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OSTIblog Articles in the public access Topic

Accepted Manuscript Submissions for DOE PAGES(Beta) Officially Start October 1, 2014

by Judy Gilmore 01 Oct, 2014 in

On August 4, 2014, the Department of Energy (DOE) launched the DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy and ScienceBeta (DOE PAGESBeta), a portal and search engine that makes scholarly scientific publications resulting from DOE research funding publicly accessible and searchable at no charge to users.

DOE PAGESBeta was developed and is maintained by the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) in response to a February 2013 White House Office of Science and Technology Policy memorandum that called on federal agencies to develop and implement plans to provide public access to the results of research they fund within a year of publication.<--break- />

When fully operational, DOE PAGESBeta will offer free public access to the best available version of DOE-affiliated scholarly publications – either the peer-reviewed, accepted manuscript or the published scientific journal article – after an administrative interval of 12 months.  When a publisher provides a publicly-accessible article about DOE R&D results, DOE PAGESBeta will link to that article; if the article is not available, DOE PAGESBeta will provide access to the corresponding accepted manuscript.

As a key step in implementing DOE PAGESBeta, DOE is building off its existing scientific and technical information (STI) reporting practices to require the submission of peer-reviewed accepted manuscripts for DOE-funded researchers starting October 1, 2014.

For publications emanating...

Related Topics: accepted manuscript, administrative interval, DOE PAGES(Beta), E-Link, journal articles, public access, stip


OSTI Partnering with Publishers on CrossRef and FundRef to Enhance Public Access to DOE Scientific and Technical Information

Throughout our history, the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) has worked to make authoritative science information ever more efficiently available to researchers and the public alike. Our core mission – ensuring access to and preservation of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research results – has not changed. But the technology we apply to that mission has changed a lot over the past 20 years. By adopting Internet technology carefully and early, pioneering new advances in that technology to meet our needs and partnering with other stakeholders in the scientific and technical information community (STI), OSTI aspires to achieve our mission better than ever before.

In 1994, OSTI actually created the first DOE home page, and we have made significant strides into the Information Age ever since, defining new electronic exchange formats, creating collections of digitized scientific and technical information and establishing an energy science and technology virtual library. OSTI also has played a leading role in developing and adopting pioneering web tools such as federated search, the simultaneous search of multiple web databases in real time via a single search query, and relevance ranking, technology that allows search results to be returned in a ranked order relevant to the search query, to enhance the diffusion of scientific knowledge.

As we reported in the last issue of the Newsletter, as directed by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and requested by former DOE Office of Science Director Dr. William Brinkman, OSTI is now developing a gateway that will provide public access to the gold standard of scientific communications, peer-reviewed accepted manuscripts and scientific journal articles resulting from DOE research investments.

OSTI is committed to being a leader in making the web work for DOE science, and in...

Related Topics: CrossRef, Digital Object Identifier, DOE STI, FundRef, public access, scientific information, SciTech Connect


Public Access – Help Shape It!


Public Access – Help Shape It!

As a reader of this blog, you are naturally a stakeholder in the government's public access policies – specifically, public access to scholarly publications containing federally-funded research results.  As the largest government funder of research in the physical sciences as well as a key funder across a broad spectrum of other science and technology fields, the Department of Energy, through our national laboratories and grantees, produces an enormous number of scholarly publications each year.

Journal articles are the gold standard of scholarly publications.  Books and conference papers are other examples.  DOE research is also recorded in the form of e-prints and technical reports.  OSTI is the repository for DOE's technical reports, having nearly 300,000 available in electronic full text on the DOE Information Bridge and another 800,000, dating back to the Manhattan Project, awaiting digitization.

For journal articles, OSTI also receives lots of metadata from national labs, but public access to the full text depends on individual journal publishers' business practices – e.g., whether the journal is open access or subscription based.  In the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010, Congress tasked the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) with reviewing, evaluating, and proposing federal public access policies and practices for peer reviewed scholarly publications.  A Public Access to Scholarly Publications (PASP) Task Force has been leading this effort on behalf of the NSTC, and a Request for Information (RFI) (i.e., an opportunity for stakeholder input) has just been...

Related Topics: Information Bridge (IB), public access, RFI