National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for additional storm water

  1. Storm Water Individual Permit.

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    are cordially invited to a public information meeting to discuss the biannual update on the NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit. Wednesday, January 22, 2014 5:30 p.m. Cities of Gold Conference Center 10 Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, NM The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with industrial activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory from specified Solid Waste Management Units and Areas of Concern referred to as Sites. Public meetings about the NPDES Storm

  2. Storm Water Individual Permit.

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit. Wednesday, January 22, 2014 5:30 p.m. Cities of Gold Conference Center 10 Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, NM The Individual Permit authorizes...

  3. Storm Water Analytical Period

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    water associated with historical industrial activities at LANL from specified solid waste management units and areas of concern, collectively referred to as Sites. Contact...

  4. Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ANL-15/20 Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan Argonne National Laboratory FY 2015 Revised September 10, 2015 Approved by the Environment, Safety, and Health Core Process Owner SWPPP CERTIFICATION AND REVISION HISTORY NPDES Permit Special Condition 9 requires that the plan shall include the signature and title of the person responsible for preparation of the plan and the date of initial preparation and of each amendment. This information is presented below: Current Plan Rewritten by:

  5. Individual Permit for Storm Water

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Laws » Individual Permit Individual Permit The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial activities at LANL from specified solid waste management units and areas of concern, collectively referred to as Sites. Canada del Buey Gage station in Mortandad Canyon Pajarito Canyon Sandia Canyon Willows planted for bank stabilization in Pueblo Canyon Willows planted for bank stabilization in Pueblo Canyon What's New Documents submitted to EPRR in

  6. UPDES Storm Water Permits: General Construction Website | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Storm Water Permits: General Construction Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: UPDES Storm Water Permits: General Construction...

  7. Washington Construction Storm Water General Permit | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Construction Storm Water General Permit Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Washington Construction Storm Water General...

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - Aluminum Concentrations in Storm Water...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Title: Solid and Dissolved Phase Aluminum in Storm Water Runoff on the Pajarito Plateau, Poster, Individual Permit for Storm Water, NPDES Permit No. NM0030759 Author(s): ...

  9. Storm Water Permits at LANL.pdf

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    a Storm Water Permit? Poster, Individual Permit for Storm Water, NPDES Permit No. NM0030759 Author(s): Veenis, Steven J. Intended for: Public Purpose: This poster was prepared for the May 2011 Individual Permit for Storm Water (IP) public meeting. The purpose of the meeting was to update the public on implementation of the permit as required under Part 1.I (7) of the IP (National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit No. NM0030759). The poster will be available on Los Alamos National

  10. California State Water Resources Control Board Storm Water Homepage...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    State Water Resources Control Board Storm Water Homepage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California State Water Resources Control Board...

  11. CDPHE Construction Storm Water Forms | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Construction Storm Water Forms Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: CDPHE Construction Storm Water FormsLegal Abstract The...

  12. Individual Permit for Storm Water

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    discharges. The Permit establishes target action levels (TALs) that are equivalent to New Mexico State water-quality criteria. These TALs are used as benchmarks to determine the...

  13. California Construction Storm Water Program Website | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    California's Construction Storm Water Program. Author California State Water Resources Control Board Published California State Water Resources Control Board, Date Not Provided DOI...

  14. Storm water modeling at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Veis, Christopher

    1996-05-01

    Storm water modeling is important to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for compliance with regulations that govern water discharge at large industrial facilities. Modeling is also done to study trend in contaminants and storm sewer infrastructure. The Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) was used to simulate rainfall events at LLNL. SWMM is a comprehensive computer model for simulation of urban runoff quantity and quality in storm and combined sewer systems. Due to time constraints and ongoing research, no modeling was completed at LLNL. With proper information about the storm sewers, a SWMM simulation of a rainfall event on site would be beneficial to storm sewer analyst.

  15. Notice of Intent (NOI) for Storm Water Discharges Associated...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    (NOI) for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Construction Activities under TPDES General Permit (TXR150000) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  16. Update on the NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Update on the NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit Update on the NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit WHEN: Oct 18, 2016 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM WHERE: University of New Mexico, Los Alamos 4000 University Drive, Los Alamos, NM CONTACT: Lorrie Bonds Lopez (505) 667-0216 CATEGORY: Community TYPE: Meeting INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Public meetings about the NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit Project are held twice per year, one meeting before the field season to describe work for the

  17. Overview of the Storm Water Individual Permit.pdf

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    the LANL Storm Water Individual Permit? Poster, Individual Permit for Storm Water, NPDES Permit No. NM0030759 Author(s): Veenis, Steven J. Intended for: Public Purpose: This poster was prepared for the May 2011 Individual Permit for Storm Water (IP) public meeting. The purpose of the meeting was to update the public on implementation of the permit as required under Part 1.I (7) of the IP (National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit No. NM0030759). The poster will be available on Los

  18. CDPHE Construction Storm Water Forms R-Factor Waiver Application...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    CDPHE Construction Storm Water Forms R-Factor Waiver Application Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Permit ApplicationPermit...

  19. Agenda Individual Permit for Storm Water Public Meeting

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Patricia Jones @ 665-7748 Agenda Individual Permit for Storm Water Public Meeting Tuesday, June 4, 2013 Fuller Lodge, Los Alamos, NM 5:30 - 7:30 5:30 p.m. Poster Session 5:50 p.m. Welcome Bruce MacAllister 6:00 p.m. Site Discharge Pollution Prevention Plan Update Steve Veenis 6:10 p.m. IP Website Steve Veenis 6:20 p.m. Background Metals Concentrations in Storm Armand Groffman Water on the Pajarito Plateau 6:30 p.m. Alternative Compliance Submittal at Kate Lynnes S-SMA-0.25 & S-SMA-2 Debbie

  20. File:06NVBConstructionStormWaterPermit (1).pdf | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    NVBConstructionStormWaterPermit (1).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:06NVBConstructionStormWaterPermit (1).pdf Size of this preview: 463...

  1. File:06AKBConstructionStormWaterPermitting (1).pdf | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    6AKBConstructionStormWaterPermitting (1).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:06AKBConstructionStormWaterPermitting (1).pdf Size of this...

  2. File:06CABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    06CABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:06CABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf Size of this preview: 463 ...

  3. File:06TXBConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    06TXBConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:06TXBConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599...

  4. File:06HIBHawaiiConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    6HIBHawaiiConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:06HIBHawaiiConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf Size of this preview:...

  5. File:06ORBConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    ORBConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:06ORBConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf Size of this preview: 463 599...

  6. File:06-WA-b - Washington Construction Storm Water Permit.pdf...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    6-WA-b - Washington Construction Storm Water Permit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:06-WA-b - Washington Construction Storm Water...

  7. Title 40 CFR 122.26 Storm water discharges | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    122.26 Storm water discharges Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 40 CFR 122.26 Storm water...

  8. Agenda Individual Permit for Storm Water Project Update Public Meeting

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Lorrie Bonds Lopez @ 667-0216 Agenda Individual Permit for Storm Water Project Update Public Meeting Thursday, December 13, 2012 Fuller Lodge, Los Alamos, NM 5:30 - 7:30 5:30 View Posters 5:40 Meeting Opening Bruce MacAllister Welcome Dave McInroy Individual Permit Overview Steve Veenis 5:50 Enhanced Controls Installation Jeff Walterscheid 6:05 Data Results for 2012 Armand Groffman 6:20 Designing for Total Stormwater Retention Bill Foley 6:40 Low-impact Design for Stormwater Management Erin

  9. File:06COBConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History File:06COBConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:06COBConstructio...

  10. Storm water pollution prevention plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the final storm water regulation on November 16, 1990. The storm water regulation is included in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) regulations. An NPDES permit was issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995, and was effective on July 1, 1995. The permit requires that a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3) be developed by December 28, 1995, and be fully implemented by July 1, 1996; this plan has been developed to fulfill that requirement. The outfalls and monitoring points described in this plan contain storm water discharges associated with industrial activities as defined in the NPDES regulations. For storm water discharges associated with industrial activity, including storm water discharges associated with construction activity, that are not specifically monitored or limited in this permit, Y-12 Plant personnel will meet conditions of the General Storm Water Rule 1200-4-10. This document presents the programs and physical controls that are in place to achieve the following objectives: ensure compliance with Section 1200-4-10-.04(5) of the TDEC Water Quality Control Regulations and Part 4 of the Y-12 Plant NPDES Permit (TN0002968); provide operating personnel with guidance relevant to storm water pollution prevention and control requirements for their facility and/or project; and prevent or reduce pollutant discharge to the environment, in accordance with the Clean Water Act (CWA) and the Tennessee Water Quality Control Act.

  11. Hanford Site storm water comprehesive site compliance evaluation report for the reporting period July 1, 1995 through June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, C.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-09

    This document contains the results of inspections of the storm water outfalls listed in WHC-SD-EN-EV-021, Rev. 1, Hanford Site Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan.

  12. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Environment Compliance Department

    2012-01-01

    The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

  13. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Clean Water Compliance Section of the Environment Compliance Department

    2012-01-01

    The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

  14. File:Texas NOI for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Construction...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    metadata was last modified 02:31, 12 March 2013 Software used Acrobat PDFMaker 9.1 for Word Short title Notice of Intent (NOI) for Storm Water Discharges Associated with...

  15. AGENDA ADEP Surface Water Protection Project NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit Bi-Annual Update

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    AGENDA ADEP Surface Water Protection Project NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit Bi-Annual Update Public Meeting January 22, 2014 5:30-7:30 p.m. Cities of Gold Conference Center Pojoaque, New Mexico 5:30 p.m. Poster Session 5:50 p.m. Welcome Steve Veenis 6:00 p.m. Flooding Events Fall 2013 Armand Groffman 6:15 p.m. IP Compliance for 2013 Jeff Walterscheid Kate Lynnes 6:35 p.m. IP Corrective Action Screening Process Thaddeus Kostrubala 6:45 p.m. Permit Renewal Kate Lynnes 7:00 p.m. Communities

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE NPDES STORM WATER COMPLIANCE ALTERNATIVES AT THE SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Shedrow, C

    2006-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with proposed and alternative actions to achieve water quality permit compliance at 38 storm water outfalls located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) (Figure 1-1). Effluent monitoring data indicates that some of these outfalls may not presently comply with new National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm Water General Permit effluent standards that became effective July 1, 2005 (SCR000000). The NPDES permit requires that best management practices (BMPs) be implemented and maintained, as necessary, to ensure that storm water discharges at SRS do not cause or contribute to the contravention of applicable state water quality standards (WQS).

  17. Potential Release Site Sediment Concentrations Correlated to Storm Water Station Runoff through GIS Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    C.T. McLean

    2005-06-01

    This research examined the relationship between sediment sample data taken at Potential Release Sites (PRSs) and storm water samples taken at selected sites in and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The PRSs had been evaluated for erosion potential and a matrix scoring system implemented. It was assumed that there would be a stronger relationship between the high erosion PRSs and the storm water samples. To establish the relationship, the research was broken into two areas. The first area was raster-based modeling, and the second area was data analysis utilizing the raster based modeling results and the sediment and storm water sample results. Two geodatabases were created utilizing raster modeling functions and the Arc Hydro program. The geodatabase created using only Arc Hydro functions contains very fine catchment drainage areas in association with the geometric network and can be used for future contaminant tracking. The second geodatabase contains sub-watersheds for all storm water stations used in the study along with a geometric network. The second area of the study focused on data analysis. The analytical sediment data table was joined to the PRSs spatial data in ArcMap. All PRSs and PRSs with high erosion potential were joined separately to create two datasets for each of 14 analytes. Only the PRSs above the background value were retained. The storm water station spatial data were joined to the table of analyte values that were either greater than the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP) benchmark value, or the Department of Energy (DOE) Drinking Water Defined Contribution Guideline (DWDCG). Only the storm water stations were retained that had sample values greater than the NPDES MSGP benchmark value or the DOE DWDCG. Separate maps were created for each analyte showing the sub-watersheds, the PRSs over background, and the storm water stations greater than the NPDES MSGP benchmark value or the

  18. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-01

    This is the second annual storm water report prepared in accordance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) on December 1, 2011, and the corresponding Y-12 Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3) which became effective on September 7, 2012. However, Appendix A does contain some analytical data gathered under the previous NPDES permit and SWP3 for comparison purposes. The quality of storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek remained relatively stable from 2012 to 2013. However, there was one largely unexpected high concentration of mercury noted in an area that is not known to have previously been a mercury use area. This was noted in Sector AA, Outfall 014. This outfall is normally sampled on a rotating basis but, due this elevated concentration, will be sampled again in 2014. The Y-12 Complex will continue to implement appropriate BMPs and reduce outside material storage ares where possible. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and timely implementation of proper storm water control measures.

  19. Evaluation of urban storm-water maintenance in North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Roenigk, D.J.; Paterson, R.G.; Heraty, M.A.; Kaiser, E.J.; Burby, R.J.

    1992-06-01

    Spurred by continuing urban growth and new federal mandates for control of nonpoint source pollution, local governments are increasingly concerned about the need to improve stormwater management. Long-term maintenance is a critical aspect of stormwater management if both water quality and water quantity benefits are to be realized in practice. The report examines what is actually being done in North Carolina cities to maintain stormwater systems and what selected stormwater experts feel should be done. Several actions are needed. First, local governments are recommended to pay greater attention to system planning, apply more stringent design standards, and monitor the effectiveness of structures protecting water quality as the most critical basis for successful long-term maintenance. Second, policy makers at all levels of government and researchers need to determine appropriate strategies for the treatment and disposal of accumulated sediments. Finally, further research about the best maintenance practices and financing arrangements may be needed.

  20. Analysis of fecal coliform levels at selected storm water monitoring points at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Skaggs, B.E.

    1995-07-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency staff published the final storm water regulation on November 16, 1990. The storm water regulation is included in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) regulations. It specifies the permit application requirements for certain storm water discharges such as industrial activity or municipal separate storm sewers serving populations of 100,000 or greater. Storm water discharge associated with industrial activity is discharge from any conveyance used for collecting and conveying storm water that is directly related to manufacturing, processing, or raw material storage areas at an industrial plant. Quantitative testing data is required for these discharges. An individual storm water permit application was completed and submitted to Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) personnel in October 1992. After reviewing this data in the permit application, TDEC personnel expressed concern with the fecal coliform levels at many of the outfalls. The 1995 NPDES Permit (Part 111-N, page 44) requires that an investigation be conducted to determine the validity of this data. If the fecal coliform data is valid, the permit requires that a report be submitted indicating possible causes and proposed corrective actions.

  1. Storm water runoff for the Y-12 Plant and selected parking lots

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.T.

    1996-01-01

    A comparison of storm water runoff from the Y-12 Plant and selected employee vehicle parking lots to various industry data is provided in this document. This work is an outgrowth of and part of the continuing Non-Point Source Pollution Elimination Project that was initiated in the late 1980s. This project seeks to identify area pollution sources and remediate these areas through the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process as managed by the Environmental Restoration Organization staff. This work is also driven by the Clean Water Act Section 402(p) which, in part, deals with establishing a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for storm water discharges. Storm water data from events occurring in 1988 through 1991 were analyzed in two reports: Feasibility Study for the Best Management Practices to Control Area Source Pollution Derived from Parking Lots at the DOE Y-12 Plant, September 1992, and Feasibility Study of Best Management Practices for Non-Point Source Pollution Control at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, February 1993. These data consisted of analysis of outfalls discharging to upper East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) within the confines of the Y-12 Plant (see Appendixes D and E). These reports identified the major characteristics of concern as copper, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, nitrate (as nitrogen), zinc, biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids (TSS), fecal coliform, and aluminum. Specific sources of these contaminants were not identifiable because flows upstream of outfalls were not sampled. In general, many of these contaminants were a concern in many outfalls. Therefore, separate sampling exercises were executed to assist in identifying (or eliminating) specific suspected sources as areas of concern.

  2. Hanford Site storm water comprehensive site compliance evaluation report for the reporting period July 1, 1996 through June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, C.J.

    1997-09-18

    On September 9, 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued General Permit No. WA-R-00-OOOF, Authorization to Discharge Under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Industrial Activity to the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). RL submitted a Notice of Intent to comply with this permit to EPA in conformance with the General Permit requirements on October 1, 1992. On February 14, 1994, EPA issued a Storm Water General Permit Coverage Notice and assigned WA-R-00-Al7F as the Hanford Site`s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) storm water permit number. The Hanford Site Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) (WHC 1996a) was certified by J. E Rasmussen, Director Environmental Assurance, RL, on September 24, 1996, in compliance with Part IV.B(i) of the General Permit. As required by General Permit No. WA-R-00-OOOF (WA-R-00-Al7F), Section IV, Part D, Section 4.c, an annual report must be developed by RL and retained on site to verify that the requirements listed in the General Permit are being implemented. The previous Hanford Site Storm Plater Comprehensive Site Compliance Evaluation Report (WHC 1996b) addressed the period from July 1995 through June 1996. This document fulfills the requirement to prepare an annual report and contains the results of inspections of the storm water outfalls listed in the SWPPP (WHC 1996a). This report also describes the methods used to conduct the 1100 Storm Plater Comprehensive Site Compliance Evaluation (SWCSCE) as required in Part IV, Section D.4.c in the General Permit; summarizes the results of the compliance evaluation; and documents significant leaks and spills. The reporting year for this SWCSCE report is July 1, 1996 through June 30, 1997.

  3. The Newest Addition to the ENERGY STAR Lineup: Water Heaters...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    there, you can read all about their newest addition: ENERGY STAR-qualified water heaters. ENERGY STAR-qualified water heaters were first rolled out at the beginning of 2009. ...

  4. Study in use and management of de/anti-icing constituents with regard to new storm water legislation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, D.P.; Willing, B.L.

    1992-09-01

    This research identified management practices of airfield and aircraft de/anti-icing constituents which may be implemented to deal with new storm water legislation. Storm water regulations require that deicing operations obtain a NPDES permit for discharges into storm water runoff which may mandate the use of Best Management Practices. An FAA civilian airport survey and a USAF survey were used, with a literature search, to identify practices of de/anti-icing constituents. Four major constituents are used-glycol, urea, calcium magnesium acetate, and sodium formate. Concerns of uncontrolled release of the constituents include high BOD rates, nitrate and nitrite enrichment, impaired aesthetic water quality, ammonia formation from the degradation of urea, and the toxicity of such chemicals to aquatic life. Several options that exist for managing the runoff of de/anti-icing constituents include alternative constituents such as potassium acetate; alternative application procedures such as centralized facilities and greater use of anti-icing operations; collection alternatives using porous surface materials, drainage systems, and holding tanks; and treatment alternatives such as a mobile recovery unit to recycle deicing fluids for re-use.... Aircraft, Runways, Deicing systems, Deicing materials, Runoff, Water pollution, Urea, Glycols, Biochemical oxygen demand.

  5. Contaminant Concentrations in Storm Water Entering the Sinclair/Dyes Inlet Subasin of the Puget Sound, USA, During Storm Event and Baseflow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; May, Christopher W.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Johnston, Robert K.; Leisle, D. E.; Beckwith, B.; Sherrell, Gerald; Mettallo, David; Pingree, Ryan

    2007-03-29

    The Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed is located on the west side of Puget Sound in Kitsap County, Washington, U.S.A. (Figure 1). Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), U.S Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA-DOE), Kitsap County, City of Bremerton, City of Bainbridge Island, City of Port Orchard, and the Suquamish Tribe have joined in a cooperative effort to evaluate water-quality conditions the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and correct identified problems. A major focus of this project, known as Project ENVVEST, is to develop Water Clean-up (TMDL) Plans for constituents listed on the 303(d) list within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed. Segments within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed were listed on the State of Washington’s 1998 303(d) due to fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue (WA-DOE 2003). Stormwater loading was identified by ENVVEST as one potential source of sediment contamination, which lacked sufficient data for the contaminant mass balance calculations conducted for the watershed. This paper summarizes the contaminant concentrations in representative streams and outfalls discharging into Sinclair and Dyes Inlets during 18 storm events and wet/dry season baseflow conditions between November 2002 and May 2005. This paper serves as a portion of the report titled, “Surface and Stormwater Quality Assessment for Sinclair and Dyes Inlet, Washington” (Brandenberger et al. 2007).

  6. Analysis of storm-water infiltration ponds on the North Carolina Outer Banks

    SciTech Connect

    Chescheir, G.M.; Fipps, G.; Skaggs, R.W.

    1990-09-01

    Increasing development along the North Carolina coast has been linked to the deterioration of water quality in adjacent sounds and estuaries. Degradation of water quality in sounds and estuaries threatens the coastal ecology which provides resources for the area's fishing and tourism industries. The state of N.C. adopted the current Stormwater Runoff Disposal Rules in 1988 requiring stormwater management plans for new development in 20 coastal counties. Stormwater infiltration pond systems are approved by the State as an option for retaining stormwater on the developed site; however, the long-term performance of these systems has not been measured or determined. The study was conducted to monitor the hydrology of stormwater infiltration ponds on the North Carolina barrier islands and to develop a model that continuously simulates the performance of these ponds. The hydrology of two operating infiltration ponds systems was evaluated in an 18-month field study. Rainfall, pond stage, and water table elevations at selected locations were monitored continuously. Water table elevations at additional locations were monitored on a biweekly basis. Soil hydraulic conductivities and soil water characteristic relationships were determined at both field sites. The subsurface geology was described at one site and an aquifer pump test was performed to determine aquifer transmissivity and specific yield. Both of the infiltration ponds in the field studies effectively served their primary purpose of retaining on site the stormwater runoff from the first 38 mm (1.5 in) of rainfall. In nearly every case, the pond seepage rate was sufficient to completely draw down the pond within 5 days. The hydrology of the infiltration ponds at the two research sites was very different.

  7. Mitigation of Hexavalent Chromium in Storm Water Resulting from Demolition of Large Concrete Structure at the East Tennessee Technology Park - 12286

    SciTech Connect

    Britto, Ronnie; Brown, Bridget; Hale, Timothy B.; Hensley, Janice L.; Johnson, Robert T.; Patel, Madhu; Emery, Jerry A.; Gaston, Clyde; Queen, David C.

    2012-07-01

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding was provided to supplement the environmental management program at several DOE sites, including the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Demolition of the ETTP K-33 Building, the largest building to be demolished to date in Oak Ridge, was awarded to LSRS in FY-2010 under the ARRA program. The K-33 building was an 82 foot tall 2-story structure covering approximately 32 acres. Once this massive building was brought down to the ground, the debris was segregated and consolidated into piles of concrete rubble and steel across the remaining pad. The process of demolishing the building, tracking across concrete debris with heavy equipment, and stockpiling the concrete rubble caused it to become pulverized. During and after storm events, hexavalent chromium leached from the residual cement present in the large quantities of concrete. Storm water control measures were present to preclude migration of contaminants off-site, but these control measures were not designed to control hexavalent chromium dissolved in storm water from reaching nearby receiving water. The following was implemented to mitigate hexavalent chromium in storm water: - Steel wool was distributed around K-33 site catch basins and in water pools as an initial step in addressing hexavalent chromium. - Since the piles of concrete were too massive and unsafe to tarp, they were placed into windrows in an effort to reduce total surface area. - A Hach colorimetric field meter was acquired by the K-33 project to provide realtime results of hexavalent chromium in site surface water. - Three hexavalent chromium treatment systems were installed at three separate catch basins that receive integrated storm water flow from the K-33 site. Sodium bisulfite is being used as a reducing agent for the immobilization of hexavalent chromium while also assisting in lowering pH. Concentrations initially were 310 - 474 ppb of hexavalent chromium in

  8. Storm Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Storm Windows Storm Windows An energy upgrade on this daycare center included interior storm windows because most of the windows are on the north elevation. | Photo courtesy of ...

  9. Separation of switchgrass bio-oil by water/organic solvent addition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    waterorganic solvent addition and pH adjustment This content will become publicly available on January 29, 2017 Prev Next Title: Separation of switchgrass bio-oil by water...

  10. Dynamic effect of sodium-water reaction in fast flux test facility power addition sodium pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.N.; Anderson, M.J.

    1990-03-01

    The Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) is a demonstration and test facility of the sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. A power addition'' to the facility is being considered to convert some of the dumped, unused heat into electricity generation. Components and piping systems to be added are sodium-water steam generators, sodium loop extensions from existing dump heat exchangers to sodium-water steam generators, and conventional water/steam loops. The sodium loops can be subjected to the dynamic loadings of pressure pulses that are caused by postulated sodium leaks and subsequent sodium-water reaction in the steam generator. The existing FFTF secondary pipes and the new power addition sodium loops were evaluated for exposure to the dynamic effect of the sodium-water reaction. Elastic and simplified inelastic dynamic analyses were used in this feasibility study. The results indicate that both the maximum strain and strain range are within the allowable limits. Several cycles of the sodium-water reaction can be sustained by the sodium pipes that are supported by ordinary pipe supports and seismic restraints. Expensive axial pipe restraints to withstand the sodium-water reaction loads are not needed, because the pressure-pulse-induced alternating bending stresses act as secondary stresses and the pressure pulse dynamic effect is a deformation-controlled quantity and is self-limiting. 14 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. ARM - Word Seek: Storms

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Storms Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Word Seek: Storms

  12. Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte Additive

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Jiangfeng; Xu, Wu; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Engelhard, Mark H.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Zhang, Yaohui; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-07-01

    Residual water presents in nonaqueous electrolytes has been widely regarded as a detrimental factor for lithium (Li) batteries. This is because water is highly reactive with the commonly used LiPF6 salt and leads to the formation of HF that corrodes battery materials. In this work, we demonstrate that a controlled trace-amount of water (25-100 ppm) can be an effective electrolyte additive for achieving dendrite-free Li metal deposition in LiPF6-based electrolytes and avoid its detrimental effect at the same time. Detailed analyses reveal that the trace amount of HF formed by the decomposition reaction of LiPF6 with water will be electrochemically reduced during initial Li deposition process to form a uniform and dense LiF-rich SEI layer on the surface of the substrate. This LiF-rich SEI layer leads to a uniform distribution of the electric field on the substrate surface and enables uniform and dendrite-free Li deposition. Meanwhile the detrimental effect of HF is diminished due to the consumption of HF in the LiF formation process. Microscopic analysis reveals that the as-deposited dendrite-free Li films exhibit a self-aligned and highly-compacted Li nanorods structure which is consistent with their charming blue color or known as structure color. These findings clearly demonstrate a novel approach to control the nucleation and grow process of Li metal films using well-controlled trace-amount of water. They also shine the light on the effect of water on other electrodeposition processes.

  13. Improving the performance of ammonia-water absorption cycles using salt additives and membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, O.M.; Barnett, S.M.; Balamuru, V.G.

    1997-12-31

    This paper proposes a new design of an ammonia-water absorption refrigeration cycle for low-temperature heat sources such as solar energy and waste heat. The proposed cycle uses a salt additive to shift the chemical equilibrium toward more effective separation of ammonia molecules from aqueous solution (i.e., salting out). Since salt additives can affect all aspects of the absorption cycle, membranes have been chosen to control the flow of ions in the cycle and limit their effects to the generation side. This paper describes an absorption cycle that uses membrane separation processes, such as reverse osmosis, dialysis, and electrodialysis. To optimize the performance of the cycle, however, the membranes and salts must be carefully chosen.

