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OSTIblog Articles in the r&d Topic

DOE research videos available on ScienceCinema

ScienceCinema

 

Scientific videos highlighting research and development (R&D) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are available on ScienceCinema. ScienceCinema uses innovative, state-of-the-art audio indexing and speech recognition technology to enable users to quickly find video files produced by the DOE national laboratories, other DOE research facilities and CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research). When users search for scientific words and phrases, precise snippets of the video where the search term was spoken are provided along with a timeline.

More than 2,500 videos are currently available in ScienceCinema, and the database will continue to grow as new R&D-related videos are produced by DOE programs, labs and facilities and submitted to OSTI. Scientific videos, animations, interactive visualizations and other multimedia are expected to become an increasingly prominent form of scientific communications. ScienceCinema was recently recognized as one of DOE’s six new initiatives in the DOE Open Government Plan 2.0 for making the federal government more transparent, participatory and collaborative. 

Related Topics: ScienceCinema, audio indexing, communications, open government plan, r&d, scientific, transparency, videos

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ETDEWEB World Energy Base

ETDE web world energy base

Just in time for the summer heat, a refreshing new design of ETDEWEB World Energy Base!  New results screen and display options make your search experience cool.  (Registration may be required). See more records on your search results screen and don’t forget to use the new ‘…Show More’ to expand content.  Interested in full text?  Users may now limit their searches to show only records with full text available.

Not sure exactly what you want to search for?  Check out the latest ETDEWEB World Energy Base enhancement: Popular Topics.  Using Popular Topics will give you search results from topics you may have not thought to explore yet. Or if a Popular Topic is already your area of interest, simply click the search to get the latest information available.

ETDEWEB World Energy Base is constantly working to expand the content you know and love.  Come explore and search for information on energy R&D; energy policy and planning; basic sciences and materials research; the environmental impact of energy production and use, including climate change; energy conservation; nuclear; coal and fossil fuels; renewable energy technologies and much, much more. ETDE is always open to receiving your thoughts and suggestions.

Related Topics: ETDEWEB, climate change, coal, conservation, energy, fossil, fuels, nuclear, r&d

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A New Way To Find Reviewers

DOE program managers are routinely called upon to identify peer reviewer candidates for grant and field work proposals.  Each proposal requires a minimum of three reviewers and often more to cover separate aspects of the proposal.  To generate reviewer candidates, program managers draw upon their subject matter expertise and manually scour journal literature.  Although this process is facilitated by the availability of electronic journals, it is labor intensive and represents a major cost.

Information experts at OSTI have demonstrated the capability to identify high quality potential reviewers by analyzing the scientific content underlying its R&D information collections and other integrated sources. This analytical procedure combines sophisticated semantic algorithms with informed judgments. Not only is it efficient, it also raises the prospect of broadening the reviewer base by finding new qualified reviewers.

In non-technical language, the OSTI Reviewer Finder works as follows. First a semantic technique is used to find a core set of papers that are directly related to the proposal in question. This can also be done for groups of proposals or other topic specific needs.

Second, a sophisticated semantic algorithm, developed by OSTI, is used to find all those papers that are closely related to the core papers. In fact these papers are ranked according to the degree of closeness. This means the pool of related papers can be made larger or smaller as needed.

This two step process may be repeated when a proposal involves several distinct topics, methods or other aspects, which often happens. For example, in addition to subject matter experts one might want to have reviewers who are experts in the methods used.

All of the authors of the core and closely related papers are potential reviewers, so they are abstracted and listed. However, some authors must be excluded, for various reasons. For example, it is common practice...

Related Topics: authors, r&d, reviewers, semantic

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OSTI and Its Mission Highlighted in Secretary Chu’s Policy Statement on Scientific Integrity

The Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) plays an integral role in ensuring transparency and access to the results of the Department of Energy’s scientific efforts – and such transparency and access help assure DOE’s scientific integrity, according to a policy statement recently issued by Secretary of Energy Steven Chu. 

“Science and technology are the foundation of all Department of Energy activities…,” the Secretarial Policy Statement on Scientific Integrity opens. “The Department’s mission relies on objective, reliable, accurate, and accessible scientific and technical information.”  And OSTI addresses the agency’s responsibilities to collect, preserve and disseminate scientific and technical information emanating from the Department’s research and development activities.

