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OSTI Employees Are Committed to Giving Back to Their Communities

by Erin Dominick Anderson 30 Nov, 2016 in

Besides having a passion for serving our country and its citizens through broad dissemination of Department of Energy R&D results, Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) employees are also committed to giving back to their local, national, and global communities in other ways.

Similar to many employer-supported charitable giving campaigns, there is an annual effort across the U.S. Federal Government known as the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC).  OSTI has participated for many years, with a high percentage of employees donating each campaign season.  The CFC was created in 1961 to coordinate the fundraising efforts of various charitable organizations, which must demonstrate standards of transparency and effectiveness in order to participate in the campaign.  Federal employees continue to make the CFC the largest and most successful workplace philanthropic fundraiser in the world.  The CFC is structured with 125 local campaigns that organize the annual fundraising effort.  OSTI is part of the Smoky Mountain Region Combined Federal Campaign.  In 2016, OSTI employees donated thousands of dollars to local, national, and international organizations.

osti employees
OSTI employees Tammy Payne
(front left), Catherine Pepmiller
(top left), and Kelly Dunlap
volunteering on the
2016 Day of Caring.

In addition to their monetary gifts, this year a number of OSTI federal employees also participated in a Day of Caring volunteer service event held on October 28, 2016.  OSTI joined more than 200 volunteers from the DOE Oak Ridge Office...

Related Topics: CFC, Communities, osti, Smoky Mountain Region Combined Federal Campaign

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OSTI Employees Are Committed to Giving Back to Their Communities

by Erin Dominick Anderson 30 Nov, 2016 in

Besides having a passion for serving our country and its citizens through broad dissemination of Department of Energy R&D results, Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) employees are also committed to giving back to their local, national, and global communities in other ways.

Similar to many employer-supported charitable giving campaigns, there is an annual effort across the U.S. Federal Government known as the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC).  OSTI has participated for many years, with a high percentage of employees donating each campaign season.  The CFC was created in 1961 to coordinate the fundraising efforts of various charitable organizations, which must demonstrate standards of transparency and effectiveness in order to participate in the campaign.  Federal employees continue to make the CFC the largest and most successful workplace philanthropic fundraiser in the world.  The CFC is structured with 125 local campaigns that organize the annual fundraising effort.  OSTI is part of the Smoky Mountain Region Combined Federal Campaign.  In 2016, OSTI employees donated thousands of dollars to local, national, and international organizations.

osti employees
OSTI employees Tammy Payne
(front left), Catherine Pepmiller
(top left), and Kelly Dunlap
volunteering on the
2016 Day of Caring.

In addition to their monetary gifts, this year a number of OSTI federal employees also participated in a Day of Caring volunteer service event held on October 28, 2016.  OSTI joined more than 200 volunteers from the DOE Oak Ridge Office...

Related Topics: CFC, Communities, osti, Smoky Mountain Region Combined Federal Campaign

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OSTI and ORCID: Working to Help Link DOE Authors and Their Research Results

by Catherine Pepmiller 20 Sep, 2016 in
orcid ids on scitech connect

 

It has always been important for authors and researchers to maintain and present accurate records of their work and experience.  In this digital age, an author can achieve such record-keeping by using a persistent digital identifier, a number associated with a particular author that remains with him or her, regardless of changes in discipline, research project, organization, or position.  ORCID, a not-for-profit-organization working to make it easier to connect research results to authors, has stepped in to provide just such a service.  To date, they have registered over 2.5 million ORCID iDs for their users, and this number grows daily.

ORCID first opened its registry allowing researchers to register ORCID iDs and link their works to their iD in 2012, and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) was one of the first federal organizations to embrace the ORCID concept.  In spring 2013, OSTI moved to help make it even easier for researchers to employ ORCID iD by offering the option to submit scientific and technical information (STI) records including an ORCID iD via E-Link, the DOE corporate STI ingest system.  Once records have been processed, users may search SciTech Connect by ORCID iD to find works associated with that iD.  Under this system, authors curate their ORCID Works list manually, adding records found in OSTI’s databases.

OSTI has...