  14. Diesel engine experiments with oxygen enrichment, water addition and lower-grade fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J. ); Schaus, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The concept of oxygen enriched air applied to reciprocating engines is getting renewed attention in the context of the progress made in the enrichment methods and the tougher emissions regulations imposed on diesel and gasoline engines. An experimental project was completed in which a direct injection diesel engine was tested with intake oxygen levels of 21% -- 35%. Since an earlier study indicated that it is necessary to use a cheaper fuel to make the concept economically attractive, a less refined fuel was included in the test series. Since a major objection to the use of oxygen enriched combustion air had been the increase in NO{sub x} emissions, a method must be found to reduce NO{sub x}. Introduction of water into the engine combustion process was included in the tests for this purpose. Fuel emulsification with water was the means used here even though other methods could also be used. The teat data indicated a large increase in engine power density, slight improvement in thermal efficiency, significant reductions in smoke and particulate emissions and NO{sub x} emissions controllable with the addition of water. 15 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Polymer Growth Rate in a Wire Chamber with Oxygen,Water, or Alcohol Gas Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarski, Adam; /SLAC

    2008-07-02

    The rate of polymer growth on wires was measured in a wire chamber while the chamber was aged initially with helium-isobutane (80:20) gas, and then with either oxygen, water, or alcohol added to the gas. At the completion of the aging process for each gas mixture, the carbon content on the wires was measured in a SEM/EDX instrument. The same physical wires were used in all the gas mixtures, allowing measurement of polymer build up or polymer depletion by each gas additive. It is found that the rate of polymer growth is not changed by the presence of oxygen, water or alcohol. Conjecture that oxygen reduces breakdown by removing polymer deposits on field wires is negated by these measurements. Instead, it appears that the reduced breakdown is due to lower resistance in the polymer from oxygen ions being transported into the polymer. It is also observed that field wires bombarded by the electrons in the SEM and then placed back into the chamber show an abundance of single electrons being emitted, indicating that electron charge is stored in the polymer layer and that a high electric field is necessary to remove the charge.

  16. Coastal ocean current response to storm winds

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.L.

    1982-03-20

    Design of offshore structures requires knowledge of the appropriate current profile to be used in conjunction with the design wave. Accurate determination of the current profile will depend on reliable current models. Vertical transfer of momentum in storm-driven current models is commonly treated either by using eddy viscosity or by assuming 'slab-like' mixed layer flow. These two fundamentally different approaches predict different current speeds and profiles during severe storms. The existing data base is inadequate to determine which approach is better, but most existing data sets are subject to one or more of four limitations that can lead one improperly to interpret the data as supporting the existence of current velocity shear in otherwise uniform mixed layers. One-dimensional slab models are found to compare favorably with observed wind-driven currents at the Ocean Test Structure in the Gulf of Mexico (deployed in 20 m deep water). By using some reasonably simple assumptions, these slab models are able to replicate many of the significantly features of the wide range of different responses. The character of the response appears to depend on an interaction of stratification and topography. Barotropic responses are characteristic of typical coastal responses; current oriented longshore and are in phase with the wind. Baroclinic responses are dominantly inertial as might be expected in the deep sea, but with an additional near-bottom cross-shore counter flow. The structure of one observed barotropic response is compared to detail to predictions of both slab and eddy viscosity models and found consistent with a slab model and inconsistent with eddy viscosity models. Shear observed during this event was not significantly different from zero, but was significantly below estimated shear predictions of four eddy viscosity models given the peak 0.4 N/m/sup 2/ wind stress.

  17. ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  18. Design Storm for Total Retention.pdf

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Title: Design Storm for "Total Retention" under Individual Permit, Poster, Individual ... International. Environmental Programs Design Storm for "Total Retention" under ...

  19. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 7

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-21

    Despite a small storm that came through the area last night with wind gusts peaking at 45 MPH, progress continues to be made in restoring power to customers who lost power during the December 14-15 storms which hit the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 95,971 customers remain without power, down from 1.8 million customers. The wind storm which affected the area yesterday was not as bad as previously expected, with the majority of the customer outages in the BC Hydro region, and 3,000 additional customer outages in the Puget Sound Energy service area. The customers without power represent 5 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Washington. The majority of customers without power are served by Puget Sound Energy, BC Hydro, and Seattle City Light.

  20. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  1. The Gathering Storm:

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Gathering Storm: The Coming Crisis in the Internet R. Kevin Oberman Senior Engineer oberman@es.net, www.es.net Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Networking for the Future of Science ESCC/Internet2 Joint Techs Workshop January 21, 2008 2 Overview: The Clouds Gather * IPv4 address space exhaustion * Continued growth in the DFZ * Hardware limitations - DFZ FIB approaching capacity of many popular routers - RIB size now often exceeds router capacity - Routing table

  2. Transient experiments with thermite melts for a core catcher concept based on water addition from below

    SciTech Connect

    Tromm, W.; Alsmeyer, H.

    1995-09-01

    A core catcher concept is proposed to be integrated into a new pressurized water reactor. The core catcher achieves coolability by spreading and fragmentation of the ex-vessel core melt based on a process of water inlet from the bottom through the melt. By highly effective heat removal that uses evaporating water in direct contact with the fragmented melt, the corium melt would solidify in a short time period, and long-term cooling could be maintained by continuous water evaporation from the flooded porous or fragmented corium bed. The key process for obtaining coolability is the coupling of the three effects: (a) water ingression from below and its evaporation, (b) break up and fragmentation of the corium layer, and (c) heat transfer and solidification of the let. These mechanisms are investigated in transient medium-scale experiments with thermite melts. The experimental setup represents a section of the proposed core catcher design. A thermite melt is located on the core catcher plate with a passive water supply from the bottom. After generation of the melt, the upper sacrificial layer is eroded until water penetrates into the melt for the bottom through plugs in the supporting plate. Fragmentation and fast solidification of the melt are observed, and long-term heat removal is guaranteed by the coolant water flooding the porous melt. Water inflow is sufficient to safely remove the decay heat in a comparable corium layer. The open porosity is created by the vapor streaming through the melt during the solidification process. Fracture of the solid by thermomechanical stresses is not observed. The experiments in their current stage show the principal feasibility of the proposed cooling concept and are used to prepare large-scale experiments to be performed in the modified BETA facility with sustained heating of the melt.

  3. Storm Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    interior storm windows because most of the windows are on the north elevation. | Photo courtesy of Larry Kinney, Synergistic Building Technologies. An energy upgrade on this...

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage to environmental

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    monitoring stations, canyons Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage to environmental monitoring stations, canyons Stations supporting Santa Fe water utility returned to service September 18, 2013 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to

  5. Investigation of inappropriate pollutant entries into storm drainage systems: A user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Pitt, R.; Lalor, M.; Adrian, D.D.; Field, R.; Barbe, D.

    1993-01-01

    The User's Guide is the result of a series of EPA sponsored research projects to develop a procedure to investigate non-stormwater entries into storm drainage systems. A number of past projects have found that dry-weather flows discharging from storm drainage systems can contribute significant pollutant loadings to receiving waters. If these loadings are ignored (by only considering wet-weather stormwater runoff, for example), little improvement in receiving water conditions may occur with many stormwater control programs. These dry-weather flows may originate from many sources, the most important sources may include sanitary wastewater or industrial and commercial pollutant entries, failing septic tank systems, and vehicle maintenance activities. After the outfalls are identified that are affected by polluted dry-weather flows, additional survey activities are needed to locate and correct the non-stormwater entries into the storm drainage systems. The User's Guide contains information to allow the design and conduct of local investigations to identify the types and to estimate the magnitudes of these non-stormwater entries.

  6. THE USE OF DI WATER TO MITIGATE DUSTING FOR ADDITION OF DWPF FRIT TO THE SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E.

    2010-07-21

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DPWF) presently is in the process to determine means to reduce water utilization in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process, thus reducing effluent and processing times. The frit slurry addition system mixes the dry frit with water, yielding approximately a 50 weight percent slurry containing frit and the other fraction water. This slurry is discharged into the SME and excess water is removed via boiling. To reduce this water load to the SME, DWPF has proposed using a pneumatic system in conveying the frit to the SME, in essence a dry delivery system. The problem associated with utilizing a dry delivery system with the existing frit is the generation of dust when discharged into the SME. The use of water has been shown to be effective in the mining industry as well in the DOE complex to mitigate dusting. The method employed by SRNL to determine the quantity of water to mitigate dusting in dry powders was effective, between a lab and bench scale tests. In those tests, it was shown that as high as five weight percent (wt%) of water addition was required to mitigate dust from batches of glass forming minerals used by the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford, Washington. The same method used to determine the quantity of water to mitigate dusting was used in this task to determine the quantity of water to mitigate this dusting using as-received frit. The ability for water to mitigate dusting is due to its adhesive properties as shown in Figure 1-1. Wetting the frit particles allows for the smaller frit particles (including dust) to adhere to the larger frit particles or to agglomerate into large particles. Fluids other than water can also be used, but their adhesive properties are different than water and the quantity required to mitigate dusting is different, as was observed in reference 1. Excessive water, a few weight percentages greater than that required to mitigate dusting can cause the resulting material not to flow. The primary

  7. storm | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    storm Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 29 October, 2012 - 14:46 East Coast Utilities prepare for Hurricane Sandy East Coast Hurricane Sandy...

  8. UPDATE: Tropical Storm Isaac | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    UPDATE: Tropical Storm Isaac UPDATE: Tropical Storm Isaac August 27, 2012 - 6:30pm Addthis Satellite image of Tropical Storm Isaac. | Courtesy of NOAA. Satellite image of Tropical Storm Isaac. | Courtesy of NOAA. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Tropical Storm Isaac has impacted Florida and is expected to make landfall along the Gulf Coast by early morning on August 29. As thousands of Gulf Coast residents are without power, the Energy

  9. Red Storm usage model :Version 1.12.

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, Karen L.; Sturtevant, Judith E.

    2005-12-01

    Red Storm is an Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) funded massively parallel supercomputer located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The Red Storm Usage Model (RSUM) documents the capabilities and the environment provided for the FY05 Tri-Lab Level II Limited Availability Red Storm User Environment Milestone and the FY05 SNL Level II Limited Availability Red Storm Platform Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and SNL. Additionally, the Red Storm Usage Model maps the provided capabilities to the Tri-Lab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the ASC community and have been updated in FY05 to reflect the community's needs. For each section of the RSUM, Appendix I maps the ACE requirements to the Limited Availability User Environment capabilities and includes a description of ACE requirements met and those requirements that are not met in that particular section. The Red Storm Usage Model, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and vetted throughout the Tri-Lab community.

  10. Annual Report: 2011-2012 Storm Season Sampling, Non-Dry Dock Stormwater Monitoring for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Metallo, David; Rupert, Brian; Johnston, Robert K.; Gebhart, Christine

    2013-07-03

    Annual PSNS non-dry dock storm water monitoring results for 2011-2012 storm season. Included are a brief description of the sampling procedures, storm event information, laboratory methods and data collection, a results and discussion section, and the conclusions and recommendations.

  11. Evaluation of biological treatment of pharmaceutical waste water with PAC (powdered activated carbon) addition. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, D.A.; Osantowski, R.A.

    1988-05-01

    A lack of information on applicable removal technologies for total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) prevented promulgation of best available technology economically achievable (BAT) limitations and new source performance standards (NSPS) for TCOD for pharmaceutical manufacturing plants in 1983 (EPA/440/1-83/084). One technology that was evaluated was powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition to an activated-sludge system (PACT*). A viscous floating mass of mixed-liquor solids (VFMLS) developed in the PACT units and resulted in premature termination of the study. The purposes of the study were to: (1) attempt to find the cause of the formation of the VFMLS; (2) generate additional research data for TCOD removal from pharmaceutical waste water using the PACT process; (3) evaluate the efficiency of PACT in removing specific organics; (4) evaluate the effectiveness of PACT in reducing effluent aquatic toxicity and (5) evaluate the use of a selector to improve the settleability of the mixed liquor. One control unit, two PACT units and a unit equipped with a series of selector basins for improving the settling characteristics of the mixed-liquor suspended solids were operated.

  12. Architectural requirements for the Red Storm computing system.

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, William J.; Tomkins, James Lee

    2003-10-01

    This report is based on the Statement of Work (SOW) describing the various requirements for delivering 3 new supercomputer system to Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) program. This system is named Red Storm and will be a distributed memory, massively parallel processor (MPP) machine built primarily out of commodity parts. The requirements presented here distill extensive architectural and design experience accumulated over a decade and a half of research, development and production operation of similar machines at Sandia. Red Storm will have an unusually high bandwidth, low latency interconnect, specially designed hardware and software reliability features, a light weight kernel compute node operating system and the ability to rapidly switch major sections of the machine between classified and unclassified computing environments. Particular attention has been paid to architectural balance in the design of Red Storm, and it is therefore expected to achieve an atypically high fraction of its peak speed of 41 TeraOPS on real scientific computing applications. In addition, Red Storm is designed to be upgradeable to many times this initial peak capability while still retaining appropriate balance in key design dimensions. Installation of the Red Storm computer system at Sandia's New Mexico site is planned for 2004, and it is expected that the system will be operated for a minimum of five years following installation.

  13. Thor's Hammer/Red Storm

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Camp & Jim Tomkins The Design Specification and Initial Implementation of the Red Storm Architecture --in partnership with Cray, Inc. William J. Camp & James L. Tomkins CCIM, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM bill@sandia.gov Our rubric Mission critical engineering & science applications Large systems with a few processors per node Message passing paradigm Balanced architecture Use commodity wherever possible Efficient systems software Emphasis on scalability &

  14. Performance Validation of Low-e Storm Windows Paves Way for Market Acceptance

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    One recent addition to the arsenal of cost-effective efficiency measures is low-emissivity (low-e) storm windows. A low-e coating or glazing is a thin layer deposited directly on the surface of one...

  15. Enhancement of the anaerobic hydrolysis and fermentation of municipal solid waste in leachbed reactors by varying flow direction during water addition and leachate recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Uke, Matthew N.; Stentiford, Edward

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► Combined downflow and upflow water addition improved hydraulic conductivity. ► Upflow water addition unclogged perforated screen leading to more leachate flow. ► The volume of water added and transmitted positively correlated with hydrolysis process. ► Combined downflow and upflow water addition increased COD production and yield. ► Combined downflow and upflow leachate recycle improved leachate and COD production. - Abstract: Poor performance of leachbed reactors (LBRs) is attributed to channelling, compaction from waste loading, unidirectional water addition and leachate flow causing reduced hydraulic conductivity and leachate flow blockage. Performance enhancement was evaluated in three LBRs M, D and U at 22 ± 3 °C using three water addition and leachate recycle strategies; water addition was downflow in D throughout, intermittently upflow and downflow in M and U with 77% volume downflow in M, 54% volume downflow in U while the rest were upflow. Leachate recycle was downflow in D, alternately downflow and upflow in M and upflow in U. The strategy adopted in U led to more water addition (30.3%), leachate production (33%) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) solubilisation (33%; 1609 g against 1210 g) compared to D (control). The total and volatile solids (TS and VS) reductions were similar but the highest COD yield (g-COD/g-TS and g-COD/g-VS removed) was in U (1.6 and 1.9); the values were 1.33 and 1.57 for M, and 1.18 and 1.41 for D respectively. The strategy adopted in U showed superior performance with more COD and leachate production compared to reactors M and D.

  16. Predicting the impact from significant storm events on a hazardous waste site

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, U.P.; Dixon, N.P.; Mitchell, J.S.

    1994-12-31

    The Stringfellow Hazardous Waste Site is a former Class 1 industrial waste disposal facility located near the community of Glen Avon in southern California. In response to community concerns regarding flooding and possible exposure to contaminants via the surface water pathway, a study was performed to evaluate the potential effect significant/episodic storm events may have on the site and its engineered structures as they exist during present day conditions. Specific storm events such as significant recorded historic storms as well as synthetic design storms were considered and the impact on the onsite area and surface channels in Pyrite Canyon downstream of the site was evaluated. Conclusions were reached, and recommendations were made to minimize the potential flood impacts and exposure to contaminants via the surface water pathway in the areas downstream of the site.

  17. Modeling of Arctic Storms with a Variable High-Resolution General Circulation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Mark A.; Roesler, Erika Louise; Bosler, Peter Andrew

    2015-08-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Biological and Environmental Research project, “Water Cycle and Climate Extremes Modeling” is improving our understanding and modeling of regional details of the Earth’s water cycle. Sandia is using high resolution model behavior to investigate storms in the Arctic.

  18. Low-e Storm Windows: Market Assessment and Pathways to Market Transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, Katherine A.

    2013-06-08

    Field studies sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have shown that the use of low-e storm windows can lead to significant heating and cooling energy savings in residential homes. This study examines the market for low-e storm windows based on market data, case studies, and recent experience with weatherization deployment programs. It uses information from interviews conducted with DOE researchers and industry partners involved in case studies and early deployment efforts related to low-e storm windows. In addition, this study examines potential barriers to market acceptance, assesses the market and energy savings potential, and identifies opportunities to transform the market for low-e storm windows and overcome market adoption barriers.

  19. StormVEx_2009ARM_poster

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Storm Windows (Even with a Low-E Coating!) Storm Windows (Even with a Low-E Coating!) November 11, 2008 - 3:45pm Addthis John Lippert Earlier I wrote about purchasing energy-efficient windows. Jen followed up with an excellent blog on improving your existing windows, which mentioned low-e films. One fairly well-kept secret-low-emissivity (low-e) storm windows-lies somewhere between these two options. They aren't the simple, low-cost, do-it-yourself option that Jen spoke of. But they are a less

  20. SGP CART Site Affected by Ice Storm

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2 SGP CART Site Affected by Ice Storm Beginning on January 29, 2002, a major winter storm passed through the Plains states, leaving snow and ice in its path. Northern locales received snow, but most of the SGP CART site received a coating of thick, damaging ice. The intense storm system moved out of the Rocky Mountains, pulling in moisture from the Gulf of Mexico. A cold, shallow air mass already over Oklahoma and Kansas set up a temperature inversion in the atmosphere, with warmer air

  1. Separation of switchgrass bio-oil by water/organic solvent addition and pH adjustment

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Park, Lydia Kyoung-Eun; Ren, Shoujie; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Ye, X. Philip; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Tsouris, Costas

    2016-01-29

    Applications of bio-oil are limited by its challenging properties including high moisture content, low pH, high viscosity, high oxygen content, and low heating value. Separation of switchgrass bio-oil components by adding water, organic solvents (hexadecane and octane), and sodium hydroxide may help to overcome these issues. Acetic acid and phenolic compounds were extracted in aqueous and organic phases, respectively. Polar chemicals, such as acetic acid, did not partition in the organic solvent phase. Acetic acid in the aqueous phase after extraction is beneficial for a microbial-electrolysis-cell application to produce hydrogen as an energy source for further hydrodeoxygenation of bio-oil. Organicmore » solvents extracted more chemicals from bio-oil in combined than in sequential extraction; however, organic solvents partitioned into the aqueous phase in combined extraction. When sodium hydroxide was added to adjust the pH of aqueous bio-oil, organic-phase precipitation occurred. As the pH was increased, a biphasic aqueous/organic dispersion was formed, and phase separation was optimized at approximately pH 6. The neutralized organic bio-oil had approximately 37% less oxygen and 100% increased heating value than the initial centrifuged bio-oil. In conclusion, the less oxygen content and increased heating value indicated a significant improvement of the bio-oil quality through neutralization.« less

  2. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 1

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-15

    Severe wind and snow storms hit the Pacific Northwest region on December 14 – 15, 2006, following severe flooding during the past few days. The severe weather resulted in major power outages through the region. At peak there were 1.8 million customers without power which included BC Hydro in Canada. Currently, there are over 1.5 million outages in the region as a result of the Pacific Northwest Storms. This represents about 42 percent of customers in affected utility service areas in Oregon and Washington. See table below. Because the current wind and snow storms are coming on the heels of extensive flooding in the region, electric utilities are experiencing damage. Wind gusts reached close to 100 mph in some areas of the region. The storm is expected to bring its strong winds and heavy snow into Idaho, Montana and Wyoming Friday and into the weekend. There are currently no reported major impacts to the petroleum and natural gas infrastructure.

  3. EERE Success Story—Performance Validation of Low-e Storm Windows Paves Way for Market Acceptance

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    One recent addition to the arsenal of cost-effective efficiency measures is low-emissivity (low-e) storm windows. A low-e coating or glazing is a thin layer deposited directly on the surface of one...

  4. 'Perfect Storm' Sank Solyndra | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    'Perfect Storm' Sank Solyndra 'Perfect Storm' Sank Solyndra September 14, 2011 - 6:14am Addthis Daniel B. Poneman Daniel B. Poneman Former Deputy Secretary of Energy Editorial Note: This article also appears in USA Today. The International Energy Agency projects that solar power will grow steadily, producing nearly a quarter of the world's electricity within four decades. Conservatively, that means more than $3 trillion worth of solar panels will need to be manufactured - a vast economic and

  5. AGENDA ADEP Surface Water Protection Project NPDES Storm Water...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Permit Bi-Annual Update Public Meeting January 22, 2014 5:30-7:30 p.m. Cities of Gold Conference Center Pojoaque, New Mexico 5:30 p.m. Poster Session 5:50 p.m. Welcome Steve...

  6. Additive Manufacturing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    MST » MST Research Programs » Additive Manufacturing Additive Manufacturing A method allowing unparalleled manufacturing control, data visualization, and high-value parts repair. Through additive manufacturing, Los Alamos is developing materials for the future. Taking complex manufacturing challenges from design to fabrication. A science and engineering approach for additive manufacturing solutions. Get Expertise John Carpenter Technical Staff Member Metallurgy Email Division Leader Materials

  7. Irreversible Wash Aid Additive for Cesium Mitigation: Phase II. Selection and/or Modification of COTS Field Portable Waste Water Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Michael; Mertz, Carol; Kivenas, Nadia; Magnuson, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    After an accidental or malicious release of radioactivity, large urban areas may be contaminated, compromising response efforts by first responders and law enforcement officials. In addition, some public services (e.g., drinking water and wastewater treatment, electrical power distribution, etc.) may be disrupted. In such an event, it may be important to deploy mitigation efforts in certain areas to restore response activities and public services (Fig. S-1). This report explores the state-of-the-art approach for a system to rapidly return critical infrastructure components to service following a cesium-137 (Cs-137) radiological dispersal device (RDD) release while avoiding the spread of Cs-137 beyond its original deposition area and minimizing the amount of Cs-137-contaminated wastewater. Specifically, we describe a wash system consisting of chemical additives added to fire hydrant water and irreversible solid sequestering agents added as the water is collected and treated for recycle in situ. The wash system is intended to be a rapidly deployable, cost-effective means of mitigating an urban setting for the purpose of restoring critical infrastructure and operational activities after a radiological release.

  8. Acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons during small geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B. R.; Millan, R. M.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.

    2015-12-02

    We report that past studies of radiation belt relativistic electrons have favored active storm time periods, while the effects of small geomagnetic storms (Dst >₋50 nT) have not been statistically characterized. In this timely study, given the current weak solar cycle, we identify 342 small storms from 1989 through 2000 and quantify the corresponding change in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Surprisingly, small storms can be equally as effective as large storms at enhancing and depleting fluxes. Slight differences exist, as small storms are 10% less likely to result in flux enhancement and 10% more likely to result in flux depletion than large storms. Nevertheless, it is clear that neither acceleration nor loss mechanisms scale with storm drivers as would be expected. Small geomagnetic storms play a significant role in radiation belt relativistic electron dynamics and provide opportunities to gain new insights into the complex balance of acceleration and loss processes.

  9. Acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons during small geomagnetic storms

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Anderson, Brett R.; Millan, R. M.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Friedel, Reinhard Hans W.

    2015-12-02

    Past studies of radiation belt relativistic electrons have favored active storm time periods, while the effects of small geomagnetic storms (Dst > –50 nT) have not been statistically characterized. In this timely study, given the current weak solar cycle, we identify 342 small storms from 1989 through 2000 and quantify the corresponding change in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Surprisingly, small storms can be equally as effective as large storms at enhancing and depleting fluxes. Slight differences exist, as small storms are 10% less likely to result in flux enhancement and 10% more likely to result in flux depletionmore » than large storms. Nevertheless, it is clear that neither acceleration nor loss mechanisms scale with storm drivers as would be expected. As a result, small geomagnetic storms play a significant role in radiation belt relativistic electron dynamics and provide opportunities to gain new insights into the complex balance of acceleration and loss processes.« less

  10. Acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons during small geomagnetic storms

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Anderson, B. R.; Millan, R. M.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.

    2015-12-02

    We report that past studies of radiation belt relativistic electrons have favored active storm time periods, while the effects of small geomagnetic storms (Dst >₋50 nT) have not been statistically characterized. In this timely study, given the current weak solar cycle, we identify 342 small storms from 1989 through 2000 and quantify the corresponding change in relativistic electron flux at geosynchronous orbit. Surprisingly, small storms can be equally as effective as large storms at enhancing and depleting fluxes. Slight differences exist, as small storms are 10% less likely to result in flux enhancement and 10% more likely to result inmore » flux depletion than large storms. Nevertheless, it is clear that neither acceleration nor loss mechanisms scale with storm drivers as would be expected. Small geomagnetic storms play a significant role in radiation belt relativistic electron dynamics and provide opportunities to gain new insights into the complex balance of acceleration and loss processes.« less

  11. The effect of in-situ noble metal chemical addition on crack growth rate behavior of structural materials in 288 C water

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, P.L.; Angeliu, T.

    1996-10-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC), especially in existing boiling water reactor (BVM) components, is most effectively accomplished by reducing the corrosion potential. This was successfully demonstrated by adding hydrogen to BNM water, which reduced oxidant concentration and corrosion potential by recombining with the radiolytically formed oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. However, reduction in the corrosion potential for some vessel internals is difficult, and others require high hydrogen addition rates, which results in an increase in the main steam radiation level from volatile N{sup 16}. Noble metal electrocatalysis provides a unique opportunity to efficiently achieve a dramatic reduction in corrosion potential and SCC in BWRs, by catalytically reacting all oxidants that diffuse to a (catalytic) metal surface with hydrogen. There are many techniques for creating catalytic surfaces, including alloying with noble metals or applying noble metal alloy powders to existing BWR components by thermal spraying or weld cladding. A novel system-wide approach for producing catalytic surfaces on all wetted components has been developed which employs the reactor coolant water as the medium of transport. This approach is termed in-situ noble metal chemical addition (NMCA), and has been successfully used in extensive laboratory tests to coat a wide range of pre-oxidized structural materials. In turn, these specimens have maintained catalytic response in long term, cyclic exposures to extremes in dissolved gases, impurity levels, pH, flow rate, temperature, straining, etc. With stoichiometric excess H{sub 2}, the corrosion potential drops dramatically and crack initiation and growth are greatly reduced, even at high O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels. Without excess H{sub 2} (i.e., in normal BWR water chemistry), noble metals do not increase the corrosion potential or SCC.

  12. Effects of zinc additions on the stress corrosion crack growth rate of sensitized stainless steel, Alloy 600 and Alloy 182 weld metal in 288 C water

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, P.L.; Angeliu, T.M.

    1995-09-01

    ZnO additions to boiling water reactor (BWR) water have been the focus of recent interest, primarily because of their beneficial influence in reducing buildup of radioactive species such as Co{sup 60} in the oxide film of structural components, e.g., stainless steel piping. The effect of ZnO additions on stress corrosion crack growth rates were studied using 1T CT fracture mechanics specimens of sensitized type 304 stainless steel, sensitized Alloy 600, and Alloy 182 weld metal exposed to {approx}288 C water containing various levels of dissolved oxygen and impurities. Zn levels of 5 to 100 ppb Zn{sup 2+} were evaluated and found to reduce crack growth rates for all materials and in all water chemistries. Many Zn tests involved long term exposure and were performed at somewhat reduced corrosion potential (e.g., from {approx}+200 to 0 {minus}+50 mV{sub she}); variations in corrosion potential from +200, to +50, to {minus}50 mV{sub she} clearly had an important effect. The benefit of Zn appeared to be most pronounced when the growth rate was decreased (e.g., by corrosion potential). This was consistent with the findings of mechanistic studies, which showed that Zn decreased the repassivation response at times >10{sup 4} s, which is associated with low crack tip strain rates, i.e., low growth rates. Reduced corrosion potentials are also expected to directly effect Zn, since high (crack mouth) corrosion potentials inhibit the transport of Zn{sup 2+} into the crack. Zn also increased the fracture strain of the oxide on stainless steel, and may also reduce crack growth rates by increasing the pH in the crack. Similar benefits are expected for other structural materials, such as nonsensitized or irradiated stainless steel, carbon steel, low alloy steel, and other nickel alloys.

