, and in chapter II a detailed description of the apparatus is presented. The threshold photodetachment spectra of I{sup {minus}}, and SH{sup {minus}}, presented in the last sections of chapter II, indicated that a resolution of 3 cm{sup {minus}1} can be achieved using our technique. In chapter III the threshold photodetachment spectroscopy study of the transition state region of I + HI and I + Di reactions is discussed. Our technique probes the transition state region directly, and the results of our study are the first unambiguous observations of reactive resonances in a chemical reaction. Chapters IV, V and VI are concerned with the spectroscopy of small silicon and carbon clusters. From our spectra we were able to assign electronic state energies and vibrational frequencies for the low lying electronics states of Si{sub n} (n=2,3,4), C{sub 5} and their corresponding anions.

  5. Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Jordan, David V.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2014-06-13

    Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km – 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRIS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

  6. Beamline 11.0.2

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Endstations: Ambient-pressure photoemission spectroscopy Scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 5.0-cm...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Valley, NY (United States) Western Area Power Administration, Golden, CO (United States) ... Soft- and hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements reveal a sizable reduction of ...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Valley, NY (United States) Western Area Power Administration, Golden, CO (United States) ... SrTiOsub 3 single crystals and investigated by soft X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. ...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Document Reviews DOE Office of Science ... science (6) mutations (6) applied life sciences (5) basic ... a Ag(111) surface by two-photon photoemission spectroscopy. ...

  10. B and D spectroscopy at LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Muheim, Franz

    1999-02-17

    Results from the four LEP experiments ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL on the spectroscopy of B and charmed mesons are presented. The predictions of Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) for the masses and the widths of excited L=1 B mesons are supported by a new measurement from L3. A few B{sub c}{sup +} candidate events have masses consistent with the recent CDF observation and the predictions. New results on D** production and B{yields}D**l{nu} are also presented. The evidence for a D*{sup '} meson reported recently by DELPHI is not supported by OPAL and CLEO.

  11. Infrared spectroscopy study of irradiated PVDF

    SciTech Connect

    Chappa, Veronica; Grosso, Mariela del; Garcia Bermudez, Gerardo; Behar, Moni

    2007-10-26

    The effects induced by 1 MeV/amu ion irradiations were compared to those induced by 4-12 MeV/amu irradiations. Structural analysis with infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was carried out on PVDF irradiated using C and He beams with different fluences. From these spectra it was observed, as a function of fluence, an overall destruction of the polymer, amorphization of the crystalline regions and the creation of in-chain unsaturations. The track dimensions were determined using a previously developed Monte Carlo simulation code and these results were compared to a semiempirical model.

  12. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2001-05-15

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  13. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2003-01-01

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  14. Method for conducting nonlinear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Adler, Stuart B.; Wilson, Jamie R.; Huff, Shawn L.; Schwartz, Daniel T.

    2015-06-02

    A method for conducting nonlinear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The method includes quantifying the nonlinear response of an electrochemical system by measuring higher-order current or voltage harmonics generated by moderate-amplitude sinusoidal current or voltage perturbations. The method involves acquisition of the response signal followed by time apodization and fast Fourier transformation of the data into the frequency domain, where the magnitude and phase of each harmonic signal can be readily quantified. The method can be implemented on a computer as a software program.

  15. (Resonance ionization spectroscopy and its applications)

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, M.G.

    1990-10-05

    The field of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy grew out of work done in the Photophysics Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As one of the original developers of this field the traveler has continued to attend this meeting on a regular basis. The traveler was originally asked to present an invited talk and to present part of a short course offered to graduate students attending the conference. Subsequently, the traveler was also asked to chair a session and to be a judge of the students papers entered in a contest for a $1000 first prize.

  16. Mössbauer spectroscopy of Basal Ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Miglierini, Marcel; Lančok, Adriana; Kopáni, Martin; Boča, Roman

    2014-10-27

    Chemical states, structural arrangement, and magnetic features of iron deposits in biological tissue of Basal Ganglia are characterized. The methods of SQUID magnetometry and electron microscopy are employed. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy is used as a principal method of investigation. Though electron microscopy has unveiled robust crystals (1-3 μm in size) of iron oxides, they are not manifested in the corresponding {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra. The latter were acquired at 300 K and 4.2 K and resemble ferritin-like behavior.

  17. Theoretical aspects of light meson spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T. |

    1995-12-31

    In this pedagogical review the authors discuss the theoretical understanding of light hadron spectroscopy in terms of QCD and the quark model. They begin with a summary of the known and surmised properties of QCD and confinement. Following this they review the nonrelativistic quark potential model for q{anti q} mesons and discuss the quarkonium spectrum and methods for identifying q{anti q} states. Finally, they review theoretical expectations for non-q{anti q} states (glueballs, hybrids and multiquark systems) and the status of experimental candidates for these states.

  18. Cavity-locked ring down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Harb, Charles C.; Spence, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Distinct locking and sampling light beams are used in a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system to perform multiple ring-down measurements while the laser and ring-down cavity are continuously locked. The sampling and locking light beams have different frequencies, to ensure that the sampling and locking light are decoupled within the cavity. Preferably, the ring-down cavity is ring-shaped, the sampling light is s-polarized, and the locking light is p-polarized. Transmitted sampling light is used for ring-down measurements, while reflected locking light is used for locking in a Pound-Drever scheme.

  19. Automated plasma control with optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, P.P.

    1995-08-01

    Plasma etching and desmear processes for printed wiring board (PWB) manufacture are difficult to predict and control. Non-uniformity of most plasma processes and sensitivity to environmental changes make it difficult to maintain process stability from day to day. To assure plasma process performance, weight loss coupons or post-plasma destructive testing must be used. These techniques are not real-time methods however, and do not allow for immediate diagnosis and process correction. These tests often require scrapping some fraction of a batch to insure the integrity of the rest. Since these tests verify a successful cycle with post-plasma diagnostics, poor test results often determine that a batch is substandard and the resulting parts unusable. These tests are a costly part of the overall fabrication cost. A more efficient method of testing would allow for constant monitoring of plasma conditions and process control. Process anomalies should be detected and corrected before the parts being treated are damaged. Real time monitoring would allow for instantaneous corrections. Multiple site monitoring would allow for process mapping within one system or simultaneous monitoring of multiple systems. Optical emission spectroscopy conducted external to the plasma apparatus would allow for this sort of multifunctional analysis without perturbing the glow discharge. In this paper, optical emission spectroscopy for non-intrusive, in situ process control will be explored along with applications of this technique to for process control, failure analysis and endpoint determination in PWB manufacture.

  20. Auger electron spectroscopy applied to braze wettability

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, R.L.; Larson, D.T.

    1981-01-01

    The initial requirement for brazing is for the liquid metal filler alloy to wet the solid metal surfaces. While atomically clean metal surfaces are not necessary for good wettability, excessive oxygen (metal oxide) and/or carbon contaminants will leave non-wettable surfaces. The causes of non-wettable surfaces during brazing have been examined utilizing Auger electron spectroscopy. This surface spectroscopy with a sampling depth of 10 to 20A combined with sputter etching to provide film profiles was used to examine non-wettable specimens. Three different systems were studied. In the first case, carbon was found to segregate from the bulk to the surface of a nickel-copper alloy (Monel) during the braze heating. The formation of a graphitic layer was responsible for the non-wettability. In the second case, an external carbon contaminant was found on the surface of 316 stainless steel and resulted in a non-wettable surface. In the third situation, the non-wettability of 304 stainless steel was caused by a thick oxide film which formed in vacuum during brazing.

  1. Oxide superconductor physics and nano-engineering. Proceedings SPIE Volume 2158

    SciTech Connect

    Pavuna, D.; Bozovic, I.

    1994-12-31

    This conference was divided into the following sessions: electronic and transport properties; photoemission spectroscopy; Raman spectroscopy; tunneling spectroscopy; photoinduced phenomena; thin-film structures; novel devices; and poster session. Separate abstracts were prepared for 27 papers in this conference.

  2. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yuexing

    1995-12-01

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs{sup {minus}}. In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy.

  3. Optical Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Disordered Semiconductor Quantum

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wells and Quantum Dots (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Optical Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Disordered Semiconductor Quantum Wells and Quantum Dots Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optical Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Disordered Semiconductor Quantum Wells and Quantum Dots This final report describes the activities undertaken under grant "Optical Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Disordered Semiconductor Quantum Wells and Quantum Dots". The goal of this program

  4. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    electron microscope (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy

  5. Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search ... This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and ...

  6. An internal report: Electron Spectroscopy of the Oxidation and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An internal report: Electron Spectroscopy of ... are essentially blind to the changes corresponding to oxidation and aging in U and Pu. ...

  7. The 21st International Conference on Laser Spectroscopy - ICOLS...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    The 21st International Conference on Laser Spectroscopy - ICOLS 2013 http:icols.berkeley.edu June 9-14, 2013; Berkeley, CA

  8. High resolution absorption spectroscopy of exploding wire plasmas...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Published Article: High resolution absorption spectroscopy of exploding wire plasmas using an x-pinch x-ray source and spherically bent crystal Title: High resolution absorption ...

  9. X-ray transient absorption and picosecond IR spectroscopy of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray transient absorption and picosecond IR spectroscopy of fulvalene(tetracarbonyl)diruthenium on photoexcitation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-ray transient ...

  10. Impedance spectroscopy of organic magnetoresistance devices-Effect...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 117; Journal ... POLARONS; RECOMBINATION; ROUGHNESS; SPECTROSCOPY; SURFACES; TRAPS Word Cloud More Like ...

  11. Optical Spectroscopy for Materials Applications | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Optical Spectroscopy for Materials Applications The two main objectives of the Smith research group are: (1) to measure the organization and dynamics of biological structures, and...

  12. Report on the Feasibility of Pu Photoelectron Spectroscopy with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report on the Feasibility of Pu Photoelectron Spectroscopy with Microscopic and Nanoscopic Samples at NSLSII Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Report on the Feasibility of ...

  13. Two-dimensional stimulated resonance Raman spectroscopy of molecules...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Two-dimensional stimulated resonance Raman spectroscopy of molecules with broadband x-ray pulses Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Two-dimensional stimulated resonance ...

  14. XRMS: X-Ray Spectroscopy of Magnetic Solids

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    XRMS: X-Ray Spectroscopy of Magnetic Solids October 22-23, 2011 SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA More information...

  15. First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Materials: NMR First Principles Calculations and NMR Spectroscopy of Electrode Materials: NMR 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer...

  16. High speed double quantum 1H MAS NMR spectroscopy investigations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of water dynamics in materials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High speed double quantum 1H MAS NMR spectroscopy investigations of water dynamics in ...

  17. Structural Characterization for Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Structural Characterization for H 2 storage NREL: Steven Christensen, Katherine Hurst, Philip Parilla, Thomas Gennett SLAC/SSRL: Dimosthenis Sokaras, Dennis Nordlund, (Tsu-Chien Wang) 2 Core-level spectroscopy * Core-level spectroscopy: electronic structure via excitation of core electrons o X-ray absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) o X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES) o Photoemission Spectroscopy (PES) - XPS / UPS o Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy (IPES) * Applications: o Composition: XPS, XES

  18. Spectroscopy, Kinetics, and Dynamics of Combustion Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-08-06

    Spectroscopy, kinetics and dynamics of jet cooled hydrocarbon transients relevant to the DOE combustion mission have been explored, exploiting i) high resolution IR lasers, ii) slit discharge sources for formation of jet cooled radicals, and iii) high sensitivity detection with direct laser absorption methods and near the quantum shot noise limit. What makes this combination powerful is that such transients can be made under high concentrations and pressures characteristic of actual combustion conditions, and yet with the resulting species rapidly cooled (T ≈10-15K) in the slit supersonic expansion. Combined with the power of IR laser absorption methods, this provides novel access to spectral detection and study of many critical combustion species.

  19. Multiplex coherent raman spectroscopy detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Peter; Joyner, Candace C.; Patrick, Sheena T.; Guyer, Dean R.

    2004-06-08

    A multiplex coherent Raman spectrometer (10) and spectroscopy method rapidly detects and identifies individual components of a chemical mixture separated by a separation technique, such as gas chromatography. The spectrometer (10) and method accurately identify a variety of compounds because they produce the entire gas phase vibrational Raman spectrum of the unknown gas. This is accomplished by tilting a Raman cell (20) to produce a high-intensity, backward-stimulated, coherent Raman beam of 683 nm, which drives a degenerate optical parametric oscillator (28) to produce a broadband beam of 1100-1700 nm covering a range of more than 3000 wavenumber. This broadband beam is combined with a narrowband beam of 532 nm having a bandwidth of 0.003 wavenumbers and focused into a heated windowless cell (38) that receives gases separated by a gas chromatograph (40). The Raman radiation scattered from these gases is filtered and sent to a monochromator (50) with multichannel detection.

  20. Baryon spectroscopy at CLAS and CLAS12

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Livingston

    2011-10-01

    The N* programme at CLAS in Jefferson Lab is dedicated to the study of the spectrum of baryon resonances and the search for missing resonances. Recent developments in polarized beams and targets at CLAS have made it possible to measure many of the single and double polarization observables which are necessary to disentangle the contributing processes. In particular, CLAS is well on the way to making the first complete measurement on pseudoscalar meson production. The current status of the N* program is presented together with preliminary results from recently completed experiments. A brief overview of the hadron spectroscopy capabilities of the upgraded CLAS12 detector is also be presented, with emphasis on the plans for a tagged, quasi real photon beam.

  1. Remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe

    DOEpatents

    Schmucker, John E.; Blasi, Raymond J.; Archer, William B.

    1999-01-01

    A remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe allows for analyzing Raman scattered light from a point of interest external probe. An environmental barrier including at least one window separates the probe from the point of interest. An optical tube is disposed adjacent to the environmental barrier and includes a long working length compound lens objective next to the window. A beam splitter and a mirror are at the other end. A mechanical means is used to translated the prove body in the X, Y, and Z directions resulting in a variable focus optical apparatus. Laser light is reflected by the beam splitter and directed toward the compound lens objective, then through the window and focused on the point of interest. Raman scattered light is then collected by the compound lens objective and directed through the beam splitter to a mirror. A device for analyzing the light, such as a monochrometer, is coupled to the mirror.

  2. Anion photoelectron spectroscopy of radicals and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, Taylor R.

    1999-12-16

    Anion photoelectron spectroscopy is used to study free radicals and clusters. The low-lying {sup 2}{Sigma} and {sup 2}{Pi} states of C{sub 2n}H (n = 1--4) have been studied. The anion photoelectron spectra yielded electron affinities, term values, and vibrational frequencies for these combustion and astrophysically relevant species. Photoelectron angular distributions allowed the author to correctly assign the electronic symmetry of the ground and first excited states and to assess the degree of vibronic coupling in C{sub 2}H and C{sub 4}H. Other radicals studied include NCN and I{sub 3}. The author was able to observe the low-lying singlet and triplet states of NCN for the first time. Measurement of the electron affinity of I{sub 3} revealed that it has a bound ground state and attachment of an argon atom to this moiety enabled him to resolve the symmetric stretching progression.

  3. Deflecting light into resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.

    1998-01-01

    Light is coupled into a cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) resonant cavity using an acousto-optic modulator. The AOM allows in-coupling efficiencies in excess of 40%, which is two to three orders of magnitude higher than in conventional systems using a cavity mirror for in-coupling. The AOM shutoff time is shorter than the roundtrip time of the cavity. The higher light intensities lead to a reduction in shot noise, and allow the use of relatively insensitive but fast-responding detectors such as photovoltaic detectors. Other deflection devices such as electro-optic modulators or elements used in conventional Q-switching may be used instead of the AOM. The method is particularly useful in the mid-infrared, far-infrared, and ultraviolet wavelength ranges, for which moderately reflecting input mirrors are not widely available.

  4. Deflecting light into resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.

    1998-09-29

    Light is coupled into a cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) resonant cavity using an acousto-optic modulator. The AOM allows in-coupling efficiencies in excess of 40%, which is two to three orders of magnitude higher than in conventional systems using a cavity mirror for in-coupling. The AOM shutoff time is shorter than the roundtrip time of the cavity. The higher light intensities lead to a reduction in shot noise, and allow the use of relatively insensitive but fast-responding detectors such as photovoltaic detectors. Other deflection devices such as electro-optic modulators or elements used in conventional Q-switching may be used instead of the AOM. The method is particularly useful in the mid-infrared, far-infrared, and ultraviolet wavelength ranges, for which moderately reflecting input mirrors are not widely available. 5 figs.

  5. Multiplexed gas spectroscopy using tunable VCSELs

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, T; Bond, S; McCarrick, J; Zumstein, J; Chang, A; Moran, B; Benett, W J

    2012-04-10

    Detection and identification of gas species using tunable laser diode laser absorption spectroscopy has been performed using vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL). Two detection methods are compared: direct absorbance and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). In the first, the output of a DC-based laser is directly monitored to detect for any quench at the targeted specie wavelength. In the latter, the emission wavelength of the laser is modulated by applying a sinusoidal component on the drive current of frequency {omega}, and measuring the harmonics component (2{omega}) of the photo-detected current. This method shows a better sensitivity measured as signal to noise ratio, and is less susceptible to interference effects such as scattering or fouling. Gas detection was initially performed at room temperature and atmospheric conditions using VCSELs of emission wavelength 763 nm for oxygen and 1392 nm for water, scanning over a range of approximately 10 nm, sufficient to cover 5-10 gas specific absorption lines that enable identification and quantization of gas composition. The amplitude and frequency modulation parameters were optimized for each detected gas species, by performing two dimensional sweeps for both tuning current and either amplitude or frequency, respectively. We found that the highest detected signal is observed for a wavelength modulation amplitude equal to the width of the gas absorbance lines, in good agreement with theoretical calculations, and for modulation frequencies below the time response of the lasers (<50KHz). In conclusion, we will discuss limit of detection studies and further implementation and packaging of VCSELs in diode arrays for continuous and simultaneous monitoring of multiple species in gaseous mixtures.