“In December 2010,” Secretary Chu wrote in a May 11 memo to DOE employees, “the Office of Science and Technology Policy at the White House issued a memorandum asking all agencies to establish a scientific integrity policy.  In response to this call, I recently signed the Secretarial Policy Statement on Scientific Integrity for the Department of Energy applicable to all DOE Federal employees.  This policy builds on the Department’s existing policies and best practices to support a culture of scientific integrity.”

“DOE will facilitate the free flow of scientific and technological information,” the policy statement provides, “consistent with standards for treatment of classified, sensitive, private, and proprietary information.  Transparency and accessibility of scientific and technological information support the continued advancement of a sound science and technology base to help guide and inform the nation’s critical public policy decisions; advance the national, economic and energy security of the U.S.; facilitate the...

Related Topics: Science Accelerator, r&d, scientific integrity, Steven Chu

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Commemorating DOE, a Science Agency

U.S. Department of Energy

 

The energy crisis of the 1970s demonstrated the need for unified energy planning within the federal government.  The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Organization Act (Public Law 95-91) was signed into law, centralizing the responsibilities of the Federal Energy Administration, the Energy Research and Development Administration, the Federal Power Commission and other energy-related government programs into a single presidential cabinet-level department.

The DOE began operations on October 1, 1977. The new Department was responsible for long-term, high-risk research and development of energy technology, federal power marketing, energy conservation, energy regulatory programs, a central energy data collection and analysis program, and nuclear weapons research, development and production.

The Energy Department’s mission is to ensure America’s security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions.  DOE plays an important and unique role in the U.S. science and technology community by bringing together scientists and engineers from national laboratories, academia and the private sector to form multidisciplinary teams.  It strives to find solutions to the most complex and pressing challenges, and plays a leadership role in transforming the energy economy through investments in research, in developing new technologies and deploying innovative approaches. DOE is the nation’s primary sponsor of...

Related Topics: 1970s, anniversary, doe, federal, nuclear, osti, r&d, research, tools

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Energy Quadrennial Technology Review Released

“The Department is uniquely situated to serve as a resource for energy and technology data, information, and analysis that can enhance understanding, operation and planning across all organizations… ."

— From the Energy Quadrennial Technology Review


"the Department’s role as a source of information… is unique and indispensible in the advancement of energy technologies.”

— From the media announcement regarding the Energy Quadrennial Technology Review

On September 27, Secretary Steven Chu and Under Secretary Steven Koonin released the first Report on the Department of Energy Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR).

Recommended by the President’s Council on Science and Technology (PCAST), the Department of Energy’s Quadrennial Technology Review highlights the Department’s key research functions in a broad energy landscape.  It states that the Department’s role as a source of information and as a convener, two functions that are often underestimated, is unique and indispensible in the advancement of energy technologies.  It establishes a framework, utilizing six key strategies, to prioritize the Department’s research and development across energy technologies.

The QTR finds that DOE should give greater emphasis to the transport sector relative to the stationary sector.  Among the transport strategies, DOE will devote its greatest effort to electrification of the light-duty fleet, a sweet spot for pre-competitive DOE R&D.  Within the stationary heat and power sector, the QTR finds that DOE should increase emphasis on efficiency and grid modernization.  Finally, it highlights the need for DOE to develop stronger, more integrated policy, economics and technical analysis of its...

Related Topics: 21st century, doe, energy, r&d, research, Technology

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How to Integrate Anything on the Web

by Dr. Walt Warnick 03 Aug, 2011 in Technology
Computer Integration

 

OSTI is especially proud of its web integration work whereby we take multiple web pages, documents, and web databases and make them appear to the user as if they were an integrated whole.   Once the sources are virtually integrated by OSTI, the virtual collection becomes searchable via a single query.  Because information on the web appears in a variety of formats, from HTML web pages, to PDF documents, to searchable databases, OSTI has developed and uses a suite of integration approaches to make them searchable via single query.  

OSTI has two goals that make it critical for us to understand multiple solutions for integrating science content on the web.  First, we make DOE science information widely available and searchable by appropriate audienceswherever they may be; and second, we make science information from around the world searchable by DOE researchers.  Since migrating to a fully electronic operationin the late 1990s, OSTI has met these goals by deploying various search architectures for integrating content via the web.

Within the information science circles that we engage in, we are well known for our pioneering work with the integration technology known as federated search. However, there are other, possibly lesser known,  technologies that we employ to integrate web content.