  13. Re-use of drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) sludge: Characterization and technological behaviour of cement mortars with atomized sludge additions

    SciTech Connect

    Husillos Rodriguez, N.; Martinez Ramirez, S.; Blanco Varela, M.T.; Guillem, M.; Puig, J.; Larrotcha, E.; Flores, J.

    2010-05-15

    This paper aims to characterize spray-dried DWTP sludge and evaluate its possible use as an addition for the cement industry. It describes the physical, chemical and micro-structural characterization of the sludge as well as the effect of its addition to Portland cements on the hydration, water demand, setting and mechanical strength of standardized mortars. Spray drying DWTP sludge generates a readily handled powdery material whose particle size is similar to those of Portland cement. The atomized sludge contains 12-14% organic matter (mainly fatty acids), while its main mineral constituents are muscovite, quartz, calcite, dolomite and seraphinite (or clinoclor). Its amorphous material content is 35%. The mortars were made with type CEM I Portland cement mixed with 10 to 30% atomized sludge exhibited lower mechanical strength than the control cement and a decline in slump. Setting was also altered in the blended cements with respect to the control.

  14. additive manufacturing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    additive manufacturing - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power ...

  15. Additive Manufacturing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... laser-sintering) Optomec LENS MR-7 Sciaky EBAM 68 Non-metal additive manufacturing Powder bed FORMIGA P 110 PolyJet 3D ... Fused deposition modeling print technology MakerBot ...

  16. additive manufacturuing

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    an award last month for his 3D printing innovation. It could revolutionize additive manufacturing.

    Lawrence Livermore Lab engineer Bryan Moran wasn't necessarily...

  17. Los Alamos provides HOPE for radiation belt storm probes

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    HOPE for radiation belt storm probes Los Alamos provides HOPE for radiation belt storm probes The HOPE analyzer is one of a suite of instruments that was successfully launched as ...

  18. Climate Change and Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge...

    Energy Saver

    Change and Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise Climate Change and Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise This study provides ...

  19. General Permit for Small Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Storm Sewer Systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: General Permit for Small Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems Abstract Permit...

  20. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  1. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  2. Storm: lightning-fast resource management

    SciTech Connect

    Frachtenberg, E.; Petrini, F.; Fernández, J. C.; Pakin, S. D.; Coll, S.

    2002-01-01

    Although workstation clusters are a common platform for high-performance computing (HPC), they remain more difficult to manage than sequential systems or even symmetric multiprocessors. Furthermore, as cluster sizes increase, the quality of the resource-management subsystem - essentially, all of the code that runs on a cluster other than the applications - increasingly impacts application efficiency. In this paper, we present STORM, a resource-management framework designed for scalability and performance. The key innovation behind STORMis a software architecture that enables resource management to exploit low-level network features. As a result of this HPC-application-like design, STORM is orders of magnitude faster than the best reported results in the literature on two sample resource-management functions: job launching and process scheduling.

  3. Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX) Operated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy, the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) begins its inaugural deployment November 2010 in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment, or STORMVEX. For six months, the comprehensive suite of AMF2 instruments will obtain measurements of cloud and aerosol properties at various sites

  4. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 4

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-18

    Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 237,030 customers remain without power. This is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent about 8 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington.

  5. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 5

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-19

    Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 186,627 customers remain without power. The majority of customers without power are served by Puget Sound Energy. This is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent about 6 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington. See table below.

  6. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 2

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-16

    Severe wind and snow storms hit the Pacific Northwest region on December 14 – 15, 2006 resulting in major power outagesin the region. The storm is now moving off into southern Canada. A new weather disturbance nearing the Northwest coast may generate a few rain and snow showers across the Seattle and Portland areas today, but widespread active weather is not expected. There are roughly 950,000 customers in the region (including Canada) without power as a result of the Pacific Northweststorms, down from a peak of 1.8 million customers. This represents about 26 percent of customers in affected utility service areas in Oregon and Washington. See table below. As of 12:30 PM EST, the Renton Control Center for the Olympic Pipeline (petroleum products) had power restored. The pipeline, serviced by Puget Sound Energy, was shut down after it lost power during the storm. According to a pipeline official, the pipeline is expected to restart in approximately 2-3 hours with some reduced throughput later today. SeaTac International Airport receives jet fuel from the pipeline; however, it’s been reported that the airport has approximately eight days of jet fuel inventories on hand. There are no reports of problems regarding fuel production. There are some temporary and minor distribution at retail gas stations due to lack of power. Fuel delivery is also slowed in some areas due to delays on some roads. ESF #12 has not been deployed

  7. Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience, and Storm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Responses (November 2014) | Department of Energy Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience, and Storm Responses (November 2014) Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience, and Storm Responses (November 2014) Smart grid technologies are helping utilities to speed outage restoration following major storm events, reduce the total number of affected customers, and improve overall service reliability to reduce customer losses from power disruptions. This report presents

  8. Global Simulation of the March 17, 2013 storm: importance of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    current observations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Global Simulation of the March 17, 2013 storm: importance of boundary conditions in reproducing ring current ...

  9. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 6

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-20

    Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 134,868 customers remain without power. The number of outages is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent less than 5 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington. The majority of customers without power are served by Puget Sound Energy and Seattle City Light.

  10. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 3

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-17

    Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 468,200 customers, including Canada, remain without power. This is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent about 16 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington. See table below. The Olympic pipeline reports that the pipeline is operational; however, pipeline throughput remains reduced since one substation along the line remains without power. Complete power restoration is expected later today. There are no reports of problems regarding fuel distribution and production.

  11. Status of the nuSTORM Facility and a Possible Extension for Long-Baseline $\

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, Alan D.; Liu, Ao; Lagrange, Jean-Baptiste; Pasternak, Jaroslaw

    2015-11-03

    Neutrino beams produced from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring (the so called Neutrino Factory) provide a powerful way to study neutrino oscillation physics and, in addition, provide unique beams for neutrino interaction studies. The Neutrinos from STORed Muons (nuSTORM) facility uses a neutrino factory-like design. Due to the particular nature of nuSTORM, it can also provide an intense, very pure, muon neutrino beam from pion decay. This so-called “Neo-conventional" muon neutrino beam from nuSTORM makes nuSTORM a hybrid neutrino factory. In this paper we describe the facility and give a detailed description of the neutrino beam fluxes that are available and the precision to which these fluxes can be determined. We then present sensitivity plots that indicated how well the facility can perform for short-baseline oscillation searches and show its potential for a neutrino interaction physics program. Finally, we comment on the performance potential of the "Neo-conventional" muon neutrino beam optimized for long- baseline neutrino-oscillation physics.

  12. Best Management Practice #14: Alternative Water Sources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Many federal facilities may have water uses that can be met with non-potable water from alternative water sources. Potentially available alternative water sources for Federal sources include municipal-supplied reclaimed water, treated gray water from on-site sanitary sources, and storm water.

  13. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 7, 2004 (4:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-07

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, storm track, and county outage data are provided.

  14. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 6, 2004 (4:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-06

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, storm track, and county outage data are provided.

  15. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 6, 2004 (10:00 AM EDT)

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2004-09-06

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, storm track, and county outage data are provided.

  16. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 6, 2004 (10:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2004-09-06

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, storm track, and county outage data are provided.

  17. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 7, 2004 (10:00 AM EDT)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-07

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, storm track, and county outage data are provided.

  18. September 2013 Storm and Flood Assessment Report

    SciTech Connect

    Walterscheid, J. C.

    2015-12-21

    Between September 10 and 17, 2013, New Mexico and Colorado received a historically large amount of precipitation (Figure 1). This report assesses the damage caused by flooding along with estimated costs to repair the damage at Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) on the Pajarito Plateau. Los Alamos County, New Mexico, received between 200% and 600% of the normal precipitation for this time period (Figure 2), and the Laboratory received approximately 450% percent of its average precipitation for September (Figure 3). As a result, the Laboratory was inundated with rain, including the extremely large, greater-than-1000-yr return period event that occurred between September 12 and 13 (Table 1). With saturated antecedent soil conditions from the September 10 storm, when the September 12 to September 13 storm hit, the flooding was disastrous to the Laboratory’s environmental infrastructure, including access roads, gage stations, watershed controls, control measures installed under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit (hereafter, the Individual Permit), and groundwater monitoring wells (Figures 4 through 21). From September 16 to October 1, 2013, the Laboratory completed field assessments of environmental infrastructure and generated descriptions and estimates of the damage, which are presented in spreadsheets in Attachments 1 to 4 of this report. Section 2 of this report contains damage assessments by watershed, including access roads, gage stations, watershed controls, and control measures installed under the Individual Permit. Section 3 contains damage assessments of monitoring wells by the groundwater monitoring groups as established in the Interim Facility-Wide Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Monitoring Year 2014. Section 4 addresses damage and loss of automated samplers. Section 5 addresses sediment sampling needs, and Section 6 is the summary of estimated recovery costs from the significant rain and flooding during September 2013.

  19. Climate Change and Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Sea-Level Rise | Department of Energy Climate Change and Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise Climate Change and Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise This study provides an initial assessment of the effects of the interaction of sea-level rise (SLR) and storm surge on the exposure of energy infrastructure to coastal flooding. As recent hurricane events have demonstrated, this study found that an extensive amount of U.S. energy

  20. The Energy Department Prepares for Tropical Storm Karen | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy The Energy Department Prepares for Tropical Storm Karen The Energy Department Prepares for Tropical Storm Karen October 4, 2013 - 3:00pm Addthis Marissa Newhall Marissa Newhall Director of Digital Strategy and Communications What does this mean for me? Follow the latest news on Tropical Storm Karen by visiting the FEMA blog. Stay up-to-date on energy delivery impacts by reading twice-daily situation reports from the Energy Department. Visit ready.gov for more information about

  1. Effects of a geomagnetic storm on thermospheric circulation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    The motions of the thermosphere and its interactions with the ionosphere during a geomagnetic storm are of current interest to space scientists. A two-dimensional model was used to simulate the thermospheric response to the impulsive high-latitude heating associated with a geomagnetic storm. The storm-induced motions can be characterized by an initial period of transient waves followed by the development of a mean circulation. These motions generate an electrical-current system that is on the same order of magnitude as, and in the opposite sense to the normal s/sub q/ current system. Model-simulated winds and electrical currents were then compared to observations.

  2. Storm Lake, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Storm Lake is a city in Buena Vista County, Iowa. It falls under Iowa's 5th congressional district.12 Registered...

  3. Managing Storm Aftermath in Alabama | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Managing Storm Aftermath in Alabama Managing Storm Aftermath in Alabama June 18, 2010 - 3:19pm Addthis Montgomery's horizontal grinder has normal handling capacity of 108 tons per hour. | Photo Courtesy of Lynda Wool Montgomery's horizontal grinder has normal handling capacity of 108 tons per hour. | Photo Courtesy of Lynda Wool Lindsay Gsell Warm, humid climate and proximity to the Gulf of Mexico produce turbulent weather patterns that regularly bring tornadoes and hurricanes to Montgomery,

  4. Interior and Exterior Low-E Storm Window Installation

    SciTech Connect

    Witters, Sarah

    2014-09-03

    Until recently, energy-efficient window retrofit options have largely been limited to repair or replacement; leaving the homeowner to decide between affordability and deeper energy savings. A new and improved low-e storm window boasts a combination of curb appeal and energy efficiency, all for a fraction of the cost of window replacement. A recent whole-home experiment performed by PNNL suggests that attaching low-e storm windows can result in as much energy savings replacing the windows.

  5. Spurring Market Adoption of Energy Efficient Storm Windows | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Spurring Market Adoption of Energy Efficient Storm Windows Spurring Market Adoption of Energy Efficient Storm Windows June 20, 2016 - 12:53pm Addthis At the Energy Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), researchers are using two modular homes to test energy-efficient products and calculate their energy savings. Researchers test new technologies in the Experimental home (pictured above), while the Baseline home (not pictured) serves as a control and doesn’t get

  6. Dispersion of radioactive pollutant in a tornadic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model is used to calculate ground-level air concentration and deposition (due to precipitation scavenging) after a hypothetical tornado strike at a plutonium fabrication facility in Pennsylvania. Plutonium particles less than 10 ..mu..m in diameter are assumed to be lifted into the tornadic storm cell by the vortex. The rotational characteristics of the tornadic storm are embedded within the larger mesoscale flow of the storm system. The design-basis translational wind values are based on probabilities associated with existing records of tornado strikes in the vicinity of the plant site. Turbulence exchange coefficients are based on empirical values deduced from experimental data in severe storms and from theoretical assumptions obtained from the literature. The quasi-Lagrangian method of moments is used to model the transport of concentration within a grid cell volume. In all case studies, the effects of updrafts and downdrafts, coupled with scavenging of the particulates by precipitation, account for most of the material being deposited within 20 to 45 km downwind of the plant site. Ground-level isopleths in the x-y plane show that most of the material is deposited behind and slightly to the left of the centerline trajectory of the storm. Approximately 5% of the material is dispersed into the stratosphere and anvil section of the storm.

  7. Investigation of winter mountain storms in Utah during the 1989 Utah/NOAA field program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, A.W.

    1990-09-01

    A field research effort was conducted in the vicinity of the Tushar Mountains of southern Utah as part of the Federal-State Program in Atmospheric Modification Research involving the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the State of Utah. The field study took place in February and March 1989 and emphasized the studies of supercooled liquid water evolution in winter storms and attempts to measure the effects of ground-based silver iodide cloud seeding. Results of the field effort are presented.

  8. A modeling study of coastal inundation induced by storm surge, sea-level rise, and subsidence in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kraucunas, Ian P.; Rice, Jennie S.; Preston, Benjamin; Wilbanks, Thomas

    2013-12-10

    The northern coasts of the Gulf of Mexico are highly vulnerable to the direct threats of climate change, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, and such risks can be potentially exacerbated by land subsidence and global sea level rise. This paper presents an application of a coastal storm surge model to study the coastal inundation process induced by tide and storm surge, and its response to the effects of land subsidence and sea level rise in the northern Gulf coast. An unstructured-grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model was used to simulate tides and hurricane-induced storm surges in the Gulf of Mexico. Simulated distributions of co-amplitude and co-phase of semi-diurnal and diurnal tides are in good agreement with previous modeling studies. The storm surges induced by four historical hurricanes (Rita, Katrina, Ivan and Dolly) were simulated and compared to observed water levels at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tide stations. Effects of coastal subsidence and future global sea level rise on coastal inundation in the Louisiana coast were evaluated using a parameter “change of inundation depth” through sensitivity simulations that were based on a projected future subsidence scenario and 1-m global sea level rise by the end of the century. Model results suggested that hurricane-induced storm surge height and coastal inundation could be exacerbated by future global sea level rise and subsidence, and that responses of storm surge and coastal inundation to the effects of sea level rise and subsidence are highly nonlinear and vary on temporal and spatial scales.

  9. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 7, 2004 (10:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-07

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances in the Florida area. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, storm track, and county outage data are provided.

  10. EERE Success Story-Performance Validation of Low-e Storm Windows...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Validation of Low-e Storm Windows Paves Way for Market Acceptance EERE Success Story-Performance Validation of Low-e Storm Windows Paves Way for Market Acceptance September 30, ...

  11. Changes to Saturn's zonal-mean tropospheric thermal structure after the 2010-2011 northern hemisphere storm

    SciTech Connect

    Achterberg, R. K.; Hesman, B. E.; Gierasch, P. J.; Conrath, B. J.; Fletcher, L. N.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Flasar, F. M.

    2014-05-10

    We use far-infrared (20-200 μm) data from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer on the Cassini spacecraft to determine the zonal-mean temperature and hydrogen para-fraction in Saturn's upper troposphere from observations taken before and after the large northern hemisphere storm in 2010-2011. During the storm, zonal mean temperatures in the latitude band between approximately 25°N and 45°N (planetographic latitude) increased by about 3 K, while the zonal mean hydrogen para-fraction decreased by about 0.04 over the same latitudes, at pressures greater than about 300 mbar. These changes occurred over the same latitude range as the disturbed cloud band seen in visible images. The observations are consistent with low para-fraction gas being brought up from the level of the water cloud by the strong convective plume associated with the storm, while being heated by condensation of water vapor, and then advected zonally by the winds near the plume tops in the upper troposphere.

  12. nuSTORM and A Path to a Muon Collider

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Adey, David; Bayes, Ryan; Bross, Alan; Snopok, Pavel

    2015-05-20

    Our article reviews the current status of the nuSTORM facility and shows how it can be utilized to perform the next step on the path toward the realization of a μ+μ- collider. This review includes the physics motivation behind nuSTORM, a detailed description of the facility and the neutrino beams it can produce, and a summary of the short-baseline neutrino oscillation physics program that can be carried out at the facility. The idea for nuSTORM (the production of neutrino beams from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring) was discussed in the literature more than 30 years agomore » in the context of searching for noninteracting (sterile) neutrinos. However, only in the past 5 years has the concept been fully developed, motivated in large part by the facility's unmatched reach in addressing the evolving data on oscillations involving sterile neutrinos. Finally, this article reviews the basics of the μ+μ-collider concept and describes how nuSTORM provides a platform to test advanced concepts for six-dimensional muon ionization cooling.« less

  13. nuSTORM and A Path to a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Adey, David; Bayes, Ryan; Bross, Alan; Snopok, Pavel

    2015-05-20

    Our article reviews the current status of the nuSTORM facility and shows how it can be utilized to perform the next step on the path toward the realization of a μ+μ- collider. This review includes the physics motivation behind nuSTORM, a detailed description of the facility and the neutrino beams it can produce, and a summary of the short-baseline neutrino oscillation physics program that can be carried out at the facility. The idea for nuSTORM (the production of neutrino beams from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring) was discussed in the literature more than 30 years ago in the context of searching for noninteracting (sterile) neutrinos. However, only in the past 5 years has the concept been fully developed, motivated in large part by the facility's unmatched reach in addressing the evolving data on oscillations involving sterile neutrinos. Finally, this article reviews the basics of the μ+μ-collider concept and describes how nuSTORM provides a platform to test advanced concepts for six-dimensional muon ionization cooling.

  14. nuSTORM and A Path to a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Adey, David; Bayes, Ryan; Bross, Alan; Snopok, Pavel

    2015-05-20

    Our article reviews the current status of the nuSTORM facility and shows how it can be utilized to perform the next step on the path toward the realization of a ?+?- collider. This review includes the physics motivation behind nuSTORM, a detailed description of the facility and the neutrino beams it can produce, and a summary of the short-baseline neutrino oscillation physics program that can be carried out at the facility. The idea for nuSTORM (the production of neutrino beams from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring) was discussed in the literature more than 30 years ago in the context of searching for noninteracting (sterile) neutrinos. However, only in the past 5 years has the concept been fully developed, motivated in large part by the facility's unmatched reach in addressing the evolving data on oscillations involving sterile neutrinos. Finally, this article reviews the basics of the ?+?-collider concept and describes how nuSTORM provides a platform to test advanced concepts for six-dimensional muon ionization cooling.

  15. Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

    2014-05-13

    Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

  16. Additive Manufacturing Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Additive Manufacturing 1 Technology Assessment 2 1. Contents 3 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ............................................................................................... 2 4 1.1 Introduction to Additive Manufacturing ....................................................................................... 2 5 1.2 Additive Manufacturing Processes ............................................................................................... 2 6 1.3 Benefits of Additive

  17. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOEpatents

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  18. Additive Manufacturing: Going Mainstream

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, is receiving attention from media, investment communities and governments around the world transforming it from obscurity to something to be talked about.

  19. Analyzing Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy Analyzing Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise Analyzing Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise Analyzing Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is tasked with assessing risk from all hazards to the nation's energy infrastructure. As part of our commitment to understand the risks from climate change and extreme events and help

  20. Evaluation of Low-E Storm Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, Jake R.; Widder, Sarah H.

    2014-05-31

    This study examines the performance of exterior and interior low-e storm panels with a controlled whole home experimental design using PNNL's Lab Homes. Summing the estimated annual average heating and cooling savings, the installation of low-e storm panels resulted in approximately 10% annual energy savings. The results of the experiment will be used to determine and validate performance of low-e storm windows over double pane clear glass windows in a whole home setting.

  1. Evaluation of Interior Low-E Storm Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION Lab Homes; Storm; Windows; Low-e; ...

  2. Savings Project: Install Exterior Storm Windows With Low-E Coating...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    while keeping your home warm in the winter and cool in the summer. | Photo courtesy of Larson Manufacturing Company. Installing storm windows will lower your energy bill while...

  3. FPDS-NG Change Management Notice for the Oklahoma Tornado and Storm

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    A new National Interest Action value for the 'Oklahoma Tornado and Storm 2013' has been added to the FPDS-NG Production system.

  4. R-5 Highly-Insulating Windows and Low-e Storm Windows Volume Purchase Program

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-30

    Introduces DOE's Building Technologies fenestration RD&D program, and describes the highly insulated R-5 Windows and Low-e Storm Windows Volume Purchase solicitation.

  5. Building America Webinar: Low-E Storms: The Next Big Thing in Window

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Retrofits | Department of Energy Low-E Storms: The Next Big Thing in Window Retrofits Building America Webinar: Low-E Storms: The Next Big Thing in Window Retrofits This Building America webinar presented a new and improved low-e storm window that boasts a combination of curb appeal and energy efficiency, all for a fraction of the cost of window replacement, on Sept. 9, 2014. Thomas Culp, Birch Point Consulting, LLC, discussed the development of low-e storm windows and examples of success

  6. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Low-e Storms: The

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Next "Big Thing" in Window Retrofits | Department of Energy Low-e Storms: The Next "Big Thing" in Window Retrofits Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Low-e Storms: The Next "Big Thing" in Window Retrofits Low-e Storms: The Next "Big Thing" in Window Retrofits Official Webinar Transcript (September 9, 2014) Pam Cole: Welcome, everyone. Again, this is Low-E Storm Window for Retrofits webinar. I'm Pam Cole and I am a research engineer

  7. Building America's Low-e Storm Window Adoption Program Plan (FY2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, Katherine A.

    2013-12-23

    Low emissivity (low-e) storm windows/panels appear to hold promise for effectively reducing existing home heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) consumption. Due to the affordability of low-e storm windows and the large numbers of existing homes that have low-performing single-pane or double-pane clear windows, a tremendous opportunity exists to provide energy savings by transforming the low-e storm window market and increasing market adoption. This report outlines U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America’s planned market transformation activities in support of low-e storm window adoption during fiscal year (FY) 2014.

  8. Design and Simulation of the nuSTORM Pion Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.; Neuffer, D.; Bross, A.

    2015-08-15

    The nuSTORM (neutrinos from STORed Muons) proposal presents a detailed design for a neutrino facility based on a muon storage ring, with muon decay in the production straight section of the ring providing well defined neutrino beams. The facility includes a primary high-energy proton beam line, a target station with pion production and collection, and a pion beamline for pion transportation and injection into a muon decay ring. The nuSTORM design uses “stochastic injection”, in which pions are directed by a chicane, referred to as the Orbit Combination Section (OCS), into the production straight section of the storage ring. Pions that decay within that straight section provide muons within the circulating acceptance of the ring. Furthermore, the design enables injection without kickers or a separate pion decay transport line. The beam line that the pions traverse before being extracted from the decay ring is referred to as the pion beamline. Our paper describes the design and simulation of the pion beamline, and includes full beam dynamics simulations of the system.

  9. The global context of the 14 November 2012 storm event

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K. -J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Fok, M. -C. H.; Zheng, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Lee, J. -J.; Glocer, A.; Partamies, N.; Singer, H. J.; Reeves, G. D.; Mitchell, D. G.; Kletzing, C. A.; Onsager, T.

    2015-03-01

    From 2 to 5 UT on 14 November 2012, the Van Allen Probes observed repeated particle flux dropouts during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm as the satellites traversed the post-midnight to dawnside inner magnetosphere. Each flux dropout corresponded to an abrupt change in the magnetic topology, i.e., from a more dipolar configuration to a configuration with magnetic field lines stretched in the dawn-dusk direction. Geosynchronous GOES spacecraft located in the dusk and near-midnight sectors and the LANL constellation with wide local time coverage also observed repeated flux dropouts and stretched field lines with similar occurrence patterns to those of the Van Allen Probe events. THEMIS recorded multiple transient abrupt expansions of the evening-side magnetopause ~2030 min prior to the sequential Van Allen Probes observations. Ground-based magnetograms and all sky images demonstrate repeatable features in conjunction with the dropouts. We combine the various in-situ and ground-based measurements to define and understand the global spatiotemporal features associated with the dropouts observed by the Van Allen Probes. We discuss various proposed hypotheses for the mechanism that plausibly caused this storm-time dropout event as well as formulate a new hypothesis that explains the combined in-situ and ground-based observations: the earthward motion of magnetic flux ropes containing lobe plasmas that form along an extended magnetotail reconnection line in the near-Earth plasma sheet.

  10. Design and Simulation of the nuSTORM Pion Beamline

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Liu, A.; Neuffer, D.; Bross, A.

    2015-08-15

    The nuSTORM (neutrinos from STORed Muons) proposal presents a detailed design for a neutrino facility based on a muon storage ring, with muon decay in the production straight section of the ring providing well defined neutrino beams. The facility includes a primary high-energy proton beam line, a target station with pion production and collection, and a pion beamline for pion transportation and injection into a muon decay ring. The nuSTORM design uses “stochastic injection”, in which pions are directed by a chicane, referred to as the Orbit Combination Section (OCS), into the production straight section of the storage ring. Pionsmore » that decay within that straight section provide muons within the circulating acceptance of the ring. Furthermore, the design enables injection without kickers or a separate pion decay transport line. The beam line that the pions traverse before being extracted from the decay ring is referred to as the pion beamline. Our paper describes the design and simulation of the pion beamline, and includes full beam dynamics simulations of the system.« less

  11. The global context of the 14 November 2012 storm event

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Hwang, K. -J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Fok, M. -C. H.; Zheng, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Lee, J. -J.; Glocer, A.; Partamies, N.; Singer, H. J.; Reeves, G. D.; et al

    2015-03-01

    From 2 to 5 UT on 14 November 2012, the Van Allen Probes observed repeated particle flux dropouts during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm as the satellites traversed the post-midnight to dawnside inner magnetosphere. Each flux dropout corresponded to an abrupt change in the magnetic topology, i.e., from a more dipolar configuration to a configuration with magnetic field lines stretched in the dawn-dusk direction. Geosynchronous GOES spacecraft located in the dusk and near-midnight sectors and the LANL constellation with wide local time coverage also observed repeated flux dropouts and stretched field lines with similar occurrence patterns to thosemore » of the Van Allen Probe events. THEMIS recorded multiple transient abrupt expansions of the evening-side magnetopause ~20–30 min prior to the sequential Van Allen Probes observations. Ground-based magnetograms and all sky images demonstrate repeatable features in conjunction with the dropouts. We combine the various in-situ and ground-based measurements to define and understand the global spatiotemporal features associated with the dropouts observed by the Van Allen Probes. We discuss various proposed hypotheses for the mechanism that plausibly caused this storm-time dropout event as well as formulate a new hypothesis that explains the combined in-situ and ground-based observations: the earthward motion of magnetic flux ropes containing lobe plasmas that form along an extended magnetotail reconnection line in the near-Earth plasma sheet.« less

  12. The global context of the 14 November 2012 storm event

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K. -J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Fok, M. -C. H.; Zheng, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Lee, J. -J.; Glocer, A.; Partamies, N.; Singer, H. J.; Reeves, G. D.; Mitchell, D. G.; Kletzing, C. A.; Onsager, T.

    2015-03-01

    From 2 to 5 UT on 14 November 2012, the Van Allen Probes observed repeated particle flux dropouts during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm as the satellites traversed the post-midnight to dawnside inner magnetosphere. Each flux dropout corresponded to an abrupt change in the magnetic topology, i.e., from a more dipolar configuration to a configuration with magnetic field lines stretched in the dawn-dusk direction. Geosynchronous GOES spacecraft located in the dusk and near-midnight sectors and the LANL constellation with wide local time coverage also observed repeated flux dropouts and stretched field lines with similar occurrence patterns to those of the Van Allen Probe events. THEMIS recorded multiple transient abrupt expansions of the evening-side magnetopause ~20–30 min prior to the sequential Van Allen Probes observations. Ground-based magnetograms and all sky images demonstrate repeatable features in conjunction with the dropouts. We combine the various in-situ and ground-based measurements to define and understand the global spatiotemporal features associated with the dropouts observed by the Van Allen Probes. We discuss various proposed hypotheses for the mechanism that plausibly caused this storm-time dropout event as well as formulate a new hypothesis that explains the combined in-situ and ground-based observations: the earthward motion of magnetic flux ropes containing lobe plasmas that form along an extended magnetotail reconnection line in the near-Earth plasma sheet.

