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OSTIblog Articles in the osti Topic

And the winner is . . . . you!

Scientific and Technical Information Program: STI from Labs, Major Sites and Technology Centers.

Did you ever stop to think what makes it possible for you to have immediate, free access to Department of Energy (DOE) scientific findings from billions of dollars of annual research?  A lot of behind-the-scenes work and dedication of an entire community make it all possible.

The heart and soul of this endeavor is the DOE Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP), a collaboration to ensure your access to DOE research and development results. The DOE Office of Science provides overall leadership and policy direction of the STIP program consistent with the DOE mission and legal requirements.  The Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) coordinates the Department-wide STI program across DOE programs, field offices, national laboratories, and contractors to disseminate and preserve the Department’s scientific and technical information (STI) for your use. And, OSTI maintains state-of-the-art information management systems, databases, national and international web portals to provide you immediate, easy access to publicly available information.  

In total, about 50 designated representatives from the DOE Headquarters Program Offices,...

Related Topics: Department of Energy, doe, labs, osti, stip, Scientific and Technical Information Program Website

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@OSTIgov Twitter is Trending!

OSTI.GOV: Follow us on Twitter @OSTIgov

Social media has changed the way we look at everything. Just in the past few years, society has moved from a limited amount of news sources to an infinite network of information. And we don’t necessarily have to go looking for data because links, advertisements and news stories seem to be popping up on every screen, message or page. That’s why it’s more important than ever to know where valuable scientific and technical information can be accessed. One way the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is reaching out  to folks interested in high quality federally-funded scientific and technical information is through their Twitter account @OSTIgov.

@OSTIgov frequently posts information about current topics of interest such as STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) resources; search queries for weatherization; or laboratory highlights just to mention a few. Our team identifies timely subjects and cross references links to complete search results and datasets within OSTI websites. The goal is to attract science-attentive twitter users who will appreciate the post and continue using OSTI’s helpful resources. @OSTIgov also promotes DOE or @Energy tweets and other agencies or national labs that present science-related information.

The Twitter followers for @OSTIgov continue to steadily increase and we encourage you to join the information team! In addition to @OSTIgov we support two other helpful...

Related Topics: @ostigov, osti, science, social media, twitter

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The Secret City Is Emerging from Its Past

U.S. Department of Energy  Office of Scientific and Technical Information

 

Oak Ridge is rapidly emerging from a secret city into the hub of open science information.  How did this happen? It’s an amazing story. 

In 1942, deep within the quiet farm hills of East Tennessee, a secret city called Oak Ridge was created seemingly overnight.  Approximately 75,000 workers worked tirelessly to refine uranium ore into fissionable material. When the first atomic bomb was dropped in Japan and World War II came to an end, their work for the Manhattan Project was revealed to them and to the world. Their secret is still commemorated today. Oak Ridge, Tennessee has much to be proud of:  Science created its beginning and science continues to be vital to its future.

Just 5 years after the birth of Oak Ridge, the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) was established to manage the atomic information.  Since then, OSTI has become one of the world’s most comprehensive collections of information about energy science and technology.  It is a little known fact – even around Oak Ridge – that OSTI is mandated by law to maintain and make available science and technical information from research, development, demonstration, and commercial applications activities supported by DOE and its predecessors. OSTI not only collects and preserves research reports from nearby Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Y-12 and labs and weapons facilities across the country, the Office is DOE’s mechanism...

Related Topics: osti, Science.gov, WorldWideScience.org (WWS)

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OSTI: The Storefront for the DOE

open sign

The Department of Energy has made a formidable contribution to the advancement of the scientific and technological knowledge frontier.  In particular, DOE sponsors more basic and applied scientific research in the physical sciences than any other U.S. federal agency and all of this is made possible by the taxpayer.