  6. Ultrafast laser spectroscopy in complex solid state materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tianqi

    2014-12-01

    This thesis summarizes my work on applying the ultrafast laser spectroscopy to the complex solid state materials. It shows that the ultrafast laser pulse can coherently control the material properties in the femtosecond time scale. And the ultrafast laser spectroscopy can be employed as a dynamical method for revealing the fundamental physical problems in the complex material systems.

  7. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray Echo Spectroscopy Authors Shvydko, Yuri Division XSD Publication Year 2016 Publication Type Article DOI 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.080801 Supporting Data Citation Shvydko, Yuri. "X-ray Echo Spectroscopy." Physical Review Letters 116, no. 8 February 25, 2016 doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.0808

  8. Hybridization and the effective mass of quantum-well states in magnetic multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.D.; Garrison, K.; Dong, Q. ); Smith, N.V. ); Li, D.; Mattson, J.; Pearson, J.; Bader, S.D. )

    1994-09-15

    Angle-resolved-photoemission studies of the dispersion of the quantum-well states in copper thin films deposited on a Co(001) substrate reveal that hybridization in the interface leads to a large increase in the effective mass of the electrons. These observations have implications for theories of the oscillatory exchange coupling in the related magnetic multilayers, particularly where Fermi-surface spanning vectors away from the center of the zone are invoked as in the case of the short-period oscillation in the Co/Cu(001) multilayers.

  9. The art and science of magnet design: A Festschrift in honor of Klaus Halbach. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, J.

    1995-02-01

    This is a collection of technical papers and personal remembrances written expressly for the Halbach Symposium and dedicated to Klaus Halbach. The topics presented offer a hint of the diversity of Klaus`s scientific career. Most of the papers deal with magnets for accelerators and accelerator facilities. Other topics covered are free electron lasers, Halbach array motor/generators, radiation and gas conduction heat transport across a dewar multilayer insulation system, and surface structural determination from Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  10. Robust surface electronic properties of topological insulators: Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Plucinski, L.; Herdt, A.; Mussler, G.; Krumrain, J.; Gruetzmacher, D.; Suga, S.; Schneider, C. M.

    2011-05-30

    The surface electronic properties of the important topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} are shown to be robust under an extended surface preparation procedure, which includes exposure to atmosphere and subsequent cleaning and recrystallization by an optimized in situ sputter-anneal procedure under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Clear Dirac-cone features are displayed in high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectra from the resulting samples, indicating remarkable insensitivity of the topological surface state to cleaning-induced surface roughness.

  11. Fermi arcs vs. fermi pockets in electron-doped perovskite iridates

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    He, Junfeng; Hafiz, H.; Mion, Thomas R.; Hogan, T.; Dhital, C.; Chen, X.; Lin, Qisen; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, Y.; et al

    2015-02-23

    We report on an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study of bulk electron-doped perovskite iridate, (Sr1-xLax)₃Ir₂O₇. Fermi surface pockets are observed with a total electron count in keeping with that expected from La substitution. Depending on the energy and polarization of the incident photons, these pockets show up in the form of disconnected “Fermi arcs”, reminiscent of those reported recently in surface electron-doped Sr₂IrO₄. Our observed spectral variation is consistent with the coexistence of an electronic supermodulation with structural distortion in the system.

  12. Concentration-dependent surface-state shifts: Au on Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.C. ); Wagner, M.K. . Dept. of Chemistry); Tobin, J.G. )

    1991-04-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission has been used to investigate the behavior of the Cu(001) {bar M}{sub 2} surface state as a function of Au coverage and substrate temperature. Binding-energy shifts of this state are dependent on the concentration of Au atoms substituted into the top surface layer of the Cu(001) substrate. The results demonstrate the use of surface-localized Tamm states as a specific probe of the chemical environment in the surface plane. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Meson Spectroscopy in the Light Quark Sector

    SciTech Connect

    de Vita, Raffaella

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the hadron spectrum is one of the fundamental issues in modern particle physics. We know that existing hadron configurations include baryons, made of three quarks, and mesons, made of quark-antiquark pairs. However most of the mass of the hadrons is not due to the mass of these elementary constituents but to their binding force. Studying the hadron spectrum is therefore a tool to understand one of the fundamental forces in nature, the strong force, and Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD), the theory that describes it. This investigation can provide an answer to fundamental questions as what is the origin of the mass of hadrons, what is the origin of quark confinement, what are the relevant degrees of freedom to describe these complex systems and how the transition between the elementary constituents, quarks and gluons, and baryons and mesons occurs. In this field a key tool is given by meson spectroscopy. Mesons, being made by a quark and an anti-quark, are the simplest quark bound system and therefore the ideal benchmark to study the interaction between quarks and understand what the role of gluons is. In this investigation, it is fundamental to precisely determine the spectrum and properties of mesons but also to search for possible unconventional states beyond the configuration q{anti q} as tetraquarks (qq{anti qq}), hybrids (q{anti q}g) and glueballs. These states can be distinguished unambiguously from regular mesons when they have exotic quantum numbers, i.e. combinations of total angular momentum, spin and parity that are not allowed for q{anti q} states. These are called exotic quantum numbers and the corresponding states are referred to as exotics. The study of the meson spectrum and the search for exotics is among the goals of several experiments in the world that exploit different reaction processes, as e{sup +}e{sup −} annihilation, p{anti p} annihilation, pion scattering, proton-proton scattering and photo-production, to produce meson states

  14. ARPES study of the evolution of band structure and charge density wave properties in RTe3 ( R=Y , La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Tb, and Dy)

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Zahid; Brouet, Veronique; Yang, Wanli; Zhou, Xingjiang; Hussain, Zahid; Moore, R.G.; He, R.; Lu, D. H.; Shen, Z.X.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.B.; Ru, N.; Fisher, R.

    2008-01-16

    We present a detailed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation of the RTe3 family, which sets this system as an ideal"textbook" example for the formation of a nesting driven charge density wave (CDW). This family indeed exhibits the full range of phenomena that can be associated to CDWinstabilities, from the opening of large gaps on the best nested parts of Fermi surface (up to 0.4 eV), to the existence of residual metallic pockets. ARPES is the best suited technique to characterize these features, thanks to its unique ability to resolve the electronic structure in k space. An additional advantage of RTe3 is that theband structure can be very accurately described by a simple two dimensional tight-binding (TB) model, which allows one to understand and easily reproduce many characteristics of the CDW. In this paper, we first establish the main features of the electronic structure by comparing our ARPES measurements with the linear muffin-tinorbital band calculations. We use this to define the validity and limits of the TB model. We then present a complete description of the CDW properties and of their strong evolution as a function of R. Using simple models, we are able to reproduce perfectly the evolution of gaps in k space, the evolution of the CDW wave vector with R, and the shape of the residual metallic pockets. Finally, we give an estimation of the CDWinteraction parameters and find that the change in the electronic density of states n (EF), due to lattice expansion when different R ions are inserted, has the correct order of magnitude to explain the evolution of the CDW properties.

  15. New Developments in the Theory of HTSC [High Temperature Superconductors

    DOE R&D Accomplishments

    Abrikosov, A.A.

    1994-09-01

    The superconductor is supposed to consist of alternating layers of two kinds: (1) layers with an attractive electron interaction and an effective mass of usual magnitude, (2) layers without interaction and with a large effective mass. The overlap between the layers is assumed to be small, its energy, t, being much less than {Delta}. It is shown, that such a model explains the most peculiar property found in experiments on electronic Raman light scattering in BSCCO 2212: different threshold values for the Raman satellite measured at two different polarizations of the incident and scattered light. The tunneling conductance G(V)= dJ/dV is analyzed for the same model. In order to fit the qualitative features of experimental data, it is assumed that the tunneling probability to the normal layers is much less, than to the superconducting layers. The conductance is calculated for the case t{much_lt}{Delta}. A brief analysis is given for the case t{approximately}{Delta}, which proves that such an assumption definitely contradicts the experimental data for BSCCO. The possible nature of the electronic states in the normal layers is discussed. In connection with the experimental discovery (angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy, ARPES) of the extended saddle point singularities in the electron spectrum of a variety of HTSC consequences are derived for T{sub c} and {Delta} in a simple model. A large enhancement of superconductivity is possible if the singularity has a sufficient extension and is located close to the Fermi energy. In order to explain the anisotropy of the energy gap, observed in ARPES experiments, on the basis of the "extended saddle point singularities" an assumption is done that the Coulomb interactions are weakly screened, i.e. the Debye screening radius is much larger than the lattice period; this makes the electron interaction long ranged (E-L model).

  16. Application of impedance spectroscopy to SOFC research

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, G.; Mason, T.O.; Pederson, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    With the resurgence of interest in solid oxide fuel cells and other solid state electrochemical devices, techniques originally developed for characterizing aqueous systems are being adapted and applied to solid state systems. One of these techniques, three-electrode impedance spectroscopy, is particularly powerful as it allows characterization of subcomponent and interfacial properties. Obtaining accurate impedance spectra, however, is difficult as reference electrode impedance is usually non-negligible and solid electrolytes typically have much lower conductance than aqueous solutions. Faidi et al and Chechirlian et al have both identified problems associated with low conductivity media. Other sources of error are still being uncovered. Ford et al identified resistive contacts with large time constants as a possibility, while Me et al showed that the small contact capacitance of the reference electrode was at fault. Still others show that instrument limitations play a role. Using the voltage divider concept, a simplified model that demonstrates the interplay of these various factors, predicts the form of possible distortions, and offers means to minimize errors is presented.

  17. Bimolecular reaction dynamics from photoelectron spectroscopy of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradforth, S.E.

    1992-11-01

    The transition state region of a neutral bimolecular reaction may be experimentally investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy of an appropriate negative ion. The photoelectron spectrum provides information on the spectroscopy and dynamics of the short lived transition state and may be used to develop model potential energy surfaces that are semi-quantitative in this important region. The principles of bound [yields] bound negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy are illustrated by way of an example: a full analysis of the photoelectron bands of CN[sup [minus

  18. Terahertz magneto-optical spectroscopy of a two-dimensional hole...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE PAGES Search Results Accepted Manuscript: Terahertz magneto-optical spectroscopy of a two-dimensional hole gas Title: Terahertz magneto-optical spectroscopy of a...

  19. Zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy of triphenylene

    SciTech Connect

    Harthcock, Colin; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2014-06-28

    We report vibrational information of both the first electronically excited state and the ground cationic state of jet-cooled triphenylene via the techniques of resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy. The first excited electronic state S{sub 1} of the neutral molecule is of A{sub 1}? symmetry and is therefore electric dipole forbidden in the D{sub 3h} group. Consequently, there are no observable Franck-Condon allowed totally symmetric a{sub 1}? vibrational bands in the REMPI spectrum. All observed vibrational transitions are due to Herzberg-Teller vibronic coupling to the E? third electronically excited state S{sub 3}. The assignment of all vibrational bands as e? symmetry is based on comparisons with calculations using the time dependent density functional theory and spectroscopic simulations. When an electron is eliminated, the molecular frame undergoes Jahn-Teller distortion, lowering the point group to C{sub 2v} and resulting in two nearly degenerate electronic states of A{sub 2} and B{sub 1} symmetry. Here we follow a crude treatment by assuming that all e? vibrational modes resolve into b{sub 2} and a{sub 1} modes in the C{sub 2v} molecular frame. Some observed ZEKE transitions are tentatively assigned, and the adiabatic ionization threshold is determined to be 63?365 7 cm{sup ?1}. The observed ZEKE spectra contain a consistent pattern, with a cluster of transitions centered near the same vibrational level of the cation as that of the intermediate state, roughly consistent with the propensity rule. However, complete assignment of the detailed vibrational structure due to Jahn-Teller coupling requires much more extensive calculations, which will be performed in the future.

  20. Magnetic spectroscopy and microscopy of functional materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, C.A.

    2011-01-28

    Heusler intermetallics Mn{sub 2}Y Ga and X{sub 2}MnGa (X; Y =Fe, Co, Ni) undergo tetragonal magnetostructural transitions that can result in half metallicity, magnetic shape memory, or the magnetocaloric effect. Understanding the magnetism and magnetic behavior in functional materials is often the most direct route to being able to optimize current materials for todays applications and to design novel ones for tomorrow. Synchrotron soft x-ray magnetic spectromicroscopy techniques are well suited to explore the the competing effects from the magnetization and the lattice parameters in these materials as they provide detailed element-, valence-, and site-specifc information on the coupling of crystallographic ordering and electronic structure as well as external parameters like temperature and pressure on the bonding and exchange. Fundamental work preparing the model systems of spintronic, multiferroic, and energy-related compositions is presented for context. The methodology of synchrotron spectroscopy is presented and applied to not only magnetic characterization but also of developing a systematic screening method for future examples of materials exhibiting any of the above effects. The chapter progression is as follows: an introduction to the concepts and materials under consideration (Chapter 1); an overview of sample preparation techniques and results, and the kinds of characterization methods employed (Chapter 2); spectro- and microscopic explorations of X{sub 2}MnGa/Ge (Chapter 3); spectroscopic investigations of the composition series Mn{sub 2}Y Ga to the logical Mn{sub 3}Ga endpoint (Chapter 4); and a summary and overview of upcoming work (Chapter 5). Appendices include the results of a Think Tank for the Graduate School of Excellence MAINZ (Appendix A) and details of an imaging project now in progress on magnetic reversal and domain wall observation in the classical Heusler material Co{sub 2}FeSi (Appendix B).

  1. XAS and XMCD spectroscopies to study matter at high pressure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    XAS and XMCD spectroscopies to study matter at high pressure: Probing the correlation between structure and magnetism in the 3d metals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  2. Review of meson spectroscopy: quark states and glueballs

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1981-11-01

    A group of three lectures on hadron spectroscopy are presented. Topics covered include: light L = 0 mesons, light L = 1 mesons, antiquark antiquark quark quark exotics, a catalogue of higher quark antiquark excitations, heavy quarkonium, and glueballs. (GHT)

  3. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Graphene-a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice-has very high conductivity that can be tuned...

  4. Dirac Charge Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamcs in Graphene by Infrared Spectroscopy Print Wednesday, 29 October 2008 00:00 Graphene-a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice-has very high...

  5. Raman Spectroscopy for Analysis of Thorium Compounds (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Raman Spectroscopy for Analysis of Thorium Compounds The thorium fuel cycle is an alternative to the uranium fuel cycle in that when 232Th is irradiated with neutrons it is ...

  6. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy from Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy from Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics and Static Normal Mode Analysis: The C-H Region of DMSO as a Case Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  7. Ambient Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy Using Soft X-ray...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ambient Pressure Photoelectron Spectroscopy Using Soft X-ray and Hard X-ray, and its applications in electrochemistry Friday, December 14, 2012 - 3:30pm SSRL, Bldg. 137, room 322...

  8. Enhanced superconductivity due to forward scattering in FeSe thin films on SrTiO3 substrates

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Rademaker, Louk; Wang, Yan; Berlijn, Tom; Johnston, Steve

    2016-02-10

    In this paper, we study the consequences of an electron–phonon (e–ph) interaction that is strongly peaked in the forward scattering (more » $${\\bf{q}}=0$$) direction in a two-dimensional superconductor using Migdal–Eliashberg theory. We find that strong forward scattering results in an enhanced T c that is linearly proportional to the strength of the dimensionless e–ph coupling constant $${\\lambda }_{m}$$ in the weak coupling limit. This interaction also produces distinct replica bands in the single-particle spectral function, similar to those observed in recent angle-resolved photoemission experiments on FeSe monolayers on SrTiO3 and BaTiO3 substrates. Finally, by comparing our model to photoemission experiments, we infer an e–ph coupling strength that can provide a significant portion of the observed high T c in these systems.« less

  9. In Situ Diffuse Reflectance IR Spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Fast Catalytic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    N Marinkovic; Q Wang; A Frenkel

    2011-12-31

    A new instrument for synchronous in situ investigations of catalytic materials by IR and X-ray absorption spectroscopies was designed and built at the X18A beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides analytical tools for solving structural, electronic and kinetic problems in catalysis science by two complementary methods. Among the features attractive for catalysis research are the broad range of catalytically active elements that can be investigated (starting with Ni and beyond), the wide range of reaction conditions (temperatures up to 873 K, various reactive gases) and time scales (starting from tens of seconds). The results of several representative experiments that illustrate the attractive capabilities of the new set-up are discussed.

  10. Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) As Next Generation Nonlinear LIDAR Spectroscopy and Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2009-07-10

    Nonlinear spectroscopy using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and femtosecond laser pulses has been successfully developed as powerful tools for chemical analysis and biological imaging. Recent developments show promising possibilities of incorporating CARS into LIDAR system for remote detection of molecular species in airborne particles. The corresponding theory is being developed to describe nonlinear scattering of a mesoscopic particle composed of complex molecules by laser pulses with arbitrary shape and spectral content. Microscopic many-body transform theory is used to compute the third order susceptibility for CARS in molecules with known absorption spectrum and vibrational modes. The theory is combined with an integral scattering formula and Mie-Lorentz formulae, giving a rigorous formalism which provides powerful numerical experimentation of CARS spectra, particularly on the variations with the laser parameters and the direction of detection.

