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OSTIblog Articles in the wind Topic

Wind Direction Forward

Wind Direction Forward

Wind-Energy - A Revitalized Pursuit was issued by Sandia Laboratories in 1974.  This report discusses challenges of the “energy crunch” and the U.S. goal to maintain high standards of living by developing “promising energy sources that are (1) vast, (2) environmentally acceptable, and (3) economically competitive.”  The authors felt that wind energy was a feasible solution. 

Devising ways to efficiently harness the wind is an ongoing pursuit of scientists around the world.  The wind mills of the past have evolved into high-tech wind turbines, governed by complex computer systems.  These control systems continue to be more and more important as turbines become larger, with more flexible and lighter components.  Advanced controls are necessary to prevent damage and possible malfunction of the turbines.  Facilities for testing new control systems at the National Wind Technology Center are described in the fact sheet Advanced Wind Turbine Controls Reduce Loads

Read more about wind energy in the DOE Science Showcase: Wind Power and watch Energy 101: Wind Turbines  (YouTube) to learn about the fundamentals and future of wind energy.

 

Daphne Evans, OSTI Staff

Related Topics: energy, Sandia, showcase, wind

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Wind Turbines and Wear and Tear

Wind turbines in a field

A modern wind turbine has more than 8,000 component parts that must withstand the wear and tear of wind stresses. DOE researchers and stakeholders have been working hard to predict and eliminate wind stress related barriers and extend the lifespan of wind turbines.  Working on a paper on this subject? OSTI can save you wear and tear by providing web tools that eliminate the need to search through database after database to find the research you need.  For example, if you use DOE’s Science Accelerator, you could search through 11 DOE databases, and in about 10 seconds or less, retrieve hundreds of documents about the use of simulations to understand wind turbine shear stress.You could learn about...

Related Topics: osti.gov, wind, Science.gov, Science Accelerator

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Energy in the Forecast

Wind Power Map

If you can accurately predict the weather, you may be able to predict how much energy can be generated from wind turbines.  That was one objective of the “Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project,” completed in 2011, to “develop a wind energy forecast system, and demonstrate its efficacy in scheduling power output from wind farms in the Great Plains.”  The forecasting system described in the report was comprised of three elements, a software component using various weather prediction models, a wind energy output model, and a graphical user interface.

Detailed wind resource maps, provided by the Wind Powering America Initiative, are another tool for demonstrating wind resource potential and removing some of the guesswork from wind energy prediction. 

You can read more about the wind, weather, and turbine dynamics in OSTI Collections: Wind Power, and link to many other research reports delving deeper into a range of topics related to wind energy.

Daphne Evans, OSTI Staff

Related Topics: energy, maps, OSTI collections, weather, wind, wind collection

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DOE’s Solar Decathlon – Building the Future

U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon

 

The Solar Decathlon is being held September 23–October 2, 2011, at the National Mall’s West Potomac Park in Washington, DC. The event is free and open to the public.

The U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon  challenges collegiate teams to design, build and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient and attractive. The winner of the competition is the team that best blends affordability, consumer appeal and design excellence with optimal energy production and maximum efficiency.

19 teams from universities from the US and around the world are competing in the sixth running of the Solar Decathlon.  Each team’s home is monitored for its performance in five areas relating to performance and livability: comfort (maintaining comfortable temperature and humidity in the home), hot water (producing a sufficient quantity for washing and bathing), appliances (such as keeping refrigerated items at the right temperature), home entertainment (running lights, computers and other devices) and energy balance.  For the energy balance portion, homes must even out energy consumption and generation so that they use zero net energy over the course of a week. Other contests rate the teams for their communications with the public, as well as the affordability, architecture, engineering and market appeal of their homes. The winner of the competition will be announced on October 1.

To learn more about solar energy and other green energy...

Related Topics: biomass, collegiate, decathlon, energy, geothermal, green, hydro, power, solar, synthetic fuels, wave, wind, DOE Green Energy

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