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OSTIblog Posts by Kate Bannan

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Communication and Outreach Specialist

Kate Bannan is a Communications and Outreach Specialist for the Department of Energy’s Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) She develops and implements strategic communications and outreach programs to build awareness of OSTI, its programs and initiatives.

Congratulations to SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory on its Golden Anniversary

Science Communications

Published on Aug 27, 2012

celebrating 50 years of discovery

 

SLAC was established in1962 at Stanford University. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is a Department of Energy Office of Science national laboratory  and home to a two-mile linear accelerator—the longest in the world.  Originally a particle physics research center, SLAC is now a multipurpose laboratory for astrophysics, photon science, accelerator and particle physics research and home to some of the world’s most cutting-edge technologies used by researchers from around the world to uncover scientific mysteries on the smallest and the largest scales—from the workings of the atom to the mysteries of the cosmos.

SLAC is at the frontier of scientific discovery. With its range of diverse programs and facilities and exceptional researchers, SLAC is at the forefront of groundbreaking discoveries across the sciences, from astrophysics and accelerator research to chemistry, materials and energy science.

The lab’s core competencies are:

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Preservation Week 2012, April 22-28

Science Communications

Published on Apr 24, 2012

Preservation Week

 

Preservation Week was created in 2010 because there are over 630 million items in collecting institutions such as libraries that require immediate attention and care.

Preserving books, articles and other important information is no easy task because as many as 80% of these institutions have no paid staff dedicated to carry out these activities, and 22% operate without any collections care personnel. Complicating matters, it is estimated that 2.6 billion items are not protected by an emergency plan, which means these resources are in jeopardy should a disaster strike.  One way to protect and preserve these resources, as well as make them more readily available to a wider audience, is digital preservation.

Digital preservation is active management of digital content.  Some items are created in a digital format, but many (and all older documents) have to be converted from their original physical format into a digital format. This takes time and can be costly to do, so many collections remain in non-digital formats.

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Join OSTI for Earth Week 2012

Science Communications

Published on Apr 16, 2012

DOE Green Energy

 

April 22, 2012 is the 42nd celebration of Earth Day, a day that is intended to inspire awareness and appreciation for the Earth's natural environment.   The first Earth Day focused on the United States, but it has grown over the years and is now celebrated in more than 175 countries every year.  The U.S. Department of Energy will be celebrating Earth Week April 16-20 in the Forrestal Building and April 23-29 in Germantown. 

Many of the program offices, including the Office of Scientific and Technical Information(OSTI) will have displays, plus there will be activities such as environmental films, green bag lunches, nature walks and talks, children’s activities, free recycling of personal electronics, a farmers marketand community activity days.  The Earth Week activities are sure to be fun, and it is a great opportunity to see how the Department is “Changing Behavior to Reduce DOE’s Carbon Footprint.”

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Happy Mathematics Awareness Month

Science Communications

Published on Apr 13, 2012

MATH

 

“Pure mathematics is, in its way, the poetry of logical ideas.”

  ~Albert Einstein

As you prepare your taxes, keep in mind that April is  Mathematics Awareness Month.  This year’s theme is, “Mathematics, Statistics and the Data Deluge”.

Mathematics is used throughout the world as an essential tool in many fields, including natural science, engineering, medicine and the social sciences. Large amounts of data are collected every day, and scientific data comes in massive amounts from supercomputers, sensor networks, astronomical instruments and other devices.  These data need to be sorted out and understood in order to be useful.

The White House recently released its Big Data Research and Development Initiative, and OSTI, was recognized as playing a "key role " in shaping the policies and technical implementation of the practice of data citation. Data citation enables efficient reuse and verification of data

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OSTI Salutes Librarians During National Library Week -- April 9-14, 2012

Science Communications

Published on Apr 05, 2012

Library Shelves

 

April 9 - 14 is National Library Week, a time to honor the contributions of libraries, librarians and library workers in schools, campuses and communities nationwide.   First sponsored in 1958, it is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries across the country.  It is a time to celebrate the contributions of our nation’s libraries and librarians and to promote library use.