  11. Study of asymmetries of Cd(Zn)Te devices investigated using photo-induced current transient spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, surface photo-voltage spectroscopy, and gamma ray spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Crocco, J.; Bensalah, H.; Zheng, Q.; Dieguez, E.; Corregidor, V.; Avles, E.; Castaldini, A.; Fraboni, B.; Cavalcoli, D.; Cavallini, A.; Vela, O.

    2012-10-01

    Despite these recent advancements in preparing the surface of Cd(Zn)Te devices for detector applications, large asymmetries in the electronic properties of planar Cd(Zn)Te detectors are common. Furthermore, for the development of patterned electrode geometries, selection of each electrode surface is crucial for minimizing dark current in the device. This investigation presented here has been carried out with three objectives. Each objective is oriented towards establishing reliable methods for the selection of the anode and cathode surfaces independent of the crystallographic orientation. The objectives of this study are (i) investigate how the asymmetry in I-V characteristics of Cd(Zn)Te devices may be associated with the TeO2 interfacial layer using Rutherford backscattering to study the structure at the Au-Cd(Zn)Te interface, (ii) develop an understanding of how the concentration of the active traps in Cd(Zn)Te varies with the external bias, and (iii) propose non-destructive methods for selection of the anode and cathode which are independent of crystallographic orientation. The spectroscopic methods employed in this investigation include Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, photo-induced current transient spectroscopy, and surface photo-voltage spectroscopy, as well as gamma ray spectroscopy to demonstrate the influence on detector properties.

  12. Electronic structure of the heavy-fermion caged compound Ce3Pd20X6(X=Si,Ge) studied by density functional theory and photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Schwier, Eike F.; Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya; Tsujii, Naohito; Jarrige, Ignace; Jiang, Jian; Hayashi, Hirokazu; Iwasawa, Hideaki; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Kitazawa, Hideaki

    2015-03-30

    The electronic structure of Ce₃Pd₂₀X₆ (X = Si, Ge) has been studied using detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculations and high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) measurements. The orbital decomposition of the electronic structure by DFT calculations indicates that Ce atoms at the (8c) site surrounded by 16 Pd atoms have a more localized nature and a tendency to be magnetic. Ce atoms in the (4a) site surrounded by 12 Pd and 6 X atoms, on the other, show only a negligible magnetic moment. In the photoemission valence-band spectra we observe a strong f⁰ (Ce⁴⁺) component with a small fraction of f¹ (Ce³⁺) component. The spectral weight of f¹ component near the Fermi level Ce₃Pd₂₀Si₆ is stronger than that for Ce₃Pd₂₀Ge₆ at the 4d-4f resonance, suggesting stronger c-f hybridization in the former. This may hint to the origin of the large electronic specific coefficient of Ce₃Pd₂₀Si₆ compared to Ce₃Pd₂₀Ge₆.

  13. Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglieri, Marco; Briscoe, William; Celentano, Andrea; Chung, Suh-Urk; D'Angelo, Annalisa; De Vita, Rafaella; Döring, Michael; Dudek, Jozef; Eidelman, S.; Fegan, Stuart; Ferretti, J.; Filippi, A.; Fox, G.; Galata, G.; García-Tecocoatzi, H.; Glazier, Derek; Grube, B.; Hanhart, C.; Hoferichter, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ireland, David G.; Ketzer, B.; Klein, Franz J.; Kubis, B.; Liu, B.; Masjuan, P.; Mathieu, Vincent; McKinnon, Brian; Mitchel, R.; Nerling, F.; Paul, S.; Peláez, J. R.; Rademacker, J.; Rizzo, Alessandro; Salgado, Carlos; Santopinto, E.; Sarantsev, Andrey V.; Sato, Toru; Schlüter, T.; da Silva, M. L.L.; Stankovic, I.; Strakovsky, Igor; Szczepaniak, Adam; Vassallo, A.; Walford, Natalie K.; Watts, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopy in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near Berlin in September 2013. The aim of this document is to summarize the discussions that took place at the ATHOS 2012 and ATHOS 2013 meetings. We do not attempt a comprehensive review of the field of amplitude analysis, but offer a collection of thoughts that we hope may lay the ground for such a document.

  14. 2012 ELECTRONIC SPECTROSCOPY & DYNAMICS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JULY 22-27, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Bern

    2012-07-27

    Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, coherent electronic energy transport in biology, excited state theory and dynamics, excitonics, electronic spectroscopy of cold and ultracold molecules, and the spectroscopy of nanostructures. Several sessions will highlight innovative techniques such as time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy, frequency combs, and liquid microjet photoelectron spectroscopy that have forged stimulating new connections between gas-phase and condensed-phase work.

  15. Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy of optical clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Oates, C. W.; Barber, Z. W.; Lemke, N. D.; Ludlow, A. D.; Sterr, U.; Lisdat, Ch.; Riehle, F.

    2010-07-15

    We present nonstandard optical Ramsey schemes that use pulses individually tailored in duration, phase, and frequency to cancel spurious frequency shifts related to the excitation itself. In particular, the field shifts and their uncertainties can be radically suppressed (by two to four orders of magnitude) in comparison with the usual Ramsey method (using two equal pulses) as well as with single-pulse Rabi spectroscopy. Atom interferometers and optical clocks based on two-photon transitions, heavily forbidden transitions, or magnetically induced spectroscopy could significantly benefit from this method. In the latter case, these frequency shifts can be suppressed considerably below a fractional level of 10{sup -17}. Moreover, our approach opens the door for high-precision optical clocks based on direct frequency comb spectroscopy.

  16. Spectroscopy and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, H.L.

    1993-12-01

    Spectroscopy, energy transfer and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules are studied through a combination of laser-based excitation techniques and efficient detection of emission from the energized molecules with frequency and time resolution. Specifically, a Time-resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy technique has been developed for detecting dispersed laser-induced fluorescence in the IR, visible and UV regions. The structure and spectroscopy of the excited vibrational levels in the electronic ground state, as well as energy relaxation and reactions induced by specific vibronic excitations of a transient molecule can be characterized from time-resolved dispersed fluorescence in the visible and UV region. IR emissions from highly vibrational excited levels, on the other hand, reveal the pathways and rates of collision induced vibrational energy transfer.

  17. 2010 GRC VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY AUGUST 1 - AUGUST 6, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks Pate

    2010-08-06

    The Vibrational Spectroscopy conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and at interfaces. The conference explores the wide range of state-of-the-art techniques based on vibrational motion. These techniques span the fields of time-domain, high-resolution frequency-domain, spatially-resolved, nonlinear and multidimensional spectroscopies. The conference highlights the application of these techniques in chemistry, materials, biology, and medicine. The theory of molecular vibrational motion and its connection to spectroscopic signatures and chemical reaction dynamics is the third major theme of the meeting. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of molecular systems ranging from small polyatomic molecules to large biomolecules and nanomaterials.

  18. Field Emission Auger Electron Spectroscopy with Scanning Auger Microscopy |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science | NREL Field Emission Auger Electron Spectroscopy with Scanning Auger Microscopy Photo images of surface defects provided by SEM and SAM (a) SEM and (b&c) SAM images of a surface defect in Cu(In,Ga)SeS. SAM analysis shows the defect to be an In-rich region (b), indicating that the likely origin was an "In-spit" during precursor deposition that was subsequently selenized during downstream processing (c). In Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), we bombard a sample

  19. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P.

    1993-12-01

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy Laboratory | Argonne National

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy Laboratory Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy Laboratory The CSE Division in Building 241 has a 500 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer. Users have recorded spectra of 1H, 2H, 7Li, 11B, 13C, 14N, 15N, 17O, 19F, 25Mg, 27Al, 29Si, 31P, 95Mo, 119Sn, and 195Pt. Full complement of one, two and three-dimensional pulse sequence library is available. This system uses an UltraShield Plus superconducting magnet with 5.4

  1. Spectroscopy and Decay of $B$ Hadrons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Paulini, Manfred

    2007-02-01

    The authors review recent results on heavy quark physics focusing on Run II measurements of B hadron spectroscopy and decay at the Tevatron. A wealth of new B physics measurements from CDF and D0 has been available. These include the spectroscopy of excited B states (B**, B**{sub s}) and the observation of the {Sigma}{sub b} baryon. The discussion of the decays of B hadrons and measurements of branching fractions focuses on charmless two-body decays of B {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -}. They report several new B{sub s}{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} decay channels.

  2. High resolution absorption spectroscopy of exploding wire plasmas using an

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    x-pinch x-ray source and spherically bent crystal (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Published Article: High resolution absorption spectroscopy of exploding wire plasmas using an x-pinch x-ray source and spherically bent crystal Title: High resolution absorption spectroscopy of exploding wire plasmas using an x-pinch x-ray source and spherically bent crystal Authors: Knapp, P. F. [1] ; Pikuz, S. A. [1] ; Shelkovenko, T. A. [1] ; Hammer, D. A. [1] ; Hansen, S. B. [2] + Show Author Affiliations

  3. Indium diffusion through high-k dielectrics in high-k/InP stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, H.; Cabrera, W.; Santosh KC,; Brennan, B.; Qin, X.; McDonnell, S.; Hinkle, C. L.; Cho, K.; Chabal, Y. J.; Galatage, R. V.; Zhernokletov, D.; Wallace, R. M.; Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080

    2013-08-05

    Evidence of indium diffusion through high-k dielectric (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}) films grown on InP (100) by atomic layer deposition is observed by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The analysis establishes that In-out diffusion occurs and results in the formation of a PO{sub x} rich interface.

  4. Spectroscopy of triply and quadruply ionized states of mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Huttula, M.; Huttula, S.-M.; Lablanquie, P.; Palaudoux, J.; Penent, F.; Andric, L.; Eland, J. H. D.

    2011-03-15

    Multielectron coincidence spectroscopy has been used to study multiple ionization of atomic mercury. The binding energies of triply and quadruply ionized states of Hg have been determined from three- and fourfold electron coincidences. Relativistic ab initio theory has been used to calculate the state energies and predict the experimental findings.

  5. Charm and Charmonium Spectroscopy in BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Negrini, M.; /Ferrara U.

    2008-02-06

    The BABAR experiment at the PEP-II B-factory offers excellent opportunities in charm and charmonium spectroscopy. The recent observation of new states in the D{sub s} and in the charmonium mass regions revived the interest in this field. Recent BABAR results are presented.

  6. Pentaquarks and New Hadron Spectroscopy at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciardi, S.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London

    2005-07-11

    Recent results on the search for pentaquarks and on charmonium spectroscopy at BABAR are reviewed. The latter includes the observation of the puzzling new state X(3872) {yields} J/{psi} {pi}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} in B decays, and the searches for X(3872) in two-body B decays and initial state radiation events.

  7. Overview of applications of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)

    SciTech Connect

    Cremers, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a method of performing elemental analyses of solids, liquids, and gases using the microplasma produced by a focused laser pulse. Because the microplasma is formed by optical radiation, LIBS has some important advantages compared to conventional laboratory based analytical methods. Three applications are discussed which use the LIBS method. 6 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Battaglieri, Marco; Briscoe, William; Celentano, Andrea; Chung, Suh-Urk; D'Angelo, Annalisa; De Vita, Rafaella; Döring, Michael; Dudek, Jozef; Eidelman, S.; Fegan, Stuart; et al

    2015-01-01

    The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopymore » in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near Berlin in September 2013. The aim of this document is to summarize the discussions that took place at the ATHOS 2012 and ATHOS 2013 meetings. We do not attempt a comprehensive review of the field of amplitude analysis, but offer a collection of thoughts that we hope may lay the ground for such a document.« less

  9. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  10. Summary of the working group 4: Hadron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, K.M.

    1991-03-01

    This report is a summary of the working group 4 on hadron spectroscopy. The topics covered are: physics motivation; design of spectrometer; status of some existing hadron spectrometers; improvements to LASS; and arguments for/against a LASS-like design.

  11. 10 Questions for a Spectroscopy Expert: Nancy Hess

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dr. Hess is using her expertise in molecular level spectroscopy to protect water supplies and advance carbon capture and sequestration technologies. And find out how the Apollo missions, Jacques Cousteau and the Krebs cycle all had a hand in encouraging her interests in science.

  12. Improved Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Elemental Composition

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Detection System - Energy Innovation Portal Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Geothermal Geothermal Find More Like This Return to Search Improved Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Elemental Composition Detection System A device to measure subsurface gases, liquids, and solids at subsurface conditions National Energy Technology Laboratory Contact NETL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary This device can measure subsurface gases, liquids, and solids at

  13. Protein Characterisation by Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, B.

    2009-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a well-established technique for the study of proteins. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy extends the utility of conventional CD spectroscopy (i.e. using laboratory-based instruments) because the high light flux from a synchrotron enables collection of data to lower wavelengths, detection of spectra with higher signal-to-noise levels and measurements in the presence of strongly absorbing non-chiral components such as salts, buffers, lipids and detergents. This review describes developments in instrumentation, methodologies and bioinformatics that have enabled new applications of the SRCD technique for the study of proteins. It includes examples of the use of SRCD spectroscopy for providing static and dynamic structural information on molecules, including determinations of secondary structures of intact proteins and domains, assessment of protein stability, detection of conformational changes associated with ligand and drug binding, monitoring of environmental effects, examination of the processes of protein folding and membrane insertion, comparisons of mutant and modified proteins, identification of intermolecular interactions and complex formation, determination of the dispositions of proteins in membranes, identification of natively disordered proteins and their binding partners and examination of the carbohydrate components of glycoproteins. It also discusses how SRCD can be used in conjunction with macromolecular crystallography and other biophysical techniques to provide a more complete picture of protein structures and functions, including how proteins interact with other macromolecules and ligands. This review also includes a discussion of potential new applications in structural and functional genomics using SRCD spectroscopy and future instrumentation and bioinformatics developments that will enable such studies. Finally, the appendix describes a number of computational

  14. Electronic band structure and Kondo coupling in YbRh2Si2

    SciTech Connect

    Wigger, G.A.

    2010-04-15

    The electronic band structure of YbRh2Si2 is calculated in a relativistic framework including correlation corrections and magnetization of the Yb ion and compared to detailed angle-resolved photoemission spectra. The photoemission spectra for LuRh2Si2 are used as reference to identify electronic bands with no f symmetry. The calculated band structure manifests a 4f13 spin-polarized configuration leaving the unoccupied state at 1.4eV above the Fermi energy. At the band theory level, the 4f bands are located far below the Fermi level and the anisotropic Coulomb interaction within the 4f shell spreads the multilevel into broader 4f complexes below -2.5eV . The photoemission spectra obtained on YbRh2Si2 show a clear f -multilevel splitting into j=7/2 and 5/2 excitations. The interaction of the 4f7/2 levels close to the Fermi energy with two conduction bands shows visible hybridization gaps of 45 and 80meV, respectively. We discuss the origin of these excitations and provide an analysis according to Anderson's single-impurity model with parameters suggested by the band-structure calculation and the photoemission spectra. Both experiment and theory indicate nearly identical Fermi surfaces for LuRh2Si2 and YbRh2Si2 . The valency of Yb in YbRh2Si2 is estimated to be close to +3.

  15. Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pulsed laser Raman spectroscopy in the laser-heated diamond anvil...

  16. Spin-polarized electron energy loss spectroscopy on Fe(100) thin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spin-polarized electron energy loss spectroscopy on Fe(100) thin films grown on Ag(100) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spin-polarized electron energy loss spectroscopy ...

  17. X-ray line polarization spectroscopy of Li-like satellite line...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray line polarization spectroscopy of Li-like satellite line spectra Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-ray line polarization spectroscopy of Li-like satellite line ...

  18. X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (Book) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy Authors: Newville, M. 1 + Show Author ...

  19. X-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy for use in plasma transport...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy for use in plasma transport research Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy for use in plasma transport ...

  20. In Operando Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of 3D Graphene Supercapacitor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In Operando Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of 3D Graphene Supercapacitor Electrodes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: In Operando Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of 3D Graphene ...

  1. Excited-state spectroscopy of singly, doubly and triply-charmed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Excited-state spectroscopy of singly, doubly and triply-charmed baryons from lattice QCD Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Excited-state spectroscopy of singly, doubly and ...

  2. Hubbard model corrections in real-space x-ray spectroscopy theory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hubbard model corrections in real-space x-ray spectroscopy theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hubbard model corrections in real-space x-ray spectroscopy theory ...

  3. Bottomonium Spectroscopy at BaBar and Belle (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bottomonium Spectroscopy at BaBar and Belle Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bottomonium Spectroscopy at BaBar and Belle You are accessing a document from the ...

  4. Calibration of Spherically Bent Crystals used in X-Ray Spectroscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Calibration of Spherically Bent Crystals used in X-Ray Spectroscopy. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Calibration of Spherically Bent Crystals used in X-Ray Spectroscopy. ...

  5. Soft X-Ray and Vacuum Ultraviolet Based Spectroscopy of the Actinides...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Soft X-Ray and Vacuum Ultraviolet Based Spectroscopy of the Actinides Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Soft X-Ray and Vacuum Ultraviolet Based Spectroscopy of ...

  6. Soft X-Ray and Vacuum Ultraviolet Based Spectroscopy of the Actinides...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Soft X-Ray and Vacuum Ultraviolet Based Spectroscopy of the Actinides Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Soft X-Ray and Vacuum Ultraviolet Based Spectroscopy of...

