Accelerating Science Discovery - Join the Discussion

OSTIblog Articles in the research Topic

ScienceCinema – See Science in ACTION!


ScienceCinema – See Science in ACTION!

More than 2,600 videos showcasing DOE’s most exciting research are available on ScienceCinema.  Grab the popcorn and see science in “ACTION!”

Curious about DOE’s work in robotics, antimatter, or outer space?  How about microbes, bugs, or mutants?  Simply enter a search, and ScienceCinema’s innovative audio indexing and speech recognition technology will identify videos containing the words, plus pointers to the exact spots in the videos where the words are spoken.  ScienceCinema adds new videos as they are produced and submitted by DOE Laboratories, programs, and other facilities, and it was named one of six new initiatives in DOE’s Open Government Plan 2.0.

No need for science “fiction” with “real” science this exciting!  Catch the action on ScienceCinema today.

Related Topics: audio indexing, DOE laboratories, open government plan, research, ScienceCinema


Cool Connections

The coolest people are found on OSTI’s .EDUconnections Spotlights. Penn State’s Dr. Prabhu and Dr. Paulsonresearch different fields but discovered a possible cure for leukemia over a pizza faculty lunch. Howard University’s Binanca Baileyis a White House “Champion of Change for Women and Girls in STEM”. Student automotive technicianslearn how to work on hybrid vehicles at Colorado’s Arapahoe Community College. ASU’s Jane Maienschein, AZ’s top Professor of the Year, changes lives by empowering students for the future. Students at Mesalands Community College are easing the shortage of trained wind energy technicians. NYU-Poly’s Professor Maurizio Porfiridevelops underwater robots that may steer fish populations away from hazards. EDUconnections spotlights the most amazing science programs at institutions all across the country. So much is happening. Go there

Kathy Chambers 

DOE/OSTI Contractor

Related Topics: .EDUconnections, research, science programs, spotlight


Commemorating DOE, a Science Agency


Commemorating DOE, a Science Agency

The energy crisis of the 1970s demonstrated the need for unified energy planning within the federal government.  The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Organization Act (Public Law 95-91) was signed into law, centralizing the responsibilities of the Federal Energy Administration, the Energy Research and Development Administration, the Federal Power Commission and other energy-related government programs into a single presidential cabinet-level department.

The DOE began operations on October 1, 1977. The new Department was responsible for long-term, high-risk research and development of energy technology, federal power marketing, energy conservation, energy regulatory programs, a central energy data collection and analysis program, and nuclear weapons research, development and production.

The Energy Department’s mission is to ensure America’s security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions.  DOE plays an important and unique role in the U.S. science and technology community by bringing together scientists and engineers from national laboratories, academia and the private sector to form multidisciplinary teams.  It strives to find solutions to the most complex and pressing challenges, and plays a leadership role in transforming the energy economy through investments in research, in developing new technologies and deploying innovative approaches. DOE is the nation’s primary sponsor of research in the physical sciences, and is home to cutting-edge, one-of-a-kind user facilities used by thousands of researchers annually.

The Department of Energy is committed to the collection, preservation, and dissemination of sponsored R&D results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide, as well as...

Related Topics: 1970s, anniversary, doe, federal, nuclear, osti, r&d, research, tools


Energy Quadrennial Technology Review Released

“The Department is uniquely situated to serve as a resource for energy and technology data, information, and analysis that can enhance understanding, operation and planning across all organizations… ."

— From the Energy Quadrennial Technology Review

"the Department’s role as a source of information… is unique and indispensible in the advancement of energy technologies.”

— From the media announcement regarding the Energy Quadrennial Technology Review

On September 27, Secretary Steven Chu and Under Secretary Steven Koonin released the first Report on the Department of Energy Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR).

Recommended by the President’s Council on Science and Technology (PCAST), the Department of Energy’s Quadrennial Technology Review highlights the Department’s key research functions in a broad energy landscape.  It states that the Department’s role as a source of information and as a convener, two functions that are often underestimated, is unique and indispensible in the advancement of energy technologies.  It establishes a framework, utilizing six key strategies, to prioritize the Department’s research and development across energy technologies.

The QTR finds that DOE should give greater emphasis to the transport sector relative to the stationary sector.  Among the transport strategies, DOE will devote its greatest effort to electrification of the light-duty fleet, a sweet spot for pre-competitive DOE R&D.  Within the stationary heat and power sector, the QTR finds that DOE should increase emphasis on efficiency and grid modernization.  Finally, it highlights the need for DOE to develop stronger, more integrated policy, economics and technical analysis of its...

Related Topics: 21st century, doe, energy, r&d, research, Technology


Sharing Data Leads to Progress

by Nena Moss 19 Aug, 2010 in Personal Perspectives

My mother died in March 2010 after a 15-year battle with Alzheimer’s, so I pay particular attention to news about this dreadful disease. A recent New York Times article caught my eye: “Sharing of Data Leads to Progress on Alzheimer's.”

How did sharing data lead to progress on Alzheimer’s?  A collaborative effort, the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, was formed to find the biological markers that show the progression of Alzheimer’s disease in the human brain. The key was to share all the data, making every finding public immediately – “available to anyone with a computer anywhere in the world.”
Alzheimer’s research is an enormous task with limited returns. Dr. Michael W. Weiner of the San Francisco Department of Veterans Affairs said “Different people using different methods on different subjects in different places were getting different results, which is not surprising. What was needed was to get everyone together and to get a common data set.” Numerous entities were willing to shoulder the burden and work together on the project, sharing their information for the good of all.
 According to Dr. John Q. Trojanowski, an Alzheimer’s researcher at the University of Pennsylvania, “It’s not science the way most of us have practiced it in our careers. But we all realized that we would never get biomarkers unless all of us parked our egos and intellectual-property noses outside the door and agreed that all of our data would be public immediately.” The National institutes of Health served as an “honest broker, between the pharmaceutical industry and academia.”
 The effort has produced “a wealth of recent scientific papers on the early...

Related Topics: ADNI, Alzheimer's, biomarkers, collaboration, corollary, data, disease, initiative, mission, neuroimaging, osti, research, sharing


Impact of Basic Research on Innovation


Impact of Basic Research on Innovation

 The development of MP3 technologies illustrates the unexpected benefits of basic research. In 1965, a hand-sized storage and playback device that would hold 15,000 recorded songs was the stuff of science fiction. Even simple hand-held calculators were rare and expensive at that time. Research funded by the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Energy, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology contributed to the breakthrough technologies of magnetic storage drives, lithium-ion batteries, and the liquid crystal display, which came together in the development of MP3 devices. The device itself is innovative, but it built upon a broad platform of component technologies, each derived from fundamental studies in physical science, mathematics, and engineering.

Related Topics: dod, doe, nih, nist, nsf, research