OSTI has a number of Library Tools that are provided as a free service to librarians and the library community to expand access to and use of DOE scientific research results:

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Celebrate National Engineers’ Week 2012 – February 19-25, 2012

Science Communications

Published on Feb 22, 2012

George Washington

 

National Engineers’ Week was started in 1951 by the National Society of Professional Engineers.  The celebration is held in conjunction with President George Washington's Birthday; our first President is considered by many engineers to be the nation's first engineer because of his survey work.

Engineers use imagination and analytical skills to invent, design, improve and build things and turn ideas into reality, apply basic research and dream up creative and practical solutions.  Engineering has made numerous contributions to modern life, and has made it more comfortable, safe and prosperous.  Engineers change the world.

The engineering field is as varied as engineers themselves. Engineers design and build superstructures and delicate medical instruments.  They explore for energy and better and more efficient ways to deliver it, they design environmental controls for buildings and drive innovation in various fields of energy such as wind, fuel cell technology, solar energy, geothermal energy, petroleum, gas, nuclear engineering, alternative energy, energy efficiency, fusion, hydrogen and superconductor technologies.

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National Nuclear Science Week – January 23-27, 2012

Science Communications

Published on Jan 24, 2012

Nuclear science comprises many fields. From astrophysics to radioisotopes, nuclear science starts with the atom. The atom, and its fundamental building blocks of protons and neutrons, is the bundle of radioactive energy that makes so much possible.

National Nuclear Science Week is designed to recognize the contributions of nuclear science and those who work in it every day.   Did you know that nuclear science is used in archeology, food safety and nuclear medicine?  Or to help industry with such things as locating cracks in steel, getting rid of dust from film, or measuring the amount of air whipped into ice cream?  And that nuclear power provides 20% of the electricity in the United States?

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Science and Innovation Create Jobs

Science Communications

Published on Jan 13, 2012

 

U.S. Department of Energy

 

 

The rules have changed. In a single generation, revolutions in technology have transformed the way we live, work and do business . . . .  In America, innovation doesn't just change our lives.  It is how we make our living. . . .This is our generation’s Sputnik moment.”

President Obama

2011 State of the Union Address

The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy(DOE) is to ensure America’s security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions.  DOE delivers breakthroughresearch and innovation.

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Snowflake Science

Science Communications

Published on Dec 13, 2011

Snowflake

 

With winter just around the corner, can snow be far behind?

We’ve all heard that no two snowflakes are alike, but what do we really know about them?

Snowflakes always have six sides.   Their form and shape depends on temperature and moisture.   Snowflake shapes fall into six main categories:  plate (flat), column, stars, dendrite (lacy), needle and capped column. When it is extremely cold, snow becomes fine and powdery and the snowflakes’ design becomes simpler, usually needle or rod shaped. When the temperature is close to freezing point, snowflakes become much larger and more complex in design.

Snow crystals form in clouds when the temperature is below freezing and are created by water droplets freezing on small ice particles. As an ice crystal drops through the cloud it bumps and knocks others and becomes a snowflake. This process of bumping others, along with melting and re-freezing aids the creation of their complex design. The air that the snowflake drops through has to be under freezing or the snowflake will simply melt and turn into rain.

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International Education Week 2011

Science Communications

Published on Nov 17, 2011

International Education Weekwas first held in 2000; today it's celebrated annually in more than 100 countries worldwide.  IEW is a joint initiative of the US Departments of Stateand Education, and is part of the federal government’s efforts to promote programs that prepare Americans for a global environment and attract future leaders from abroad to study, learn and exchange experiences in the United States.

Science and technology have been and will continue to be engines of US economic growth and national security. Excellence in discovery and innovation in science and engineering and in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education will strengthen the US economy, increase the capacity of US research and sustain our nation’s leadership role in increasingly competitive international science.

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