  13. LANL in Compliance with Clean Water Act

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    disputes citizens' lawsuit February 7, 2008 LANL in Compliance with Clean Water Act LOS ALAMOS, NM, Feb. 7, 2008-Los Alamos National Laboratory officials today expressed surprise to a lawsuit alleging noncompliance with the federal Clean Water Act filed today by citizens groups against Los Alamos National Security LLC and the U.S. Department of Energy. "The Laboratory is in compliance with its storm water permit under the federal Clean Water Act," said Dick Watkins, associate director

  14. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1999 Water Year

    SciTech Connect

    D. A. Shaull; M. R. Alexander; R. P. Reynolds; C. T. McLean; R. P. Romero

    2000-04-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 22 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory with one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs that flow into Canon de Valle and nine partial-record storm water stations.

  15. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation from Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments.

  16. Thermal and Optical Properties of Low-E Storm Windows and Panels

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, Thomas D.; Widder, Sarah H.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2015-07-17

    Installing low-emissivity (low-E) storm windows and panels over existing windows has been identified as a cost-effective new approach for improving the energy efficiency of existing buildings where window replacement is impractical or too expensive. As such, it is desirable to characterize the key energy performance properties of low-E storm windows and panels when installed over different types of existing primary windows. this paper presents the representative U-factors, solar heat gain coefficients (SGHCs) and visible transmittance properties of the combined assemblies of various storm windows and panel types installed over different primary windows.

  17. The Red Storm Architecture and Early Experiences with Multi-core Processors

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkins, James L; Brightwell, Ron; Camp, William J; Dosanjh, Sudip; Kelly, Suzanne M; Lin, Paul T.; Vaughan, Courtenay T.; Levesque, John; Tipparaju, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    The Red Storm architecture, which was conceived by Sandia National Laboratories and implemented by Cray, Inc., has become the basis for most successful line of commercial supercomputers in history. The success of the Red Storm architecture is due largely to the ability to effectively and efficiently solve a wide range of science and engineering problems. The Cray XT series of machines that embody the Red Storm architecture have allowed for unprecedented scaling and performance of parallel applications spanning many areas of scientific computing. In this paper, we describe the fundamental characteristics of the architecture and its implementation that have enabled this success, even through successive generations of hardware and software.

  18. Storm Windows (Even with a Low-E Coating!) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Storm Windows (Even with a Low-E Coating!) Storm Windows (Even with a Low-E Coating!) November 11, 2008 - 3:45pm Addthis John Lippert Earlier I wrote about purchasing energy-efficient windows. Jen followed up with an excellent blog on improving your existing windows, which mentioned low-e films. One fairly well-kept secret-low-emissivity (low-e) storm windows-lies somewhere between these two options. They aren't the simple, low-cost, do-it-yourself option that Jen spoke of. But they are a less

  19. Electrolyte additive for improved battery performance

    DOEpatents

    Bellows, Richard J. (Hampton, NJ); Kantner, Edward (E. Brunswick, NJ)

    1989-04-04

    In one embodiment of the present invention, there is provided an electrochemical cell having a metal bromine couple. The cell includes an electrode structure on which to deposit the metal of the couple and a counterelectrode at which to generate bromine. A microporous membrane separates the electrode and counterelectrode. Importantly, the aqueous electrolyte comprises an aqueous metal bromide solution containing a water soluble bromine complexing agent capable of forming a water immiscible complex with bromine and an additive capable of decreasing the wettability of the microporous separators employed in such cells by such water immiscible bromine complexes.

  20. Neutrinos from STORed Muons - nuSTORM (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    decay ring provide a powerful way to study this potential new physics. In this talk, I will describe the facility, nuSTORM, and an appropriate far detector for neutrino...

  1. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 8, 2004 (10:00 AM EDT)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-08

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances in the Florida area. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, and county outage data are provided.

  2. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 8, 2004 (10:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-08

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances n the Florida area. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, and county outage data are provided.

  3. SEP Success Story: Florida's SunSmart Program Helps Provide Power to Schools When Storms Strike

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This hurricane season, which officially starts on Sunday, the Sunshine State will be more ready than usual to recover from storms that wreak havoc, thanks to the SunSmart Schools and Emergency Shelters Program. Learn more.

  4. Correlative comparison of geomagnetic storms and auroral substorms using geomagnetic indeces. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cade, W.B.

    1993-06-01

    Partial contents include the following: (1) Geomagnetic storm and substorm processes; (2) Magnetospheric structure; (3) Substorm processes; (4) Data description; (5) Geomagnetic indices; and (6) Data period and data sets.

  5. Building America Webinar: Low-E Storms: The Next Big Thing in...

    Energy Saver

    This Building America webinar presented a new and improved low-e storm window that boasts a combination of curb appeal and energy efficiency, all for a fraction of the cost of ...

  6. EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm Photo of a dog sitting on a bed ... Following is a short excerpt of Marder's letter describing how her wind-phobic dog, ...

  7. The Red Storm Architecture and Early Experiences With Multi-Core...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    With Multi-Core Processors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Red Storm Architecture and Early Experiences With Multi-Core Processors Authors: Tomkins, James L 1 ; ...

  8. Savings Project: Install Exterior Storm Windows With Low-E Coating...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Storm window Tape measure Screwdriver Putty knife Caulk Caulking gun STEP-BY-STEP ... Do not caulk the bottom sill. Hold the caulking gun at a 45-degree angle to the edge of ...

  9. Low-E Storms: The Next "Big Thing" in Window Retrofits

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... PNNL-21678, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA. 34 How Low-e Storms Save Energy Low-e coating reflects heat back into the space 35 Materials Needed Caulking Gun ...

  10. Clouds, Computers, and the Coming Storms | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Clouds, Computers, and the Coming Storms News News Home Featured Articles 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.15.15 Clouds, Computers, and the Coming Storms Scientists uncover secrets behind hurricanes, monsoons, and polar

  11. Winter storms and the Spring Transition over the western U.S.: Quantifying

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    discrepancies between coarse and high-resolution simulations and observations (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Winter storms and the Spring Transition over the western U.S.: Quantifying discrepancies between coarse and high-resolution simulations and observations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Winter storms and the Spring Transition over the western U.S.: Quantifying discrepancies between coarse and high-resolution simulations and observations This project addressed the

  12. Zinc electrode with cement additive

    DOEpatents

    Charkey, Allen

    1982-06-01

    A zinc electrode having a cement additive, preferably, Portland Cement, distributed in the zinc active material.

  13. Additive Manufacturing: Pursuing the Promise

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fact sheet overviewing additive manufacturing techniques that are projected to exert a profound impact on manufacturing.

  14. File:06MTBConstructionStormWaterPermit (7).pdf | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    8 August 2014 1,275 1,650 (23 KB) Mbennett (Talk | contribs) Timeframes removed 14:56, 2 April 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 14:56, 2 April 2013 1,275 1,650 (38 KB)...

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - Aluminum Concentrations in Storm Water_w_lighter_photo_for_pdf.pptx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    505 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Los Alamos National Laboratory, an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer, is operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. By acceptance of this article, the publisher recognizes that the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this

  16. 7X performance results - final report : ASCI Red vs Red Storm.

    SciTech Connect

    Dinge, Dennis C.; Davis, Michael E.; Haskell, Karen H.; Ballance, Robert A.; Gardiner, Thomas Anthony; Stevenson, Joel O.; Noe, John P.

    2011-04-01

    The goal of the 7X performance testing was to assure Sandia National Laboratories, Cray Inc., and the Department of Energy that Red Storm would achieve its performance requirements which were defined as a comparison between ASCI Red and Red Storm. Our approach was to identify one or more problems for each application in the 7X suite, run those problems at multiple processor sizes in the capability computing range, and compare the results between ASCI Red and Red Storm. The first part of this report describes the two computer systems, the applications in the 7X suite, the test problems, and the results of the performance tests on ASCI Red and Red Storm. During the course of the testing on Red Storm, we had the opportunity to run the test problems in both single-core mode and dual-core mode and the second part of this report describes those results. Finally, we reflect on lessons learned in undertaking a major head-to-head benchmark comparison.

  17. Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Blake Marshall, AMO's lead for Additive Manufacturing Technologies, will provide an overview of current R&D activities in additive manufacturing and its application to fuel cell prototyping and...

  18. Lubrication with boric acid additives

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali

    2000-01-01

    Self-lubricating resin compositions including a boric acid additive and a synthetic polymer including those thermoset materials.

  19. Stride search: A general algorithm for storm detection in high resolution climate data

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Bosler, Peter Andrew; Roesler, Erika Louise; Taylor, Mark A.; Mundt, Miranda

    2015-09-08

    This article discusses the problem of identifying extreme climate events such as intense storms within large climate data sets. The basic storm detection algorithm is reviewed, which splits the problem into two parts: a spatial search followed by a temporal correlation problem. Two specific implementations of the spatial search algorithm are compared. The commonly used grid point search algorithm is reviewed, and a new algorithm called Stride Search is introduced. Stride Search is designed to work at all latitudes, while grid point searches may fail in polar regions. Results from the two algorithms are compared for the application of tropicalmore » cyclone detection, and shown to produce similar results for the same set of storm identification criteria. The time required for both algorithms to search the same data set is compared. Furthermore, Stride Search's ability to search extreme latitudes is demonstrated for the case of polar low detection.« less

  20. Stride search: A general algorithm for storm detection in high resolution climate data

    SciTech Connect

    Bosler, Peter Andrew; Roesler, Erika Louise; Taylor, Mark A.; Mundt, Miranda

    2015-09-08

    This article discusses the problem of identifying extreme climate events such as intense storms within large climate data sets. The basic storm detection algorithm is reviewed, which splits the problem into two parts: a spatial search followed by a temporal correlation problem. Two specific implementations of the spatial search algorithm are compared. The commonly used grid point search algorithm is reviewed, and a new algorithm called Stride Search is introduced. Stride Search is designed to work at all latitudes, while grid point searches may fail in polar regions. Results from the two algorithms are compared for the application of tropical cyclone detection, and shown to produce similar results for the same set of storm identification criteria. The time required for both algorithms to search the same data set is compared. Furthermore, Stride Search's ability to search extreme latitudes is demonstrated for the case of polar low detection.

  1. Energy Savings of Low-E Storm Windows and Panels across US Climate Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, Thomas D.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2015-10-01

    This report builds off of previous modeling work related to low-e storm windows used to create a "Database of U.S. Climate-Based Analysis for Low-E Storm Windows." This work updates similar studies using new fuel costs and examining the separate contributions of reduced air leakage and reduced coefficients of overall heat transfer and solar heat gain. In this report we examine the energy savings and cost effectiveness of low-E storm windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climates, excluding the impact from infiltration reductions, which tend to vary using the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) and RESFEN model calculations. This report includes a summary of the results, NEAT and RESFEN background, methodology, and input assumptions, and an appendix with detailed results and assumptions by climate zone.

  2. Countering third world weapons of mass destruction: Desert storm as a prototype. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.M.

    1993-02-19

    The proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMDs)--nuclear, biological, and chemical--is occurring throughout the Third World. Desert Storm offers an excellent case study for assessing the various measures and operations which can be employed to protect U.S.. forces against an adversary possessing a WMD capability. The elements of Desert Storm's successful strategy can be categorized in three broad approaches--deterrence, denial, and defense. All three approaches were necessary and syngergistic. In the future, the ability to quickly deny or destroy an adversary's WMD capability will be increasingly important, due to the unacceptability of exposing forces to any type of NBC agent, the likelihood for increased uncertainty surrounding deterrent threats, and the diplomatic, political, and psychological dilemmas posed by an adversary's first use....Weapons of mass destruction, Desert Storm.

  3. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  4. NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Later: Accelerating Progress toward a Brighter Economic Future" | Department of Energy NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years Later: Accelerating Progress toward a Brighter Economic Future" NAS-NAE National Convocation on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm Two Years Later: Accelerating Progress toward a Brighter Economic Future" April 29, 2008 - 11:31am Addthis Remarks As Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you, Tom for

  5. EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm Photo of a dog sitting on a bed or couch with a stuffed toy in front of it. People aren't the only ones who must endure the discomfort of a drafty room. As a recent letter sent to Energy Impact Illinois (EI2) contractor Anthony Stonis from customer Stephanie Marder points out, even man's best friend can benefit from the increased comfort of an air-sealing upgrade.

  6. Database of Low-e Storm Window Energy Performance across U.S. Climate Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, Thomas D.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2014-09-04

    This is an update of a report that describes process, assumptions, and modeling results produced Create a Database of U.S. Climate-Based Analysis for Low-E Storm Windows. The scope of the overall effort is to develop a database of energy savings and cost effectiveness of low-E storm windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climates using the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) and RESFEN model calculations. This report includes a summary of the results, NEAT and RESFEN background, methodology, and input assumptions, and an appendix with detailed results and assumptions by cliamte zone.

  7. F A C T S H E E T Winter Storm Fire Safety A

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Winter Storm Fire Safety A wide range of natural disasters occurs within the United States every year. Natural disasters can have a devastating effect on you and your home. The Federal Emergency Management Agency's U.S. Fire Administration encourages you to use the following safety tips to help protect yourself, your family and your home from the potential threat of fire during or after a winter storm. You can greatly reduce your chances of becoming a fire casualty by being able to identify

  8. Federal Energy and Water Management Awards 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Pamela Dei, Melissa Kostich, Scott McIlhargey, Kristine Murray, Russell Strach U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Great Lakes Science Center Ann Arbor, Michigan The U.S. Geological Survey's Great Lakes Science Center completed a major wet laboratory upgrade in FY 2013 that will save $9,000 in annual storm water discharge costs and decrease water use by about 52.6 million gallons per year. The upgrade replaced a once-through well water system with a re-circulating city water

  9. Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-STORM 100 Storage Modules at Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI

    SciTech Connect

    Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2014-04-17

    Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for two modules at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI identified as candidates for inspection. These are HI-STORM 100 modules of a site-specific design for storing PWR 17x17 fuel in MPC-32 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions. • storage module overpack configuration based on FSAR documentation of HI-STORM100S-218, Version B; due to unavailability of site-specific design data for Diablo Canyon ISFSI modules • Individual assembly and total decay heat loadings for each canister, based on at-loading values provided by PG&E, “aged” to time of inspection using ORIGEN modeling o Special Note: there is an inherent conservatism of unquantified magnitude – informally estimated as up to approximately 20% -- in the utility-supplied values for at-loading assembly decay heat values • Axial decay heat distributions based on a bounding generic profile for PWR fuel. • Axial location of beginning of fuel assumed same as WE 17x17 OFA fuel, due to unavailability of specific data for WE17x17 STD and WE 17x17 Vantage 5 fuel designs • Ambient conditions of still air at 50°F (10°C) assumed for base-case evaluations o Wind conditions at the Diablo Canyon site are unquantified, due to unavailability of site meteorological data o additional still-air evaluations performed at 70°F (21°C), 60°F (16°C), and 40°F (4°C), to cover a range of possible conditions at the time of the inspection. (Calculations were also performed at

  10. Additional Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Additional Resources Additional Resources Additional Resources Energy Assurance Planning The Local Government Energy Assurance Planning (LEAP) program, developed by the Public Technology Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy, offers resources to help local governments of all sizes in developing energy assurance plans for their communities. U.S. Department of Energy, State and Local Energy Assurance Planning The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) The National Association

  11. LANL installs additional protective measures

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab completes additional protections LANL installs additional protective measures Work crews completed additional flood and erosion-control measures this week to reduce the environmental effects of any flash floods following the Las Conchas Fire. July 20, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma

  12. Storm-induced changes of the topside ionosphere as deduced from incoherent-scatter radars. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lunn, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    Incoherent scatter radar observations from Millstone Hill, Saint Santin, and Arecibo are used to illustrate changes of the topside ionosphere during a geomagnetic storm. These observations consist of electron density, electron and ion temperatures, and ion velocity components parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. These parameters can further describe changes in ion composition, electric fields, and neutral winds. Attention is given to a specific storm during the Equinox Transition Study (ETS) of September 1984. In order to isolate the storm effects in the topside ionosphere, a comparison will be made between a disturbed and quiet day. A novel result from this study is the finding of correlated oscillations between parallel and perpendicular ion velocity components which are apparently storm induced. Previously, these oscillations have been observed primarily at night, but now it's noticed that during storm conditions there are prominent oscillations during the day.

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - Colorado: SP2 Deployment at StormVEx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Colorado: SP2 Deployment at StormVEx 2010.11.15 - 2011.04.25 Lead Scientist :...

  14. Optimization of the magnetic horn for the nuSTORM non-conventional neutrino beam using the genetic algorithm

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Liu, A.; Bross, A.; Neuffer, D.

    2015-05-28

    This paper describes the strategy for optimizing the magnetic horn for the neutrinos from STORed Muons (nuSTORM) facility. The nuSTORM magnetic horn is the primary collection device for the secondary particles generated by bombarding a solid target with 120 GeV protons. As a consequence of the non-conventional beamline designed for nuSTORM, the requirements on the horn are different from those for a conventional neutrino beamline. At nuSTORM, muons decay while circulating in the storage ring, and the detectors are placed downstream of the production straight so as to be exposed to the neutrinos from muon decay. nuSTORM aims at preciselymore » measuring the neutrino cross sections, and providing a definitive statement about the existence of sterile neutrinos. The nuSTORM horn aims at focusing the pions into a certain phase space so that more muons from pion decay can be accepted by the decay ring. The paper demonstrates a numerical method that was developed to optimize the horn design to gain higher neutrino flux from the circulating muons. A Genetic Algorithm (GA) was applied to the simultaneous optimization of the two objectives in this study. In conclusion, the application of the technique discussed in this paper is not limited to either the nuSTORM facility or muon based facilities, but can be used for other neutrino facilities that use magnetic horns as collection devices.« less

  15. Use of Remote Technology in the Surface Water Environmental Monitoring Program at SRS Reducing Measurements in the Field - 13336

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, T.; Terry, B.; Meyer, A.; Hall, J.; Allen, P.; Hughey, D.; Hartley, T.

    2013-07-01

    automated sampler. In addition, automated rain gauges will be tied into this technology for immediate notification of rain at storm-water locations further enhancing the automation of environmental data collection. These technological improvements at SRS have led to data-quality improvements while reducing the field technician time in the field and costs for maintaining the traditional environmental monitoring applications. (authors)

  16. nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Letter of Intent to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Kyberd, P.; Smith, D.R.; Coney, L.; Pascoli, S.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brice, S.J.; Bross, A.D.; Cease, H.; Kopp, J.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; /Fermilab /Yerkes Observ. /Glasgow U. /Imperial Coll., London /Valencia U. /Jefferson Lab /Kyoto U. /Northwestern U. /Osaka U.

    2012-06-01

    The idea of using a muon storage ring to produce a high-energy ({approx_equal} 50 GeV) neutrino beam for experiments was first discussed by Koshkarev in 1974. A detailed description of a muon storage ring for neutrino oscillation experiments was first produced by Neuffer in 1980. In his paper, Neuffer studied muon decay rings with E{sub {mu}} of 8, 4.5 and 1.5 GeV. With his 4.5 GeV ring design, he achieved a figure of merit of {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup 9} useful neutrinos per 3 x 10{sup 13} protons on target. The facility we describe here ({nu}STORM) is essentially the same facility proposed in 1980 and would utilize a 3-4 GeV/c muon storage ring to study eV-scale oscillation physics and, in addition, could add significantly to our understanding of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}} cross sections. In particular the facility can: (1) address the large {Delta}m{sup 2} oscillation regime and make a major contribution to the study of sterile neutrinos, (2) make precision {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} cross-section measurements, (3) provide a technology ({mu} decay ring) test demonstration and {mu} beam diagnostics test bed, and (4) provide a precisely understood {nu} beam for detector studies. The facility is the simplest implementation of the Neutrino Factory concept. In our case, 60 GeV/c protons are used to produce pions off a conventional solid target. The pions are collected with a focusing device (horn or lithium lens) and are then transported to, and injected into, a storage ring. The pions that decay in the first straight of the ring can yield a muon that is captured in the ring. The circulating muons then subsequently decay into electrons and neutrinos. We are starting with a storage ring design that is optimized for 3.8 GeV/c muon momentum. This momentum was selected to maximize the physics reach for both oscillation and the cross section physics. See Fig. 1 for a schematic of the facility.

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - SAND2005-2351C_RedStormEarlyExperiences [Read-Only]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Early Experience with Red Storm April 19, 2005 Sue Kelly and Bob Ballance Sandia National Laboratories smkelly@sandia.gov, 505-845-9770 Outline of Talk * Overview of Red Storm * Where we are * How we got here * Where we're going * What we learned Red Storm is a Massively Parallel Processor Users

  18. Fight over fuel additive rekindled

    SciTech Connect

    Stringer, J.

    1996-03-20

    Ethyl and EPA are trading punches over EPA`s doubts about the safety of Ethyl`s gasoline additive methylcyclopentadienyl manganese (MMT). Late last week, EPA released a statement reaffirming its position that there has not been enough research on health effects of MMT and asking gas stations to label pumps that contain the additive so consumers will be aware they are using it. Responding to that statement, Ethyl has written Administrator Carol Browner asking why she appears to be supporting the Environmental Defense Fund`s (EDF; Washington) campaign against MMT and advocating the delay of the additive use in light of its known emission-reducing characteristics. The tension began in the early `90s, when the EPA refused to allow Ethyl to market MMT and required it to perform more long-term health studies. Last October a court ordered the agency to grant Ethyl approval to use MMT in nonreformulated gasoline.

  19. Out of Bounds Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Holshouser, Chris [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Newell, Clint [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Palas, Sid [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Love, Lonnie J [ORNL; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL; Lloyd, Peter D [ORNL; Rowe, John C [ORNL; Blue, Craig A [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing (AM) system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  20. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; et al

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  1. Local drainage analyses of the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants during an extreme storm

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.O.; Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.

    1993-11-01

    Local drainage analyses have been performed for the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants during an extreme storm having an approximate 10,000-yr recurrence interval. This review discusses the methods utilized to accomplish the analyses in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) design and evaluation guidelines, and summarizes trends, results, generalizations, and uncertainties applicable to other DOE facilities. Results indicate that some culverts may be undersized, and that the storm sewer system cannot drain the influx of precipitation from the base of buildings. Roofs have not been designed to sustain ponding when the primary drainage system is clogged. Some underground tunnels, building entrances, and ground level air intakes may require waterproofing.

  2. STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment Science and Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, J; Matrosov, S; Shupe, M; Lawson, P; Hallar, G; McCubbin, I; Marchand, R; Orr, B; Coulter, R; Sedlacek, A; Avallone, L; Long, C

    2010-09-29

    During the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX), a substantial correlative data set of remote sensing observations and direct in situ measurements from fixed and airborne platforms will be created in a winter season, mountainous environment. This will be accomplished by combining mountaintop observations at Storm Peak Laboratory and the airborne National Science Foundation-supported Colorado Airborne Multi-Phase Cloud Study campaign with collocated measurements from the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2). We describe in this document the operational plans and motivating science for this experiment, which includes deployment of AMF2 to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The intensive STORMVEX field phase will begin nominally on 1 November 2010 and extend to approximately early April 2011.

  3. Visualizing Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge and Sea-Level Rise

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) recently released an innovative, interactive visualization tool to highlight the findings from our work on the effect of sea level rise and storm surge on energy infrastructure. The tool is designed to enhance the communication of the results and allows users to better understand the context of the potential exposure and explore spatial data used to create the maps. The tool also includes full reports for each of the seven metropolitan statistical areas (MSA).

  4. OSTIblog Articles in the geomagnetic storms Topic | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information geomagnetic storms Topic Plasmas - The Greatest Show on Earth by Kathy Chambers 24 Jun, 2013 in Products and Content Perhaps the most beautiful and eerie displays of light in our sky are a phenomenon known as the auroras. This natural glow of light in the sky in high latitude regions usually displays ribbons of colors from a fluorescent green to brilliant purple to a vivid crimson somewhat like an unexpected beautiful sunrise or sunset.

  5. Storm and combined sewer overflow: An overview of EPA's Research Program. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.

    1993-01-01

    The report represents an overview of the EPA's Storm and Combined Sewer Pollution Control Research Program performed over a 20-year period beginning with the mid-1960s. It covers Program involvements in the development of a diverse technology including pollution-problem assessment/solution methodology and associated instrumentation and stormwater management models, best management practices, erosion control, infiltration/inflow, control, control-treatment technology and the associated sludge and solids residuals handling and many others.

  6. Additive Manufacturing: Pursuing the Promise

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Lower energy intensity: These techniques save energy by eliminating production steps, using substantially less material, enabling reuse of by-products, and producing lighter products. Remanufacturing parts through advanced additive manufacturing and surface treatment processes can also return end-of-life products to as-new condition, 1 using only 2-25% of the energy required to make new parts. 2 * Less waste: Building objects up layer by layer, instead of traditional machining processes that cut

  7. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects.more » Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.« less

  8. Solar wind-magnetosphere coupling during intense magnetic storms (1978--1979)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, W.D. ); Tsurutani, B.T.; Gonzalez, A.L.C.; Smith, E.J.; Tang, F.; Akasofu, S.

    1989-07-01

    The solar wind-magnetosphere coupling problem is investigated for the ten intense magnetic storms (Dst {lt}{minus}100 nT) that occurred during the 500 days (August 16, 1978 to December 28, 1979) studied by Gonzalez and Tsurutani (1987). This investigation concentrates on the ring current energization in terms of solar wind parameters, in order to explain the {vert bar} {minus}Dst {vert bar} growth observed during these storms. Thus several coupling functions are tested as energy input and several sets of the ring current decay time-constant {tau} are searched to find best correlations with the Dst response. From the fairly large correlation coefficients found in this study, there is strong evidence that large scale magnetopause reconnection operates during such intense storm events and that the solar wind ram pressure plays an important role in the ring current energization. Thus a ram pressure correction factor is suggested for expressions concerning the reconnection power during time intervals with large ram pressure variations.

  9. Characterization of Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort Improvements Derived from Using Interior Storm Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, Jake R.; Widder, Sarah H.

    2013-09-30

    This field study of a single historic home in Seattle, WA documents the performance of Indow Windows’s interior storm window inserts. Energy use and the temperature profile of the house were monitored before and after the installation of the window inserts and changes in the two recorded metrics were examined. Using the defined analysis approach, it was determined that the interior storm windows produced a 22% reduction of the HVAC energy bill and had an undetermined effect on the thermal comfort in the house. Although there was no measurable changes in the thermal comfort of the house, the occupant noted the house to be “warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer” and that the “temperatures are more even (throughout the house).” The interior storm windows were found to be not cost effective, largely due to the retrofits completed on its heating system. However, if the economic analysis was conducted based on the old heating system, a 72% efficient oil fired furnace, the Indow Windows proved to be economical and had a simple payback period of 9.0 years.

  10. Highly relativistic radiation belt electron acceleration, transport, and loss: Large solar storm events of March and June 2015

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Baker, Daniel N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; et al

    2016-07-26

    Two of the largest geomagnetic storms of the last decade were witnessed in 2015. On 17 March 2015, a coronal mass ejection-driven event occurred with a Dst (storm time ring current index) value reaching –223 nT. On 22 June 2015 another strong storm (Dst reaching –204 nT) was recorded. These two storms each produced almost total loss of radiation belt high-energy (E ≳ 1 MeV) electron fluxes. Following the dropouts of radiation belt fluxes there were complex and rather remarkable recoveries of the electrons extending up to nearly 10 MeV in kinetic energy. The energized outer zone electrons showed amore » rich variety of pitch angle features including strong “butterfly” distributions with deep minima in flux at α = 90°. However, despite strong driving of outer zone earthward radial diffusion in these storms, the previously reported “impenetrable barrier” at L ≈ 2.8 was pushed inward, but not significantly breached, and no E ≳ 2.0 MeV electrons were seen to pass through the radiation belt slot region to reach the inner Van Allen zone. Altogether, these intense storms show a wealth of novel features of acceleration, transport, and loss that are demonstrated in the present detailed analysis.« less

  11. Fuel Additives: Canada bans MMT

    SciTech Connect

    Sissell, K.