  7. Ion dip spectroscopy of cold molecules and ions. Progress report and renewal proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Wessel, J.

    1987-08-13

    A research program is underway with the objective of developing techniques of high resolution multiphoton spectroscopy for selective, ultrasensitive molecular detection. Methods under study include various forms of ion dip spectroscopy and new methods of ion fragmentation spectroscopy. The studies are providing a new understanding of the fundamental spectroscopy and photophysics of large molecular ions. Dimer and cluster ions of polynuclear aromatics and related species are also being investigated, with potential detection applications.

  8. Cone penetrometer fiber optic raman spectroscopy probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kyle, Kevin R.; Brown, Steven B.

    2000-01-01

    A chemically and mechanically robust optical Raman spectroscopy probe assembly that can be incorporated in a cone penetrometer (CPT) for subsurface deployment. This assembly consists of an optical Raman probe and a penetrometer compatible optical probe housing. The probe is intended for in-situ chemical analysis of chemical constituents in the surrounding environment. The probe is optically linked via fiber optics to the light source and the detection system at the surface. A built-in broadband light source provides a strobe method for direct measurement of sample optical density. A mechanically stable sapphire window is sealed directly into the side-wall of the housing using a metallic, chemically resistant, hermetic seal design. This window permits transmission of the interrogation light beam and the resultant signal. The spectroscopy probe assembly is capable of accepting Raman, Laser induced Fluorescence, reflectance, and other optical probes with collimated output for CPT deployment.

  9. Photodissociation dynamics and spectroscopy of free radical combustion intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, D.L.

    1996-12-01

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals is studied by the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Photodetachment of internally cold, mass-selected negative ions produces a clean source of radicals, which are subsequently dissociated and detected. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states of the radical. In addition, the photodissociation dynamics, product branching ratios, and bond energies are probed at fixed photon energies by measuring the translational energy, P(E{sub T}), and angular distribution of the recoiling fragments using a time- and position-sensitive detector. Ab initio calculations are combined with dynamical and statistical models to interpret the observed data. The photodissociation of three prototypical hydrocarbon combustion intermediates forms the core of this work.

  10. Method and apparatus for two-dimensional spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    DeCamp, Matthew F.; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2010-10-12

    Preferred embodiments of the invention provide for methods and systems of 2D spectroscopy using ultrafast, first light and second light beams and a CCD array detector. A cylindrically-focused second light beam interrogates a target that is optically interactive with a frequency-dispersed excitation (first light) pulse, whereupon the second light beam is frequency-dispersed at right angle orientation to its line of focus, so that the horizontal dimension encodes the spatial location of the second light pulse and the first light frequency, while the vertical dimension encodes the second light frequency. Differential spectra of the first and second light pulses result in a 2D frequency-frequency surface equivalent to double-resonance spectroscopy. Because the first light frequency is spatially encoded in the sample, an entire surface can be acquired in a single interaction of the first and second light pulses.

  11. Real-time multiplexed digital cavity-enhanced spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boyson, Toby K.; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Pavey, Karl D.; Fitzgerald, Nicholas J.; Spence, Thomas G.; Moore, David S.; Harb, Charles C.

    2015-10-01

    Cavity-enhanced spectroscopy is a sensitive optical absorption technique but one where the practical applications have been limited to studying small wavelength ranges. In addition, this Letter shows that wideband operation can be achieved by combining techniques usually reserved for the communications community with that of cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, producing a multiplexed real-time cavity-enhanced spectrometer. We use multiple collinear laser sources operating asynchronously and simultaneously while being detected on a single photodetector. This is synonymous with radio frequency (RF) cellular systems in which signals are detected on a single antenna but decoded uniquely. Here, we demonstrate results with spectra of methyl salicylate and show parts-per-billion per root hertz sensitivity measured in real-time.

  12. A spectroelectrochemical cell for ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    El Khoury, Youssef; Van Wilderen, Luuk J. G. W.; Vogt, Tim; Winter, Ernst; Bredenbeck, Jens E-mail: bredenbeck@biophysik.uni-frankfurt.de

    2015-08-15

    A spectroelectrochemical cell has been designed to combine electrochemistry and ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy, which is a powerful tool to extract structure and dynamics information on the femtosecond to picosecond time scale. Our design is based on a gold mirror with the dual role of performing electrochemistry and reflecting IR light. To provide the high optical surface quality required for laser spectroscopy, the gold surface is made by electron beam evaporation on a glass substrate. Electrochemical cycling facilitates in situ collection of ultrafast dynamics of redox-active molecules by means of 2D-IR. The IR beams are operated in reflection mode so that they travel twice through the sample, i.e., the signal size is doubled. This methodology is optimal for small sample volumes and successfully tested with the ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox system of which the corresponding electrochemically induced 2D-IR difference spectrum is reported.

  13. Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals, clusters, and ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hyeon, Choi

    1999-12-16

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals and ions is studied to characterize the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a special method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states. Branching ratios to various product channels, the translational energy distributions of the fragments, and bond dissociation energies are then determined at selected photon energies. The detailed picture of photodissociation dynamics is provided with the aid of ab initio calculations and a statistical model to interpret the observed data. Important reaction intermediates in combustion reactions have been studied: CCO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}O, and linear C{sub n} (n = 4--6).

  14. Applications of laser-induced gratings to spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlfing, E.A.

    1993-12-01

    This program has traditionally emphasized two principal areas of research. The first is the spectroscopic characterization of large-amplitude motion on the ground-state potential surface of small, transient molecules. The second is the reactivity of carbonaceous clusters and its relevance to soot and fullerene formation in combustion. Motivated initially by the desire to find improved methods of obtaining stimulated emission pumping (SEP) spectra of transients, most of our recent work has centered on the use of laser-induced gratings or resonant four-wave mixing in free-jet expansions. These techniques show great promise for several chemical applications, including molecular spectroscopy and photodissociation dynamics. The author describes recent applications of two-color laser-induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) to obtain background-free SEP spectra of transients and double resonance spectra of nonfluorescing species, and the use of photofragment transient gratings to probe photodissociation dynamics.

  15. Real-time multiplexed digital cavity-enhanced spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Boyson, Toby K.; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Pavey, Karl D.; Fitzgerald, Nicholas J.; Spence, Thomas G.; Moore, David S.; Harb, Charles C.

    2015-10-01

    Cavity-enhanced spectroscopy is a sensitive optical absorption technique but one where the practical applications have been limited to studying small wavelength ranges. In addition, this Letter shows that wideband operation can be achieved by combining techniques usually reserved for the communications community with that of cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, producing a multiplexed real-time cavity-enhanced spectrometer. We use multiple collinear laser sources operating asynchronously and simultaneously while being detected on a single photodetector. This is synonymous with radio frequency (RF) cellular systems in which signals are detected on a single antenna but decoded uniquely. Here, we demonstrate results with spectra of methyl salicylatemore » and show parts-per-billion per root hertz sensitivity measured in real-time.« less

  16. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David M.; Bradley, Rich; De Viveiros Souza Filho, Luiz A.; Doe, Peter J.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, Erin C.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Kofron, Jared N.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, Prajwal T.; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Rysewyk, Devyn M.; Sternberg, Michael G.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Thummler, Thomas; VanDevender, Brent A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges should emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spectrometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source and are magnetically trapped. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work is a proof-of-concept for future neutrino mass experiments using this technique.

  17. Analysis of uranium oxide weathering by molecular spectroscopy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zickafoose, M.S.

    1997-11-01

    A preliminary study of the weathering of uranium oxide particles diluted in diamond dust at ambient environmental conditions is presented. The primary weathering reaction is oxidation of the uranium from the +4 to +6 oxidation state, although formation of compounds such as carbonates and hydroxides is possible. Identification of the state of uranium oxide has been attempted using luminescence spectroscopy and diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Luminescence spectra of nominal samples of three common oxides, UO3, U3O8, and UO2, have been measured showing significant spectral differences in peaks at 494 nm, 507 nm, 529 nm, and 553 nm. DRIFTS spectra of the same three oxides show significant differences in peaks at 960 /cm, 856 /cm, and 754 /cm. The differences in these peaks allow determination of the oxidation to the +6 state in these compounds.

  18. Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy Modeling for Remote Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.

    2000-09-30

    Frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy techniques show promise for active infrared remote chemical sensing. FM spectroscopy techniques have reduced sensitivity to optical and electronic noise, and are relatively immune to the effects of various electronic and mechanical drifts. FM systems are responsive to sharp spectral features and can therefore reduce the effects of spectral clutter due to interfering chemicals in the plume or in the atmosphere. The relatively high modulation frequencies used for FM also reduces the effects of albedo (reflectance) and plume variations. Conventional differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems are performance limited by the noise induced by speckle. Analysis presented in this report shows that FM based sensors may reduce the effects of speckle by one to two orders of magnitude. This can result in reduced dwell times and faster area searches, as well as reducing various forms of spatial clutter. FM systems will require a laser system that is continuously tunable at relatively high frequencies (0.1 to 20 MHz). One promising candidate is the quantum-cascade (QC) laser [1, 2]. The QC laser is potentially capable of power levels on the order of 1 Watt and frequency tuning on the order of 3 - 6 GHz, which is the performance level required for FM spectroscopy based remote sensing. In this report we describe a high-level numerical model for an FM spectroscopy based remote sensing system, and application to two unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) scenarios. A Predator scenario operating at a slant range of 6.5 km with a 10 cm diameter telescope, and a Global Hawk scenario operating at a range of 30 km with a 20 cm diameter telescope, has been assumed to allow estimation of the performance of potential FM systems.

  19. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Aguiar, Jeffery A.

    2015-09-15

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to determine the chemistry and oxidation state of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 thin film battery electrodes in liquid cells for in situ scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). Using the L2,3 white line intensity ratio method we determine the oxidation state of Mn and Ti in a liquid electrolyte solvent and discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity.

  20. Detection of lateral composition modulation by magnetoexciton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.D.; Millunchick, J.M.; Follstaedt, D.; Lee, S.; Reno, J.; Twesten, R.D.; Zhang, Y.; Mascerenhas, A.

    1997-07-10

    An experimental signature for detecting spontaneous lateral composition modulation in a (InAs){sub n}/(GaAs){sub m} short period superlattice on an InP substrate based on magnetoexciton spectroscopy described. The authors find by aligning the magnetic field in three crystallographic directions, one parallel to and the other two perpendicular to the composition modulation direction, that the magnetoexciton shifts are anisotropic and are a good indicator for the presence of composition modulation.

  1. Nonlinearity sensing via photon-statistics excitation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, Marc; Bayer, Manfred

    2011-11-15

    We propose photon-statistics excitation spectroscopy as an adequate tool to describe the optical response of a nonlinear system. To this end we suggest to use optical excitation with varying photon statistics as another spectroscopic degree of freedom to gather information about the system in question. The responses of several simple model systems to excitation beams with different photon statistics are discussed. Possible spectroscopic applications in terms of identifying lasing operation are pointed out.

  2. Ramsey-type spectroscopy in the XUV spectral region

    SciTech Connect

    Pirri, A. [IFAC-CNR, Via Madonna del piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy, Via N. Carrara 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Sali, E.; Cavalieri, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy, Via N. Carrara 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Corsi, C. [European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy, Via N. Carrara 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bellini, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Ottica Applicata (CNR), Largo E. Fermi 6, I-50125 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy, Via N. Carrara 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Eramo, R. [European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy, Via N. Carrara 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFM-CRS-Soft Matter (CNR), Piazzale A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2010-02-02

    We report an experimental and theoretical investigation of Ramsey-type spectroscopy with high-order harmonic generation applied to autoionizing states of Krypton. The ionization yield, detected by an ion-mass spectrometer, shows the characteristic quantum interference pattern. The behaviour of the fringe contrast was interpreted on the basis of a simple analytic model, which reproduces the experimental data without any free parameter.

  3. Laser produced plasma diagnostics by cavity ringdown spectroscopy and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Milosevic, S.

    2012-05-25

    Laser-produced plasmas have many applications for which detailed characterization of the plume is requested. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy is a versatile absorption method which provides data on the plume and its surroundings, with spatial and temporal resolution. The measured absorption line shapes contain information about angular and velocity distributions within the plume. In various plasmas we have observed molecules or metastable atoms which were not present in the emission spectra.

  4. Quarkonium Spectroscopy and New States from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Vitale, L.; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2007-06-08

    We review results on charmonium and bottomonium spectroscopy by the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. More space is reserved to the new results like the observation of hadronic non-B{bar B} {Upsilon}(4S) decays and the investigation on the production and decay properties of the recently discovered charmonium-like states X(3872) and Y (4260). These results are preliminary, unless otherwise specified.

  5. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for specimen analysis

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Akshaya; Yu-Yueh, Fang; Burgess, Shane C.; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2006-08-15

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus, a system and a method for detecting the presence or absence of trace elements in a biological sample using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy. The trace elements are used to develop a signature profile which is analyzed directly or compared with the known profile of a standard. In one aspect of the invention, the apparatus, system and method are used to detect malignant cancer cells in vivo.

  6. New focusing multilayer structures for X-ray plasma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bibishkin, M S; Luchin, V I; Salashchenko, N N; Chernov, V V; Chkhalo, N I; Kazakov, E D; Shevelko, A P

    2008-02-28

    New focusing short-period multilayer structures are developed which opens up wide possibilities for X-ray and VUV spectroscopy. Multilayer structures are deposited on a flat surface of a mica crystal which is then bent to a small-radius cylinder. The use of this structure in a von Hamos spectrometer for X-ray laser plasma diagnostics is demonstrated. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  7. Theoretical Spectroscopy of Low Dimensional Systems | MIT-Harvard Center

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    for Excitonics Theoretical Spectroscopy of Low Dimensional Systems November 11, 2009 at 2pm/Pfizer Hall - Mb-23 Harvard University 12 Oxford Street Cambridge Angel Rubio Universidad del Pais Vasco UPV/EHU and Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU rubio abstract: There has been much progress in the synthesis and characterization of nanostructures however, there remain immense challenges in understanding their properties and interactions with external probes in order to realize their tremendous potential

  8. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  9. Bimolecular reaction dynamics from photoelectron spectroscopy of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradforth, S.E.

    1992-11-01

    The transition state region of a neutral bimolecular reaction may be experimentally investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy of an appropriate negative ion. The photoelectron spectrum provides information on the spectroscopy and dynamics of the short lived transition state and may be used to develop model potential energy surfaces that are semi-quantitative in this important region. The principles of bound {yields} bound negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy are illustrated by way of an example: a full analysis of the photoelectron bands of CN{sup {minus}}, NCO{sup {minus}} and NCS{sup {minus}}. Transition state photoelectron spectra are presented for the following systems Br + HI, Cl + HI, F + HI, F + CH{sub 3}0H,F + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH,F + OH and F + H{sub 2}. A time dependent framework for the simulation and interpretation of the bound {yields} free transition state photoelectron spectra is subsequently developed and applied to the hydrogen transfer reactions Br + HI, F + OH {yields} O({sup 3}P, {sup 1}D) + HF and F + H{sub 2}. The theoretical approach for the simulations is a fully quantum-mechanical wave packet propagation on a collinear model reaction potential surface. The connection between the wavepacket time evolution and the photoelectron spectrum is given by the time autocorrelation function. For the benchmark F + H{sub 2} system, comparisons with three-dimensional quantum calculations are made.

  10. Low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy: An atomic-resolution complement to optical spectroscopies and application to graphene

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Kapetanakis, Myron; Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P.; Lee, Jaekwang; Prange, Micah P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-09-25

    Photon-based spectroscopies have played a central role in exploring the electronic properties of crystalline solids and thin films. They are a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of nanostructures, but they are limited by lack of spatial resolution. On the other hand, electron-based spectroscopies, e.g., electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), are now capable of subangstrom spatial resolution. Core-loss EELS, a spatially resolved analog of x-ray absorption, has been used extensively in the study of inhomogeneous complex systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that low-loss EELS in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which probes low-energy excitations, combined with amore » theoretical framework for simulating and analyzing the spectra, is a powerful tool to probe low-energy electron excitations with atomic-scale resolution. The theoretical component of the method combines density functional theory–based calculations of the excitations with dynamical scattering theory for the electron beam. We apply the method to monolayer graphene in order to demonstrate that atomic-scale contrast is inherent in low-loss EELS even in a perfectly periodic structure. The method is a complement to optical spectroscopy as it probes transitions entailing momentum transfer. The theoretical analysis identifies the spatial and orbital origins of excitations, holding the promise of ultimately becoming a powerful probe of the structure and electronic properties of individual point and extended defects in both crystals and inhomogeneous complex nanostructures. The method can be extended to probe magnetic and vibrational properties with atomic resolution.« less

  11. Low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy: An atomic-resolution complement to optical spectroscopies and application to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Kapetanakis, Myron; Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P.; Lee, Jaekwang; Prange, Micah P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-09-25

    Photon-based spectroscopies have played a central role in exploring the electronic properties of crystalline solids and thin films. They are a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of nanostructures, but they are limited by lack of spatial resolution. On the other hand, electron-based spectroscopies, e.g., electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), are now capable of subangstrom spatial resolution. Core-loss EELS, a spatially resolved analog of x-ray absorption, has been used extensively in the study of inhomogeneous complex systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that low-loss EELS in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which probes low-energy excitations, combined with a theoretical framework for simulating and analyzing the spectra, is a powerful tool to probe low-energy electron excitations with atomic-scale resolution. The theoretical component of the method combines density functional theory–based calculations of the excitations with dynamical scattering theory for the electron beam. We apply the method to monolayer graphene in order to demonstrate that atomic-scale contrast is inherent in low-loss EELS even in a perfectly periodic structure. The method is a complement to optical spectroscopy as it probes transitions entailing momentum transfer. The theoretical analysis identifies the spatial and orbital origins of excitations, holding the promise of ultimately becoming a powerful probe of the structure and electronic properties of individual point and extended defects in both crystals and inhomogeneous complex nanostructures. The method can be extended to probe magnetic and vibrational properties with atomic resolution.

