Accelerating Science Discovery - Join the Discussion

Published by Dr. Walt Warnick
OSTI Employees

 

The notion that science progresses only if knowledge is shared is the reason that OSTI wascreated in 1947. Documents sent to and from President Franklin Roosevelt near the end of World War II included this rationale for sharing knowledge, and the concept was incorporated into the Atomic Energy Act of 1946 which led to the creation of OSTI.

 

In recent years the advent of the web has opened up the possibility of sharing knowledge with orders of magnitude more people and making it heretofore unimaginably easier to find and use. The possibility of sharing knowledge faster and better led us to formulate the OSTI Corollary in the mid-2000s: If the sharing of knowledge is accelerated, discovery is accelerated. In mathematical parlance, the Corollary might be considered the time derivative of the concept.

 

The Corollary seemed rather intuitive to us, but in an attempt to add authority to it, in 2005 we commissioned a rigorous literature search to learn who else in the history of science or knowledge management had stated it. We anticipated that we would be making speeches that said, “According to Professor Muckety-Muck, discovery can be accelerated by accelerating the spread of knowledge.” We were thus surprised when that literature search was unable to find any indication that the thought had been previously pursued or recorded.

 

Published by Dr. Walt Warnick
WorldWideScience.org Meeting

 

We have integrated about ten OSTI products dealing with technical reports, e-prints, patents, conference proceedings, project summaries, etc., so that they are all searchable via s single query.  The integrated product allows users to search without first having to decide which OSTI product is likely to have the content he/she seeks.  This product is ScienceAccelerator.gov.

We have integrated comparable offerings from about 14 other agencies so that all the virtually combined offerings can be searched via a single query.  Science.gov allows users to search without first having to decide which agency offers which content.  The DOE contribution to Science.gov is ScienceAccelerator.gov .

We have integrated comparable offerings from about 70 other countries so that all the offerings can be searched via a single query.  The US contribution to WorldWideScience.org is Science.gov.  WorldWideScience.org allows users to search without first having to decide which country offers which content.  The virtual collection is enormous, being comparable in size to science made searchable via Google.  Our tests suggest, however, that well over 90% of the content of WorldWideScience is non-Googelable.

Published by Dr. Lali Chatterjee

The recent launch of a new multilingual search capability for international science-  multilingual WorldWideScience.org (see www.science.doe.gov ) represents a significant step

Published by Mary Schorn

You can now have multiple access points to Science Accelerator at your fingertips. Just download the new tabbed widget and you will have access to search Science Accelerator, to the RSS feed, and to the Science Accelerator Alerts.  Download via the 'Get Widget Options' link or by placing the inclusion code in the online location of your choice.

When you use the widget search feature, a federated search provides one-stop simultaneous searching of multiple networked data resources, including the newly-added resources -- DOE Data Explorer and DOE Green Energy.

Published by Lorrie Johnson
WorldWideScience.org

 

On June 11, the Multilingual WorldWideScience.org BETA was officially launched in Helsinki, Finland at the International Council for Scientific and Technical Information (ICSTI) annual conference.  This new capability is the result of an international public-private partnership between the WorldWideScience.org Alliance and Microsoft Research, whose translations technology has been paired with the federated searching technology of Deep Web Technologies. 

WorldWideScience.org now provides the first-ever real-time searching and translation across globally-dispersed, multilingual scientific literature. Multilingual

WorldWideScience.orgBETA allows users to conduct a single query of over 70 scientific databases from around the world.  Results can then be translated into the user’s preferred language.  Currently, nine languages are available (Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Spanish, and Russian) and more languages will be added in the coming months.  With the pace of non-English scientific publishing continuing to grow, it is vitally important that English-speaking scientists gain access to non-English content.  Conversely, Multilingual WorldWideScience.orgBETA also benefits non-English-speaking users by enabling translations of English-language content.