    1997-04-16

    The Canadian Senate voted late last week to ban use of the manganese-based fuel additive MMT, produced only in the US by Ethyl. MMT, which has been sold in Canada for the past 20 years and accounts for about half of Ethyl`s Canadian sales, has been criticized by environmentalists, who have raised public health concerns, and automakers, who say it harms emission control systems. {open_quotes}Canada`s vote is a great victory for public health and the environment,{close_quotes} says Environmental Defense Fund executive director Fred Krupp. {open_quotes}The US should move swiftly to follow suit and suspend sales of MMT until adequate toxicity testing on the additive is completed.{close_quotes} EPA had refused to approve MMT for sale because of health concerns but was compelled to do so by a December 1995 court ruling. Ethyl asserts the ban violates Canada`s obligations under Nafta and says it will file a damage claim with the Nafta arbitration panel.

  12. Recommendation 212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Evaluate additional storage and disposal options Recommendation 212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal options The ORSSAB encourages DOE to evaluate additional storage...

  13. Investigation of Stinson Beach Park storm damage and evaluation of alternative shore protection measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, R.M.; Whelan, G.

    1984-07-01

    An investigation was made of storm damage during the winter of 1982-83 to the National Park Service's Stinson Beach Park. The investigation included an assessment of the storm damage, evaluation of physical processes contributing to the damage, subsequent beach recovery, and the feasibility of implementing shoreline protection measure to reduce future risk. During the winter of 1982-83, the beach was almost completely denuded of sand, wave overwash damaged the foredune, vegetation on the foredune was destroyed, and backshore flooding occurred. Two structures and a parking lot were endangered as the shoreline receded. Subsequent recovery of the park beach was rapid. By January 1982 sand had moved back onshore and a beach berm was beginning to reform. The foredune and dune vegetation received the only permanent damage. Four shoreline protection alternatives were evaluated. These include no action, dune development/enhancement, construction of a rock riprap revetment, and offshore installation of artificial seaweed. The first costs (estimated costs, excluding maintenance) range from about $90,000 to $475,000. The least-cost protection measure is riprap revetment, which protects the two structures and parking lot endangered during the 1982-83 winter storms. Construction of a foredune along the entire park beach is the highest cost protection measure. If no shore protection action measures are implemented, wave overwash of the foredune can be expected to occur on the average of every 2 to 3 years, and beach degradation, similar to that during the 1982-83 winter, can be expected to occur on the average of every 10 to 12 years. 12 references, 19 figures, 18 tables.

  14. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments

  15. Historic Storm

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The JOLT series of devices was developed at the Remote ... we transferred JOLT II technology to several U.S. companies. ... Sports Foundation Shot Show conference in Las Vegas. ...

  16. Winter Storms

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... In contrast, if the cold layer into which the melted drops fall is deep enough, the drops will refreeze before they hit the surface, forming small ice pellets more commonly known ...

  17. Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse ...

  18. Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives Develop & evaluate ...

  19. Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives Develop & Evaluate ...

  20. EFFECTS OF ALFVEN WAVES ON ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSION IN CORONAL LOOPS AND SOLAR TYPE I RADIO STORMS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.; Yan, Y. H.

    2013-06-10

    Solar type I radio storms are long-lived radio emissions from the solar atmosphere. It is believed that these type I storms are produced by energetic electrons trapped within a closed magnetic structure and are characterized by a high ordinary (O) mode polarization. However, the microphysical nature of these emissions is still an open problem. Recently, Wu et al. found that Alfven waves (AWs) can significantly influence the basic physics of wave-particle interactions by modifying the resonant condition. Taking the effects of AWs into account, this work investigates electron cyclotron maser emission driven by power-law energetic electrons with a low-energy cutoff distribution, which are trapped in coronal loops by closed solar magnetic fields. The results show that the emission is dominated by the O mode. It is proposed that this O mode emission may possibly be responsible for solar type I radio storms.

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Latest Additions

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Publications » Latest Additions Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Latest Additions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Latest Additions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Latest Additions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Latest Additions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Latest Additions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Latest Additions on Digg Find More

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX)

    DOE Data Explorer

    In October 2010, the initial deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) took place at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The objective of this field campaign was to obtain data about liquid and mixed-phase clouds using AMF2 instruments in conjunction with Storm Peak Laboratory (located at an elevation of 3220 meters on Mt. Werner), a cloud and aerosol research facility operated by the Desert Research Institute. STORMVEX datasets are freely available for viewing and download. Users are asked to register with the ARM Archive; the user's email address is used from that time forward as the login name.

  3. Impact of rising greenhouse gases on mid-latitude storm tracks and associated hydroclimate variability and change

    SciTech Connect

    Seager, Richard

    2014-12-08

    Project Summary This project aimed to advance physical understanding of how and why the mid-latitude jet streams and storm tracks shift in intensity and latitude in response to changes in radiative forcing with an especial focus on rising greenhouse gases. The motivation, and much of the work, stemmed from the importance that these mean and transient atmospheric circulation systems have for hydroclimate. In particular drying and expansion of the subtropical dry zones has been related to a poleward shift of the mid-latitude jets and storm tracks. The work involved integrated assessment of observation and model projections as well as targeted model simulations.

  4. Urbanization and recharge in the vicinity of East Meadow Brook, Nassau County, New York, part 4. Water quality in the headwaters area, 1988-93. Water resources investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.J.; Scorca, M.P.; Stockar, G.G.; Stumm, F.; Ku, H.F.H.

    1997-12-31

    This report (1) discusses the concentration of constituents in precipitation and stormwater in the headwaters area of East Meadow Brook, and (2) describes the extent, and depth to which ground water beneath the stream is affected by stormwater. It also relates the concentrations and loads of selected constituents, including sodium and chloride, to storm discharge and season. This is the final report from the four-part study that examined stormwater and ground water at East Meadow Brook during 1988-93.

  5. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Workshop Poster Abstract Submission - deadline July 10, 2015 Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials using in situ sensors, diagnostics...

  6. Directives Requiring Additional Documentation - DOE Directives,

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Delegations, and Requirements Requiring Additional Documentation by Website Administrator PDF document icon DirectivesRequiringAdditionalDocumentation (1).pdf - PDF document, 35 KB (36219

  7. Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and ...

  8. Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel ...

  9. Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures for Testing Energy Consumption of Clothes Washers with Warm Rinse Cycles, Issued: June 30, 2010 Additional Guidance...

  10. Dual Functional Cathode Additives for Battery Technologies -...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Return to Search Dual Functional Cathode Additives for Battery Technologies Brookhaven ... activation of the cell of a lithium battery having a primary metal sulfide additive ...

  11. Additive Manufacturing: Pursuing the Promise | Department of...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Fact sheet overviewing additive manufacturing techniques that are projected to exert a profound impact on manufacturing. Additive Manufacturing: Pursuing the Promise More Documents...

  12. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop WHEN: Jul 20, 2015 8:30 AM - Jul 21, 2015...

  13. Consolidated Nuclear Security announces additional leadership changes |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Conserving Water, One Drop at a Time Conserving Water, One Drop at a Time May 27, 2015 - 4:05pm Q&A What are you doing to conserve water? Tell us Addthis Every drop counts! Make sure you are doing your part to save water. | Photos courtesy of Jason Flakes, U.S. Department of Energy Every drop counts! Make sure you are doing your part to save water. | Photos courtesy of Jason Flakes, U.S. Department of Energy Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Weatherization and

  14. A retrospective tiered environmental assessment of the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility, West Virginia,USA

    SciTech Connect

    Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Day, Robin; Strickland, M. Dale

    2012-11-01

    Bird and bat fatalities from wind energy projects are an environmental and public concern, with post-construction fatalities sometimes differing from predictions. Siting facilities in this context can be a challenge. In March 2012 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) released Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines to assess collision fatalities and other potential impacts to species of concern and their habitats to aid in siting and management. The Guidelines recommend a tiered approach for assessing risk to wildlife, including a preliminary site evaluation that may evaluate alternative sites, a site characterization, field studies to document wildlife and habitat and to predict project impacts, post construction studies to estimate impacts, and other post construction studies. We applied the tiered assessment framework to a case study site, the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility in Grant County, West Virginia, USA, to demonstrate the use of the USFWS assessment approach, to indicate how the use of a tiered assessment framework might have altered outputs of wildlife assessments previously undertaken for the case study site, and to assess benefits of a tiered ecological assessment framework for siting wind energy facilities. The conclusions of this tiered assessment for birds are similar to those of previous environmental assessments for Mount Storm. This assessment found risk to individual migratory tree-roosting bats that was not emphasized in previous preconstruction assessments. Differences compared to previous environmental assessments are more related to knowledge accrued in the past 10 years rather than to the tiered structure of the Guidelines. Benefits of the tiered assessment framework include good communication among stakeholders, clear decision points, a standard assessment trajectory, narrowing the list of species of concern, improving study protocols, promoting consideration of population-level effects, promoting adaptive management through post

  15. The Great 2008 Chinese ice storm, its socioeconomic-ecological impact, and sustainability lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dr. Benzhi; Gu, Lianhong; Ding, Yihui; Wu, Zhongmin; Shao, Lan; An, Yanfei; Cao, Yonghui; Duan, Aiguo; Kong, Weijian; Li, Changzhu; Li, Zhengcai; Sun, Honggang; Wang, Shengkun; Wang, Xiaoming; Wang, Xu; Yang, Xiaosheng; Yu, Mukui; Zeng, Bingshan

    2011-01-01

    . Extreme events often expose vulnerabilities of socioeconomic infrastructures and point to directions of much-needed policy change. Integrated impact assessment of such events can lead to finding of sustainability principles. Southern and central China has for decades been undergoing a breakneck pace of socioeconomic development. In early 2008, a massive ice storm struck this region, immobilizing millions of people. The storm was a consequence of sustained convergence between tropical maritime and continental polar air masses, caused by an anomalously stable atmospheric general circulation pattern in both low and high latitudes. Successive waves of freezing rain occurred during a month period, coating southern and central China with a layer of ice 50 to 160mm in thickness. We conducted an integrated impact assessment of this event to determine whether and how the context of socioeconomic and human-disturbed natural systems may affect the transition of natural events into human disasters. We found: 1) without contingency plans, advanced technologies dependent on interrelated energy supplies can create worse problems during extreme events, 2) the weakest link in disaster response lies between science and decision making, 3) biodiversity is a form of long-term insurance for sustainable forestry against extreme events, 4) sustainable extraction of non-timber goods and services is essential to risk planning for extreme events in forest resources use, 5) extreme events can cause food shortage directly by destroying crops and indirectly by disrupting food distribution channels, 6) concentrated economic development increases societal vulnerability to extreme events, and 7) formalized institutional mechanisms are needed to ensure that unexpected opportunities to learn lessons from weather disasters are not lost in distracting circumstances.

  16. Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the atmospheric radiation balance

    SciTech Connect

    Slingo, A.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Allan, R. P.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Robinson, G. J.; Barnard, James C.; Miller, Mark; Harries, J. E.; Russell, J. E.; Dewitte, S.

    2006-12-01

    Saharan dust storms transport large quantities of material across the African continent and beyond, causing widespread disruption and hazards to health. The dust may be deposited into the Atlantic Ocean, where it provides an important source of nutrients1, and may be carried as far as the West Indies. Such events may also influence the growth of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Satellite observations have enabled estimates to be made of the effect of the dust on the radiation budget seen from space, but only limited in situ observations have hitherto been made at the surface. Here we present the first simultaneous and continuous observations of the effect of a major dust storm in March 2006 on the radiation budget both at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface. We combine data from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) broadband radiometer and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on the Meteosat-8 weather satellite with remote sensing and in situ measurements from a new Mobile Facility located in Niamey, Niger (13{sup o} 29'N, 2{sup o} 10'E), operated by the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. We show that the dust produced major perturbations to the radiation budget seen from space and from the surface. By combining the two datasets, we estimate the impact on the radiation budget of the atmosphere itself. Using independent data from the Mobile Facility, we derive the optical properties of the dust and input these and other information into radiation codes to simulate the radiative fluxes. Comparisons with the observed fluxes provides a stringent test of the ability of the codes to represent the radiative properties of this important component of the global aerosol burden.

  17. Treatment of Y-12 storm sewer sediments and DARA soils by thermal desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.I.; Shealy, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    The 1992 Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) listed a number of mixed wastes, subject to land disposal restrictions (LDR), for which no treatment method had been identified, and required DOE to develop strategies for treatment and ultimate disposal of those wastes. This paper presents the results of a program to demonstrate that thermal desorption can remove both organics and mercury from two mixed wastes from the DOE Y-12 facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first waste, the Y-12 Storm Sewer Sediments (SSSs) was a sediment generated from upgrades to the plant storm sewer system. This material contained over 4 percent mercury, 2 percent uranium and 350 mg/kg polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Leachable mercury exceeded toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and LDR criteria. The second waste, the Disposal Area Remedial Action (DARA) Soils, are contaminated with uranium, mercury and PCBs. This treatability study included bench-scale testing of a thermal desorption process. Results of the testing showed that, for the SSSs, total mercury could be reduced to 120 mg/kg by treatment at 600{degrees}C, which is at the high end of the temperature range for typical thermal desorption systems. Leachable TCLP mercury was less than 50 {mu}g/L and PCBs were below 2 mg/kg. Treatment of the DARA Soils at 450{degrees}C for 10 minutes resulted in residual PCBs of 0.6 to 3.0 mg/kg. This is too high (goal < 2mg/kg) and higher treatment temperatures are needed. The testing also provided information on the characteristics and quantities of residuals from the thermal desorption process.

  18. Surface water drainage system. Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) is written pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The document identifies and evaluates the action proposed to correct deficiencies in, and then to maintain, the surface water drainage system serving the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), located north of Golden, Colorado. Many of the activities proposed would not normally be subject to this level of NEPA documentation. However, in many cases, maintenance of the system has been deferred to the point that wetlands vegetation has become established in some ditches and culverts, creating wetlands. The proposed activities would damage or remove some of these wetlands in order to return the drainage system to the point that it would be able to fully serve its intended function - stormwater control. The Department of Energy (DOE) regulations require that activities affecting environmentally sensitive areas like wetlands be the subject of an EA. Most portions of the surface water drainage system are presently inadequate to convey the runoff from a 100-year storm event. As a result, such an event would cause flooding across much of the Site and possibly threaten the integrity of the dams at the terminal ponds. Severe flooding would not only cause damage to facilities and equipment, but could also facilitate the transport of contaminants from individual hazardous substance sites (IHSSs). Uncontrolled flow through the A- and B-series ponds could cause contaminated sediments to become suspended and carried downstream. Additionally, high velocity flood flows significantly increase erosion losses.

  19. Radiant heating and cooling, displacement ventilation with heat recovery and storm water cooling: An environmentally responsible HVAC system

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, S.C.; Kokko, J.P.

    1998-12-31

    This paper describes the design, operation, and performance of an HVAC system installed as part of a project to demonstrate energy efficiency and environmental responsibility in commercial buildings. The systems installed in the 2180 m{sup 2} office building provide superior air quality and thermal comfort while requiring only half the electrical energy of conventional systems primarily because of the hydronic heating and cooling system. Gas use for the building is higher than expected because of longer operating hours and poor performance of the boiler/absorption chiller.

  20. Storm-water characterization and lagoon sediment analysis, Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, J.G.; Vaughn, R.W.; Scott, P.T.

    1990-08-01

    Sampling was conducted in the wastewater treatment lagoons and stormwater runoff at Grand Forks AFB. The base was concerned about whether the unlined lagoons were creating a potential groundwater contamination problem and whether their stormwater runoff met North Dakota state stream standards. Lagoon sediment did not contain Extraction Procedure hazardous chemicals. Stormwater runoff exceeded state standards for boron, phosphates, and phenols and contained trace levels of methylene chloride. Characterization of lagoon influent showed it to be generally representative of domestic sewage, but also contained trace levels of boron, phenols, toluene, cyanide, chloroform, methylene chloride and ethyl benzene.

  1. Additional potential for older, Antrim Shale wells

    SciTech Connect

    Frantz, J.H. Jr.; Hopkins, C.W.; Hill, D.G.

    1995-09-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) has been performing evaluations to estimate the recompletion and restimulation potential in older, Antrim Shale wells. The recompletion potential is two-fold: (1) wells that can be deepened to the productive Norwood interval, and (2) wells with Upper Antrim potential. There are also numerous restimulation candidates due to sand flowback and/or other problems. The Antrim Shale is an organic-rich naturally fractured formation which produces both gas and water. Operators today typically complete the Lachine and Norwood intervals but many older wells were not drilled deep enough to encounter to Norwood. We performed an evaluation to determine the optimal deepening method using actual and simulated data. We estimate there are over 500 deepening candidates with total potential reserve additions of 50 Bscf. The Upper antrim formation can be added in approximately 1,500 existing wells throughout several counties. This interval is uphole from the Lachine and Norwood. In this phase of the project, we collected production and reservoir data from several Upper Antrim tests across the basin. We estimate the Upper Antrim could add total new reserves of 100 to 200 Bscf from al the recompletion candidates across the basin. In the restimulation evaluation, we developed a novel injection test unit to help operators identify the best restimulation candidates in a cost effective manner. The injection test determines if an effective hydraulic fracture is connected to the wellbore. Based on 60 test wells, we estimate the restimulations could add 50 to 200 Bscf of future reserves from the 500 to 1,000 candidate wells.

  2. Clark Public Utilities- Solar Water Heater Rebate

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition, Clark Public Utilities offers a loan program for eligible solar water heater equipment. For additional information, call Energy Services at (360) 992-3355.

  3. Saving Water Saves Energy

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-06-15

    Hot water use in households, for showers and baths as wellas for washing clothes and dishes, is a major driver of household energyconsumption. Other household uses of water (such as irrigatinglandscaping) require additional energy in other sectors to transport andtreat the water before use, and to treat wastewater. In California, 19percent of total electricity for all sectors combined and 32 percent ofnatural gas consumption is related to water. There is a criticalinterdependence between energy and water systems: thermal power plantsrequire cooling water, and water pumping and treatment require energy.Energy efficiency can be increased by a number of means, includingmore-efficient appliances (e.g., clothes washers or dishwashers that useless total water and less heated water), water-conserving plumbingfixtures and fittings (e.g., showerheads, faucets, toilets) and changesin consumer behavior (e.g., lower temperature set points for storagewater heaters, shorter showers). Water- and energy-conserving activitiescan help offset the stress imposed on limited water (and energy) suppliesfrom increasing population in some areas, particularly in drought years,or increased consumption (e.g., some new shower systems) as a result ofincreased wealth. This paper explores the connections between householdwater use and energy, and suggests options for increased efficiencies inboth individual technologies and systems. Studies indicate that urbanwater use can be reduced cost-effectively by up to 30 percent withcommercially available products. The energy savings associated with watersavings may represent a large additional and largely untappedcost-effective opportunity.

  4. Additive Manufacturing - Materials by Design - Energy Innovation...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing - Materials by Design Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ... Send Message Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Industrial Partnerships Office Visit ...

  5. Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled "Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells," originally presented on February 11, 2014.

  6. Additional Resources for Tribes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Additional Resources for Tribes Additional Resources for Tribes The following tribal and federal organizations, education and training opportunities, and tribal directories provide helpful information for Indian tribes and Alaska Natives. For resources specifically related to developing and financing energy projects on tribal lands, visit the Energy Resource Library. Resource Type Additional Resources for Tribes

  7. Water Quality

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  8. Novel additives to retard permeable flow

    SciTech Connect

    Golombok, Michael; Crane, Carel; Ineke, Erik; Welling, Marco; Harris, Jon

    2008-09-15

    Low concentrations of surfactant and cosolute in water, can selectively retard permeable flow in high permeability rocks compared to low permeability ones. This represents a way forward for more efficient areal sweep efficiency when water flooding a reservoir during improved oil recovery. (author)

  9. Two-dimensional water quality modeling of Town Creek embayment on Guntersville Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, M.D.; Shiao, Ming C.; Hauser, G.E. . Engineering Lab.); Butkus, S.R. . Water Quality Dept.)

    1990-09-01

    TVA investigated water quality of Town Creek embayment using a branched two-dimensional model of Guntersville Reservoir. Simulation results were compared in terms of algal biomass, nutrient concentrations, and volume of embayment with depleted dissolved oxygen. Stratification and flushing play a significant role in the embayment water quality. Storms introduce large loadings of organics, nutrients, and suspended solids. Dissolved oxygen depletion is most severe after storms followed by low flow that fails to flush the embayment. Embayment water quality responses to potential animal waste and erosion controls were explored. Modeling indicated animal waste controls were much more cost-effective than erosion controls. Erosion controls will decrease embayment suspended solids and thereby increase algal biomass due to greater light penetration. 29 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Nitrogen as a friendly addition to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Interstitial alloying with nitrogen or carbon is a common means of enhancing properties of iron-based alloys. Interstitial nitrogen addition to fcc-phase Fe-Cr-Mn/Ni alloys results in improved mechanical properties, whereas addition of carbon can result in the formation of unwanted carbides. Carbon addition to low alloy, bcc-phase iron alloys significantly improves strength through the formation of carbides, whereas addition of nitrogen in bcc-phase iron alloys can result in porous casting and reduced mechanical properties. This study will show that alloying iron-based alloys with both nitrogen and carbon can produce positive results. Nitrogen addition to Fe-C and Fe-Cr-C alloys, and both nitrogen and nitrogen-carbon additions to Fe-Cr-Mn/Ni alloys altered the microstructure, improved mechanical properties, increased hardness, and reduced wear by stabilizing the fcc-phase and altering (possibly eliminating) precipitate formation.

  11. Cincinnati Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, Chad E.; Love, Lonnie J.

    2015-03-04

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) worked with Cincinnati Incorporated (CI) to demonstrate Big Area Additive Manufacturing which increases the speed of the additive manufacturing (AM) process by over 1000X, increases the size of parts by over 10X and shows a cost reduction of over 100X. ORNL worked with CI to transition the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology from a proof-of-principle (TRL 2-3) demonstration to a prototype product stage (TRL 7-8).

  12. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Workshop Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials (AM) Workshop Our goal is to define opportunities and research gaps within additive manufacturing (AM) and to engage the broader scientific/engineering community to discuss future research directions. thumbnail of thumbnail of Contact Institute Director Dr. Alexander V. Balatsky Institute for Materials Science (505) 665-0077 Email Deputy Director Dr. Jennifer S. Martinez Institute for Materials Science

  13. ,"Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015"...

  14. ,"Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  15. ,"Wisconsin Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  16. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  17. ,"Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  18. ,"Alaska Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska...

  19. ,"California Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  20. ,"Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  1. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  2. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  3. ,"Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  4. ,"Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  5. ,"Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  6. ,"Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  7. ,"Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  8. ,"Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  9. ,"Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  10. ,"Massachusetts Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Massachusetts Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  11. Surface Additives for Enhanced Electrode Performance - Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ...efficient and almost non-polluting, making them an attractive alternative for energy generation. Some solid oxide fuel cells burn ... High performance additives then can be ...

  12. Redox Shuttle Additives | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology available for licensing: A series of novel redox shuttle additives for lithium-ion batteries Seven-technology suite helps reduce battery costs Provides overcharge ...

  13. Breaking Barriers in Polymer Additive Manufacturing (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) enables the creation of complex structures directly from a computer-aided design (CAD). There are limitations that prevent the technology from realizing ...

  14. Microsoft Word - Appendix I - Additional Field Implementation...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... SPPTS Solar Ponds Plume Treatment System TSS total suspended solids Additional Field Implementation Detail for Selected Monitoring Objectives U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. ...

  15. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    To increase acceptance of additive manufacturing as a viable processing method, pathways ... Included in this Gordon style workshop will be panel discussions with the invited ...

  16. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    To increase acceptance of additive manufacturing as a viable processing method, pathways ... Included in this Gordon style workshop will be panel discussions with the invited ...

  17. additive manufacturuing | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Laboratory engineer Bryan Moran won an award last month for his 3D printing innovation. It could revolutionize additive manufacturing.Lawrence Livermore Lab engineer Bryan Moran...

  18. Cincinnati Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: additive manufacturing Word Cloud More ...

  19. DOE Announces Additional Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action to Protect Consumers DOE Announces Additional Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action to Protect Consumers January 7, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis ...

  20. Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-Storm 100S-218 Version B Storage Modules at Hope Creek Cuclear Power Station ISFSI

    SciTech Connect

    Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2013-08-30

    As part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development, a consortium of national laboratories and industry is performing visual inspections and temperature measurements of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States. This report documents thermal analyses in in support of the inspections at the Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station ISFSI. This site utilizes the HI-STORM100 vertical storage system developed by Holtec International. This is a vertical storage module design, and the thermal models are being developed using COBRA-SFS (Michener, et al., 1987), a code developed by PNNL for thermal-hydraulic analyses of multi assembly spent fuel storage and transportation systems. This report describes the COBRA-SFS model in detail, and presents pre-inspection predictions of component temperatures and temperature distributions. The final report will include evaluation of inspection results, and if required, additional post-test calculations, with appropriate discussion of results.

  1. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  2. Water Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple water fixture inventory information and calculates the water/energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes water conservation measures for: Low-flow Toilets, Low-flow Urinals, Low-flow Faucets, and Low-flow Showheads. This tool calculates water savings, energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  3. Water Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple water fixture inventory information and calculates the water/energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes water conservation measures for: Low-flow Toilets, Low-flow Urinals, Low-flow Faucets, and Low-flow Showheads. This tool calculates water savings, energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, and building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits ofmore » a project.« less

  4. Blue Ridge Mountain Electric Membership Corporation - Energy...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Insulation: 200 Air Sealing: 200 Windows: 500 (25window) Duct Repair: 200 Heat Pump Water Heater: 200unit Storm Window Additions: 250 (12.50window) Exterior Door...

  5. About Additive Manufacturing | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Introducing Additive Manufacturing at GE Global Research Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Introducing Additive Manufacturing at GE Global Research Prabhjot Singh, manager of the Additive Manufacturing Lab at GE Global Research, describes the technology used in his lab. You Might Also Like DirectWrite_V

  6. Martin's Additions, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Martin's Additions is a village in Montgomery County, Maryland. It falls under Maryland's 8th congressional district.12...

  7. Water resources data, Kentucky. Water year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, D.L.; Byrd, F.D.; Brown, A.C.

    1991-12-31

    Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Kentucky consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and lakes; and water-levels of wells. This report includes daily discharge records for 115 stream-gaging stations. It also includes water-quality data for 38 stations sampled at regular intervals. Also published are 13 daily temperature and 8 specific conductance records, and 85 miscellaneous temperature and specific conductance determinations for the gaging stations. Suspended-sediment data for 12 stations (of which 5 are daily) are also published. Ground-water levels are published for 23 recording and 117 partial sites. Precipitation data at a regular interval is published for 1 site. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurement and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperation State and Federal agencies in Kentucky.

  8. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Workshop Poster Abstract Submission - deadline July 10, 2015 Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials using in situ sensors, diagnostics and modeling Contact Institute Director Dr. Alexander V. Balatsky Institute for Materials Science (505) 665-0077 Email Deputy Director Dr. Jennifer S. Martinez Institute for Materials Science (505) 665-0045 Email Deputy Director Dr. Nathan A. Mara Institute for Materials Science (505) 667 8665 Email Institute

  9. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    SciTech Connect

    Jumate, E.; Manea, D.; Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R.

    2013-11-13

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

  10. Hygroscopicity of fuels with anti-icing additives

    SciTech Connect

    Bedrik, B.G.; Golubushkin, V.N.; Uspenskii, S.I.