  12. Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Betts, J; Trugman, A; Mielke, C H; Mitchell, J N; Ramos, M; Stroe, I

    2009-01-01

    Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

  13. Molecular shock response of explosives: electronic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrne, Shawn D; Moore, David S; Whitley, Von H; Bolme, Cindy A; Eakins, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the question of the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference from the shock front as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation hypotheses and the need for time dependent absorption data (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  14. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Aguiar, Jeffery A.

    2015-09-15

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to determine the chemistry and oxidation state of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 thin film battery electrodes in liquid cells for in situ scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). Using the L2,3 white line intensity ratio method we determine the oxidation state of Mn and Ti in a liquid electrolyte solvent and discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity.

  15. Quantum process tomography by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Marcus, Andrew H.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-06-07

    Reconstruction of the dynamics (quantum process tomography) of the single-exciton manifold in energy transfer systems is proposed here on the basis of two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D-FS) with phase-modulation. The quantum-process-tomography protocol introduced here benefits from, e.g., the sensitivity enhancement ascribed to 2D-FS. Although the isotropically averaged spectroscopic signals depend on the quantum yield parameter Γ of the doubly excited-exciton manifold, it is shown that the reconstruction of the dynamics is insensitive to this parameter. Applications to foundational and applied problems, as well as further extensions, are discussed.

  16. Position-Sensitive Nuclear Spectroscopy with Pixel Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Granja, Carlos; Vykydal, Zdenek; Jakubek, Jan; Pospisil, Stanislav

    2007-10-26

    State-of-the-art hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors such as Medipix2 are suitable for energy- and position-sensitive nuclear spectroscopy. In addition to excellent energy- and spatial-resolution, these devices can operate in spectroscopic, single-quantum counting and/or on-line tracking mode. A devoted compact USB-readout interface provides functionality and ease of operation. The compact and versatile Medipix2/USB radiation camera provides visualization, vacuum and room-temperature operation as a real-time portable active nuclear emulsion.

  17. Application of Raman spectroscopy to high-temperature analytical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.P.; Dai, S.; Lee, Y.; Xizo, H.

    1997-01-01

    There are numerous analytical applications of scatter-emission and/or absorption spectroscopy applied to liquids and solids at 0 to 350 C. This paper describes an all-silica fiberoptic probe which is useful for spectral analyses from 0 to 1600 K and can be used in harsh chemical environments. The probe has been used for Raman spectral analyses of many molten salt and solid material systems to 1000 C. It has applications for such studies at higher temperature ranges. The instrumentation required along with the demonstrated and proposed applications of the all-silica probe are presented and discussed.

  18. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frédéric A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities. Two-dimensional

  19. The Meson Spectroscopy Program at the Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Filippi, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    The experimental techniques that will be applied by the next generation meson spectroscopy experiments at JLab are described. For the first time, these experiments will be able to exploit the features of a photon beam of unprecedented intensity and momentum resolution, that will allow to perform precision studies of meson states with masses below 3 GeV/c2. Photon induced reactions will enhance the production of spin-1 mesons, that are of particular interest according to the most recent Lattice QCD calculations of the lightest exotic hybrid meson.

  20. Holdup Measures on an SRNL Mossbauer Spectroscopy Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.; Brown, T.; Salaymeh, S.

    2010-05-05

    Gamma-ray holdup measurements of a Mossbauer spectroscopy instrument are described and modeled. In the qualitative acquisitions obtained in a low background area of Savannah River National Laboratory, only Am-241 and Np-237 activity were observed. The Am-241 was known to be the instrumental activation source, while the Np-237 is clearly observed as a source of contamination internal to the instrument. The two sources of activity are modeled separately in two acquisition configurations using two separate modeling tools. The results agree well, demonstrating a content of (1980 {+-} 150) {mu}Ci Am-241 and (110 {+-} 50) {mu}Ci of Np-237.

  1. Probing Battery Chemistry with Liquid Cell Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren L.

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate the ability to apply electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to follow the chemistry and oxidation states of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 battery electrodes within a battery solvent. The use and importance of in situ electrochemical cells coupled with a scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) has expanded and been applied to follow changes in battery chemistry during electrochemical cycling. Furthermore, we discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity and provide a framework to apply this important analytical method to future in situ electrochemical studies.

  2. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  3. Development of the SRS environmental counting laboratory gamma spectroscopy system

    SciTech Connect

    Filler, D.A.; Crandall, B.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), one of several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, produces nuclear materials for national defense and for other government and civilian uses. SRS ceased production of defense materials in 1988, and the site`s main activities now involve waste management and environmental restoration. These programs have generated extensive effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs for the Environmental Monitoring Section (EMS), which performs {approximately}105,000 radiological analyses on 30,000 samples a year. Gamma spectroscopy is performed on an estimated 10,000 samples annually. This report describes a program to develop and improve the EMS system.

  4. Developing a gamma spectroscopy system at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Filler, D.A.; Crandall, B.S.

    1996-11-01

    This article presents details of a program begun at the Savannah River Site in 1990 to develop and improve the EMS gamma Spectroscopy system and develop it into a univerom, integrated and easily upgradable platform of Ethernet-based hardware and software. The program included implementing seven automated sample changers, numberous stand-alone detectors, and user friendly software designed to provide automated batch operation of data acquisition, review, and management while supporting the average of more than 10,000 samples annually to monitor radioactive waste effluents and contamination.

  5. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of alcohols and protein solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Melikechi, N.; Ding, H.; Marcano, O. A.; Rock, S.

    2008-04-15

    We report on the use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the study of organic samples that exhibit similar elemental composition. We evaluate the method for its potential application for the measurement of small spectroscopic differences between samples such as alcohols and water solution of proteins. We measure differences in the relative amplitudes of the oxygen peaks for alcohols and find that these correlate with the relative amount of oxygen atoms within the molecule. We also show that the spectra of proteins reveal differences that can be used for their detection and identification.

  6. Time Domain Phonon Spectroscopy at LCLS | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Time Domain Phonon Spectroscopy at LCLS Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Tom Henighan, PULSE Program Description Fourier-transform inelastic x-ray scattering is a novel technique enabled by the high flux of the LCLS for measuring phonon dispersions and more in crystalline solids. Following a short optical pump, we observe phonon coherences throughout the Brillion zone via scattering of a non-resonant femtosecond x-ray probe. I

  7. Polarization Studies in Fast-Ion Beam Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2001-12-20

    In a historical review, the observations and the insight gained from polarization studies of fast ions interacting with solid targets are presented. These began with J. Macek's recognition of zero-field quantum beats in beam-foil spectroscopy as indicating alignment, and D.G. Ellis' density operator analysis that suggested the observability of orientation when using tilted foils. Lastly H. Winter's studies of the ion-beam surface interaction at grazing incidence yielded the means to produce a high degree of nuclear orientation in ion beams.

  8. Laser absorption spectroscopy system for vaporization process characterization and control

    SciTech Connect

    Galkowski, J.; Hagans, K.

    1993-09-07

    In support of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) Program, a laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (LAS) system has been developed. This multi-laser system is capable of simultaneously measuring the line densities of {sup 238}U ground and metastable states, {sup 235}U ground and metastable states, iron, and ions at up to nine locations within the separator vessel. Supporting enrichment experiments that last over one hundred hours, this laser spectroscopy system is employed to diagnose and optimize separator system performance, control the electron beam vaporizer and metal feed systems, and provide physics data for the validation of computer models. As a tool for spectroscopic research, vapor plume characterization, vapor deposition monitoring, and vaporizer development, LLNL`s LAS laboratory with its six argon-ion-pumped ring dye lasers and recently added Ti:Sapphire and external-cavity diode-lasers has capabilities far beyond the requirements of its primary mission.

  9. Focusing adaptive-optics for neutron spectroscopy at extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Simeoni, G. G.; Valicu, R. G.; Borchert, G.; Böni, P.; Rasmussen, N. G.; Yang, F.; Kordel, T.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Kargl, F.; Meyer, A.

    2015-12-14

    Neutron Spectroscopy employing extreme-conditions sample environments is nowadays a crucial tool for the understanding of fundamental scientific questions as well as for the investigation of materials and chemical-physical properties. For all these kinds of studies, an increased neutron flux over a small sample area is needed. The prototype of a focusing neutron guide component, developed and produced completely at the neutron source FRM II in Garching (Germany), has been installed at the time-of-flight (TOF) disc-chopper neutron spectrometer TOFTOF and came into routine-operation. The design is based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept for finite-size divergent sources. It represents a unique device combining the supermirror technology with Adaptive Optics, suitable for broad-bandwidth thermal-cold TOF neutron spectroscopy (here optimized for 1.4–10 Å). It is able to squeeze the beam cross section down to a square centimeter, with a more than doubled signal-to-background ratio, increased efficiency at high scattering angles, and improved symmetry of the elastic resolution function. We present a comparison between the simulated and measured beam cross sections, as well as the performance of the instrument within real experiments. This work intends to show the unprecedented opportunities achievable at already existing instruments, along with useful guidelines for the design and construction of next-generation neutron spectrometers.

  10. Structural dynamics in complex liquids studied with multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-08-31

    The development of new sustainable energy sources is linked to our understanding of the molecular properties of water and aqueous solutions. Energy conversion, storage, and transduction processes, particularly those that occur in biology, fuel cells, and batteries, make use of water for the purpose of moving energy in the form of charges and mediating the redox chemistry that allows this energy to be stored as and released from chemical bonds. To build our fundamental knowledge in this area, this project supports work in the Tokmakoff group to investigate the molecular dynamics of water’s hydrogen bond network, and how these dynamics influence its solutes and the mechanism of proton transport in water. To reach the goals of this grant, we developed experiments to observe molecular dynamics in water as directly as possible, using ultrafast multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy. We excite and probe broad vibrational resonances of water, molecular solutes, and protons in water. By correlating how molecules evolve from an initial excitation frequency to a final frequency, we can describe the underlying molecular dynamics. Theoretical modeling of the data with the help of computational spectroscopy coupled with molecular dynamics simulations provided the atomistic insight in these studies.

  11. THz time-domain spectroscopy for tokamak plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Causa, F.; Zerbini, M.; Buratti, P.; Gabellieri, L.; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.; Johnston, M.; Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.

    2014-08-21

    The technology is now becoming mature for diagnostics using large portions of the electromagnetic spectrum simultaneously, in the form of THz pulses. THz radiation-based techniques have become feasible for a variety of applications, e.g., spectroscopy, imaging for security, medicine and pharmaceutical industry. In particular, time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) is now being used also for plasma diagnostics in various fields of application. This technique is promising also for plasmas for fusion applications, where plasma characteristics are non-uniform and/or evolve during the discharge This is because THz pulses produced with femtosecond mode-locked lasers conveniently span the spectrum above and below the plasma frequency and, thus, can be used as very sensitive and versatile probes of widely varying plasma parameters. The short pulse duration permits time resolving plasma characteristics while the large frequency span permits a large dynamic range. The focus of this work is to present preliminary experimental and simulation results demonstrating that THz TDS can be realistically adapted as a versatile tokamak plasma diagnostic technique.

  12. Terahertz spectroscopy of two-dimensional subwavelength plasmonic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Abul K; Chen, Houtong; Taylor, Antoinette; O' Hara, John F; Han, Jiaguang; Lu, Xinchao; Zhang, Weili

    2009-01-01

    The fascinating properties of plasmonic structures have had significant impact on the development of next generation ultracompact photonic and optoelectronic components. We study two-dimensional plasmonic structures functioning at terahertz frequencies. Resonant terahertz response due to surface plasmons and dipole localized surface plasmons were investigated by the state-of-the-art terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) using both transmission and reflection configurations. Extraordinary terahertz transmission was demonstrated through the subwavelength metallic hole arrays made from good conducting metals as well as poor metals. Metallic arrays m!lde from Pb, generally a poor metal, and having optically thin thicknesses less than one-third of a skin depth also contributed in enhanced THz transmission. A direct transition of a surface plasmon resonance from a photonic crystal minimum was observed in a photo-doped semiconductor array. Electrical controls of the surface plasmon resonances by hybridization of the Schottkey diode between the metallic grating and the semiconductor substrate are investigated as a function of the applied reverse bias. In addition, we have demonstrated photo-induced creation and annihilation of surface plasmons with appropriate semiconductors at room temperature. According to the Fano model, the transmission properties are characterized by two essential contributions: resonant excitation of surface plasmons and nonresonant direct transmission. Such plasmonic structures may find fascinating applications in terahertz imaging, biomedical sensing, subwavelength terahertz spectroscopy, tunable filters, and integrated terahertz devices.

  13. Charge exchange spectroscopy as a fast ion diagnostic on TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Delabie, E.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Hellermann, M. G. von; Nielsen, S. K.; Marchuk, O.

    2008-10-15

    An upgraded charge exchange spectroscopy diagnostic has been taken into operation at the TEXTOR tokamak. The angles of the viewing lines with the toroidal magnetic field are close to the pitch angles at birth of fast ions injected by one of the neutral beam injectors. Using another neutral beam for active spectroscopy, injected counter the direction in which fast ions injected by the first beam are circulating, we can simultaneously measure a fast ion tail on the blue wing of the D{sub {alpha}} spectrum while the beam emission spectrum is Doppler shifted to the red wing. An analysis combining the two parts of the spectrum offers possibilities to improve the accuracy of the absolute (fast) ion density profiles. Fast beam modulation or passive viewing lines cannot be used for background subtraction on this diagnostic setup and therefore the background has to be modeled and fitted to the data together with a spectral model for the slowing down feature. The analysis of the fast ion D{sub {alpha}} spectrum obtained with the new diagnostic is discussed.

  14. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  15. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  16. SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Spectroscopy Techniques in Environmen...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Tourism & Dining SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Spectroscopy Techniques in Environmental and Materials Sciences: Theory and Application June 2-5, 2009 Group...

  17. X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Gd[superscript 3+]-loaded...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Gdsuperscript 3+-loaded ultra-short carbon nanotubes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-ray absorption ...

  18. Terahertz magneto-optical spectroscopy of a two-dimensional hole...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We then used terahertz magneto-optical spectroscopy to investigate the cyclotron resonance frequency in a high mobility 2DHG, revealing a nonlinear dependence on the applied ...

  19. Development of Time Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy in High Intensity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Development of Time Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy in High Intensity Laser-Plasma Interactions Authors: Notley, M ; Weber, R ; Fell, B ; Jefferies, J ; Freeman, R ; Mackinnon, ...

  20. Gas cell for in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    cell for in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of materials Previous ... Abstract: A simple gas cell design, constructed primarily from commercially available ...

  1. Characterization of the Electronic and Chemical Structure at the Thin Film Solar Cell Interfaces: June 2005 -- June 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Heske, C.

    2009-09-01

    Study using photoelectron spectroscopy, inverse photoemission, and X-ray absorption and emission to derive the electronic structure of interfaces in CIGSS and CdTe thin-film solar cells.

  2. Experimental Station 13-2 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2 BL13-2 has stations designed for surface and solid state experiments (SSE). The SSE station has an electron spectrometer (SES-R3000, VG-Scienta) for photoemission spectroscopy...

  3. Experimental Station 8-2 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    for controlling a temperature (4 - 350 K) and pressure (10-4 10-11 Torr) during XAS measurement. Status Open Supported Techniques Photoemission spectroscopy Soft x-ray...

  4. Uncertainty in terahertz time-domain spectroscopy measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Fischer, Bernd M.; Lin Hungyen; Abbott, Derek

    2008-06-15

    Measurements of optical constants at terahertz--or T-ray--frequencies have been performed extensively using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). Spectrometers, together with physical models explaining the interaction between a sample and T-ray radiation, are progressively being developed. Nevertheless, measurement errors in the optical constants, so far, have not been systematically analyzed. This situation calls for a comprehensive analysis of measurement uncertainty in THz-TDS systems. The sources of error existing in a terahertz spectrometer and throughout the parameter estimation process are identified. The analysis herein quantifies the impact of each source on the output optical constants. The resulting analytical model is evaluated against experimental THz-TDS data.

  5. Spectroscopy of {sup 193,195,197}Po

    SciTech Connect

    Fotiades, N.; Cizewski, J.A.; McNabb, D.P.; Ding, K.Y.; Davids, C.N.; Janssens, R.V.; Seweryniak, D.; Carpenter, M.P.; Amro, H.; Decrock, P.; Reiter, P.; Nisius, D.; Brown, L.T.; Fischer, S.; Lauritsen, T.; Wauters, J.; Bingham, C.R.; Huyse, M.; Andreyev, A.; Seweryniak, D.; Conticchio, L.F.; Brown, L.T.