Additionally, in the March 2011 Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Summary Report to the President and the Congress, it was noted that in FY09 across the federal government there were over 4,400 new inventions of which 33% were from DOE; 1,500 new patents issued with 35% from DOE; and over 2,000 new patent applications of which 44% were from DOE.

If the DOE is thought of as an organization that generates innovative “products”—the cutting edge research, discoveries, patents, inventions and other technological results—then the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is its “storefront”.  It is precisely from this storefront that the taxpayer—the citizen, the businessperson, the entrepreneur, the student, or the researcher—is able to access transparently this enormous array of products, know-how and scientific information. 

OSTI recognizes that in this storefront capacity, it plays a crucial role not only in generating return on investment (ROI) for the taxpayer in terms of making the fruits of their “investments” available to those that are interested, but also in being a catalyst for the generation of economic activity which supports and creates jobs each year from the commercialization of government-funded...

Related Topics: doe, osti, product offering, ROI, scientific information

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Halloween and Science

Jack-o-lantern

 

Halloween is celebrated on October 31, and is one of the world’s oldest holidays.  It has evolved into a celebration enjoyed by all ages, and includes fun activities like trick-or-treating, dressing up in costumes, carving jack-o'-lanterns, going to a bonfire, apple bobbing, visiting a haunted house and telling scary stories.

Did you ever wonder why we sometimes enjoy being scared?  Learn about the science of fear, find tips about staying safe and healthy on Halloween, learn about “vampire” appliances, download  information on Halloween storms, do research on black cats or find fun activities to do at home or in school – all of this information (and more) is available for free on Science.gov

Science.gov is made available to the public by the US Department of Energy’s Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI).  It searches over 50 databases and over 2100 selected websites from 14 federal agencies, offering 200 million pages of authoritative U.S. government science information including research and development results.

So have a scary, happy and scientific Halloween…...

Related Topics: Halloween, osti, Science.gov

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Commemorating DOE, a Science Agency

U.S. Department of Energy

 

The energy crisis of the 1970s demonstrated the need for unified energy planning within the federal government.  The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Organization Act (Public Law 95-91) was signed into law, centralizing the responsibilities of the Federal Energy Administration, the Energy Research and Development Administration, the Federal Power Commission and other energy-related government programs into a single presidential cabinet-level department.

The DOE began operations on October 1, 1977. The new Department was responsible for long-term, high-risk research and development of energy technology, federal power marketing, energy conservation, energy regulatory programs, a central energy data collection and analysis program, and nuclear weapons research, development and production.

The Energy Department’s mission is to ensure America’s security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions.  DOE plays an important and unique role in the U.S. science and technology community by bringing together scientists and engineers from national laboratories, academia and the private sector to form multidisciplinary teams.  It strives to find solutions to the most complex and pressing challenges, and plays a leadership role in transforming the energy economy through investments in research, in developing new technologies and deploying innovative approaches. DOE is the nation’s primary sponsor of...

Related Topics: 1970s, anniversary, doe, federal, nuclear, osti, r&d, research, tools

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Mutual Benefits at Work!

DOE OSTI recently hosted a graduate student from the University of Michigan (UM) School of Information (SI) for a week in our Germantown offices.  The student, Ryan Tabor, was participating in the UM SI Alternative Spring Break (ASB) program, which matches graduate students with professional-experience projects identified by host organizations.  Ryan's graduate school specialty area is human-computer interaction. That, coupled with his undergraduate degree in psychology and his work experience on IT Help Desks, created a great match for OSTI's project -- a usability study of DOE R&D Accomplishments.

Ryan tested and evaluated the site via various methodologies and reported his findings and recommendations.  He provided some valuable insights which will result in an even more user-friendly website.  This collaboration was mutually beneficial in that Ryan gained experience by working in a professional environment doing professional-level work and OSTI gained from having a 'third-party' review and feedback about one of its core products. 