    1984-03-01

    This article investigates the accumulation of water by hydrocarbon fuels under static and dynamic conditions. Standard TS-1 fuel (aviation kerosine) is examined without an anti-icing additive (AIA) and blended with ethyl cellosolve or tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol in the concentrations that are added to fuel before refueling flight vehicles under service conditions in order to prevent the formation of ice crystals in the fuel. The fuel hygroscopicity under static conditions is measured in desiccators over saturated salt solutions giving air relative humidities from 37% to 97% at 20/sup 0/C. It is determined that tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol increases the fuel hygroscopicity to a greater degree than does the ethyl cellosolve. The fuel containing the AIA becomes a medium for the transfer of water from the ambient medium to the emulsion droplets, and these droplets in turn form a liquid phase. It is shown that the rate at which the fuel with the AIA becomes saturated with water under dynamic conditions is much greater than under static conditions. In the fuel without the AIA no water emulsion is formed, even with prolonged contact (more than 2 days) with 100% humidity air, whereas in the fuel with the AIA (even with 0.1% ethyl cellosolve), emulsion and liquid phase are formed. It is concluded that the physical stability of fuel containing AIA depends on the AIA concentration. Includes 3 tables.

  11. Arsenic removal from water

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2007-07-24

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  12. DOE/SC-ARM-10-021 STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Observing System ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ... thermometer IWC ice water content JPL Jet Propulsion ... around the area (e.g., weekly testing of diesel generators). ...

  13. Decontamination formulation with additive for enhanced mold remediation

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Mark D.; Irvine, Kevin; Berger, Paul; Comstock, Robert

    2010-02-16

    Decontamination formulations with an additive for enhancing mold remediation. The formulations include a solubilizing agent (e.g., a cationic surfactant), a reactive compound (e.g., hydrogen peroxide), a carbonate or bicarbonate salt, a water-soluble bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate), a mold remediation enhancer containing Fe or Mn, and water. The concentration of Fe.sup.2+ or Mn.sup.2+ ions in the aqueous mixture is in the range of about 0.0001% to about 0.001%. The enhanced formulations can be delivered, for example, as a foam, spray, liquid, fog, mist, or aerosol for neutralization of chemical compounds, and for killing certain biological compounds or agents and mold spores, on contaminated surfaces and materials.

  14. Water Security

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Water Security HomeTag:Water Security Electricity use by water service sector and county. Shown are electricity use by (a) ...

  15. Water Power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary PowerEnergy Conversion EfficiencyWater Power Water Power Tara Camacho-Lopez 2016-06-01T22:32:54+00:00 Enabling a successful water power industry. Hydropower ...

  16. water scarcity

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 ... Geochemistry Geoscience SubTER Carbon Sequestration Program Leadership EnergyWater Nexus ...

  17. water savings

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 ... Geochemistry Geoscience SubTER Carbon Sequestration Program Leadership EnergyWater Nexus ...

  18. water infrastructure

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 ... Geochemistry Geoscience SubTER Carbon Sequestration Program Leadership EnergyWater Nexus ...

  19. Water Demand

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 ... Geochemistry Geoscience SubTER Carbon Sequestration Program Leadership EnergyWater Nexus ...

  20. drinking water

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    drinking water - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 ...

  1. Water Security

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Security - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 ...

  2. Water Power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Power bernadette Permalink Gallery Bernie Hernandez-Sanchez wins HENAAC Award for outstanding technical achievement News, Water Power Bernie Hernandez-Sanchez wins HENAAC ...

  3. Water Power

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 ... Geochemistry Geoscience SubTER Carbon Sequestration Program Leadership EnergyWater Nexus ...

  4. Effect of additives on lithium cycling efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Toshiro; Yoshimatsu, Isamu; Yamaki, J. )

    1994-09-01

    Lithium cycling efficiency was evaluated for LiAsF[sub 6]-ethylene carbonate/2-methyltetrahydrofuran mixed-solvent electrolyte (LiAsF[sub 6]-EC/2MeTHF) with several additives: tetraalkylammonium chlorides with a long n-alkyl chain and three methyl groups. The ammonium chlorides with n-alkyl group longer than n-C[sub 12]H[sub 25]- increased lithium cycling efficiency. Cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) produced the best improvement in lithium cycling efficiency. A figure of merit (FOM) of lithium for 0.01 M CTAC was 46, which was 1.5 times the FOM for the corresponding additive-free electrolyte. The LiAsF[sub 6]-EC/2MeTHF with CTAC showed an increase in FOM with stack pressure, but the effect was less than that for the additive-free LiAsF[sub 6]-EC/2MeTHF. Scanning electron microscope observation showed that the addition of CTAC decreased the needle-like lithium deposition and increased particulate lithium deposition. This deposition morphology may be the main cause of the increase in FOM. The additive had no effect on rate capability for cell cycling at 3 mA/cm[sup 2] discharge and 1 mA/cm[sup 2] charge.

  5. Evaluation of advanced polymers for additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Orlando; Morrison, Crystal

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) technical collaboration project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and PPG Industries, Inc. was to evaluate the feasibility of using conventional coatings chemistry and technology to build up material layer-by-layer. The PPG-ORNL study successfully demonstrated that polymeric coatings formulations may overcome many limitations of common thermoplastics used in additive manufacturing (AM), allow lightweight nozzle design for material deposition and increase build rate. The materials effort focused on layer-by-layer deposition of coatings with each layer fusing together. The combination of materials and deposition results in an additively manufactured build that has sufficient mechanical properties to bear the load of additional layers, yet is capable of bonding across the z-layers to improve build direction strength. The formulation properties were tuned to enable a novel, high-throughput deposition method that is highly scalable, compatible with high loading of reinforcing fillers, and is inherently low-cost.

  6. Additive manufacturing of materials: Opportunities and challenges

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Love, Lonnie J.; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Peter, William H.; Watkins, Thomas R.; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2015-11-01

    Additive manufacturing (also known as 3D printing) is considered a disruptive technology for producing components with topologically optimized complex geometries as well as functionalities that are not achievable by traditional methods. The realization of the full potential of 3D printing is stifled by a lack of computational design tools, generic material feedstocks, techniques for monitoring thermomechanical processes under in situ conditions, and especially methods for minimizing anisotropic static and dynamic properties brought about by microstructural heterogeneity. In this paper, we discuss the role of interdisciplinary research involving robotics and automation, process control, multiscale characterization of microstructure and properties, and high-performancemore » computational tools to address each of these challenges. In addition, emerging pathways to scale up additive manufacturing of structural materials to large sizes (>1 m) and higher productivities (5–20 kg/h) while maintaining mechanical performance and geometrical flexibility are also discussed.« less

  7. Additive manufacturing of materials: Opportunities and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Love, Lonnie J.; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Peter, William H.; Watkins, Thomas R.; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2015-11-01

    Additive manufacturing (also known as 3D printing) is considered a disruptive technology for producing components with topologically optimized complex geometries as well as functionalities that are not achievable by traditional methods. The realization of the full potential of 3D printing is stifled by a lack of computational design tools, generic material feedstocks, techniques for monitoring thermomechanical processes under in situ conditions, and especially methods for minimizing anisotropic static and dynamic properties brought about by microstructural heterogeneity. In this paper, we discuss the role of interdisciplinary research involving robotics and automation, process control, multiscale characterization of microstructure and properties, and high-performance computational tools to address each of these challenges. In addition, emerging pathways to scale up additive manufacturing of structural materials to large sizes (>1 m) and higher productivities (5–20 kg/h) while maintaining mechanical performance and geometrical flexibility are also discussed.

  8. Packaging and Transportation of Additional Neptunium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, R.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

    2010-05-05

    The Savannah River Site's HB-Line Facility completed a second neptunium oxide production campaign in which nine (9) additional cans of neptunium oxide were produced and shipped to the Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the 9975 shipping container. These additional cans were from a different feed solution than the first fifty (50) cans of neptunium oxide that were previously produced and shipped via a Letter of Amendment to the 9975 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) content table. This paper will address the challenges associated with demonstrating the neptunium oxide produced from the additional feed solution was equivalent to the original neptunium oxide and within the content description of the Letter of Amendment.

  9. Metal-air cell comprising an electrolyte with a room temperature ionic liquid and hygroscopic additive

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Cody A.; Krishnan, Ramkumar; Tang, Toni; Wolfe, Derek

    2014-08-19

    An electrochemical cell comprising an electrolyte comprising water and a hydrophobic ionic liquid comprising positive ions and negative ions. The electrochemical cell also includes an air electrode configured to absorb and reduce oxygen. A hydrophilic or hygroscopic additive modulates the hydrophobicity of the ionic liquid to maintain a concentration of the water in the electrolyte is between 0.001 mol % and 25 mol %.

  10. Effusion plate using additive manufacturing methods

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul; Ostebee, Heath Michael; Wegerif, Daniel Gerritt

    2016-04-12

    Additive manufacturing techniques may be utilized to construct effusion plates. Such additive manufacturing techniques may include defining a configuration for an effusion plate having one or more internal cooling channels. The manufacturing techniques may further include depositing a powder into a chamber, applying an energy source to the deposited powder, and consolidating the powder into a cross-sectional shape corresponding to the defined configuration. Such methods may be implemented to construct an effusion plate having one or more channels with a curved cross-sectional geometry.

  11. Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to bout 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution.

  12. Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.

    1996-12-10

    A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to about 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution. 4 figs.

  13. Breaking Barriers in Polymer Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie J; Duty, Chad E; Post, Brian K; Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Kunc, Vlastimil; Peter, William H; Blue, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) enables the creation of complex structures directly from a computer-aided design (CAD). There are limitations that prevent the technology from realizing its full potential. AM has been criticized for being slow and expensive with limited build size. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a large scale AM system that improves upon each of these areas by more than an order of magnitude. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system directly converts low cost pellets into a large, three-dimensional part at a rate exceeding 25 kg/h. By breaking these traditional barriers, it is possible for polymer AM to penetrate new manufacturing markets.

  14. Residential Absorption Water Heater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Residential Absorption Water Heater 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Kyle Gluesenkamp, gluesenkampk@ornl.gov Oak Ridge National Laboratory Project Summary Timeline: Start date: Oct 1, 2009 Planned end date: Sep 30, 2015 Key Milestones 1. Glycol additive report; Dec 2013 2. Prototype EF>1.0; March 2014 Budget: Total DOE $ to date: $2,429k Total future DOE $: $250k Target Market/Audience: Residential gas water heating Key Partners: GE CRADA partner SRA International Market

  15. Interaction of water with epoxy.

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Dana Auburn

    2009-07-01

    The chemistries of reactants, plasticizers, solvents and additives in an epoxy paint are discussed. Polyamide additives may play an important role in the absorption of molecular iodine by epoxy paints. It is recommended that the unsaturation of the polyamide additive in the epoxy cure be determined. Experimental studies of water absorption by epoxy resins are discussed. These studies show that absorption can disrupt hydrogen bonds among segments of the polymers and cause swelling of the polymer. The water absorption increases the diffusion coefficient of water within the polymer. Permanent damage to the polymer can result if water causes hydrolysis of ether linkages. Water desorption studies are recommended to ascertain how water absorption affects epoxy paint.

  16. BOILING WATER REACTOR WITH FEED WATER INJECTION NOZZLES

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1963-04-30

    This patent covers the use of injection nozzles for pumping water into the lower ends of reactor fuel tubes in which water is converted directly to steam. Pumping water through fuel tubes of this type of boiling water reactor increases its power. The injection nozzles decrease the size of pump needed, because the pump handles only the water going through the nozzles, additional water being sucked into the tubes by the nozzles independently of the pump from the exterior body of water in which the fuel tubes are immersed. The resulting movement of exterior water along the tubes holds down steam formation, and thus maintains the moderator effectiveness, of the exterior body of water. (AEC)

  17. Water Summit

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Advisory: White House to host Water Summit March 21, 2016 Los Alamos watershed research among featured projects LOS ALAMOS, N.M., March 21, 2016-On Tuesday, March 22, 2016-World Water Day-the Administration will host a White House Water Summit to raise awareness of the national importance of water and to highlight new commitments and announcements that the Administration and non-Federal institutions are making to build a sustainable water future. A project from Los Alamos National Laboratory

  18. Water Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Efficiency Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, Florida WATER EFFICIENCY Federal Utility Partnership Working Group November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, FL * Kate McMordie Stoughton - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory * kate.mcmordie@pnnl.gov * Francis Wheeler - Water Savers, LLC * fwheeler@watersaversllc.com Topics * Performance contracting analysis * Water industry terms * Federal reduction goals * Water balance * Water efficiency

  19. Microsoft Word - 07 Texas Water Plan.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    monthly regional meetings * TWAA (Texas Water Allocation Assessment) * www.swf.usace.army.mil ("(at bottom) Additional Related Material", "Texas Water Allocation Assessment ...

  20. Vehicular fuels and additives for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Interest in automotive fuel is resurging. Automobile fuels must increasingly deal with clean air regulations and ozone problems. Furthermore, feedstocks become heavier,as refinery production changes, as more unleaded is produced, and as an increasing number of pollution regulations must be satisfied greater attention will be paid to better mixtures, solvents, additives, and neat methanol. BCC report analyzes developments technologies, markets, players and the political/regulations aspects of this important market. Study also assesses the advantages and drawbacks of methanol, ethanol, MTBE and other additives which have their place as octane enhancers and fuel substitutes-all now deeply involved in the gasoline modification battle. Other issues addressed are subsidies, farm lobbying, imports, pricing, economics, Detroit's response, neat fuel testing projects, volatility problems vs. fewer ozone-forming hydrocarbon species, and emission ratings.

  1. The addition of disilanes to cumulenes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.

    1997-10-08

    The syntheses of silicon-containing compounds and the studies of their rearrangements have been active research areas in the Barton research group. Previously, the addition of disilanes to acetylenes was studied in the group and an intramolecular 2S + 2A mechanism has been proposed. In this thesis, the work is focused on the addition of disilanes to cumulenes. The syntheses of the precursors are discussed and the possible mechanisms for their thermal, photochemical and catalytic rearrangements are proposed. Conjugated organic polymers have been studied in the group since 1985 because of their potential for exhibiting high electroconductivity, photoconductivity, strong non-linear optical response and intense fluorescence. In the second section of this dissertation, the synthesis and property studies of poly(phenylene vinylene) analogues are discussed.

  2. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Furthermore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.

  3. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Furthermore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numericalmore » modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.« less

  4. Energetic additive manufacturing process with feed wire

    DOEpatents

    Harwell, Lane D.; Griffith, Michelle L.; Greene, Donald L.; Pressly, Gary A.

    2000-11-07

    A process for additive manufacture by energetic wire deposition is described. A source wire is fed into a energy beam generated melt-pool on a growth surface as the melt-pool moves over the growth surface. This process enables the rapid prototyping and manufacture of fully dense, near-net shape components, as well as cladding and welding processes. Alloys, graded materials, and other inhomogeneous materials can be grown using this process.

  5. Ground Control Review Identifies Additional Rock Fall

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    October 5, 2016 Ground Control Review Identifies Additional Rock Fall On October 4, during on-going ground control inspections, mining and ground control engineers at WIPP discovered a rock fall had taken place in what was the exhaust access drift to Panel 3. Panel 3 was closed in February 2007, and access to the openings of the panel have been restricted (requiring management approval to access) since November 2014 and prohibited (no personnel entry allowed) since January 2015. No employees

  6. Additional Resources | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Development Additional Resources Photo: DARHT's Accelerators help create the x-rays at DARHT, the world's most advanced radiography facility. Reports 2013 Stewardship Science Academic Programs Annual 2012 Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Annual 2011 Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Annual FY 2011 Stockpile Stewardship and Management Plan, Annex A (April 7, 2010) Supplement to the Stockpile Stewardship Plan, Fiscal Years 2010-2014 (December 2009) Advances in Matter Under Extreme

  7. Impacts of Water Quality on Residential Water Heating Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, Sarah H.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2013-11-01

    Water heating is a ubiquitous energy use in all residential housing, accounting for 17.7% of residential energy use (EIA 2012). Today, there are many efficient water heating options available for every fuel type, from electric and gas to more unconventional fuel types like propane, solar, and fuel oil. Which water heating option is the best choice for a given household will depend on a number of factors, including average daily hot water use (total gallons per day), hot water draw patterns (close together or spread out), the hot water distribution system (compact or distributed), installation constraints (such as space, electrical service, or venting accommodations) and fuel-type availability and cost. While in general more efficient water heaters are more expensive than conventional water heating technologies, the savings in energy use and, thus, utility bills can recoup the additional upfront investment and make an efficient water heater a good investment over time in most situations, although the specific payback period for a given installation will vary widely. However, the expected lifetime of a water heater in a given installation can dramatically influence the cost effectiveness and savings potential of a water heater and should be considered, along with water use characteristics, fuel availability and cost, and specific home characteristics when selecting the optimum water heating equipment for a particular installation. This report provides recommendations for selecting and maintaining water heating equipment based on local water quality characteristics.

  8. Database of Low-E Storm Window Energy Performance across U.S. Climate Zones (Task ET-WIN-PNNL-FY13-01_5.3)

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, Katherine A.; Culp, Thomas D.

    2013-09-01

    This report describes process, assumptions, and modeling results produced in support of the Emerging Technologies Low-e Storm Windows Task 5.3: Create a Database of U.S. Climate-Based Analysis for Low-E Storm Windows. The scope of the overall effort is to develop a database of energy savings and cost effectiveness of low-E storm windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climates using the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) and RESFEN model calculations. This report includes a summary of the results, NEAT and RESFEN background, methodology, and input assumptions, and an appendix with detailed results and assumptions by cliamte zone. Both sets of calculation results will be made publicly available through the Building America Solution Center.

  9. RAM-SCB simulations of electron transport and plasma wave scattering during the October 2012 “double-dip” storm

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Jordanova, Vania Koleva; Tu, Weichao; Chen, Yue; Morley, Steven Karl; Panaitescu, Alin -Daniel; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Kletzing, Craig A.

    2016-09-13

    Here, mechanisms for electron injection, trapping, and loss in the near-Earth space environment are investigated during the October 2012 “double-dip” storm using our magnetically self-consistent ring current model (RAM-SCB). Pitch angle and energy scattering are included for the first time in RAM-SCB using L and magnetic local time (MLT) dependent event-specific chorus wave models inferred from NOAA POES and Van Allen Probes EMFISIS observations. The dynamics of the source (~10s keV) and seed (~100s keV) populations of the radiation belts simulated with RAM-SCB is compared with Van Allen Probes MagEIS observations in the morning sector and with measurements from NOAA-15more » satellite in the predawn and afternoon MLT sectors. We find that although the low-energy (E < 100 keV) electron fluxes are in good agreement with observations, increasing significantly by magnetospheric convection during both SYM-H dips while decreasing during the intermediate recovery phase, the injection of high-energy electrons is underestimated by this mechanism throughout the storm. Local acceleration by chorus waves intensifies the electron fluxes at E ≥ 50 keV considerably and RAM-SCB simulations overestimate the observed trapped fluxes by more than an order of magnitude; the simulated with RAM-SCB precipitating fluxes are weaker and their temporal and spatial evolution agree well with POES/MEPED data.« less

  10. NOVEL LUBRICANT ADDITIVES - Energy Innovation Portal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search NOVEL LUBRICANT ADDITIVES Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology <em>Upper, the functionalized nanostructures mixed with poly-alpha-olefin (PAO)-4 reduce friction as test temperature is raised. Lower, Friction coefficient remains unchanged at all test temperatures with PAO4 alone.&nbsp; </em><br /> <br type="_moz" /> Upper, the functionalized nanostructures mixed with poly-alpha-olefin (PAO)-4

  11. PDII- Additional discussion of the dynamic aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Norman M. Gelfand

    2002-07-23

    This note is in the nature of an addition to the dynamic aperture calculations found in the report on the Proton Driver, FERMILAB-TM-2169. A extensive discussion of the Proton Driver lattice, as well as the nomenclature used to describe it can be found in TM-2169. Basically the proposed lattice is a racetrack design with the two arcs joined by two long straight sections. The straight sections are dispersion free. Tracking studies were undertaken with the objective of computing the dynamic aperture for the lattice and some of the results have been incorporated into TM-2169. This note is a more extensive report of those calculations.

  12. Reusing Water

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Reusing Water Reusing Water Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater is recycled at LANL by virtue of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into...

  13. Reusing Water

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Reusing Water Reusing Water Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater is recycled at LANL by virtue of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into ...

  14. Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with portland cement

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, Meyer; Krishna, Coimbatore R.

    1986-01-01

    Coal-water mixes stabilized by the addition of portland cement which may additionally contain retarding carbohydrates, or borax are described.

  15. Stabilizing coal-water mixtures with Portland cement

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, M.; Krishna, C.R.

    1984-10-17

    Coal-water mixes stabilized by the addition of Portland cement which may additionally contain retarding carbohydrates, or borax are described. 1 tab.

  16. Reply to "Comment on papers by K. Shanahan that propose to explain anomalous heat generated by cold fusion", E. Storms, Thermochim. Acta (2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, Kirk

    2005-09-21

    Dr. E. Storms has published a Letter [1] in which he argues that in a sequence of recent papers [2-5], the apparent excess heat signal claimed by Dr. Shanahan to arise from a calibration constant shift is actually true excess heat. In particular he proposes that the mechanisms proposed that foster the proposed calibration constant shifts [3,5] cannot occur as postulated for several reasons. As well, he proposes Shanahan has ignored the extant data proving this. Because this Letter may lend unwarranted support to acceptance of cold fusion claims, these erroneous arguments used by Storms need to be answered.

  17. Water Quality

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewables » Water Power Technologies Office Water Power Technologies Office Wave Energy Prize Winners Announced Wave Energy Prize Winners Announced Four teams surpassed the difficult threshold of doubling the energy captured from ocean waves with their wave energy converter technologies. See who won the $2.25 million in cash prizes! Read more Direct Current: From Water to Wattage Podcast Direct Current: From Water to Wattage Podcast Hydropower is America's oldest and largest source of clean,

  18. Neutrinos from STORed Muons - nuSTORM (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In addition I will explain how the facility can be used to make neutrino interaction cross ... transformational in our approach to n interaction physics, offering a "n light source" to ...

  19. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  20. Printability of alloys for additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Mukherjee, T.; Zuback, J. S.; De, A.; DebRoy, T.

    2016-01-22

    Although additive manufacturing (AM), or three dimensional (3D) printing, provides significant advantages over existing manufacturing techniques, metallic parts produced by AM are susceptible to distortion, lack of fusion defects and compositional changes. Here we show that the printability, or the ability of an alloy to avoid these defects, can be examined by developing and testing appropriate theories. A theoretical scaling analysis is used to test vulnerability of various alloys to thermal distortion. A theoretical kinetic model is used to examine predisposition of different alloys to AM induced compositional changes. A well-tested numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model is usedmore » to compare susceptibilities of various alloys to lack of fusion defects. These results are tested and validated with independent experimental data. Here, the findings presented in this paper are aimed at achieving distortion free, compositionally sound and well bonded metallic parts.« less

  1. Acetals and ketals of reduced sugars as fuel system icing inhibitor additives

    SciTech Connect

    Mushrush, G.W.; Stalick, W.M.; Basu, S.

    1996-10-01

    Currently the fuel system icing inhibitor additives ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) and diethylene glycol monomethyl ether (DiEGME) are mandatory in all military aircraft fuels. These additives are optional for use in all worldwide commercial aviation fuels depending on routes, flight lengths, and season. These deicing compounds are toxic at the concentrations that are required for effective deicing. The additives are leached out of the fuel and into tank water bottoms; glycols exert high oxygen demand. In addition, water drained from fuel system pumps, filters and storage tanks contain EGME/DiEGME and creates a personnel hazard. Acetals and ketals of reduced sugars represent viable alternatives to glycol based additives. They are inexpensive, fuel stable for at least one year and show the similar icing inhibitor characteristics. The synthesis and fuel studies for these compounds will be presented.

  2. Peter Agre and Aquaporin Water Channels

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Peter Agre and Aquaporin Water Channels Resources with Additional Information Peter Agre Courtesy of Johns Hopkins University 'Peter Agre, MD received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry ...

  3. Additionality of global benefits and financial additionality in the context of the AIJ negotiations

    SciTech Connect

    Puhl, I.

    1996-12-31

    The Conference of the Party at their first meeting (COP1) took a decision regarding criteria for joint implementation as indicated in Art. 4.2 (a) of the FCCC which established a pilot phase for activities implemented jointly (AIJ) under the pilot phase. Besides some more technical issues this decision specified that such measures should bring about real, measurable and long-term environmental benefits related to the mitigation of climate change that would not have occurred in the absence of such activities. It also established that the financing of AIJ shall be additional to the financial obligations of developed country parties. These two requirements are called the additionality criteria for AIJ. The first refers to the realness of GHG emission abatement (which means reduction compared to a baseline) whereas the second describes that funds earmarked for AIJ have no other objective (i.e. profit making, export promotion) but to reduce GHG emissions to avoid the free-riding of investors and subsequently developed country parties. The reporting framework as well as the reporting requirements under national programs do not specify further the two types of additionality and even though research focuses on issues like baseline determination there has been no attempt so far to identify approaches which contribute towards defining strict and practicable methods and guidelines to frame additionality criteria. The first FCCC assessment of pilot project reporting revealed that in the reporting of activities, emissions additionality often remained unclear, especially in cases where AIJ was only a portion of an existing or already planned project, and that there is a point about how to account for financial additionality. It subsequently proposed to develop a uniform approach to baseline determination and the assessment of emission (reduction) additionality and financial additionality.

  4. Water resources data for Louisiana, water year 1995. Water data report (Annual), 1 October 1994-30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, C.R.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.

    1996-05-01

    Water resources data for the 1995 water year for Louisiana consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 65 gaging stations; stage only for 40 gaging stations and 6 lakes; water quality for 45 surface-water stations (including 23 gage stations) and 76 wells; and water levels for 217 observation wells. Also included are data for 113 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  5. Water resources data for Louisiana, water year 1994. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1993-30 September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, C.R.; Lovelace, W.M.; Montgomery, P.A.

    1995-03-01

    Water resources data for the 1994 water year for Louisiana consists of records for stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. This report contains records for water discharge at 64 gaging stations; stage only for 45 gaging stations and 6 lakes; water quality for 51 surface-water stations (including 24 gage stations) and 84 wells; and water levels for 209 observations wells. Also included are data for 115 crest-stage and flood-profile partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  6. Additional EIPC Study Analysis. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Stanton W; Gotham, Douglas J.; Luciani, Ralph L.

    2014-12-01

    Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 14 topics was developed for further analysis. This paper brings together the earlier interim reports of the first 13 topics plus one additional topic into a single final report.

  7. Structure Property Studies for Additively Manufactured Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Milenski, Helen M; Schmalzer, Andrew Michael; Kelly, Daniel

    2015-08-17

    Since the invention of modern Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes engineers and designers have worked hard to capitalize on the unique building capabilities that AM allows. By being able to customize the interior fill of parts it is now possible to design components with a controlled density and customized internal structure. The creation of new polymers and polymer composites allow for even greater control over the mechanical properties of AM parts. One of the key reasons to explore AM, is to bring about a new paradigm in part design, where materials can be strategically optimized in a way that conventional subtractive methods cannot achieve. The two processes investigated in my research were the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process and the Direct Ink Write (DIW) process. The objectives of the research were to determine the impact of in-fill density and morphology on the mechanical properties of FDM parts, and to determine if DIW printed samples could be produced where the filament diameter was varied while the overall density remained constant.

  8. The effects of atmosphere and additives on coal slag viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.P.; Strobel, T.M.; Nowok, J.W.