    1997-08-01

    Excited states built on the 13/2{sup +} isomers of the odd-mass {sup 193,195,197}Po isotopes have been observed via in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The {alpha} radioactivity of these isotopes has been used to tag {gamma}-ray transitions following the {sup A}Er+164 MeV {sup 32}S reactions, where A=164, 166, 167, 168, and 170. Prompt {gamma} radiation was measured by ten Compton-suppressed Ge detectors at the target position and the Fragment Mass Analyzer was used to select evaporation residues. The results are compared with the first excited states of the heavier odd-mass polonium isotopes and of the even-mass cores. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Lineshape analysis of coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy using incoherent light

    SciTech Connect

    Ulness, Darin J.; Turner, Daniel B.

    2015-06-07

    Coherent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy using incoherent (noisy) light, I{sup (4)} 2D ES, holds intriguing challenges and opportunities. One challenge is to determine how I{sup (4)} 2D ES compares to femtosecond 2D ES. Here, we merge the sophisticated energy-gap Hamiltonian formalism that is often used to model femtosecond 2D ES with the factorized time-correlation formalism that is needed to describe I{sup (4)} 2D ES. The analysis reveals that in certain cases the energy-gap Hamiltonian is insufficient to model the spectroscopic technique correctly. The results using a modified energy-gap Hamiltonian show that I{sup (4)} 2D ES can reveal detailed lineshape information, but, contrary to prior reports, does not reveal dynamics during the waiting time.

  7. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy at Micromolar Concentrations without Optical Nanoconfinement

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, Ted A.; Ly, Sonny; Bourguet, Feliza; Fischer, Nicholas O.; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2014-08-14

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is an important technique for studying biochemical interactions dynamically that may be used in vitro and in cell-based studies. It is generally claimed that FCS may only be used at nM concentrations. We show that this general consensus is incorrect and that the limitation to nM concentrations is not fundamental but due to detector limits as well as laser fluctuations. With a high count rate detector system and applying laser fluctuation corrections, we demonstrate FCS measurements up to 38 μM with the same signal-to-noise as at lower concentrations. Optical nanoconfinement approaches previously used to increase the concentration range of FCS are not necessary, and further increases above 38 μM may be expected using detectors and detector arrays with higher saturation rates and better laser fluctuation corrections. This approach greatly widens the possibilities of dynamic measurements of biochemical interactions using FCS at physiological concentrations.

  8. Hypernuclear Spectroscopy using the (e,e'K+) Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Lulin; Sarsour, Murad; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Zhu, Zhengmao; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Androic, Darko; Angelescu, Tatiana; Asaturyan, Razmik; Avery, Steven; Baker, O.; Bertovic, I.; Breuer, Herbert; Carlini, Roger; Cha, Jinseok; Chrien, Robert; Christy, Michael; Cole, Leon; Danagoulian, Samuel; Dehnhard, Dietrich; Elaasar, Mostafa; Empl, A.; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Fujii, Yu; Furic, Miroslav; Gan, Liping; Garrow, Kenneth; Gasparian, Ashot; Gueye, Paul; Harvey, Mark; Hashimoto, Osamu; Hinton, Wendy; Hu, Bitao; Hungerford, Ed; Jackson, Caesar; Johnston, Kathleen; Juengst, Henry; Keppel, Cynthia; Lan, Kejian; Liang, Yongguang; LIKHACHEV, V.; Likhachev, V.; Liu, Jinghua; Mack, David; Margaryan, Amur; Markowitz, Pete; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Nakamura, Satoshi; Petkovic, Tomislav; Reinhold, Joerg; Roche, Julie; Sato, Yoshinori; Sawafta, Reyad; Simicevic, Neven; Smith, G.; Stepanyan, Samuel; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tanida, K.; Tang, Liguang; Ukai, Mifuyu; Uzzle, Alicia; Vulcan, William; Wells, Steven; Wood, Stephen; Xu, Guanghua; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi

    2006-04-01

    A pioneering experiment in Lambda hypernuclear spectroscopy, undertaken at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jlab), was recently reported. The experiment used the high- precision, continuous electron beam at Jlab, and a special arrangement of spectrometer magnets to measure the spectrum from {nat}C and 7Li targets using the (e,e' K+)reaction. The 12B hypernuclear spectrum was previously published. This experiment is now reported in more detail, with improved results for the 12B hypernuclear spectrum. In addition, unpublished results of the 7He hypernuclear spectrum are also shown. This later spectrum indicates the need for a more detailed few-body calculation of the hypernucleus and the reaction process. The success of this experiment demonstrates that the (e,e'K+) reaction can be effectively used as a high resolution tool to study hypernuclear spectra, ant its use should be vigorously pursued.

  9. Stochastic Liouville equations for femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Ando, Hideo; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-01-14

    Electron and vibrational dynamics of molecules are commonly studied by subjecting them to two interactions with a fast actinic pulse that prepares them in a nonstationary state and after a variable delay period T, probing them with a Raman process induced by a combination of a broadband and a narrowband pulse. This technique, known as femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS), can effectively probe time resolved vibrational resonances. We show how FSRS signals can be modeled and interpreted using the stochastic Liouville equations (SLE), originally developed for NMR lineshapes. The SLE provide a convenient simulation protocol that can describe complex dynamics caused by coupling to collective bath coordinates at much lower cost than a full dynamical simulation. The origin of the dispersive features that appear when there is no separation of timescales between vibrational variations and the dephasing time is clarified.

  10. High-pressure Raman spectroscopy of phase change materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin Mao, Wendy L.; Zalden, Peter; Wuttig, Matthias; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2013-11-04

    We used high-pressure Raman spectroscopy to study the evolution of vibrational frequencies of the phase change materials (PCMs) Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, GeSb{sub 2}Te{sub 4}, and SnSb{sub 2}Te{sub 4}. We found that the critical pressure for triggering amorphization in the PCMs decreases with increasing vacancy concentration, demonstrating that the presence of vacancies, rather than differences in the atomic covalent radii, is crucial for pressure-induced amorphization in PCMs. Compared to the as-deposited amorphous phase, the pressure-induced amorphous phase has a similar vibrational spectrum but requires much lower laser power to transform into the crystalline phase, suggesting different kinetics of crystallization, which may have implications for applications of PCMs in non-volatile data storage.

  11. Apparatus, system, and method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Effenberger, Jr., Andrew J; Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R

    2014-11-18

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an apparatus includes a pulsed laser configured to generate a pulsed laser signal toward a sample, a constructive interference object and an optical element, each located in a path of light from the sample. The constructive interference object is configured to generate constructive interference patterns of the light. The optical element is configured to disperse the light. A LIBS system includes a first and a second optical element, and a data acquisition module. The data acquisition module is configured to determine an isotope measurement based, at least in part, on light received by an image sensor from the first and second optical elements. A method for performing LIBS includes generating a pulsed laser on a sample to generate light from a plasma, generating constructive interference patterns of the light, and dispersing the light into a plurality of wavelengths.

  12. Reactor cell assembly for use in spectroscopy and microscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grindstaff, Quirinus; Stowe, Ashley Clinton; Smyrl, Norm; Powell, Louis; McLane, Sam

    2015-08-04

    The present disclosure provides a reactor cell assembly that utilizes a novel design and that is wholly or partially manufactured from Aluminum, such that reactions involving Hydrogen, for example, including solid-gas reactions and thermal decomposition reactions, are not affected by any degree of Hydrogen outgassing. This reactor cell assembly can be utilized in a wide range of optical and laser spectroscopy applications, as well as optical microscopy applications, including high-temperature and high-pressure applications. The result is that the elucidation of the role of Hydrogen in the reactions studied can be achieved. Various window assemblies can be utilized, such that high temperatures and high pressures can be accommodated and the signals obtained can be optimized.

  13. Reaction mechanism studies of unsaturated molecules using photofragment translational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Longfellow, C.A. |

    1996-05-01

    A number of molecules have been studied using the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy. In Chapter One a brief introduction to the experimental technique is given. In Chapter Two the infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) of acetic acid is discussed. Carbon dioxide and methane were observed for the first time as products from dissociation under collisionless conditions. Chapter Three relates an IRMPD experiment of hexafluoropropene. The predominant channel produces CFCF{sub 3} or C{sub 2}F{sub 4} and CF{sub 2}, with the heavier species undergoing further dissociation to two CF{sub 2} fragments. In Chapter Four the ultraviolet (UV) dissociation of hexafluoropropene is investigated. Chapter Five explores the IRMPD of octafluoro-1-butene and octafluoro-2-butene.

  14. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at GANIL

    SciTech Connect

    France, G. de

    2014-11-11

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is intensively used at GANIL to measure low lying states in exotic nuclei on the neutron-rich as well as on the neutron-deficient side of the nuclear chart. On the neutron deficient border, gamma-rays have been observed for the first time in {sup 92}Pd. The level scheme which could be established points to the role of isoscalar pairing. On the neutron rich side, the lifetime of excited states in nuclei around {sup 68}Ni have been been measured using the plunger technique. This allows us to study the evolution of collectivity in a broad range of nuclei. In 2014 GANIL will host the AGATA array for a campaign of at least 2 years. This array is based on the gamma-ray tracking technique, which allows an impressive gain in resolving power.

  15. Meson Spectroscopy at JLab@12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Celentano, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    Meson, being the simplest hadronic bound system, is the ideal "laboratory" to study the interaction between quarks, to understand the role of the gluons inside hadrons and to investigate the origin of color confinement. To perform such studies it is important to measure the meson spectrum, with precise determination of resonance masses and properties, looking for rare qbar q states and for unconventional mesons with exotic quantum numbers (i.e. mesons with quantum numbers that are not compatible with a qbar q structure). With the imminent advent of the 12 GeV upgrade of Jefferson Lab a new generation of meson spectroscopy experiments will start: "Meson-Ex" in Hall B and "GLUEX" in Hall D. Both will use photo-production to explore the spectrum of mesons in the light-quark sector, in the energy range of few GeVs.

  16. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    DeJarnette, Drew; Roper, D. Keith

    2014-08-07

    Plasmon excitation decay by absorption, scattering, and hot electron transfer has been distinguished from effects induced by incident photons for gold nanoparticles on graphene monolayer using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Gold nano-ellipses were evaporated onto lithographed graphene, which was transferred onto a silicon nitride transmission electron microscopy grid. Plasmon decay from lithographed nanoparticles measured with EELS was compared in the absence and presence of the graphene monolayer. Measured decay values compared favorably with estimated radiative and non-radiative contributions to decay in the absence of graphene. Graphene significantly enhanced low-energy plasmon decay, increasing mode width 38%, but did not affect higher energy plasmon or dark mode decay. This decay beyond expected radiative and non-radiative mechanisms was attributed to hot electron transfer, and had quantum efficiency of 20%, consistent with previous reports.

  17. New results in charm meson spectroscopy from FOCUS and SELEX

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Peter S.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    I will review recent results in charmed meson spectroscopy from the Fermilab fixed target charm photo-production and hadro-production experiments, FOCUS and SELEX. FOCUS reports new measurements of the masses and widths of the D*{sub 2}{sup +} and D*{sub 2} mesons, evidence for D*{sub 0}{sup +} and D*{sub 0} broad states and a confirming observation of the D{sub sJ}{sup +}(2317) and other recently observed high mass D{sub sJ}{sup +} states. SELEX has recently reported evidence for a new D{sub sJ}{sup +}(2632) state in both the D{sub s}{sup +} {eta}{sup 0} and D{sup 0}K{sup +} final states.

  18. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet

    2014-02-18

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing.

  19. Femtosecond upconverted photocurrent spectroscopy of InAs quantum nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Tex, David M.; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko; Kamiya, Itaru

    2015-07-06

    The carrier upconversion dynamics in InAs quantum nanostructures are studied for intermediate-band solar-cell applications via ultrafast photoluminescence and photocurrent (PC) spectroscopy based on femtosecond excitation correlation (FEC) techniques. Strong upconverted PC-FEC signals are observed under resonant excitation of quantum well islands (QWIs), which are a few monolayer-thick InAs quantum nanostructures. The PC-FEC signal typically decays within a few hundred picoseconds at room temperature, which corresponds to the carrier lifetime in QWIs. The photoexcited electron and hole lifetimes in InAs QWIs are evaluated as functions of temperature and laser fluence. Our results provide solid evidence for electron–hole–hole Auger process, dominating the carrier upconversion in InAs QWIs at room temperature.

  20. Direct speciation of metal and metalloid ions by optical spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Tait, C.D.; Janecky, D.R.; Clark, D.L.; Ekberg, S.A.; Dixon, P.R.; Musgrave, J.A. ); Bennett, P.C. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1991-01-01

    Molecular level spectroscopic investigations of organic/inorganic interactions provide important new information on sedimentary geochemistry through the identification of interactions over moderate temperature and pH ranges. Although the official title of this project indicates the use of only optical spectroscopies, a combination of Uv/Vis/IR absorption, Raman scattering, and {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are actually employed. A major advantage of integrating spectroscopic results with diagenesis studies is the ability to directly examine the mechanisms of interactions, even in complex matrices and with competing processes. Furthermore, we are extending these techniques to probe fluid inclusions with micro Raman and luminescence techniques to directly compare laboratory results with natural reservoir systems. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Selected problems of baryon spectroscopy: Chiral soliton versus quark models

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, V. B.

    2009-05-15

    The inconsistency between the rigid rotator and bound state models at an arbitrary number of colors, the rigid rotator-soft rotator dilemma, and some other problems of baryon spectroscopy are discussed in the framework of the chiral soliton approach (CSA). Consequences of the comparison of CSA results with simple quark models are considered and the 1/N{sub c} expansion for the effective strange antiquark mass is presented, as it follows from the CSA. Strong dependence of the effective strange antiquark mass on the SU(3) multiplet is required to fit the CSA predictions. The difference between 'good' and 'bad' diquark masses, which is about 100 MeV, is in reasonable agreement with other estimates. Multibaryons (hypernuclei) with strangeness are described and some states of interest are also predicted within the CSA.

  2. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  3. Single-chip detector for electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yalcin, T.; Boero, G.

    2008-09-15

    We have realized an innovative integrated detector for electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The microsystem, consisting of an LC oscillator, a mixer, and a frequency division module, is integrated onto a single silicon chip using a conventional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology. The implemented detection method is based on the measurement of the variation of the frequency of the integrated LC oscillator as a function of the applied static magnetic field, caused by the presence of a resonating sample placed over the inductor of the LC-tank circuit. The achieved room temperature spin sensitivity is about 10{sup 10} spins/GHz{sup 1/2} with a sensitive volume of about (100 {mu}m){sup 3}.

  4. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Kinetics of Free Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, Robert F; Glass, Graham

    2004-11-01

    This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of the chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. Work on the reaction of OH with acetaldehyde has been completed and published and work on the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} has been completed and submitted for publication. In the course of our investigation of branching ratios of the reactions of O({sup 1}D) with acetaldehyde and methane, we discovered that hot atom chemistry effects are not negligible at the gas pressures (13 Torr) initially used. Branching ratios of the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} have been measured at a tenfold higher He flow and fivefold higher pressure.

  5. Photoelectron spectrometer for attosecond spectroscopy of liquids and gases

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, I.; Huppert, M.; Wörner, H. J.; Brown, M. A.; Bokhoven, J. A. van

    2015-12-15

    A new apparatus for attosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids and gases is described. It combines a liquid microjet source with a magnetic-bottle photoelectron spectrometer and an actively stabilized attosecond beamline. The photoelectron spectrometer permits venting and pumping of the interaction chamber without affecting the low pressure in the flight tube. This pressure separation has been realized through a sliding skimmer plate, which effectively seals the flight tube in its closed position and functions as a differential pumping stage in its open position. A high-harmonic photon spectrometer, attached to the photoelectron spectrometer, exit port is used to acquire photon spectra for calibration purposes. Attosecond pulse trains have been used to record photoelectron spectra of noble gases, water in the gas and liquid states as well as solvated species. RABBIT scans demonstrate the attosecond resolution of this setup.

  6. Auger spectroscopy and electronically-stimulated surface processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jennison, D.R.; Burns, A.R.; Stechel, E.B.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic excitations in adsorbate layers stimulate desorption and dissociation of adsorbed molecules as well as chemical reactions between adsorbates. The highest-probability stimulated processes produce neutral desorbates and determine how surface composition is altered by electron or photon radiation. A basic understanding has emerged, due largely to laser resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) experiments, which provide quantum-state resolution of the gas-phase products. Auger phenomena enter this understanding in several ways. For example, CVV Auger spectroscopy determines the screened hole-hole interaction, U, in adsorbates, which in turn provides insight into the degree of charge-transfer screening from the substrate. In those systems where screening charge is used in excitation Auger decay, screening directly determines the lifetime, which in turn can exponentially affect the yield. Reductions in screening, e.g. induced by coadsorption of electro-negative species, thus can result in giant yield enhancements. As separate issues, a finite U may prevent the fast resonant decay and thus increase the yield from two-hole excitations, as has been suggested for NO{sub 2} dissociation on Pt (111), or may assist in the localization (self-trapping) of two-hole excitations in dense adsorbate layers, as apparently is the case for NO desorption from the same surface. The latter causes the yields from one- and two-hole excitations to differ in their coverage dependence. Finally, CVV Auger spectroscopy, of course, measures the energies of two-hole excitations, which can be correlated with observed stimulated thresholds. 27 refs., 15 figs.