Related Topics: orcid, osti, SciTech Connect, SciTech Connect

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The IT Infrastructure Behind OSTI’s Mission

by Jeff Given 04 Dec, 2015 in
OSTI's new data center enclosure

OSTI's new data center enclosure

For the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) to fulfill our mission to “advance science and sustain technological creativity by making R&D findings available and useful to Department of Energy researchers and the public,” it’s important to have an information technology (IT) infrastructure up to the task of performing 40 million human transactions per year, which requires 24/7/365 availability.  At OSTI, we take pride in delivering high-availability systems, which translates to consistently reliable web-based services available at full capacity to our end users.  We work to minimize any downtime in the availability of our vast electronic scientific collections, but in case you have ever experienced that rare occasion when a product wasn’t available, we would like to explain what happens “behind the curtain” during scheduled maintenance windows. 

OSTI’s web products, applications, catalogue of collections, and the associated cyber infrastructure that supports them are a complex amalgamation of hardware devices and big data processing/storage technologies that have been tuned to provide customers the data they need while keeping the Department’s R&D information secure and available.  Much of this infrastructure is contained in our data center, a 3,500 square- foot room that has been purposely built to support IT and is designed to consider airflow (hardware doesn’t like being hot), electrical requirements, and even physical security access to the devices.  Remember the...

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DOE OSTI Implements Re-organization: Sticking to Our Knitting While Meeting New Challenges

by Brian Hitson 08 Apr, 2015 in
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

 

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), a unit of the Office of Science, recently completed a restructuring to fulfill agency-wide responsibilities to collect, preserve, and disseminate scientific and technical information (STI) emanating from DOE research and development (R&D) activities, including a new obligation to provide public access to DOE-affiliated journal articles.

The re-organization is the culmination of a year during which OSTI took steps to re-focus and re-balance our operations by devoting more resources to collecting and preserving DOE STI and to providing comprehensive access to the results of DOE R&D investments.  At the same time, we streamlined our portfolio of science search tools to make it easier to find DOE’s R&D results.  In August, DOE became the first federal science agency to issue a public access plan for scholarly scientific publications in response to a February 2013 White House Office of Science and Technology Policy directive, and OSTI launched DOE PAGESBeta, a beta portal to journal articles and accepted manuscripts resulting from DOE-funded research.  On October 1, we issued the OSTI 2015-2019 Strategic Plan, a roadmap for working to ensure its collections and portals reflect the...

Related Topics: Catalogue of Collections, osti mission, re-organization, DOE PAGES

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OSTI Joins In Celebrating the Forty-Fifth Anniversary of the International Nuclear Information System

by Debbie Cutler 25 Mar, 2015 in



Alternate Text PlaceholderForty-five years ago, nations around the world saw their dream for a more efficient way to share nuclear-related information reach fruition through the creation of a formal international collaboration. This was accomplished without the internet, email, or websites.  It was the right thing to do for public safety, education, and the further advancement of science.  It was also a necessary way forward as the volume of research and information about nuclear-related science, even back then, was skyrocketing and exceeded the capacity for any one country to go it alone.  And the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) was part of the collaboration from its initial planning stages.

The International Nuclear Information System, or INIS, as it is commonly known, was approved by the Governing Board of the United Nations’ International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in 1969 and began operations in 1970.  The primary purpose of INIS was, and still is, to collect and share information about the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology, with participating nations sharing efforts to build a centralized resource.  

OSTI grew out of the United States’ post-World War II initiative to make the scientific research of the Manhattan Project as freely available to the public as possible.  Thus, OSTI had been building the premier Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) publication since the late 1940s and was perfectly positioned to provide information gathering and organizing expertise to help the INIS concept coalesce into reality.  OSTI was a key player in formative working group discussions at the IAEA in Vienna, Austria in the 1966-67 timeframe, and led...

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Basic Research and Innovation

by Dr. Jeffrey Salmon 24 Mar, 2014 in
Basic Research and Innovation

 

Recently, I attended a roundtable discussion hosted by the Hudson Institute in Washington, D.C. on the topic of innovation – how it comes about, what factors can impede it, where the U.S. might be headed as a lead innovator in the 21st Century, and what cultural and ethical issues need to be considered in a complete understanding of innovation.

As a science and technology agency, the Department of Energy (DOE) cares a great deal about questions surrounding innovation.  As an information management agency within DOE, the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) works to accelerate innovation through the sharing of knowledge.  We also love to point out where DOE has done just that.

The discussion at Hudson on innovation was rich and multi-layered.  But there were a set of key ideas and arguments that should be of particular interest to DOE and OSTI.

Organization and Innovation.  What kind of organization best drives innovation?  The answer is not completely clear.  Is innovation or rapid development of technology more likely to come about today through a large, multidisciplinary enterprise, such as our DOE national laboratories, i.e. “big science,” or through a nimble, relatively small market-shaped group of entrepreneurs?  But even this way of posing the question isn’t precise.  It could be that the requirements for basic research today call for big science, but that application of that research to technology development is more likely to flourish where...

