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OSTIblog Posts by Sara Studwell

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Librarian and Product Manager, overseeing OSTI’s DOE PAGES, DOE Data Explorer, and DOepatents

OSTI Helping High Energy Physics Collaboration to Register Datasets

Published on Apr 01, 2016

doe data id service

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is working with a researcher in the High Energy Physics (HEP) community to register scientific datasets produced by a domain collaboration, a recent blog post has reported.

OSTI offers a service for registering datasets to help increase access to digital data from DOE-funded scientific research.  Through the DOE Data ID Service, OSTI assigns persistent identifiers, known as Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs), to datasets submitted by DOE and its contractor and grantee researchers and registers the DOIs with DataCite to aid in citation, discovery, retrieval, and reuse.  OSTI assigns and registers DOIs for datasets for DOE researchers as a free service to enhance the Department of Energy's management of this important resource.

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DOE Research Data and Digital Object Identifiers: A Perfect Match

Published on Apr 22, 2015

Alternate Text PlaceholderThe Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) became a member of and a registering agency for DataCite in 2011—making the Department of Energy the first U.S. federal agency to assign digital object identifiers (DOIs) to data through OSTI’s Data ID Service.  DataCite is an international organization that supports data visibility, ease of data citation in scholarly publications, data preservation and future re-use, and data access and retrievability.   

Through the OSTI Data ID Service, DOIs are assigned to research datasets and then registered with DataCite to establish persistence and aid in citation, discovery, and retrieval.  The assignment and registration of a DOI is a free service for DOE researchers to enhance the management of this increasingly important resource.  Citations to these datasets are then made broadly available in OSTI databases such as DOE Data Explorer and SciTech Connect and in resources such as Science.gov and WorldWideScience.org.  They are also indexed by commercial search engines like Google and Bing.  

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