  7. Experimental Study of Hypernuclei Electroproduction by High Precision Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tomislav Seva

    2009-12-01

    Jlab experiment E01-011, carried out in 2005 in JLab Hall C, is the second generation of the hypernuclear spectroscopy experiments by the (e,e{prime}K{sup +}) reaction. The (e,e{prime}K{sup +}) reaction is complimentary to the associated production reactions (K{sup -},{pi}{sup -}), ({pi}{sup +},K{sup +}) since, due to a larger momentum transfer to a hyperon, excitations of both spin-non-flip and spin-flip states are possible. The experiment uses high quality and continuous primary electron beam to produce neutron rich hypernuclei on various targets by the electroproduction. The experimental setup consists of splitter magnet, high resolution kaon spectrometer (HKS) and electron spectrometer (Enge) implemented in new configuration, the so called 'Tilt Method'. Production data was taken on multiple targets: CH{sub 2}, {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Li, {sup 9}Be, {sup 10}B, {sup 12}C and {sup 28}Si. In present study the analysis of CH{sub 2}, {sup 12}C and {sup 28}Si is presented. The elementary processes of p(e,e{prime}K{sup +}){Lambda}/{Sigma} from CH{sup 2} data were used for calibration of the spectrometer optics and kinematics. The hypernuclear spectra of {sup 12}{sub {Lambda}}B was obtained with ground state resolution of 0.47 {+-} 0.07 MeV (FWHM), the best ever achieved. Feasibility of the electroproduction reaction to study medium to heavy targets has been proven with the first high resolution beyond p-shell hypernuclear spectra from {sup 28}{sub {Lambda}}Al hypernuclei. The obtained results of the E01-011 experiment confirmed that hypernuclear spectroscopy by the (e,e{prime}K{sup +}) reaction is a very useful technique.

  8. Crystallographic, electronic, thermal, and magnetic properties of single-crystal SrCo2As2

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Abhishek; Quirinale, D. G.; Jayasekara, W.; Sapkota, A.; Kim, M. G.; Dhaka, R. S.; Lee, Y.; Heitmann, T. W.; Stephens, P. W.; Ogloblichev, V.; Kreyssig, A.; McQueeney, R. J.; Goldman, A. I.; Kaminski, Adam; Harmon, B. N.; Furukawa, Y.; Johnston, D. C.

    2013-07-01

    In tetragonal SrCo2As2 single crystals, inelastic neutron scattering measurements demonstrated that strong stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) correlations occur at a temperature T = 5 K [W. Jayasekara et al., arXiv:1306.5174] that are the same as in the isostructural AFe2As2 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba) parent compounds of high-Tc superconductors. This surprising discovery suggests that SrCo2As2 may also be a good parent compound for high-Tc superconductivity. Here, structural and thermal expansion, electrical resistivity ρ, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), heat capacity Cp, magnetic susceptibility χ, 75As NMR and neutron diffraction measurements of SrCo2As2 crystals are reported together with LDA band structure calculations that shed further light on this fascinating material. The c-axis thermal expansion coefficient αc is negative from 7 to 300 K, whereas αa is positive over this T range. The ρ(T) shows metallic character. The ARPES measurements and band theory confirm the metallic character and in addition show the presence of a flat band near the Fermi energy EF. The band calculations exhibit an extremely sharp peak in the density of states D(EF) arising from a flat dx2-y2 band. A comparison of the Sommerfeld coefficient of the electronic specific heat with χ(T → 0) suggests the presence of strong ferromagnetic itinerant spin correlations which on the basis of the Stoner criterion predicts that SrCo2As2 should be an itinerant ferromagnet, in conflict with the magnetization data. The χ(T) does have a large magnitude, but also exhibits a broad maximum at 115 K suggestive of dynamic short-range AFM spin correlations, in agreement with the neutron scattering data. The measurements show no evidence for any type of phase

  9. Crystallographic, electronic, thermal, and magnetic properties of single-crystal SrCo2As2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Pandey, Abhishek; Quirinale, D. G.; Jayasekara, W.; Sapkota, A.; Kim, M. G.; Dhaka, R. S.; Lee, Y.; Heitmann, T. W.; Stephens, P. W.; Ogloblichev, V.; et al

    2013-07-01

    In tetragonal SrCo2As2 single crystals, inelastic neutron scattering measurements demonstrated that strong stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) correlations occur at a temperature T = 5 K [W. Jayasekara et al., arXiv:1306.5174] that are the same as in the isostructural AFe2As2 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba) parent compounds of high-Tc superconductors. This surprising discovery suggests that SrCo2As2 may also be a good parent compound for high-Tc superconductivity. Here, structural and thermal expansion, electrical resistivity ρ, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), heat capacity Cp, magnetic susceptibility χ, 75As NMR and neutron diffraction measurements of SrCo2As2 crystals are reported together with LDA band structure calculations thatmore » shed further light on this fascinating material. The c-axis thermal expansion coefficient αc is negative from 7 to 300 K, whereas αa is positive over this T range. The ρ(T) shows metallic character. The ARPES measurements and band theory confirm the metallic character and in addition show the presence of a flat band near the Fermi energy EF. The band calculations exhibit an extremely sharp peak in the density of states D(EF) arising from a flat dx2-y2 band. A comparison of the Sommerfeld coefficient of the electronic specific heat with χ(T → 0) suggests the presence of strong ferromagnetic itinerant spin correlations which on the basis of the Stoner criterion predicts that SrCo2As2 should be an itinerant ferromagnet, in conflict with the magnetization data. The χ(T) does have a large magnitude, but also exhibits a broad maximum at 115 K suggestive of dynamic short-range AFM spin correlations, in agreement with the neutron scattering data. The measurements show no evidence for any type of phase transition between 1.3 and 300 K and we propose that metallic SrCo2As2 has a gapless quantum spin-liquid ground state.« less

  10. Strontium Iodide Instrument Development for Gamma Spectroscopy and Radioisotope Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, P; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Swanberg, E.; Nelson, K.; Thelin, P; Fisher, S E; Hunter, Steve; Wihl, B; Shah, Kanai; Hawrami, Rastgo; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn A; Momayezi, M; Stevens, K; Randles, M H; Solodovnikov, D

    2014-01-01

    Development of the Europium-doped Strontium Iodide scintillator, SrI2(Eu), has progressed significantly in recent years. SrI2(Eu) has excellent material properties for gamma ray spectroscopy: high light yield (>80,000 ph/MeV), excellent light yield proportionality, and high effective atomic number (Z=49) for high photoelectric cross-section. High quality 1.5 and 2 diameter boules are now available due to rapid advances in SrI2(Eu) crystal growth. In these large SrI2(Eu) crystals, optical self-absorption by Eu2+ degrades the energy resolution as measured by analog electronics, but we mitigate this effect through on-the-fly correction of the scintillation pulses by digital readout electronics. Using this digital correction technique we have demonstrated energy resolution of 2.9% FWHM at 662 keV for a 4 in3 SrI2(Eu) crystal, over 2.6 inches long. Based on this digital readout technology, we have developed a detector prototype with greatly improved radioisotope identification capability compared to Sodium Iodide, NaI(Tl). The higher resolution of SrI2(Eu) yields a factor of 2 to 5 improvement in radioisotope identification (RIID) error rate compared to NaI(Tl).

  11. Characterization of uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) with Raman spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Wellons, Matthew S.

    2016-03-22

    The Raman spectrum of uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) is unambiguously characterized with multiple Raman excitation laser sources for the first time. Across different laser excitation wavelengths, UF4 demonstrates 16 distinct Raman bands within the 50-400 cm-1 region. The observed Raman bands are representative of various F-F vibrational modes. UF4 also shows intense fluorescent bands in the 325 – 750 nm spectral region. Comparison of the UF4 spectrum with the ZrF4 spectrum, its crystalline analog, demonstrates a similar Raman band structure consistent with group theory predictions for expected Raman bands. Additionally, a demonstration of combined scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and in situmore » Raman spectroscopy microanalytical measurements of UF4 particulates shows that despite the inherent weak intensity of Raman bands, identification and characterization are possible for micron-sized particulates with modern instrumentation. The published well characterized UF4 spectrum is extremely relevant to nuclear materials and nuclear safeguard applications.« less

  12. Dynamic force spectroscopy of parallel individual mucin1-antibody bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Sulchek, T A; Friddle, R W; Langry, K; Lau, E; Albrecht, H; Ratto, T; DeNardo, S; Colvin, M E; Noy, A

    2005-05-02

    We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure the binding forces between Mucin1 (MUC1) peptide and a single chain antibody fragment (scFv) selected from a scFv library screened against MUC1. This binding interaction is central to the design of the molecules for targeted delivery of radioimmunotherapeutic agents for prostate and breast cancer treatment. Our experiments separated the specific binding interaction from non-specific interactions by tethering the antibody and MUC1 molecules to the AFM tip and sample surface with flexible polymer spacers. Rupture force magnitude and elastic characteristics of the spacers allowed identification of the bond rupture events corresponding to different number of interacting proteins. We used dynamic force spectroscopy to estimate the intermolecular potential widths and equivalent thermodynamic off rates for mono-, bi-, and tri-valent interactions. Measured interaction potential parameters agree with the results of molecular docking simulation. Our results demonstrate that an increase of the interaction valency leads to a precipitous decline in the dissociation rate. Binding forces measured for mono and multivalent interactions match the predictions of a Markovian model for the strength of multiple uncorrelated bonds in parallel configuration. Our approach is promising for comparison of the specific effects of molecular modifications as well as for determination of the best configuration of antibody-based multivalent targeting agents.

  13. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Hunt, Alan W.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Mozin, Vladimir V.

    2012-04-01

    High-energy, beta-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy is investigated as a non-destructive assay technique for the determination of plutonium mass in spent nuclear fuel. This approach exploits the unique isotope-specific signatures contained in the delayed gamma-ray emission spectra detected following active interrogation with an external neutron source. A high fidelity modeling approach is described that couples radiation transport, analytical decay/depletion, and a newly developed gamma-ray emission source reconstruction code. Initially simulated and analyzed was a “one-pass” delayed gamma-ray assay that focused on the long-lived signatures. Also presented are the results of an independent study that investigated “pulsed mode” measurements, to capture the more isotope-specific, short-lived signatures. Initial modeling results outlined in this paper suggest that delayed gamma-ray assay of spent nuclear fuel assemblies can be accomplished with a neutron generator of sufficient strength and currently available gamma-ray detectors.

  14. Local spectroscopy of a kondo impurity: Co on Au(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavan, V.; Chen, W.; Jamneala, T.; Crommie, M.F.; Wingreen, N.S.

    2001-07-15

    We present a detailed study of the local electronic properties of the Kondo system formed from cobalt adatoms deposited onto Au(111) at a temperature of 6.6 K. Cryogenic scanning-tunneling spectroscopy was used to observe impurity-induced resonances at the Fermi energy and at the Au(111) surface-state band edge. The line shape of the Fermi-energy resonance, identified as a Kondo resonance, is observed to vary with lateral position from the impurity center and with impurity binding position on the reconstructed Au(111) surface. Little vertical dependence is seen in the resonance line shape for positions above the center of the impurity. Interaction effects between Kondo impurities are observed to remain small as cobalt coverage is increased up to 1 ML on the gold surface. The Kondo resonance is shown theoretically to be a member of a general class of Fano resonances arising from the interaction of a discrete impurity state with a conduction-electron continuum. The asymmetric line shape of the resonance thus reflects quantum interference between the d orbital and continuum conduction electron channels, as well as their coupling to the STM tip.

  15. Optical heterodyne detection for cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, Marc D.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Zare, Richard N.

    2000-07-25

    A cavity ring-down system for performing cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) using optical heterodyne detection of a ring-down wave E.sub.RD during a ring-down phase or a ring-up wave E.sub.RU during a ring up phase. The system sends a local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and a signal wave E.sub.SIGNAL to the cavity, preferably a ring resonator, and derives an interference signal from the combined local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD (or ring-up wave E.sub.RU). The local oscillator wave E.sub.LO has a first polarization and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD has a second polarization different from the first polarization. The system has a combining arrangement for combining or overlapping local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD at a photodetector, which receives the interference signal and generates a heterodyne current I.sub.H therefrom. Frequency and phase differences between the waves are adjustable.

  16. Computational expressions for signals in frequency-modulation spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Di Rosa, Michael D.; Reiten, M. T.

    2015-05-25

    In this study, general expressions for the signals in frequency-modulation spectroscopy (FMS) appear in the literature but are often reduced to simple analytical equations following the assumption of a weak modulation index. This is little help to the experimentalist who wants to predict signals for modulation depths of the order of unity or greater, where strong FMS signals reside. Here, we develop general formulas for FMS signals in the case of an absorber with a Voigt line shape and then link these expressions to an example and existing numerical code for the line shape. The resulting computational recipe is easymore » to implement and exercised here to show where the larger FMS signals are found over the coordinates of modulation index and modulation frequency. One can also estimate from provided curves the in-phase FMS signal over a wide range of modulation parameters at either the Lorentzian-broadening or Doppler-broadening limit, or anywhere in between by interpolation.« less

  17. Characterization of uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) with Raman spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Wellons, Matthew S.

    2016-03-22

    The Raman spectrum of uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) is unambiguously characterized with multiple Raman excitation laser sources for the first time. Across different laser excitation wavelengths, UF4 demonstrates 16 distinct Raman bands within the 50-400 cm-1 region. The observed Raman bands are representative of various F-F vibrational modes. UF4 also shows intense fluorescent bands in the 325 – 750 nm spectral region. Comparison of the UF4 spectrum with the ZrF4 spectrum, its crystalline analog, demonstrates a similar Raman band structure consistent with group theory predictions for expected Raman bands. Additionally, a demonstration of combined scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and in situmore » Raman spectroscopy microanalytical measurements of UF4 particulates shows that despite the inherent weak intensity of Raman bands, identification and characterization are possible for micron-sized particulates with modern instrumentation. The published well characterized UF4 spectrum is extremely relevant to nuclear materials and nuclear safeguard applications.« less

  18. Multiplicative or t1 Noise in NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Granwehr, Josef

    2005-01-25

    The signal in an NMR experiment is highly sensitive to fluctuations of the environment of the sample. If, for example, the static magnetic field B{sub 0}, the amplitude and phase of radio frequency (rf) pulses, or the resonant frequency of the detection circuit are not perfectly stable and reproducible, the magnetic moment of the spins is altered and becomes a noisy quantity itself. This kind of noise not only depends on the presence of a signal, it is in fact proportional to it. Since all the spins at a particular location in a sample experience the same environment at any given time, this noise primarily affects the reproducibility of an experiment, which is mainly of importance in the indirect dimensions of a multidimensional experiment, when intense lines are suppressed with a phase cycle, or for difference spectroscopy techniques. Equivalently, experiments which are known to be problematic with regard to their reproducibility, like flow experiments or experiments with a mobile target, tend to be affected stronger by multiplicative noise. In this article it is demonstrated how multiplicative noise can be identified and characterized using very simple, repetitive experiments. An error estimation approach is developed to give an intuitive, yet quantitative understanding of its properties. The consequences for multidimensional NMR experiments are outlined, implications for data analysis are shown, and strategies for the optimization of experiments are summarized.

  19. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy signatures of the glass transition

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Lewis, K. L. .M.; Myers, J. A.; Fuller, F.; Tekavec, P. F.; Ogilvie, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy is a sensitive probe of solvation dynamics. Using a pump–probe geometry with a pulse shaper [ Optics Express 15 (2007), 16681-16689; Optics Express 16 (2008), 17420-17428], we present temperature dependent 2D spectra of laser dyes dissolved in glass-forming solvents. At low waiting times, the system has not yet relaxed, resulting in a spectrum that is elongated along the diagonal. At longer times, the system loses its memory of the initial excitation frequency, and the 2D spectrum rounds out. As the temperature is lowered, the time scale of this relaxation grows, and the elongation persists for longermore » waiting times. This can be measured in the ratio of the diagonal width to the anti-diagonal width; the behavior of this ratio is representative of the frequency–frequency correlation function [ Optics Letters 31 (2006), 3354–3356]. Near the glass transition temperature, the relaxation behavior changes. Understanding this change is important for interpreting temperature-dependent dynamics of biological systems.« less

  20. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in industrial and security applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Yoo, Jong H.; Liu Chunyi; Plumer, John R.; Russo, Richard E.

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers rapid, localized chemical analysis of solid or liquid materials with high spatial resolution in lateral and depth profiling, without the need for sample preparation. Principal component analysis and partial least squares algorithms were applied to identify a variety of complex organic and inorganic samples. This work illustrates how LIBS analyzers can answer a multitude of real-world needs for rapid analysis, such as determination of lead in paint and children's toys, analysis of electronic and solder materials, quality control of fiberglass panels, discrimination of coffee beans from different vendors, and identification of generic versus brand-name drugs. Lateral and depth profiling was performed on children's toys and paint layers. Traditional one-element calibration or multivariate chemometric procedures were applied for elemental quantification, from single laser shot determination of metal traces at {approx}10 {mu}g/g to determination of halogens at 90 {mu}g/g using 50-shot spectral accumulation. The effectiveness of LIBS for security applications was demonstrated in the field by testing the 50-m standoff LIBS rasterizing detector.

