Accelerating Science Discovery - Join the Discussion

Published by Kate Bannan

“The Department is uniquely situated to serve as a resource for energy and technology data, information, and analysis that can enhance understanding, operation and planning across all organizations… ."

— From the Energy Quadrennial Technology Review

Published by Kate Bannan
Albert Einstein

 

According to Einstein's theory of relativity, it is not possible for matter to travel faster than the speed of light in a vacuum.  The speed of light (186,282 miles per second) has long been considered a cosmic speed limit, and much of modern physics is based on Einstein's work. Now there is a possibility that Einstein was wrong -- and physics may have to rethink the concept of matter and energy.


The science world was surprised when workers at CERN, the world's largest physics lab, recently announced that they had recorded subatomic particles travelling faster than the speed of light.  If their findings are proven to be correct, they would overturn one of the pillars of the Standard Model of physics, which attempts to explain the way the universe and everything within it works. 
Neutrinos have long been suspected of being able to travel beyond light speed but the ability to measure their speed accurately has only recently been possible thanks to the CERN lab. This may be one of those moments in science history that opens the door to new discoveries, and could change the way we understand the universe and ourselves. However, given the potential far-reaching consequences of such a result, independent measurements are needed before the effect can either be refuted or firmly established.

Published by Kate Bannan
9-11-01 NEVER FORGET 9-11-01 GOD BLESS AMERICA

 

On the morning of September 11, 2001, 19 hijackers took control of four commercial airliners en route to San Francisco and Los Angeles after takeoff from Boston, Newark and Washington, DC.  Many of us will always remember where we were and what we were doing that Tuesday morning in what turned out to be the worst attack on American soil that claimed the lives of 2,977 innocent victims.

Department of Energy researchers and national laboratories responded to the call to ensure that such an attack be avoided in the future.  DOE researchers have a long history of working on research that is now connected with the anti-terrorism effort, and in partnership with the federal government to carry out basic and applied research across many scientific disciplines that will help keep Americans safe.  These efforts include research on the early detection of deadly threats, providing expert analyses of and recommendations to address natural or terrorist-generated disasters that could affect the national infrastructure, developing sensors that can detect biological or chemical agents, and recommendations on how to improve energy and environment security.

To find out more about research results and DOE’s efforts to fight terrorism, go to: Science Accelerator. For example, a search using the term "terrorism" provides links to 731 reports.