Related Topics: basic research, doe research, economic impact, Hudson Institute, innovation, DOE R&D Accomplishments

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OSTI Is Re-Focusing and Re-Balancing Its Operations – And Refreshing Its Home Page – to Advance Public Access

Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP)

 

Let’s call it creative destruction, borrowing from a popular term in economics.  The idea is that the very essence of capitalism is the destruction of old structures and the building of new ones that inevitably face the same pressures as the structures they replaced.  It’s the reason the buggy whip industry fell on hard times. The information management business of the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is in constant flux too, where the next big thing can soon become the next big flop. OSTI cannot be immune to these disruptive forces, nor would we wish it to be.  Here, I would like to focus on just one of many disruptive forces in the information management and information technology worlds compelling OSTI to change, the push for greater public access to federally-funded R&D results.  Frankly, it’s a disruptive force we welcome.

Increasingly the legislative and executive branches of government have emphasized public access to federally-funded scholarly publications (i.e., journal articles and accepted manuscripts) and digital datasets. OSTI will lead the implementation of public access to scholarly publications for DOE, just as the organization has offered public access to other forms of scientific and technical information (STI) emanating from DOE and its predecessor agencies for the past 67 years.

To this end, OSTI is re-focusing and re-balancing its resources, operations, and priorities. For OSTI, this means looking first and foremost at the STI produced by DOE and serving DOE R&D...

Related Topics: DOE STI, journal literature, osti

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OSTI Is Re-Focusing and Re-Balancing Its Operations – And Refreshing Its Home Page – to Advance Public Access

Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP)

 

Let’s call it creative destruction, borrowing from a popular term in economics.  The idea is that the very essence of capitalism is the destruction of old structures and the building of new ones that inevitably face the same pressures as the structures they replaced.  It’s the reason the buggy whip industry fell on hard times. The information management business of the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is in constant flux too, where the next big thing can soon become the next big flop. OSTI cannot be immune to these disruptive forces, nor would we wish it to be.  Here, I would like to focus on just one of many disruptive forces in the information management and information technology worlds compelling OSTI to change, the push for greater public access to federally-funded R&D results.  Frankly, it’s a disruptive force we welcome.

Increasingly the legislative and executive branches of government have emphasized public access to federally-funded scholarly publications (i.e., journal articles and accepted manuscripts) and digital datasets. OSTI will lead the implementation of public access to scholarly publications for DOE, just as the organization has offered public access to other forms of scientific and technical information (STI) emanating from DOE and its predecessor agencies for the past 67 years.

To this end, OSTI is re-focusing and re-balancing its resources, operations, and priorities. For OSTI, this means looking first and foremost at the STI produced by DOE and serving DOE R&D...

Related Topics: DOE STI, journal literature, osti

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OSTI Partnering with Publishers on CrossRef and FundRef to Enhance Public Access to DOE Scientific and Technical Information

Throughout our history, the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) has worked to make authoritative science information ever more efficiently available to researchers and the public alike. Our core mission – ensuring access to and preservation of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research results – has not changed. But the technology we apply to that mission has changed a lot over the past 20 years. By adopting Internet technology carefully and early, pioneering new advances in that technology to meet our needs and partnering with other stakeholders in the scientific and technical information community (STI), OSTI aspires to achieve our mission better than ever before.

In 1994, OSTI actually created the first DOE home page, and we have made significant strides into the Information Age ever since, defining new electronic exchange formats, creating collections of digitized scientific and technical information and establishing an energy science and technology virtual library. OSTI also has played a leading role in developing and adopting pioneering web tools such as federated search, the simultaneous search of multiple web databases in real time via a single search query, and relevance ranking, technology that allows search results to be returned in a ranked order relevant to the search query, to enhance the diffusion of scientific knowledge.

As we reported in the last issue of the OSTI.gov Newsletter, as directed by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and requested by former DOE Office of Science Director Dr. William Brinkman, OSTI is now developing a gateway that will provide public access to the gold standard of scientific communications, peer-reviewed accepted manuscripts and scientific journal articles resulting from DOE research investments.

OSTI is committed to being a leader in making the web work for DOE science, and in recent...

Related Topics: CrossRef, Digital Object Identifier, DOE STI, FundRef, public access, scientific information

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