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OSTIblog Articles in the public access Topic

The Grand Compromise of U.S. Public Access Programs: Going Green

by Dr. Jeffrey Salmon 12 Sep, 2016 in

DOE PAGES

In April 2012, The Economist ran a biting editorial arguing that, “[w]hen research is funded by the taxpayer or by charities, the results should be available to all without charge.”  Academic journals, the magazine contended, were raking in huge profits by selling content that was supplied to them largely for free and in the process restricting public access to valuable research to just those willing to pay for subscriptions.  The answer to this “absurd and unjust” situation, The Economist wrote, is “simple”: governments and foundations that fund research “should require that the results be made available free to the public.”

We at the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) have found that providing full public access to the research DOE funds is simple in principle and complex in practice.  And reflecting on this 2012 editorial, we can say that a great deal of progress has been made toward reaching the goal of free public access it sets out.  And much of that progress is due to hard collaborative work by both the government and publishers. 

Following the February 2013 memo from the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) on “Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research,” all major U.S. federal science agencies are now implementing public access plans, which comprehend both publications and data.

DOE was the first federal agency to gain OSTP approval of its plan – in July 2014.  DOE’s early implementation is a result of the longstanding scientific and technical information (STI) program and infrastructure managed by OSTI...

Related Topics: Going Green, DOE PAGES

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The DOE Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP): At the Center of Public Access for DOE

 

2015 DOE STIP Working Meeting Attendees2015 DOE STIP Working Meeting Attendees

Each year, representatives of the Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP), led by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), convene for their annual meeting.  At this year’s working meeting of STIP representatives, held in April and hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory, there was something different in the air.  Each year there is lively discussion, new contacts are made, and important information is shared, but this year's meeting had a different feel overall.  Perhaps it was the record number of participants, perhaps it was the number of first-time participants who were eager to learn and gain insight from strong scientific and technical information (STI) management programs in place at other labs and offices, or perhaps it was the feeling of being part of something groundbreaking as the DOE STIP community works together to implement the Department of Energy Public Access Plan.  In reflecting on the April meeting, I have concluded that it was “all of the above.”  

This is an important and exciting time to be a part of the Department's STIP.Whether one is a program manager, contracting officer,  technical information specialist, or other designated STIP participant, all play a role in management of Departmental research results.  STIP participants help ensure that the results of DOE-funded research and development (R&D) and technical activities are identified, collected, preserved, and then made accessible through...

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How to Accelerate Public Access

by Dr. Jeffrey Salmon 20 Apr, 2015 in


Alternate Text PlaceholderFor science agencies, access to federally funded research is a key part of our mission.  And the very first requirement for federal agency public access plans directed by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) was that the plans must encompass “a strategy for leveraging existing archives, where appropriate, and fostering public-private partnerships with scientific journals relevant to the agency’s research [emphasis added].”  This 2013 OSTP memo is replete with calls for public-private partnerships.  When it comes to the key issue of repositories, for example, agencies are told that “[r]epositories could be maintained by the Federal agency funding the research, through an arrangement with other Federal agencies, or through other parties working in partnership with the agency including, but not limited to, scholarly and professional associations, publishers, and libraries [emphasis added].”  Under the section on “Objectives for Public Access to Scientific Publications,” the OSTP memo states that agency plans “shall …[e]ncourage public-private collaboration to: maximize the potential for interoperability between public and private platforms and creative reuse to enhance value to all stakeholders, avoid unnecessary duplication of existing mechanisms, maximize the impact of the Federal research investment, and otherwise assist with implementation of the agency plan [emphasis added].”  And public-private partnerships are also called out in the memo’s section on data management plans.

In its clear-cut instructions to...

Related Topics: CHORUS, DOE PAGES(Beta)

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DOE OSTI Implements Re-organization: Sticking to Our Knitting While Meeting New Challenges

by Brian Hitson 08 Apr, 2015 in
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

 

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), a unit of the Office of Science, recently completed a restructuring to fulfill agency-wide responsibilities to collect, preserve, and disseminate scientific and technical information (STI) emanating from DOE research and development (R&D) activities, including a new obligation to provide public access to DOE-affiliated journal articles.