  1. Photoelectron spectroscopy of wet and gaseous samples through graphene membranes

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Kraus, Jürgen; Reichelt, Robert; Günther, Sebastian; Gregoratti, Luca; Amati, Matteo; Kiskinova, Maya; Yulaev, Alexander; Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Kolmakov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and microscopy are highly important for exploring morphologically and chemically complex liquid–gas, solid–liquid and solid–gas interfaces under realistic conditions, but the very small electron mean free path inside dense media imposes serious experimental challenges. Currently, near ambient pressure PES is conducted using dexterously designed electron energy analyzers coupled with differentially pumped electron lenses which make it possible to conduct PES measurements at a few hPa. This report proposes an alternative ambient pressure approach that can be applied to a broad class of samples and be implemented in conventional PES instruments. It uses ultrathin electron transparent but molecularmore » impermeable membranes to isolate the high pressure sample environment from the high vacuum PES detection system. We show that the separating graphene membrane windows are both mechanically robust and sufficiently transparent for electrons in a wide energy range to allow soft X-ray PES of liquid and gaseous water. The performed proof-of-principle experiments confirm the possibility to probe vacuum-incompatible toxic or reactive samples placed inside such hermetic, gas flow or fluidic environmental cells.« less

  2. An Analog Filter Approach to Frequency Domain Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, Clifford P.; O'Neill, Mary D.; McKenna, Ian J.

    2015-04-24

    The rate equations found in frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy are the same as those found in electronics under analog filter theory. Laplace transform methods are a natural way to solve the equations, and the methods can provide solutions for arbitrary excitation functions. The fluorescence terms can be modeled as circuit components and cascaded with drive and detection electronics to produce a global transfer function. Electronics design tools such as Spicea can be used to model fluorescence problems. In applications, such as remote sensing, where detection electronics are operated at high gain and limited bandwidth, a global modeling of the entire system is important, since the filter terms of the drive and detection electronics affect the measured response of the fluorescence signals. The techniques described here can be used to separate signals from fast and slow fluorophores emitting into the same spectral band, and data collection can be greatly accelerated by means of a frequency comb driver waveform and appropriate signal processing of the response.

  3. Pump probe spectroscopy of quasiparticle dynamics in cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Segre, Gino P.

    2001-05-01

    Pump probe spectroscopy is used to examine the picosecond response of a BSCCO thin film, and two YBCO crystals in the near infrared. The role of pump fluence and temperature have been closely examined in an effort to clarify the mechanism by which the quasiparticles rejoin the condensate. BSCCO results suggest that the recombination behavior is consistent with the d-wave density of states in that quasiparticles appear to relax to the nodes immediately before they rejoin the condensate. The first substantial investigation of polarized pump probe response in detwinned YBCO crystals is also reported. Dramatic doping dependent anisotropies along the a and b axes are observed in time and temperature resolved studies. Among many results, we highlight the discovery of an anomalous temperature and time dependence of a- axis response in optimally doped YBCO. We also report on the first observation of the photoinduced response in a magnetic field. We find the amplitude of the response, and in some cases, the dynamics considerably changed with the application of a 6T field. Finally, we speculate on two of the many theoretical directions stimulated by our results. We find that the two-fluid model suggests a mechanism to explain how changes at very low energies are visible to a high-energy probe. Also discussed are basic recombination processes which may play a role in the observed decay.

  4. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  5. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy at Micromolar Concentrations without Optical Nanoconfinement

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Laurence, Ted A.; Ly, Sonny; Bourguet, Feliza; Fischer, Nicholas O.; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2014-08-14

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is an important technique for studying biochemical interactions dynamically that may be used in vitro and in cell-based studies. It is generally claimed that FCS may only be used at nM concentrations. We show that this general consensus is incorrect and that the limitation to nM concentrations is not fundamental but due to detector limits as well as laser fluctuations. With a high count rate detector system and applying laser fluctuation corrections, we demonstrate FCS measurements up to 38 μM with the same signal-to-noise as at lower concentrations. Optical nanoconfinement approaches previously used to increase themore » concentration range of FCS are not necessary, and further increases above 38 μM may be expected using detectors and detector arrays with higher saturation rates and better laser fluctuation corrections. This approach greatly widens the possibilities of dynamic measurements of biochemical interactions using FCS at physiological concentrations.« less

  6. Infrared spectroscopy and structure of (NO)n clusters

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Hoshina, Hiromichi; Slipchenko, Mikhail; Prozument, Kirill; Verma, Deepak; Schmidt, Michael W.; Ivanic, Joseph; Vilesov, Andrey F.

    2016-01-12

    Nitrogen oxide clusters (NO)n have been studied in He droplets via infrared depletion spectroscopy and by quantum chemical calculations. The ν1 and ν5 bands of cis-ON-NO dimer have been observed at 1868.2 and 1786.5 cm–1, respectively. Furthermore, spectral bands of the trimer and tetramer have been located in the vicinity of the corresponding dimer bands in accord with computed frequencies that place NO-stretch bands of dimer, trimer, and tetramer within a few wavenumbers of each other. In addition, a new line at 1878.1 cm–1 close to the band origin of single molecules was assigned to van der Waals bound dimersmore » of (NO)2, which are stabilized due to the rapid cooling in He droplets. Spectra of larger clusters (n > 5), have broad unresolved features in the vicinity of the dimer bands. As a result, experiments and calculations indicate that trimers consist of a dimer and a loosely bound third molecule, whereas the tetramer consists of two weakly bound dimers.« less

  7. An analog filter approach to frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Trainham, Clifford P.; O'Neill, Mary D.; McKenna, Ian J.

    2015-10-01

    The rate equations found in frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy are the same as those found in electronics under analog filter theory. Laplace transform methods are a natural way to solve the equations, and the methods can provide solutions for arbitrary excitation functions. The fluorescence terms can be modeled as circuit components and cascaded with drive and detection electronics to produce a global transfer function. Electronics design tools such as Spicea can be used to model fluorescence problems. In applications, such as remote sensing, where detection electronics are operated at high gain and limited bandwidth, a global modeling of the entiremore » system is important, since the filter terms of the drive and detection electronics affect the measured response of the fluorescence signals. Furthermore, the techniques described here can be used to separate signals from fast and slow fluorophores emitting into the same spectral band, and data collection can be greatly accelerated by means of a frequency comb driver waveform and appropriate signal processing of the response.« less

  8. Bismuth-Loaded Polymer Scintillators for Gamma Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, B L; Cherepy, N J; Sturm, B W; Sanner, R D; Dai, Z; Payne, S A

    2011-04-11

    We synthesize a series of polyvinylcarbazole monoliths containing varying loadings of triphenyl bismuth as a high-Z dopant and varying fluors, either organic or organometallic, in order to study their use as scintillators capable of gamma ray spectroscopy. A trend of increasing bismuth loading resulting in a better-resolved photopeak is observed. For PVK parts with no fluor or a standard organic fluor, diphenylanthracene, increasing bismuth loading results in decreasing light yield while with samples 1 or 3 % by weight of the spin-orbit coupling organometallic fluor FIrpic, which emits light from both singlet and triple excitons, show increasing light yield with increasing bismuth loading. Our best performing PVK/ BiPh{sub 3}/FIrpic scintillator with 40 wt % BiPh3 and 3 wt % FIrpic has an emission maximum of 500 nm, a light yield of {approx}30,000 photons/MeV, and energy resolution better than 7% FWHM at 662 keV. Replacing the Ir complex with an equal weight of diphenylanthracene produces a sample with a light yield of {approx}6,000 photons/MeV, with an emission maximum at 420 nm and energy resolution of 9% at 662 keV. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that the BiPh{sub 3} forms small clusters of approximately 5 nm diameter.

  9. Method of using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy standard

    DOEpatents

    Spicer, Leonard D.; Bennett, Dennis W.; Davis, Jon F.

    1985-01-01

    (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH with SO.sub.2. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 O and a new solid compound [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ]. Both (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO and [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO.sub.2 pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH, whereby any SO.sub.2 present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO.sub.2 in the original gas sample. The solid product [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy, wherein the resonance peaks of either .sup.1 H, .sup.13 C, .sup.15 N, or .sup.29 Si may be used as a reference.

  10. OSIRIS - Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy Software for On-Site Inspections under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, Augustine J.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Egger, A. E.; Hall, Jeter C.; Kelly, S. M.; Krebs, K. M.; Kreek, S.; Jordan, David V.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Padgett, Stephen W.; Wharton, C. J.; Wimer, Nathan G.

    2015-06-01

    OSIRIS - Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy Software for On-Site Inspections under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

  11. High-resolution inverse Raman and resonant-wave-mixing spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rahn, L.A.

    1993-12-01

    These research activities consist of high-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy (IRS) and resonant wave-mixing spectroscopy to support the development of nonlinear-optical techniques for temperature and concentration measurements in combustion research. Objectives of this work include development of spectral models of important molecular species needed to perform coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements and the investigation of new nonlinear-optical processes as potential diagnostic techniques. Some of the techniques being investigated include frequency-degenerate and nearly frequency-degenerate resonant four-wave-mixing (DFWM and NDFWM), and resonant multi-wave mixing (RMWM).

  12. Enhanced visible and near-infrared capabilities of the JET mirror-linked divertor spectroscopy system

    SciTech Connect

    Lomanowski, B. A. Sharples, R. M.; Meigs, A. G.; Conway, N. J.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Heesterman, P.; Kinna, D. [EURATOM Collaboration: JET-EFDA Team

    2014-11-15

    The mirror-linked divertor spectroscopy diagnostic on JET has been upgraded with a new visible and near-infrared grating and filtered spectroscopy system. New capabilities include extended near-infrared coverage up to 1875 nm, capturing the hydrogen Paschen series, as well as a 2 kHz frame rate filtered imaging camera system for fast measurements of impurity (Be II) and deuterium D?, D?, D? line emission in the outer divertor. The expanded system provides unique capabilities for studying spatially resolved divertor plasma dynamics at near-ELM resolved timescales as well as a test bed for feasibility assessment of near-infrared spectroscopy.

  13. Quasiparticle interference, quasiparticle interactions, and the origin of the charge density wave in 2H-NbSe?

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Arguello, C. J.; Valla, T.; Rosenthal, E. P.; Andrade, E. F.; Jin, W.; Yeh, P. C.; Zaki, N.; Jia, S.; Cava, R. J.; Fernandes, R. M.; et al

    2015-01-20

    We show that a small number of intentionally introduced defects can be used as a spectroscopic tool to amplify quasiparticle interference in 2H-NbSe?, that we measure by scanning tunneling spectroscopic imaging. We show from the momentum and energy dependence of the quasiparticle interference that Fermi surface nesting is inconsequential to charge density wave formation in 2H-NbSe?. We demonstrate that by combining quasiparticle interference data with additional knowledge of the quasiparticle band structure from angle resolved photoemission measurements, one can extract the wavevector and energy dependence of the important electronic scattering processes thereby obtaining direct information both about the fermiology andmorethe interactions. In 2H-NbSe?, we use this combination to show that the important near-Fermi-surface electronic physics is dominated by the coupling of the quasiparticles to soft mode phonons at a wave vector different from the CDW ordering wave vector.less

  14. Unconventional Electronic Reconstruction in Undoped (Ba,Sr)Fe2As2 Across the Spin Density Wave Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, M.

    2010-06-02

    Through a systematic high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission study of the iron pnictide compounds (Ba,Sr)Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, we show that the electronic structures of these compounds are significantly reconstructed across the spin density wave transition, which cannot be described by a simple folding scenario of conventional density wave ordering. Moreover, we find that LDA calculations with an incorporated suppressed magnetic moment of 0.5{mu}{sub B} can match well the details in the reconstructed electronic structure, suggesting that the nature of magnetism in the pnictides is more itinerant than local, while the origin of suppressed magnetic moment remains an important issue for future investigations.

  15. Evidence against a charge density wave on Bi(111)

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Kim, T. K.; Wells, J.; Kirkegaard, C.; Li, Z.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Gayone, J. E.; Fernandez-Torrente, I.; Häberle, P.; Pascual, J. I.; Moore, K. T.; et al

    2005-08-18

    The Bi(111) surface was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) in order to verify the existence of a recently proposed surface charge density wave (CDW). The STM and TEM results to not support a CDW scenario at low temperatures. Thus the quasiparticle interference pattern observed in STM confirms the spin-orbit split character of the surface states which prevents the formation of a CDW, even in the case of good nesting. The dispersion of the electronic states observed with ARPES agrees well with earlier findings. In particular, the Fermi contour of the electronmore » pocket at the centre of the surface Brillouin zone is found to have a hexagonal shape. However, no gap opening or other signatures of a CDW phase transition can be found in the temperature-dependent data.« less

  16. Evidence against a charge density wave on Bi(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. K.; Wells, J.; Kirkegaard, C.; Li, Z.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Gayone, J. E.; Fernandez-Torrente, I.; Häberle, P.; Pascual, J. I.; Moore, K. T.; Schwartz, A. J.; He, H.; Spence, J. C. H.; Downing, K. H.; Lazar, S.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Borisenko, S. V.; Knupfer, M.; Hofmann, Ph.

    2005-08-18

    The Bi(111) surface was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) in order to verify the existence of a recently proposed surface charge density wave (CDW). The STM and TEM results to not support a CDW scenario at low temperatures. Thus the quasiparticle interference pattern observed in STM confirms the spin-orbit split character of the surface states which prevents the formation of a CDW, even in the case of good nesting. The dispersion of the electronic states observed with ARPES agrees well with earlier findings. In particular, the Fermi contour of the electron pocket at the centre of the surface Brillouin zone is found to have a hexagonal shape. However, no gap opening or other signatures of a CDW phase transition can be found in the temperature-dependent data.

  17. Quasiparticle interference, quasiparticle interactions, and the origin of the charge density wave in 2H–NbSe2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Arguello, C. J.; Rosenthal, E. P.; Andrade, E. F.; Jin, W.; Yeh, P. C.; Zaki, N.; Jia, S.; Cava, R. J.; Fernandes, R. M.; Millis, A. J.; et al

    2015-01-21

    We show that a small number of intentionally introduced defects can be used as a spectroscopic tool to amplify quasiparticle interference in 2H-NbSe₂, that we measure by scanning tunneling spectroscopic imaging. We show from the momentum and energy dependence of the quasiparticle interference that Fermi surface nesting is inconsequential to charge density wave formation in 2H-NbSe₂. Thus, we demonstrate that by combining quasiparticle interference data with additional knowledge of the quasiparticle band structure from angle resolved photoemission measurements, one can extract the wavevector and energy dependence of the important electronic scattering processes thereby obtaining direct information both about the fermiologymore » and the interactions. In 2H-NbSe₂, we use this combination to show that the important near-Fermi-surface electronic physics is dominated by the coupling of the quasiparticles to soft mode phonons at a wave vector different from the CDW ordering wave vector.« less

  18. Effects of charge inhomogeneities on elementary excitations in La2-xSrxCuO₄

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Park, S. R.; Hamann, A.; Pintschovius, L.; Lamago, D.; Khaliullin, G.; Fujita, M.; Yamada, K.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.; Reznik, D.

    2011-12-12

    Purely local experimental probes of many copper oxide superconductors show that their electronic states are inhomogeneous in real space. For example, scanning tunneling spectroscopic imaging shows strong variations in real space, and according to nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies, the charge distribution in the bulk varies on the nanoscale. However, the analysis of the experimental results utilizing spatially averaged probes often ignores this fact. We have performed a detailed investigation of the doping dependence of the energy and linewidth of the zone-boundary Cu-O bond-stretching vibration in La2-xSrxCuO₄ by inelastic neutron scattering. Both our results as well as previously reported angle-dependentmore » momentum widths of the electronic spectral function detected by angle-resolved photoemission can be reproduced by including the same distribution of local environments extracted from the NQR analysis.« less

  19. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in Ca0.73Le0.27FeAs2 with electron-overdoped FeAs layers

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Jiang, Shan; Liu, Chang; Cao, Huibo; Birol, Turan; Allred, Jared M.; Tian, Wei; Liu, Lian; Cho, Kyuil; Krogstad, Matthew J.; Ma, Jie; et al

    2016-02-26

    We report a study of the Ca0.73La0.27FeAs2 single crystals. We unravel a monoclinic to triclinic phase transition at 58 K, and a paramagnetic to stripe antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase transition at 54 K, below which spins order 45° away from the stripe direction. Furthermore, we demonstrate this material is substantially structurally untwinned at ambient pressure with the formation of spin rotation walls (S-walls). Lastly, in addition to the central-hole and corner-electron Fermi pockets usually appearing in FPS, angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) measurements resolve a Fermiology where an extra electron pocket of mainly As chain character exists at the Brillouin zone edge.

  20. Monitoring PVD metal vapors using laser absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D.G.; Anklam, T.M.; Berzins, L.V.; Hagans, K.G.

    1994-04-01

    Laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) has been used by the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program for over 10 years to monitor the co-vaporization of uranium and iron in its separators. During that time, LAS has proven to be an accurate and reliable method to monitor both the density and composition of the vapor. It has distinct advantages over other rate monitors, in that it is completely non-obtrusive to the vaporization process and its accuracy is unaffected by the duration of the run. Additionally, the LAS diagnostic has been incorporated into a very successful process control system. LAS requires only a line of sight through the vacuum chamber, as all hardware is external to the vessel. The laser is swept in frequency through an absorption line of interest. In the process a baseline is established, and the line integrated density is determined from the absorption profile. The measurement requires no hardware calibration. Through a proper choice of the atomic transition, a wide range of elements and densities have been monitored (e.g. nickel, iron, cerium and gadolinium). A great deal of information about the vapor plume can be obtained from the measured absorption profiles. By monitoring different species at the same location, the composition of the vapor is measured in real time. By measuring the same density at different locations, the spatial profile of the vapor plume is determined. The shape of the absorption profile is used to obtain the flow speed of the vapor. Finally, all of the above information is used evaluate the total vaporization rate.