    1996-10-01

    With the advent of advanced coal-fired power systems operating at higher working fluid temperatures, slag corrosion, erosion, and fouling of heat exchanger surfaces will become even more of a problem than in today`s systems. Laboratory experiments have shown excessive corrosion of candidate alloy and ceramic heat exchanger materials by both calcium-rich subbituminous and iron-rich bituminous coal slags. The viscosity of the slag greatly affects the corrosion rate since it determines the rate of transfer of corrosive species to the materials and corrosion product away from the materials. Slag viscosity is controlled by the composition of the slag and surrounding atmosphere as well as its temperature. In this paper we report the results of investigations of the viscosities and critical temperatures of three coal slags in three atmospheres: air, air plus water vapor, and reducing gas. In addition, the effects of additions of alumina, magnesia, and copper oxide on viscosity, crystallization, and critical temperature of the slags are reported. Conclusions are drawn about appropriate test conditions for determining slag corrosion rates and about ways of modifying slag viscosity to reduce corrosion rates.

  9. CREATION OF THE MODEL ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, F.; Rosenthal, M.; Wulf, N.

    2010-05-25

    In 1991, the international nuclear nonproliferation community was dismayed to discover that the implementation of safeguards by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) under its NPT INFCIRC/153 safeguards agreement with Iraq had failed to detect Iraq's nuclear weapon program. It was now clear that ensuring that states were fulfilling their obligations under the NPT would require not just detecting diversion but also the ability to detect undeclared materials and activities. To achieve this, the IAEA initiated what would turn out to be a five-year effort to reappraise the NPT safeguards system. The effort engaged the IAEA and its Member States and led to agreement in 1997 on a new safeguards agreement, the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between States and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards. The Model Protocol makes explicit that one IAEA goal is to provide assurance of the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities. The Model Protocol requires an expanded declaration that identifies a State's nuclear potential, empowers the IAEA to raise questions about the correctness and completeness of the State's declaration, and, if needed, allows IAEA access to locations. The information required and the locations available for access are much broader than those provided for under INFCIRC/153. The negotiation was completed in quite a short time because it started with a relatively complete draft of an agreement prepared by the IAEA Secretariat. This paper describes how the Model Protocol was constructed and reviews key decisions that were made both during the five-year period and in the actual negotiation.

  10. Water pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    Ballast water, which is sea water that is carried in oil tankers to provide stability, can become contaminated with oil. Alyeska Pipeline Service Company runs a water treatment plant at its pipeline terminal at Prot Valdez, Alaska, to treat ballast water before it is discharged into the sea. GAO reviewed EPA's recently reissued National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit for the Port Valdez facility. In this report, GAO compares the effluent limits and other requirements under the reissued permit with those of the old permit, determines the reasons for changes in the reissued permit, and examines Alyeska's initial efforts to comply with the reissued permit's effluent limits and reporting requirements.

  11. Integration of Water Resource Models with Fayetteville Shale Decision Support and Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Cothren, Jackson; Thoma, Greg; DiLuzio, Mauro; Limp, Fred

    2013-06-30

    Significant issues can arise with the timing, location, and volume of surface water withdrawals associated with hydraulic fracturing of gas shale reservoirs as impacted watersheds may be sensitive, especially in drought years, during low flow periods, or during periods of the year when activities such as irrigation place additional demands on the surface supply of water. Significant energy production and associated water withdrawals may have a cumulative impact to watersheds over the short-term. Hence, hydraulic fracturing based on water withdrawal could potentially create shifts in the timing and magnitude of low or high flow events or change the magnitude of river flow at daily, monthly, seasonal, or yearly time scales. These changes in flow regimes can result in dramatically altered river systems. Currently little is known about the impact of fracturing on stream flow behavior. Within this context the objective of this study is to assess the impact of the hydraulic fracturing on the water balance of the Fayetteville Shale play area and examine the potential impacts of hydraulic fracturing on river flow regime at subbasin scale. This project addressed that need with four unique but integrated research and development efforts: 1) Evaluate the predictive reliability of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model based at a variety of scales (Task/Section 3.5). The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to simulate the across-scale water balance and the respective impact of hydraulic fracturing. A second hypothetical scenario was designed to assess the current and future impacts of water withdrawals for hydraulic fracturing on the flow regime and on the environmental flow components (EFCs) of the river. The shifting of these components, which present critical elements to water supply and water quality, could influence the ecological dynamics of river systems. For this purpose, we combined the use of SWAT model and Richter et al.’s (1996

  12. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse High Voltage ...

  13. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & ...

  14. WATER TREATMENT

    DOEpatents

    Pitman, R.W.; Conley, W.R. Jr.

    1962-12-01

    An automated system for adding clarifying chemicals to water in a water treatment plant is described. To a sample of the floc suspension polyacrylamide or similar filter aid chemicals are added, and the sample is then put through a fast filter. The resulting filtrate has the requisite properties for monitoring in an optical turbidimeter to control the automated system. (AEC)

  15. This invention relates to methods of generating NP gallium nitride (GaN) across large areas (>1 cm.sup.2) with controlled pore diameters, pore density, and porosity. Also disclosed are methods of generating novel optoelectronic devices based on porous GaN. Additionally a layer transfer scheme to separate and create free-standing crystalline GaN thin layers is disclosed that enables a new device manufacturing paradigm involving substrate recycling. Other disclosed embodiments of this invention relate to fabrication of GaN based nanocrystals and the use of NP GaN electrodes for electrolysis, water splitting, or photosynthetic process applications.

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Qian; Han, Jung

    2015-12-08

    This invention relates to methods of generating NP gallium nitride (GaN) across large areas (>1 cm.sup.2) with controlled pore diameters, pore density, and porosity. Also disclosed are methods of generating novel optoelectronic devices based on porous GaN. Additionally a layer transfer scheme to separate and create free-standing crystalline GaN thin layers is disclosed that enables a new device manufacturing paradigm involving substrate recycling. Other disclosed embodiments of this invention relate to fabrication of GaN based nanocrystals and the use of NP GaN electrodes for electrolysis, water splitting, or photosynthetic process applications.

  16. NOx reduction in diesel fuel flames by additions of water and CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.C.

    1997-12-31

    Natural gas has the highest heating value per unit mass (50.1 MJ/kg, LHV) of any of the hydrocarbon fuels (e.g., butane, liquid diesel fuel, gasoline, etc.). Since it has the lowest carbon content per unit mass, combustion of natural gas produces much less carbon dioxide, soot particles, and oxide of nitrogen than combustion of liquid diesel fuel. In view of anticipated strengthening of regulations on pollutant emissions from diesel engines, alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) have been experimentally introduced to replace the traditional diesel fuels in heavy-duty trucks, transit buses, off-road vehicles, locomotives, and stationary engines. To help in applying natural gas in Diesel engines and increasing combustion efficiency, the emphasis of the present paper is placed on the detailed flame chemistry of methane-air combustion. The present work is the continued effort in finding better methods to reduce NO{sub x}. The goal is to identify a reliable chemical reaction mechanism for natural gas in both premixed and diffusion flames and to establish a systematic reduced mechanism which may be useful for large-scale numerical modeling of combustion behavior in natural gas engines.

  17. Water Wars

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2012-09-11

    Sandia National Laboratories and Intel Corporation are cooperating on a project aimed at developing serious games to assist in resource planners in conducting open and participatory projects. Water Wars serves as a prototype game focused on water issues. Water Wars is a multi-player, online role-playing "serious game" combining large-scale simulation (e.g. SimCity), with strategy and interpersonal interaction (e.g. Diplomacy). The game is about water use set in present-day New Mexico. Players enact various stakeholder rolesmore » and compete for water while simultaneously cooperating to prevent environmental collapse. The gamespace utilizes immersive 3D graphics to bring the problem alive. The game integrates Intel's OpenSim visualization engine with Sandia developed agent-based and system dynamics models.« less

  18. Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOEpatents

    Moens, Luc

    2003-06-24

    A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

  19. WATEQ3 geochemical model: thermodynamic data for several additional solids

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.

    1982-09-01

    Geochemical models such as WATEQ3 can be used to model the concentrations of water-soluble pollutants that may result from the disposal of nuclear waste and retorted oil shale. However, for a model to competently deal with these water-soluble pollutants, an adequate thermodynamic data base must be provided that includes elements identified as important in modeling these pollutants. To this end, several minerals and related solid phases were identified that were absent from the thermodynamic data base of WATEQ3. In this study, the thermodynamic data for the identified solids were compiled and selected from several published tabulations of thermodynamic data. For these solids, an accepted Gibbs free energy of formation, ..delta..G/sup 0//sub f,298/, was selected for each solid phase based on the recentness of the tabulated data and on considerations of internal consistency with respect to both the published tabulations and the existing data in WATEQ3. For those solids not included in these published tabulations, Gibbs free energies of formation were calculated from published solubility data (e.g., lepidocrocite), or were estimated (e.g., nontronite) using a free-energy summation method described by Mattigod and Sposito (1978). The accepted or estimated free energies were then combined with internally consistent, ancillary thermodynamic data to calculate equilibrium constants for the hydrolysis reactions of these minerals and related solid phases. Including these values in the WATEQ3 data base increased the competency of this geochemical model in applications associated with the disposal of nuclear waste and retorted oil shale. Additional minerals and related solid phases that need to be added to the solubility submodel will be identified as modeling applications continue in these two programs.

  20. Current-wave spectra coupling project. Volume IV. Part A. Formulation of the three-dimensional structure of storm-generated currents. Part B. Summaries of Volumes I, II and III

    SciTech Connect

    Venezian, G.; Bretschneider, C.L.

    1980-09-01

    An attempt is made to formulate the technical approach to the problem of three dimensional wind driven currents under hurricane conditions. Reference is given to the splendid piece of research on the subject by Forristall (1974) Three-dimensional structure of storm-generated currents, J. Geophys. Res. 79, 2721-2727. The present approach, although not entirely satisfactory, seems to be an improvement on the work by Forristall, but this remains to be verified with future work, including the use of measured data. An improvement could be made if there were some better way of representing the shear stress as a function of the wind velocity (wind speed and direction). It seems that the wind velocity relative to the water motion is what matters, but in turbulent flow the surface value is not well defined. This difficulty leaves one with an unbalanced vortex stretching which accounts for the spin-up of the fluid, but the details of that are lacking. Essentially, it appears that it is feasible to modify Forristall's approach to obtain a more realistic representation of the structure of the boundary layer to take into account the turbulent nature of the flow.

  1. Nonequilibrium effects of diluent addition in a recombining argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, M.H. ); Kruger, C.H. )

    1993-03-01

    Spectroscopic and calorimetric measurements have been made using a 50 kW radio frequency inductively coupled plasma torch operated at atmospheric pressure with maximum temperatures and electron densities near 8500 K and 3[times]10[sup 21] m[sup [minus]3], respectively. The plasma flowed through a water-cooled quartz test section which enabled the study of nonequilibrium effects on both a recombining pure argon plasma and a recombining argon plasma with hydrogen, nitrogen, or neon. The pure argon plasma is found to be well described by a partial equilibrium model in which the free and bound-excited electrons are in mutual equilibrium irrespective of possible departures from equilibrium with the ground state. The addition of just tenths of a percent of either atomic hydrogen or nitrogen (but not neon, in contrast) is found to significantly affect the plasma's state of equilibrium for electron densities roughly less than 10[sup 21] m[sup [minus]3] because of a nearly gas-kinetic reaction between argon's first excited state and the diluent's ground state. This quenching'' reaction provides a depopulating mechanism for argon's first excited state and thereby inhibits the establishment of partial equilibrium which then invalidates several common diagnostic methods. The extent of quenching depends on the particular diluent, the amount of diluent relative to the electron number density, and on the temperature. These experimental observations are supported by an appropriately modified argon collisional--radiative model.

  2. Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives Bench test results showed that compared with fully-formulated engine oils, ...

  3. Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in ...

  4. Fuel Additive Strategies for Enhancing the Performance of Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Additive Strategies for Enhancing the Performance of Engines and Engine Oils Fuel Additive Strategies for Enhancing the Performance of Engines and Engine Oils 2003 DEER Conference ...

  5. An Overview of Polymer Additive Manufacturing Technologies (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An Overview of Polymer Additive Manufacturing Technologies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An Overview of Polymer Additive Manufacturing Technologies You are ...

  6. Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's ...

  7. EERE Success Story - Novel Engine Lubrication Anti-Wear Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Story - Novel Engine Lubrication Anti-Wear Additives Demonstrate Improved Fuel Economy EERE Success Story - Novel Engine Lubrication Anti-Wear Additives Demonstrate Improved Fuel ...

  8. Additional Guidance for EERE Digital Data Management Plans |...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Services Funding Digital Data Management Additional Guidance for EERE Digital Data Management Plans Additional Guidance for EERE Digital Data Management Plans Beyond the ...

  9. Digital Data Management Additional Guidance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Additional Guidance Digital Data Management Additional Guidance Beyond the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) digital data management requirements, the ...

  10. Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  11. Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry Download presentation...

  12. The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects ...

  13. An Overview of Polymer Additive Manufacturing Technologies Peterson...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Polymer Additive Manufacturing Technologies Peterson, Dominic S. Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Materials Science(36) Additive Manufacturing...

  14. Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Additive Chemistry and Exhaust Conditions on Diesel Particulate Filter Service Life and Vehicle Fuel Economy Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and ...

  15. Large-Scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Large-Scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Additives Large-Scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Additives PDF icon nanoparticulate-basedlubricati...

  16. Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport...

    Energy Saver

    Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export ...

  17. Department of Energy Announces Two Additional Loans of Oil from...

    Energy Saver

    Additional Loans of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Department of Energy Announces Two Additional Loans of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve September 2, 2005 - ...

  18. Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive and Conventional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive and Conventional Manufacturing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive ...

  19. Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies ORSSAB recommends...

  20. The Importance of Carbon Fiber to Polymer Additive Manufacturing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Importance of Carbon Fiber to Polymer Additive Manufacturing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Importance of Carbon Fiber to Polymer Additive Manufacturing...

  1. Estimated Water Flows in 2005: United States

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-16

    Flow charts depicting water use in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of water use patterns. Approximately 410,500 million gallons per day of water are managed throughout the United States for use in farming, power production, residential, commercial, and industrial applications. Water is obtained from four major resource classes: fresh surface-water, saline (ocean) surface-water, fresh groundwater and saline (brackish) groundwater. Water that is not consumed or evaporated during its use is returned to surface bodies of water. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states in addition to Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands) and one national water flow chart representing a comprehensive systems view of national water resources, use, and disposition.

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Quality Data New Rifle Surface Water Quality Data Old Rifle Surface Water ...

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Quality Data New Rifle Surface Water Quality Data Old Rifle Surface Water ...

  4. Tree Mortality following Prescribed Fire and a Storm Surge Event in Slash Pine ( Pinus elliottii var. densa ) Forests in the Florida Keys, USA

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Sah, Jay P.; Ross, Michael S.; Snyder, James R.; Ogurcak, Danielle E.

    2010-01-01

    In fire-dependent forests, managers are interested in predicting the consequences of prescribed burning on postfire tree mortality. We examined the effects of prescribed fire on tree mortality in Florida Keys pine forests, using a factorial design with understory type, season, and year of burn as factors. We also used logistic regression to model the effects of burn season, fire severity, and tree dimensions on individual tree mortality. Despite limited statistical power due to problems in carrying out the full suite of planned experimental burns, associations with tree and fire variables were observed. Post-fire pine tree mortality was negatively correlated withmore » tree size and positively correlated with char height and percent crown scorch. Unlike post-fire mortality, tree mortality associated with storm surge from Hurricane Wilma was greater in the large size classes. Due to their influence on population structure and fuel dynamics, the size-selective mortality patterns following fire and storm surge have practical importance for using fire as a management tool in Florida Keys pinelands in the future, particularly when the threats to their continued existence from tropical storms and sea level rise are expected to increase.« less

  5. Annual Report: 2010-2011 Storm Season Sampling For NON-DRY DOCK STORMWATER MONITORING FOR PUGET SOUND NAVAL SHIPYARD, BREMERTON, WA

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Metallo, David; Johnston, Robert K.; Gebhardt, Christine; Hsu, Larry

    2012-09-01

    This interim report summarizes the stormwater monitoring conducted for non-dry dock outfalls in both the confined industrial area and the residential areas of Naval Base Kitsap within the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (referred to as the Shipyard). This includes the collection, analyses, and descriptive statistics for stormwater sampling conducted from November 2010 through April 2011. Seven stormwater basins within the Shipyard were sampled during at least three storm events to characterize non-dry dock stormwater discharges at selected stormwater drains located within the facility. This serves as the Phase I component of the project and Phase II is planned for the 2011-2012 storm season. These data will assist the Navy, USEPA, Ecology and other stakeholders in understanding the nature and condition of stormwater discharges from the Shipyard and inform the permitting process for new outfall discharges. The data from Phase I was compiled with current stormwater data available from the Shipyard, Sinclair/Dyes Inlet watershed, and Puget Sound in order to support technical investigations for the Draft NPDES permit. The permit would require storm event sampling at selected stormwater drains located within the Shipyard. However, the data must be considered on multiple scales to truly understand potential impairments to beneficial uses within Sinclair and Dyes Inlets.

  6. Tree Mortality following Prescribed Fire and a Storm Surge Event in Slash Pine (Pinus elliottiivar.densa) Forests in the Florida Keys, USA

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Sah, Jay P.; Ross, Michael S.; Snyder, James R.; Ogurcak, Danielle E.

    2010-01-01

    In fire-dependent forests, managers are interested in predicting the consequences of prescribed burning on postfire tree mortality. We examined the effects of prescribed fire on tree mortality in Florida Keys pine forests, using a factorial design with understory type, season, and year of burn as factors. We also used logistic regression to model the effects of burn season, fire severity, and tree dimensions on individual tree mortality. Despite limited statistical power due to problems in carrying out the full suite of planned experimental burns, associations with tree and fire variables were observed. Post-fire pine tree mortality was negatively correlated withmoretree size and positively correlated with char height and percent crown scorch. Unlike post-fire mortality, tree mortality associated with storm surge from Hurricane Wilma was greater in the large size classes. Due to their influence on population structure and fuel dynamics, the size-selective mortality patterns following fire and storm surge have practical importance for using fire as a management tool in Florida Keys pinelands in the future, particularly when the threats to their continued existence from tropical storms and sea level rise are expected to increase.less

  7. Irreversible Wash Aid Additive for Cesium Mitigation: WARRP Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This activity demonstrated, on a practical scale, the primary unit operations for building a containment structure for radioactive wash waters, washing down a hypothetically radioactively contaminated vehicle, collecting the hypothetically radioactive slurry waste water, filtering the hypothetically radioactive wash waters, disassembling the containment, and transporting the materials for final disposition.

  8. Energy Savings from Industrial Water Reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Prakash; McKane, Aimee; de Fontaine, Andre

    2015-08-03

    Although it is widely recognized that reducing freshwater consumption is of critical importance, generating interest in industrial water reduction programs can be hindered for a variety of reasons. These include the low cost of water, greater focus on water use in other sectors such as the agriculture and residential sectors, high levels of unbilled and/or unregulated self-supplied water use in industry, and lack of water metering and tracking capabilities at industrial facilities. However, there are many additional components to the resource savings associated with reducing site water use beyond the water savings alone, such as reductions in energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, treatment chemicals, and impact on the local watershed. Understanding and quantifying these additional resource savings can expand the community of businesses, NGOs, government agencies, and researchers with a vested interest in water reduction. This paper will develop a methodology for evaluating the embedded energy consumption associated with water use at an industrial facility. The methodology developed will use available data and references to evaluate the energy consumption associated with water supply and wastewater treatment outside of a facility’s fence line for various water sources. It will also include a framework for evaluating the energy consumption associated with water use within a facility’s fence line. The methodology will develop a more complete picture of the total resource savings associated with water reduction efforts and allow industrial water reduction programs to assess the energy and CO2 savings associated with their efforts.

  9. WATER CONSERVATION PLAN

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Average water consumers can save thousands of gallons of water per year by being aware of ... program on the water distribution systems to include water saving replacement parts. ...

  10. CX-004214: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Relocation of Storm-Water Monitoring Location MP-22 and Addition of Two New Storm-Water Monitoring Locations at Sandia National Laboratories/New MexicoCX(s) Applied: B3.1Date: 06/08/2010Location(s): New MexicoOffice(s): Sandia Site Office

  11. Biomass 2014: Additional Speaker Biographies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Additional Speaker Biographies Biomass 2014: Additional Speaker Biographies This document outlines the biographies of the additional speakers for Biomass 2014, held July 29-July 30 in Washington, D.C. additional_speaker_biographies_biomass_2014 (236.61 KB) More Documents & Publications 2016 Sustainable Transportation Summit Speaker Biographies Bioenergy 2015 Speaker Biographies Demonstration and Deployment Workshop - Day 2

  12. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces betweenmore » plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration reported in broader meta-analyses of N amendment effects in mesic ecosystems. The large effect sizes at low N

  13. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces between plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration

  14. Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's ...

  15. Wisconsin Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Wisconsin Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's ...

  16. Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's ...

  17. Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 110 ...

  18. Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's ...

  19. Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's ...

  20. Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's ...

  1. Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

  2. Upcoming Webinar February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Tuesday, February 11, the Energy Department will present a live webinar on additive manufacturing to stimulate discussion in the hydrogen and fuel cell community on the application of additive manufacturing to prototyping and production.

  3. Demonstration of the Recent Additions in Modeling Capabilities...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Demonstration of the Recent Additions in Modeling Capabilities for the WEC-Sim Wave Energy ... DEMONSTRATION OF THE RECENT ADDITIONS IN MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR THE WEC-SIM WAVE ENERGY ...

  4. Water Data Report: An Annotated Bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Melody, Moya

    2007-05-01

    This report and its accompanying Microsoft Excel workbooksummarize water data we found to support efforts of the EnvironmentalProtection Agency s WaterSense program. WaterSense aims to extend theoperating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities and prolongthe availability of water resourcesby reducing residential andcommercial water consumption through the voluntary replacement ofinefficient water-using products with more efficient ones. WaterSense hasan immediate need for water consumption data categorized by sector and,for the residential sector, per capita data available by region. Thisinformation will assist policy makers, water and wastewater utilityplanners, and others in defining and refining program possibilities.Future data needs concern water supply, wastewater flow volumes, waterquality, and watersheds. This report focuses primarily on the immediateneed for data regarding water consumption and product end-use. We found avariety of data on water consumption at the national, state, andmunicipal levels. We also found several databases related towater-consuming products. Most of the data are available in electronicform on the Web pages of the data-collecting organizations. In addition,we found national, state, and local data on water supply, wastewater,water quality, and watersheds.

  5. Magellan additional information | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC)

    Miscellaneous ASCR Recovery Act Projects Magellan additional information Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights ...

  6. Texas Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Net Withdrawals 0 0 0 2013-2015 Additions 0 * 0 0 2012

  7. Ionic Liquids as Multifunctional Ashless Additives for Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    lubricant additives with promising physicalchemical properties and potential ... Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Can hard coatings and lubricant ...

  8. Large-Scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Additives

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fact Sheet About Development of Boron-Based Nanolubrication Additives for Improved Energy Efficiency and Reduced Emissions

  9. Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Industry | Department of Energy Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry Download presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells" held on February 11, 2014. Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells Webinar Slides (4.6 MB) More Documents & Publications AMO Peer Review, May 6-7, 2014 Step change in Fuel

  10. Federal Water Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Water Cycle Potable water: water of sufficient quality for human consumption Industrial landscaping and agricultural (ILA) water: non-potable water from fresh surface or groundwater Alternative water: onsite non- potable water NOT supplied from fresh surface or groundwater Rainwater Reclaimed wastewater Process reuse Graywater Condensate Set goals Assess current water use Develop a water balance Evaluate efficiency Develop a plan Measure progress Water Management Planning Supply Uses Plumbing

  11. Water Resources Data. Ohio - Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    SciTech Connect

    H.L. Shindel; J.H. Klingler; J.P. Mangus; L.E. Trimble

    1993-03-01

    Water-resources data for the 1992 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations, 336 wells, and 72 partial-record sites; and water levels at 312 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. Volume 1 covers the central and southern parts of Ohio, emphasizing the Ohio River Basin. (See Order Number DE95010451 for Volume 2 covering the northern part of Ohio.)

  12. Water resources data, Ohio: Water year 1991. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    SciTech Connect

    Shindel, H.L.; Klingler, J.H.; Mangus, J.P.; Trimble, L.E.

    1992-03-01

    Water-resources data for the 1991 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 131 gaging stations, 378 wells, and 74 partial-record sites; and water levels at 431 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio.

  13. WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; McNeil, Michael; Dunham_Whitehead, Camilla; Letschert, Virginie; della_Cava, Mirka

    2008-02-28

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) influences the market for plumbing fixtures and fittings by encouraging consumers to purchase products that carry the WaterSense label, which certifies those products as performing at low flow rates compared to unlabeled fixtures and fittings. As consumers decide to purchase water-efficient products, water consumption will decline nationwide. Decreased water consumption should prolong the operating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities.This report describes the method used to calculate national water savings attributable to EPA?s WaterSense program. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model, the National Water Savings (NWS) analysis model, accompanies this methodology report. Version 1.0 of the NWS model evaluates indoor residential water consumption. Two additional documents, a Users? Guide to the spreadsheet model and an Impacts Report, accompany the NWS model and this methodology document. Altogether, these four documents represent Phase One of this project. The Users? Guide leads policy makers through the spreadsheet options available for projecting the water savings that result from various policy scenarios. The Impacts Report shows national water savings that will result from differing degrees of market saturation of high-efficiency water-using products.This detailed methodology report describes the NWS analysis model, which examines the effects of WaterSense by tracking the shipments of products that WaterSense has designated as water-efficient. The model estimates market penetration of products that carry the WaterSense label. Market penetration is calculated for both existing and new construction. The NWS model estimates savings based on an accounting analysis of water-using products and of building stock. Estimates of future national water savings will help policy makers further direct the focus of WaterSense and calculate stakeholder impacts from the program.Calculating the total gallons of water the

  14. Additive development for ultra-clean coal slurry fuel: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Berggren, M.H.; Swanson, W.W.

    1988-05-24

    AMAX performed research to develop improved quality, cost-effective dispersing additives for coal-water slurry fuels intended for high-intensity combustion systems. Dispersants were identified on the basis of coal surface characteristics and coal-dispersant interactions. Micronized samples of physically and chemically cleaned coal feedstocks from the Eastern and Midwestern regions of the United States were examined using bulk and surface analysis techniques. Utilization of coal surface and dispersant functionality was optimized through multicomponent application of additives, pH control, and control of surface oxidation. A low-cost, low-alkali, sulfur-free dextrin compound was found to be effective in enhancing dispersion when applied to the coal surfaces as a pretreatment or with conventional dispersants as a co-additive. The cleaning method and ash content had minimal direct impact on coal surface functionality. Parameters such as internal moisture, particle size, surface area, surface oxidation, and soluble ions were the primary considerations which influenced slurry loading and additive consumption. The dispersing additive packages functioned over the range of coal types and cleaning levels investigated. The preferred additives were compatible with each other, allowing for blending to optimize performance, cost, and alkali contamination. Each additive was found to be suitable for use in applications which utilize elevated-temperature fuel delivery systems. 17 refs., 8 figs., 27 tabs.

  15. Evaluation of Subsurface Flow and Free-water Surface Wetlands Treating NPR-3 Produced Water - Year No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J. E.; Jackson, L. M.

    2001-10-13

    This paper is a summary of some of the activities conducted during the first year of a three-year cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) and Texaco relating to the treatment of produced water by constructed wetlands. The first year of the CRADA is for design, construction and acclimation of the wetland pilot units. The second and third years of the CRADA are for tracking performance of pilot wetlands as the plant and microbial communities mature. A treatment wetland is a proven technology for the secondary and tertiary treatment of produced water, storm water and other wastewaters. Treatment wetlands are typically classified as either free-water surface (FWS) or subsurface flow (SSF). Both FWS and SSF wetlands work well when properly designed and operated. This paper presents a collection of kinetic data gathered from pilot units fed a slipstream of Wyoming (NPR-3) produced water. The pilot units are set up outdoors to test climatic influences on treatment. Monitoring parameters include evapotranspiration, plant growth, temperature, and NPDES discharge limits. The pilot wetlands (FWS and SSF) consist of a series of 100-gal plastic tubs filled with local soils, gravel, sharp sand and native wetland plants (cattail (Typha spp.), bulrush (Scirpus spp.), dwarf spikerush (Eleocharis)). Feed pumps control hydraulic retention time (HRT) and simple water control structures control the depth of water. The treated water is returned to the existing produced water treatment system. All NPDES discharge limits are met. Observations are included on training RMOTC summer students to do environmental work.