To  integrate information sources which are not interoperable, we see three categories of solutions:  1) you can create a data warehouse where you copy the information items, standardize metadata, and host them on your own servers;  2) you can create a discovery...

Related Topics: data warehouse, federated search, information, integration, r&d, science, scientific, technical

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STIP Partnership Ensures DOE R&D Results Are Disseminated

STIP meeting

 

Many posts could be written about the rich history of the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), which dates back to 1945 when Colonel K. D. Nichols announced plans for a complete and authoritative scientific record of all research work performed by Manhattan District contractors.  However, I want to focus on a specific slice of that history, one that is going strong and is well represented across the DOE complex.  I’m referring to DOE’s Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP, www.osti.gov/stip).

Just a month ago, STIP representatives from across the DOE complex convened in Pleasanton, CA, to participate in the annual STIP Working Meeting.  This important present-day collaboration, which is coordinated by OSTI, stems from the 1948 establishment of the Technical Information Panel by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC).  In 1948, the country was just coming to terms with the wealth of scientific research resulting from the Manhattan Project. The formation of the Technical Information Panel was an important step forward for the agency and focused on establishing information policies, ascertaining information needs, recommending information dissemination methods, and serving as an important liaison between central and local organizations.

Today – some 60+ years later – STIP continues to be an important partnership in ensuring that results of the Department’s research are made available to DOE’s central STI organization in order to be made broadly accessible via OSTI web search tools and also through national and international...

Related Topics: Scientific and Technical Information Program Website, Manhattan Project, r&d, sti, stip

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The Importance of Small Business Innovation Research Funding

by Dr. Walt Warnick 09 Mar, 2011 in Technology
Search products

 

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs were established to provide funding to stimulate technological innovation in small businesses to meet federal agency research and development needs.  Under SBIR, federal agencies with large R&D budgets set aside a small fraction of their funding for competitions exclusively among small businesses.  Each year, the DOE Office of Science sets aside 2.8% of its research budget for SBIR (2.5%) and STTR (.3%) awards.  Small businesses that win SBIR awards keep the rights to any technology developed and are encouraged to commercialize the technology.

 

Established in 1947, the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) fulfills the agency’s responsibilities to collect, preserve and disseminate scientific and technical information (STI) emanating from DOE R&D activities.  OSTI’s mission is to advance science and sustain creativity by making R&D findings available to DOE and other researchers and the public.  OSTI is founded on the principle that science progresses only if knowledge is shared; furthermore, OSTI is animated by the concept, now widely accepted, that accelerating the sharing of knowledge accelerates the advancement of science.  SBIR projects have been integral to OSTI’s success in speeding access to scientific knowledge to speed discovery, innovation and economic progress.

 

Since 2003, the Office of Science’s SBIR office has had a policy of funding knowledge technology SBIR projects under OSTI guidance that have produced technologies that today...

Related Topics: federated search, multilingual, r&d, relevance ranking, SBIR, sttr, translations

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DOE Data: Would We, Could We...?

I can’t remember how it went now, but as a child I skipped rope to a rhyme that included “would I, could I” somewhere in it.  Recently questions were asked about OSTI’s involvement with scientific research data.  Is OSTI planning to become a repository for numeric data?  Are we going to issue Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) for datasets, and would we be telling people how to manage their data?  For some reason, the questions triggered the memory of that old refrain, but now I was thinking from an OSTI perspective, “would we, could we…?”

Fortunately, I’m much clearer about OSTI’s answer to those questions than I am about the conclusion of that old rhyme.  In order, the answers are a simple no, maybe, and no.

I’m in a position to know these answers because of my tasks here at OSTI.  I work with the Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP) that handles policies and processes for information submissions to OSTI.  I’m also the product manager for the DOE Data Explorer http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer/) and an OSTI point of contact for a related, ongoing STTR grant.

If you wonder why anyone would think to ask if OSTI has plans to begin taking in data, the question is, no doubt, triggered by the revision currently underway of the STI directive DOE O 241.1A.  That directive basically says that an announcement notice (citation/bibliographic record) for any scientific and technical information resulting from DOE-funded R&D must be submitted to OSTI.  For technical reports and, when possible, for other document types, that announcement notice contains a URL that links to the PDF document.  OSTI’s databases allow users to search both the citation in the database as well as the full text of the document, whether it resides at...

Related Topics: DOE Data Explorer (DDE)-Obsolete, Scientific and Technical Information Program Website, data, dois, r&d, stip, sttr

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