 

Mary Schorn

Related Topics: accomplishments, collaboration, doe, osti, DOE Research & Development (R&D) Accomplishments

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OSTI CELEBRATES SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING – COME JOIN US AT THE USA SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING FESTIVAL MALL EXPO

ScienceEducation.gov

 

You need information about the environment, or physics, or chemistry, or the earth and don't know where to go. You want the information quickly, and from an authoritative source.  No problem.

Stop by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Science exhibit to see and use the new search tool, ScienceEducation.gov ScienceEducation.gov was launched in Beta Version to provide stakeholders and the education community an opportunity for feedback. The site is publicly accessible and makes federal science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education resources accessible and transparent via a single, integrated portal for one-stop searching by teachers, students, education professionals and parents. Using open source software in a web 2.0 platform that invites public participation and collaboration, ScienceEducation.gov opens government STEM education resources as never before. Science.Education.gov deploys new grade-level stratification technology, assigning many resources a grade range based on the grade levels of the science concepts. ScienceEducation.gov was developed through a partnership of the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS).  Content contributors include the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA...

Related Topics: ERIC, nasa, NOAA, NSDL, osti, USGS

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Sharing Data Leads to Progress

by Nena Moss 19 Aug, 2010 in Personal Perspectives

My mother died in March 2010 after a 15-year battle with Alzheimer’s, so I pay particular attention to news about this dreadful disease. A recent New York Times article caught my eye: “Sharing of Data Leads to Progress on Alzheimer's.”

How did sharing data lead to progress on Alzheimer’s?  A collaborative effort, the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, was formed to find the biological markers that show the progression of Alzheimer’s disease in the human brain. The key was to share all the data, making every finding public immediately – “available to anyone with a computer anywhere in the world.”
 
Alzheimer’s research is an enormous task with limited returns. Dr. Michael W. Weiner of the San Francisco Department of Veterans Affairs said “Different people using different methods on different subjects in different places were getting different results, which is not surprising. What was needed was to get everyone together and to get a common data set.” Numerous entities were willing to shoulder the burden and work together on the project, sharing their information for the good of all.
 
 According to Dr. John Q. Trojanowski, an Alzheimer’s researcher at the University of Pennsylvania, “It’s not science the way most of us have practiced it in our careers. But we all realized that we would never get biomarkers unless all of us parked our egos and intellectual-property noses outside the door and agreed that all of our data would be public immediately.” The National institutes of Health served as an “honest broker, between the pharmaceutical industry and academia.”
 
 The effort has produced “a wealth of recent scientific papers on the early...

Related Topics: ADNI, Alzheimer's, biomarkers, collaboration, corollary, data, disease, initiative, mission, neuroimaging, osti, research, sharing

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Making the Web Work Even Better for Energy R&D

The Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) maintains several collections of scientific and technical information (STI) that can be employed to help achieve the President's national objectives for the U.S. Department of Energy.

OSTI's databases are important resources for scientists and engineers working to strengthen America's role as the world leader in science and technology, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, promote energy security and enhance nuclear security. OSTI has shown that the web can work better for science and research and development - and OSTI believes that making the web work still better for science and R&D will help overcome critical roadblocks to widespread, cost-effective deployment of emerging or existing but under-deployed energy technologies.

OSTI's Progress to Date

Established in 1947, the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (http://www.osti.gov/) fulfills the agency's responsibilities to collect, preserve and disseminate scientific and technical information (STI) emanating from DOE R&D activities. OSTI's mission is to advance science and sustain creativity by making R&D findings available to DOE and other researchers and the public. In the words of Section 982 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, "The Secretary, through the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, shall maintain with the Department publicly available collections of scientific and technical information resulting from research, development, demonstration, and commercial applications supported by the Department."

OSTI is founded on the principle that science progresses only if knowledge is shared, and the OSTI Corollary - accelerating the sharing of knowledge accelerates the advancement of science - takes OSTI's founding principle to the next level. (See OSTI's FY 2009-2013 Strategic Plan,...

Related Topics: osti, sti

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