The re-organization is the culmination of a year during which OSTI took steps to re-focus and re-balance our operations by devoting more resources to collecting and preserving DOE STI and to providing comprehensive access to the results of DOE R&D investments.  At the same time, we streamlined our portfolio of science search tools to make it easier to find DOE’s R&D results.  In August, DOE became the first federal science agency to issue a public access plan for scholarly scientific publications in response to a February 2013 White House Office of Science and Technology Policy directive, and OSTI launched DOE PAGESBeta, a beta portal to journal articles and accepted manuscripts resulting from DOE-funded research.  On October 1, we issued the OSTI 2015-2019 Strategic Plan, a roadmap for working to ensure its collections and portals reflect the...

Related Topics: Catalogue of Collections, osti mission, re-organization, DOE PAGES

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Accepted Manuscript Submissions for DOE PAGES(Beta) Officially Start October 1, 2014

by Judy Gilmore 01 Oct, 2014 in

Alternate Text PlaceholderOn August 4, 2014, the Department of Energy (DOE) launched the DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy and ScienceBeta (DOE PAGESBeta), a portal and search engine that makes scholarly scientific publications resulting from DOE research funding publicly accessible and searchable at no charge to users.

DOE PAGESBeta was developed and is maintained by the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) in response to a February 2013 White House Office of Science and Technology Policy memorandum that called on federal agencies to develop and implement plans to provide public access to the results of research they fund within a year of publication.<--break- />

When fully operational, DOE PAGESBeta will offer free public access to the best available version of DOE-affiliated scholarly publications – either the peer-reviewed, accepted manuscript or the published scientific journal article – after an administrative interval of 12 months.  When a publisher provides a publicly-accessible article about DOE R&D results, DOE PAGESBeta will link to that article; if the article is not available, DOE PAGESBeta will provide access to the corresponding accepted manuscript.

As a key step in implementing DOE PAGESBeta, DOE is building off its existing scientific and technical information (STI) reporting practices to require the submission of peer-reviewed accepted manuscripts for DOE-funded researchers starting October 1, 2014...

Related Topics: accepted manuscript, administrative interval, journal articles, public access, stip, DOE PAGES(Beta)

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Accepted Manuscript Submissions for DOE PAGES(Beta) Officially Start October 1, 2014

by Judy Gilmore 01 Oct, 2014 in

Alternate Text PlaceholderOn August 4, 2014, the Department of Energy (DOE) launched the DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy and ScienceBeta (DOE PAGESBeta), a portal and search engine that makes scholarly scientific publications resulting from DOE research funding publicly accessible and searchable at no charge to users.

DOE PAGESBeta was developed and is maintained by the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) in response to a February 2013 White House Office of Science and Technology Policy memorandum that called on federal agencies to develop and implement plans to provide public access to the results of research they fund within a year of publication.<--break- />

When fully operational, DOE PAGESBeta will offer free public access to the best available version of DOE-affiliated scholarly publications – either the peer-reviewed, accepted manuscript or the published scientific journal article – after an administrative interval of 12 months.  When a publisher provides a publicly-accessible article about DOE R&D results, DOE PAGESBeta will link to that article; if the article is not available, DOE PAGESBeta will provide access to the corresponding accepted manuscript.

As a key step in implementing DOE PAGESBeta, DOE is building off its existing scientific and technical information (STI) reporting practices to require the submission of peer-reviewed accepted manuscripts for DOE-funded researchers starting October 1, 2014...

Related Topics: accepted manuscript, administrative interval, journal articles, public access, stip, DOE PAGES(Beta)

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Achieving Public Access: The Department of Energy Launches DOE PAGES(Beta)

by Dr. Jeffrey Salmon 04 Aug, 2014 in

Alternate Text PlaceholderClick here (www.osti.gov/pages/) to view the future of public access to scientific publications.

As of August 4, 2014, and for the first time ever, the Department of Energy (DOE) will provide a portal (see above) allowing anyone to read, download, and analyze in digital form final peer-reviewed manuscripts or final published articles of work sponsored by the Department.  You can read the entire DOE public access plan here.

DOE conducts more than $10 billion a year in R&D, and the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) helps ensure a return on those investments by making DOE-sponsored R&D results available in web-based searchable databases.  These DOE databases include electronic full-text research reports; energy citations going back to the Manhattan Project era; e-prints (journal article pre-publication drafts, scholarly papers, and more); DOE R&D accomplishments; and DOE patents.

Despite the breadth of these collections, they generally do not include what is considered the “gold standard” of scientific communication -- peer-reviewed journal articles or final accepted manuscripts resulting from agency funding.   To date, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the only federal science agency that has offered broad public access to scientific publications resulting from its funding (as required by a law enacted in 2008).