  16. CX-008664: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Excavate New Storm Drainage Ditch to Divert Storm Water from A-Area Coal Yard to Outfall ... Establish a new storm drainage ditch to divert storm water from the A-Area Coal Yard to an ...

  17. Dendrite-free Li deposition using trace-amounts of water as an...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dendrite-free Li deposition using trace-amounts of water as an electrolyte additive ... Title: Dendrite-free Li deposition using trace-amounts of water as an electrolyte additive ...

  18. Bounce- and MLT-averaged diffusion coefficients in a physics-based magnetic field geometry obtained from RAM-SCB for the March 17 2013 storm

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Lei; Yu, Yiqun; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Jordanova, Vania K.

    2015-04-01

    Local acceleration via whistler wave and particle interaction plays a significant role in particle dynamics in the radiation belt. In this work we explore gyro-resonant wave-particle interaction and quasi-linear diffusion in different magnetic field configurations related to the March 17 2013 storm. We consider the Earth's magnetic dipole field as a reference and compare the results against non-dipole field configurations corresponding to quiet and stormy conditions. The latter are obtained with the ring current-atmosphere interactions model with a self-consistent magnetic field RAM-SCB, a code that models the Earth's ring current and provides a realistic modeling of the Earth's magnetic field. By applying quasi-linear theory, the bounce- and MLT-averaged electron pitch angle, mixed term, and energy diffusion coefficients are calculated for each magnetic field configuration. For radiation belt (~1 MeV) and ring current (~100 keV) electrons, it is shown that at some MLTs the bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients become rather insensitive to the details of the magnetic field configuration, while at other MLTs storm conditions can expand the range of equatorial pitch angles where gyro-resonant diffusion occurs and significantly enhance the diffusion rates. When MLT average is performed at drift shell L = 4.25 (a good approximation to drift average), the diffusion coefficients become quite independent of the magnetic field configuration for relativistic electrons, while the opposite is true for lower energy electrons. These results suggest that, at least for the March 17 2013 storm and for L ? 4.25, the commonly adopted dipole approximation of the Earth's magnetic field can be safely used for radiation belt electrons, while a realistic modeling of the magnetic field configuration is necessary to describe adequately the diffusion rates of ring current electrons.

  19. Bounce- and MLT-averaged diffusion coefficients in a physics-based magnetic field geometry obtained from RAM-SCB for the March 17 2013 storm

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhao, Lei; Yu, Yiqun; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Jordanova, Vania K.

    2015-04-01

    Local acceleration via whistler wave and particle interaction plays a significant role in particle dynamics in the radiation belt. In this work we explore gyro-resonant wave-particle interaction and quasi-linear diffusion in different magnetic field configurations related to the March 17 2013 storm. We consider the Earth's magnetic dipole field as a reference and compare the results against non-dipole field configurations corresponding to quiet and stormy conditions. The latter are obtained with the ring current-atmosphere interactions model with a self-consistent magnetic field RAM-SCB, a code that models the Earth's ring current and provides a realistic modeling of the Earth's magnetic field.more » By applying quasi-linear theory, the bounce- and MLT-averaged electron pitch angle, mixed term, and energy diffusion coefficients are calculated for each magnetic field configuration. For radiation belt (~1 MeV) and ring current (~100 keV) electrons, it is shown that at some MLTs the bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients become rather insensitive to the details of the magnetic field configuration, while at other MLTs storm conditions can expand the range of equatorial pitch angles where gyro-resonant diffusion occurs and significantly enhance the diffusion rates. When MLT average is performed at drift shell L = 4.25 (a good approximation to drift average), the diffusion coefficients become quite independent of the magnetic field configuration for relativistic electrons, while the opposite is true for lower energy electrons. These results suggest that, at least for the March 17 2013 storm and for L ≲ 4.25, the commonly adopted dipole approximation of the Earth's magnetic field can be safely used for radiation belt electrons, while a realistic modeling of the magnetic field configuration is necessary to describe adequately the diffusion rates of ring current electrons.« less

  20. Bounce- and MLT-averaged diffusion coefficients in a physics-based magnetic field geometry obtained from RAM-SCB for the March 17 2013 storm

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Lei; Yu, Yiqun; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Jordanova, Vania K.

    2015-04-01

    Local acceleration via whistler wave and particle interaction plays a significant role in particle dynamics in the radiation belt. In this work we explore gyro-resonant wave-particle interaction and quasi-linear diffusion in different magnetic field configurations related to the March 17 2013 storm. We consider the Earth's magnetic dipole field as a reference and compare the results against non-dipole field configurations corresponding to quiet and stormy conditions. The latter are obtained with the ring current-atmosphere interactions model with a self-consistent magnetic field RAM-SCB, a code that models the Earth's ring current and provides a realistic modeling of the Earth's magnetic field. By applying quasi-linear theory, the bounce- and MLT-averaged electron pitch angle, mixed term, and energy diffusion coefficients are calculated for each magnetic field configuration. For radiation belt (~1 MeV) and ring current (~100 keV) electrons, it is shown that at some MLTs the bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients become rather insensitive to the details of the magnetic field configuration, while at other MLTs storm conditions can expand the range of equatorial pitch angles where gyro-resonant diffusion occurs and significantly enhance the diffusion rates. When MLT average is performed at drift shell L = 4.25 (a good approximation to drift average), the diffusion coefficients become quite independent of the magnetic field configuration for relativistic electrons, while the opposite is true for lower energy electrons. These results suggest that, at least for the March 17 2013 storm and for L ≲ 4.25, the commonly adopted dipole approximation of the Earth's magnetic field can be safely used for radiation belt electrons, while a realistic modeling of the magnetic field configuration is necessary to describe adequately the diffusion rates of ring current electrons.

  1. Maricopa Assn. of Governments - PV and Solar Domestic Water Heating...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    June 18, 2003, MAG passed permit submission requirements for residential solar domestic water heating systems. This is in addition to the existing standards for residential and...

  2. Surviving Operation Desert Storm

    SciTech Connect

    Vice, J. )

    1992-08-01

    The importance of aircraft survivability during the invasion of Iraq is examined detailing anecdotal evidence of susceptibility and vulnerability reduction. Among the aircraft used that were designed to be more survivable than their predecessors were the F-117, A-10, F/A-18, and the AH-64. Reduced vulnerability is incorporated into the aircraft designs in the form of damage tolerant components, redundancy, self-sealing fluid systems, and miniaturization.

  3. Efficient Water Use & Management

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL. Energy...

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... per liter (mgL) b New Mexico Ground Water and Surface Water Protection Standard ...

  5. The Importance of Carbon Fiber to Polymer Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie J; Kunc, Vlastimil; Rios, Orlando; Duty, Chad E; Post, Brian K; Blue, Craig A

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing holds tremendous promise in terms of revolutionizing manufacturing. However, fundamental hurdles limit mass adoption of the technology. First, production rates are extremely low. Second, the physical size of parts is generally small, less than a cubic foot. Third, while there is much excitement about metal additive manufacturing, the major growth area is in polymer additive manufacturing systems. Unfortunately, the mechanical properties of the polymer parts are poor, limiting the potential for direct part replacement. To address this issue, we describe three benefits of blending carbon fiber with polymer additive manufacturing. First, development of carbon fiber reinforced polymers for additive manufacturing achieves specific strengths approaching aerospace quality aluminum. Second, carbon fiber radically changes the behavior of the material during deposition, enabling large scale, out-of-the-oven, high deposition rate manufacturing. Finally, carbon fiber technology and additive manufacturing complement each other. Merging the two manufacturing processes enables the construction of complex components that would not be possible otherwise.

  6. Water-Heating Dehumidifier - Energy Innovation Portal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Building Energy Efficiency Building Energy Efficiency Find More Like This Return to Search Water-Heating Dehumidifier Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryA small appliance developed at ORNL dehumidifies air and then recycles heat to warm water in a water heater. The device circulates cool, dry air in summer and warm air in winter. In addition, the invention can cut the energy required to run

  7. Water Power Program Budget | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Budget Water Power Program Budget The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has allocated $70 million in fiscal year 2016 (FY16) funds for the Water Power Program to research and develop marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) and hydropower technologies. Current activities supported by this budget include: Hydropower HydroNEXT: Activities will focus on technologies and tools to improve performance and sustainably increase generation at existing water resources infrastructures, in addition to the development

  8. Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Migration Studies | Department of Energy 2: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies ORSSAB recommends that DOE proceed with an off-site groundwater quality assessment project and that DOE secure additional baseline funding for analysis to further understanding of potential migration and effects on off-site receptors. Recommendation 222 (55.21 KB) Response to Recommendation

  9. Recommendation 223: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal Capacity |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy 3: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal Capacity Recommendation 223: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal Capacity ORSSAB's recommendations encourage DOE to continue planning for an additional on-site disposal facility for low-level waste and that a second facility be placed in an area already used for similar waste disposal. Recommendation 223 (51.59 KB) Response to Recommendation 223 (779.96 KB) More Documents & Publications Recommendation 233:

  10. Fact #885: August 10, 2015 Electricity Generation - Planned Additions and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Retirements - Dataset | Department of Energy 5: August 10, 2015 Electricity Generation - Planned Additions and Retirements - Dataset Fact #885: August 10, 2015 Electricity Generation - Planned Additions and Retirements - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Electricity Generation - Planned Additions and Retirements fotw#885_web.xlsx (429.24 KB) More Documents & Publications Fact #948: October 24, 2016 Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Transportation Exceeded those from the Electric Power

  11. Additional Guidance for EERE Digital Data Management Plans | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Apply for Funding » Digital Data Management » Additional Guidance for EERE Digital Data Management Plans Additional Guidance for EERE Digital Data Management Plans Beyond the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) digital data management requirements, the following additional guidance is provided for data management plans (DMPs): The principal investigator should determine which data should be the subject of the DMP and make sure that the DMP addresses which data

  12. Lab receives an additional $19 million for environmental cleanup

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab receives an additional $19 million for environmental cleanup Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Lab receives an additional $19 million for environmental cleanup Lab also selects local businesses for five-year contracts June 1, 2013 Governor Susana Martinez visited the Lab in May to urge additional funding for cleanup Governor Susana Martinez visited the Lab in May to urge

  13. Detector Group Leader Accepts Additional Role as Lab's Chief Technology

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Officer | Jefferson Lab Detector Group Leader Accepts Additional Role as Lab's Chief Technology Officer Detector Group Leader Accepts Additional Role as Lab's Chief Technology Officer Drew Weisenberger Drew Weisenberger, who has led the Radiation Detector and Imaging Group at Jefferson Lab since 2008, recently accepted the additional role of Chief Technology Officer (CTO) for the lab. Andrew "Drew" Weisenberger, head of the Experimental Nuclear Physics Division's Radiation Detector

  14. The effect of manganese additions on the reactive evaporation of chromium in Ni–Cr alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-05-01

    Chromium is used as an alloy addition in stainless steels and nickel-chromium alloys to form protective chromium oxide scales. Chromium oxide undergoes reactive evaporation in high temperature exposures in the presence of oxygen and/or water vapor. The deposition of gaseous chromium species onto solid oxide fuel cell electrodes can reduce the efficiency of the fuel cell. Manganese additions to the alloy can reduce the activity of chromium in the oxide, either from solid solution replacement of chromium with manganese (at low levels of manganese) or from the formation of manganese-chromium spinels (at high levels of manganese). This reduction in chromium activity leads to a predicted reduction in chromium evaporation by as much as a factor of 35 at 800 °C and 55 at 700 °C. Quantifying the effects of manganese additions on chromium evaporation should aid alloy development of metallic interconnects and balance-of-plant alloys.

  15. Texas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Additions (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages: Additions of Liquefied Natural Gas into Storage Texas Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage Additions of Liquefied Natural Gas into

  16. News Release: DOE to Conduct Additional Groundwater Tests at...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The U.S. Department of Energy will conduct additional characterization work at the Riverton, WY, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Site this summer, including ...

  17. Rhode Island Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    256 -230 -7 60 -21 -879 1980-2014 Additions 698 468 430 517 624 0 1980-2014 Withdrawals 954 698 436 457 645 879

  18. Nebraska Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    -10 39 -73 -140 280 -202 1980-2014 Additions 165 346 147 1 407 481 1980-2014 Withdrawals 175 308 220 141 128 68

  19. Oregon Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    47 -53 -25 -16 -50 111 1980-2014 Additions 683 343 336 299 276 822 1980-2014 Withdrawals 436 396 361 315 326 711

  20. Wisconsin Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    -18 -29 20 -67 13 58 1980-2014 Additions 80 63 107 33 103 196 1980-2014 Withdrawals 98 92 87 100 89 138

  1. An Overview of Polymer Additive Manufacturing Technologies (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Sponsoring Org: DOELANL Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Materials Science(36) Additive ...

  2. Feasibility and testing of lighweight, energy efficient, additive...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pneumatic control valve Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Feasibility and testing of lighweight, energy efficient, additive manufactured pneumatic control valve ...

  3. Additions to natural gas in underground storage to be nearly...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Additions to natural gas in underground storage to be nearly 50% higher this summer Although it's still spring, natural gas supply companies and utilities are already preparing for ...

  4. U.S. Plutonium "Pit" Production: Additional Facilities, Production

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... new facilities, subject to planned refurbishments, but without additional nuclear facilities such as the CMRR NF, could preserve and enhance pit production capability for ...

  5. Large-Scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticulate-Based Lubrication Additives

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to design, develop, manufacture, and scale up boron-based nanoparticulate lubrication additives.

  6. Measurement of $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} } $ production with additional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mathrm t bart production with additional jet activity, including b quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at sqrts 8 TeV Citation Details...

  7. Friction Stir Additive Manufacturing for High Structural Performance...

    Energy Saver

    of other potential applications for aerospace & energy industries Laser-FSAM hybrid & mini-sample testing capabilites 2 3 Chronological evolution of metal based additive...

  8. Obama Administration Announces Additional $168,643,400 for Local...

    Energy Saver

    Efficiency Improvements in Florida Obama Administration Announces Additional 168,643,400 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Florida March 26, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis ...

  9. Department of Energy Announces Plans for Additional Comment Period...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    prior to DOE issuing any National Corridor designations. Media contact(s): Craig Stevens, (202) 586-4940 Addthis Related Articles DOE Announces Additional Public Comment...

  10. Louisiana Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 0 -24 -23 1980-2015 Additions 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980-2015 Withdrawals 0 0 0 0 24 2

  11. Missouri Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 0 0 1980-2015 Additions 0 0 0 0 0 0 1980-2015 Withdrawals 0 0 0 0 0 0

  12. New Hampshire Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Storage 4 -6 -0 -0 1973-2014 Additions 33 112 65 124 185 240 1980-2015 Withdrawals 35 108 71 124 185 241

  13. Nevada Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    -76 -69 -42 -63 -57 16 1982-2014 Additions 106 125 112 82 153 227 1982-2014 Withdrawals 182 195 154 146 210 211 1982

  14. Energy Department Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Department of Defense as Part of Hurricane Sandy and Nor'easter Recovery Energy Department Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to Department of Defense as Part of ...

  15. Two poplar-associated bacterial isolates induce additive favorable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in a constructed plant-microbiome system Prev Next Title: Two poplar-associated bacterial isolates induce additive favorable responses in a constructed plant-microbiome ...

  16. Two petroleum additives deals stall on the consolidation trail

    SciTech Connect

    Kiesche, E.S.

    1992-04-22

    The consolidation of the lubricant and fuel additives market is turning out to be anything but a slick transition. Two deals have fallen through since the beginning of April. Ethyl Corp. (Richmond, VA) has discontinued negotiations for the acquisition of BP Chemicals` (London) Adibis petroleum additives business and Lubrizol`s (Wickliffe, OH) proposed purchase of Amoco Chemical`s petroleum additives business is stalled, and may be completely derailed by antitrust concerns. Meanwhile, a third petroleum additives business, the European joint venture between Amoco and Finzis being liquidated.

  17. Alaska Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 0 1969-2015 Additions 0 0 0 0 0 0 1969-2015 Withdrawals 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999

  18. Arkansas Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    -7 9 12 14 -35 1980-2015 Additions 42 47 57 52 56 20 1980-2015 Withdrawals 40 53 48 40 42 55

  19. California Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 -5 3 1 2 1980-2015 Additions 56 73 31 95 83 54 1980-2015 Withdrawals 54 66 36 92 82 51

  20. DOE Announces Additional Steps in Developing Sustainable Biofuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    in Developing Sustainable Biofuels Industry DOE Announces Additional Steps in Developing Sustainable Biofuels Industry October 7, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis Releases Results from...

  1. NMAC 17.5.440 Extensions, Improvements, Additions, and Cooperative...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    5.440 Extensions, Improvements, Additions, and Cooperative Agreements between or among Utilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  2. Meso-Scale during Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing Chen,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermal Properties and Beam-Particle Interaction at Meso-Scale during Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing Chen, Jian ORNL ORNL; Zheng, Lili ORNL ORNL; Feng, Zhili...

  3. Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics Peterson, Dominic S. [Los...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics Peterson, Dominic S. Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Materials Science(36) 3d printing 3d printing Abstract...

  4. Ionic Liquids as Engine Lubricant Additives, Impact on Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... baseline - IL: ionic liquid lubricant-additive - ZDDP: ... rod end bushingsbearings), are to be studied. * ... electrons than a neutral metal, thus a softer base); - ...

  5. Additional capacities seen in metal oxide lithium-ion battery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional capacities seen in metal oxide lithium-ion battery electrodes Citation Details ... Language: English Subject: energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), defects, ...

  6. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Combining data from motored engine friction, a theoretical engine model, a line friction contact rig, and a fired engine can provide better insight to lube oil and additive ...

  7. EIS-0489: Notice of Comment Period Extension and Additional Scoping...

    Energy Saver

    EIS-0489: Notice of Comment Period Extension and Additional Scoping Meetings Jordan Cove Liquefaction Project (Coos County, OR) and Pacific Connector Pipeline Project (Coos, ...

  8. Upcoming Webinar February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    the hydrogen and fuel cell community on the application of additive manufacturing to prototyping and production. Presentations by Eaton and Nuvera will highlight Eaton's experience...

  9. South Dakota Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Storage 1984-1998 Additions 0 0 0 0 0 0 1984-2015 Withdrawals 0 0 0 0 0 0 1984

  10. RESIDUAL STRESSES IN ADDITIVELY MANUFACTURED INCONEL 718 ENGINE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: RESIDUAL STRESSES IN ADDITIVELY MANUFACTURED INCONEL 718 ENGINE MOUNT Authors: Watkins, Thomas R 1 ; Cornwell, Paris A 1 ; Dehoff, Ryan R 1 ; Nangia, Vinod 2 ; ...

  11. EIS-0386: Notice of Additional Public Hearing | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Federal Land in the 11 Western States Additional Public Hearing on the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement; Designation of Energy Corridors on Federal Land in the ...

  12. Dynamic Compressive Response of Wrought and Additive Manufactured...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    was performed. 1 Introduction Additive manufacturing (AM), also commonly known as 3D printing, has been increasingly utilized in many applications that include rapid ...

  13. Materials and Additive Manufacturing for Energy Efficiency in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Materials and Additive Manufacturing for Energy Efficiency in Wind Turbine and Aircraft Industries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Materials and ...

  14. Evaluation of advanced polymers for additive manufacturing (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Evaluation of advanced polymers for additive manufacturing The goal of this Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) technical collaboration project between Oak Ridge ...

  15. Maine Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    -33 -25 -18 2 1 4 1981-2014 Additions 0 0 0 36 46 39 1981-2014 Withdrawals 33 25 18 34 45 35 1981...

  16. Delaware Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    -2 -31 51 -68 29 -17 1980-2015 Additions 73 64 117 63 157 115 1980-2015 Withdrawals 76 96 66 131 128 131

  17. Idaho Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 -19 139 -259 -676 143 1981-2015 Additions 142 146 211 13 64 260 1981-2015 Withdrawals 72 166 73 271 740 117 1981

  18. Illinois Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    74 127 419 -322 -442 437 1980-2015 Additions 398 657 750 40 61 667 1980-2015 Withdrawals 325 530 331 362 503 2

  19. Obama Administration Announces Additional $24,624,200 for Local...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Obama Administration Announces Additional 24,624,200 for Local Energy Efficiency ... and energy funding announced by the Administration on March 12th and detailed at ...

  20. Chapter 1: Energy Challenges | Additional information on Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... compromise of computer-based systems in their various ... OPEC b Residen'al Space Hea'ng & Hot Water 2% Commercial Space ... that enable extraction of gas and oil at ...

  1. Method of treating waste water

    DOEpatents

    Deininger, J. Paul; Chatfield, Linda K.

    1991-01-01

    A process of treating water to remove transuranic elements contained therein by adjusting the pH of a transuranic element-containing water source to within the range of about 6.5 to about 14.0, admixing the water source with an alkali or alkaline earth ferrate in an amount sufficient to form a precipitate within the water source, the amount of ferrate effective to reduce the transuranic element concentration in the water source, permitting the precipitate in the admixture to separate and thereby yield a supernatant liquid having a reduced transuranic element concentration, and separating the supernatant liquid having the reduced transuranic element concentration from the admixture is provided. Additionally, a water soluble salt, e.g., a zirconium salt, can be added with the alkali or alkaline earth ferrate in the process to provide greater removal efficiencies. A composition of matter including an alkali or alkaline earth ferrate and a water soluble salt, e.g., a zirconium salt, is also provided.

  2. Test report - caustic addition system operability test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Parazin, R.E.

    1995-10-13

    This Operability Test Report documents the test results of test procedure WHC-SD-WM-OTP-167 ``Caustic Addition System Operability Test Procedure``. The Objective of the test was to verify the operability of the 241-AN-107 Caustic Addition System. The objective of the test was met

  3. Anomaly Detection In Additively Manufactured Parts Using Laser Doppler Vibrometery

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Carlos A.

    2015-09-29

    Additively manufactured parts are susceptible to non-uniform structure caused by the unique manufacturing process. This can lead to structural weakness or catastrophic failure. Using laser Doppler vibrometry and frequency response analysis, non-contact detection of anomalies in additively manufactured parts may be possible. Preliminary tests show promise for small scale detection, but more future work is necessary.

  4. Nationwide Nonavailability Waiver for 5 Additional Items | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Nonavailability Waiver for 5 Additional Items Nationwide Nonavailability Waiver for 5 Additional Items september2010_5addtl (156.55 KB) More Documents & Publications Status of Waivers Issued under the Recovery Act: Non-Availability Waivers Nationwide Nonavailability Waiver: September 30, 2010 Nationwide Nonavailability Waiver: January 12, 2011

  5. SUN-TO-EARTH CHARACTERISTICS OF TWO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS INTERACTING NEAR 1 AU: FORMATION OF A COMPLEX EJECTA AND GENERATION OF A TWO-STEP GEOMAGNETIC STORM

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Wang, Rui; Luhmann, Janet G.; Richardson, John D.; Lugaz, Noé

    2014-10-01

    On 2012 September 30-October 1 the Earth underwent a two-step geomagnetic storm. We examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) responsible for the geomagnetic storm with combined heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. The first CME, which occurred on 2012 September 25, is a slow event and shows an acceleration followed by a nearly invariant speed in the whole Sun-Earth space. The second event, launched from the Sun on 2012 September 27, exhibits a quick acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed, a typical Sun-to-Earth propagation profile for fast CMEs. These two CMEs interacted near 1 AU as predicted by the heliospheric imaging observations and formed a complex ejecta observed at Wind, with a shock inside that enhanced the pre-existing southward magnetic field. Reconstruction of the complex ejecta with the in situ data indicates an overall left-handed flux-rope-like configuration with an embedded concave-outward shock front, a maximum magnetic field strength deviating from the flux rope axis, and convex-outward field lines ahead of the shock. While the reconstruction results are consistent with the picture of CME-CME interactions, a magnetic cloud-like structure without clear signs of CME interactions is anticipated when the merging process is finished.

  6. Waters LANL Protects

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Waters LANL Protects Waters LANL Protects LANL watersheds source in the Jemez Mountains and end at the Rio Grande.

  7. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Alternate Water Supply System Sampling at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site May .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  8. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Static Water Level Data Time-Concentration Graphs ...

  9. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Naturita, Colorado Processing Site October 2013 LMSNAP.........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  10. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Water Sampling at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Disposal Site February 2015 LMSAMB.........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  11. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Equipment Blank Data Static ...

  12. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    July 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  13. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ... Groundwater Quality Data Static Water Level Data Hydrograph Time-Concentration ...

  14. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and Surface Water Sampling at the Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2014 LMSGRN.........7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification ...

  15. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1988-11-14

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies including temperature programmed desorption, infrared study of NO adsorption, reactive probing, steady state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive on the synthesis reaction may allow us to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas.

  16. Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water

    SciTech Connect

    Robert A. Liske

    2006-07-31

    This DOE funded study was performed to evaluate the potential for treatment and beneficial reuse of produced water from the San Ardo oilfield in Monterey County, CA. The potential benefits of a successful full-scale implementation of this project include improvements in oil production efficiency and additional recoverable oil reserves as well as the addition of a new reclaimed water resource. The overall project was conducted in two Phases. Phase I identified and evaluated potential end uses for the treated produced water, established treated water quality objectives, reviewed regulations related to treatment, transport, storage and use of the treated produced water, and investigated various water treatment technology options. Phase II involved the construction and operation of a small-scale water treatment pilot facility to evaluate the process's performance on produced water from the San Ardo oilfield. Cost estimates for a potential full-scale facility were also developed. Potential end uses identified for the treated water include (1) agricultural use near the oilfield, (2) use by Monterey County Water Resources Agency (MCWRA) for the Salinas Valley Water Project or Castroville Seawater Intrusion Project, (3) industrial or power plant use in King City, and (4) use for wetlands creation in the Salinas Basin. All of these uses were found to have major obstacles that prevent full-scale implementation. An additional option for potential reuse of the treated produced water was subsequently identified. That option involves using the treated produced water to recharge groundwater in the vicinity of the oil field. The recharge option may avoid the limitations that the other reuse options face. The water treatment pilot process utilized: (1) warm precipitation softening to remove hardness and silica, (2) evaporative cooling to meet downstream temperature limitations and facilitate removal of ammonia, and (3) reverse osmosis (RO) for removal of dissolved salts, boron, and

  17. Two step novel hydrogen system using additives to enhance hydrogen release from the hydrolysis of alane and activated aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Motyka, Theodore

    2015-12-01

    A system for the generation of hydrogen for use in portable power systems is set forth utilizing a two-step process that involves the thermal decomposition of AlH.sub.3 (10 wt % H.sub.2) followed by the hydrolysis of the activated aluminum (Al*) byproduct to release additional H.sub.2. Additionally, a process in which water is added directly without prior history to the AlH.sub.3:PA composite is also disclosed.

  18. ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer

    Maria Cadeddu

    2004-02-19

    Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

  19. ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer

    Maria Cadeddu

    Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

  20. Rheology of petroleum coke-water slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M.; Mall, B.K.; Mukherjee, A.; Basu, S.K.; Verma, S.K.; Narasimhan, K.S.

    1998-07-01

    This paper reports the results of the studies carried out on the optimization of particle size distribution, the rheological characteristics and stability of highly loaded petroleum coke-water slurry using three additives. The solids loading achieved in the slurries were in the range of 65% to 75.6% depending on the additives used. Slurry viscosity varied between 267 to 424 mPas at 128 s{sup {minus}} shear rate. The petroleum coke-water slurries exhibited pseudoplastic characteristics with yield tending towards Bingham plastic as the solids loading progressively increased. The effect of addition of petroleum coke to the extent of 25% in coal-water slurry prepared from low ash Ledo coal of Makum field in Assam was also examined. The slurry containing coal-petroleum coke blend showed better stability, having shelf life of 7 days as compared to 5 days in the case of petroleum coke-water slurry.