Accelerating Science Discovery - Join the Discussion

Published by Kate Bannan
Tim Berners Lee

 

Twenty years ago this month, Tim Berners-Lee, ayoung scientist at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), worked on a better way to communicate and share research information stored on computers at the CERN facility. The result was a browser and editor that could enable information sharing through a common hypertext language. The result was the world’s very first website.  The project was started to allow high energy physicists to share data, news and documentation, and it quickly spread. Now, it touches nearly all aspects of our daily life.

The Web has radically changed how we access information, products, services and applications. Prior to the Web, we stored paper documents in file cabinets.  We went to libraries to look up information and went to bookstores to buy books. Twenty years ago, we got our news at 6 pm on network television or in the morning newspaper. Twenty years ago, if you wanted to buy an item, you drove to the store to purchase it.  The web has changed the world!

Published by Mary Schorn
DOE R&D Accomplishments

 

You can get a quick read on exciting historical research accomplishments of DOE and its predecessors via the DOE R&D AccomplishmentsBlog. The Blog provides comments about and calls attention to the multiple diverse aspects of the outcomes of past DOE R&D that have had significant economic impact, have improved people's lives, or have been widely recognized as a remarkable advance in science. After viewing the short entries on the blog, you can then select the link to the DOE R&D Accomplishments website for more information.

The Blog showcases the website’s unique and specialized collection; celebrates anniversaries of historical research and resulting impacts; and highlights Nobel Laureates and their scientific influences and contributions.

The Blog originally grew out of 2009 Year of Science announcements and now contains historically significant documents, DOE/Predecessor connections to elements on the Periodic Table, important inventions, significant 'firsts' and discoveries, and much more.

The wide variety of interesting tidbits on the Blog can be food for thought and can provide insights into DOE/Predecessor history that are interesting yet may not be well known.

Mary Schorn

Published by Dr. Walt Warnick

WorldWideScience

 

At the youngest ages, children are intrigued by Mentos in a Diet Coke. Figuring out what nature is trying to tell us, which is otherwise known as doing science, can be exciting. But, too often, young people become disabused of that excitement when they experience the drudgery of reading dry texts while confined in a stuffy cubicle or a study carrel. Now we are taking a step to help change that perspective. We are displacing text with video, and we are making it easy to find and learn science wherever you happen to be. 

Published by Mark Martin

I have to admit that I am truly a science fiction and fantasy geek.  Blame it on growing up on a steady diet of Star Wars and Transformers.  This bit of background information helps explain why I smile internally whenever I get the chance to talk about dark archives.  Those words call to mind a picture of some mysterious, powerful object at the center of an epic story, like The Lord of the Rings.  Great words.

Published by Dr. Walt Warnick
Computer Integration

 

OSTI is especially proud of its web integration work whereby we take multiple web pages, documents, and web databases and make them appear to the user as if they were an integrated whole.   Once the sources are virtually integrated by OSTI, the virtual collection becomes searchable via a single query.  Because information on the web appears in a variety of formats, from HTML web pages, to PDF documents, to searchable databases, OSTI has developed and uses a suite of integration approaches to make them searchable via single query.  

OSTI has two goals that make it critical for us to understand multiple solutions for integrating science content on the web.  First, we make DOE science information widely available and searchable by appropriate audienceswherever they may be; and second, we make science information from around the world searchable by DOE researchers.  Since migrating to a fully electronic operationin the late 1990s, OSTI has met these goals by deploying various search architectures for integrating content via the web.

Within the information science circles that we engage in, we are well known for our pioneering work with the integration technology known as federated search. However, there are other, possibly lesser known,  technologies that we employ to integrate web content.