But now, that’s all changed with DOE PAGESBeta (Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science).  And this is a very significant change.  After a twelve-month embargo period, readers will have access to...

Related Topics: DOE PAGES(Beta)

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OSTI Is Re-Focusing and Re-Balancing Its Operations – And Refreshing Its Home Page – to Advance Public Access

Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP)

 

Let’s call it creative destruction, borrowing from a popular term in economics.  The idea is that the very essence of capitalism is the destruction of old structures and the building of new ones that inevitably face the same pressures as the structures they replaced.  It’s the reason the buggy whip industry fell on hard times. The information management business of the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is in constant flux too, where the next big thing can soon become the next big flop. OSTI cannot be immune to these disruptive forces, nor would we wish it to be.  Here, I would like to focus on just one of many disruptive forces in the information management and information technology worlds compelling OSTI to change, the push for greater public access to federally-funded R&D results.  Frankly, it’s a disruptive force we welcome.

Increasingly the legislative and executive branches of government have emphasized public access to federally-funded scholarly publications (i.e., journal articles and accepted manuscripts) and digital datasets. OSTI will lead the implementation of public access to scholarly publications for DOE, just as the organization has offered public access to other forms of scientific and technical information (STI) emanating from DOE and its predecessor agencies for the past 67 years.

To this end, OSTI is re-focusing and re-balancing its resources, operations, and priorities. For OSTI, this means looking first and foremost at the STI produced by DOE and serving DOE R&D...

Related Topics: DOE STI, journal literature, osti

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OSTI Partnering with Publishers on CrossRef and FundRef to Enhance Public Access to DOE Scientific and Technical Information

Throughout our history, the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) has worked to make authoritative science information ever more efficiently available to researchers and the public alike. Our core mission – ensuring access to and preservation of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research results – has not changed. But the technology we apply to that mission has changed a lot over the past 20 years. By adopting Internet technology carefully and early, pioneering new advances in that technology to meet our needs and partnering with other stakeholders in the scientific and technical information community (STI), OSTI aspires to achieve our mission better than ever before.

In 1994, OSTI actually created the first DOE home page, and we have made significant strides into the Information Age ever since, defining new electronic exchange formats, creating collections of digitized scientific and technical information and establishing an energy science and technology virtual library. OSTI also has played a leading role in developing and adopting pioneering web tools such as federated search, the simultaneous search of multiple web databases in real time via a single search query, and relevance ranking, technology that allows search results to be returned in a ranked order relevant to the search query, to enhance the diffusion of scientific knowledge.

As we reported in the last issue of the OSTI.gov Newsletter, as directed by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and requested by former DOE Office of Science Director Dr. William Brinkman, OSTI is now developing a gateway that will provide public access to the gold standard of scientific communications, peer-reviewed accepted manuscripts and scientific journal articles resulting from DOE research investments.

OSTI is committed to being a leader in making the web work for DOE science, and in recent...

Related Topics: CrossRef, Digital Object Identifier, DOE STI, FundRef, public access, scientific information

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OSTI Partnering with Publishers on CrossRef and FundRef to Enhance Public Access to DOE Scientific and Technical Information

Throughout our history, the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) has worked to make authoritative science information ever more efficiently available to researchers and the public alike. Our core mission – ensuring access to and preservation of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research results – has not changed. But the technology we apply to that mission has changed a lot over the past 20 years. By adopting Internet technology carefully and early, pioneering new advances in that technology to meet our needs and partnering with other stakeholders in the scientific and technical information community (STI), OSTI aspires to achieve our mission better than ever before.

In 1994, OSTI actually created the first DOE home page, and we have made significant strides into the Information Age ever since, defining new electronic exchange formats, creating collections of digitized scientific and technical information and establishing an energy science and technology virtual library. OSTI also has played a leading role in developing and adopting pioneering web tools such as federated search, the simultaneous search of multiple web databases in real time via a single search query, and relevance ranking, technology that allows search results to be returned in a ranked order relevant to the search query, to enhance the diffusion of scientific knowledge.

As we reported in the last issue of the OSTI.gov Newsletter, as directed by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and requested by former DOE Office of Science Director Dr. William Brinkman, OSTI is now developing a gateway that will provide public access to the gold standard of scientific communications, peer-reviewed accepted manuscripts and scientific journal articles resulting from DOE research investments.

OSTI is committed to being a leader in making the web work for DOE science, and in recent...

Related Topics: CrossRef, Digital Object Identifier, DOE STI, FundRef, public access, scientific information

Read more...

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