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OSTIblog Articles in the renewable energy Topic

A Roadmap to Geothermal Heat Pump Feasibility

by Kathy Chambers 28 Feb, 2013 in Technology


A Roadmap to Geothermal Heat Pump Feasibility

Planning a trip is exciting. I can’t tell you how long my family planned our trip out west.  For so many years we wanted to do this. When we finally hit the road our adventure was more than we could have possibly imagined.  

The landscape was always changing, always beautiful. Cattle ranches stretched out to infinity. Mountain peaks formed by ancient volcanos lined up in rows, one after another. Rivers of black jagged lava flowed over the landscape. We came across rainbow colors of the painted desert, a petrified forest of long ago, and the jaw-dropping expanse of the Grand Canyon. A winding road down from Flagstaff led us into the red cliffs of Sedona and on the cacti-spotted landscape of the Sonoran desert. The further we went, the more we appreciated vast mother earth. 

Our earth has an immense reservoir of geothermal energy that has helped to create this amazing landscape. Geothermal energy is the heat contained within the earth—a clean, reliable, and renewable energy. Department of Energy (DOE) researchers have made great progress harnessing this energy to make our lives better. It can be used as an energy-efficient heating and cooling alternative and can generate vast electric power across the United States. (Read more about DOE’s Geothermal Program and find geothermal energy research results in the Energy Citations Database.)

The Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) is one of DOE’s high-impact technologies that are currently being researched by the Building...

Related Topics: Building Technologies Program, EERE, energy consumption, geothermal, heat pumps, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, renewable energy



That is Choctaw for hello. My name is Erin Anderson and I am a tribal member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma.  I am an employee of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), where one of my duties is to manage the DOE Green Energy product.

November is Native American Heritage Month and it has traditionally been a time set aside to recognize the contributions, sacrifices, cultural and historical legacy of the American Indian and Alaska Native peoples.  The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has supported efforts of Native American individual scientists and researchers, as well as tribal governments and educational institutions.  Much science is being done in areas related to renewable energy, with particular focus on solar and wind power.  These greener, more sustainable technologies and energy practices are making headway in Indian Country.

TribalCollegesand Universities are one area where you can see this. In fact, you can read on the OSTI .EDUconnections Spotlight on Tribal Colleges and Universities (July 2011) about a unique partnership between DOE National Laboratories, the American Indian Higher Education Consortium and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. This partnership was created because “…[there is] significant need and significant opportunity to develop the energy literacy of future American Indian leaders by providing scientific and technological skills to help their communities manage their lands and develop energy resources.” (Page 1, American Indian Research & Education Initiative, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, July 25, 2011).

You can see the U.S....

Related Topics: DOE Green Energy, renewable energy, Tribal Energy Program