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OSTIblog Articles in the national laboratories Topic

Refreshed National Library of Energy(Beta) Takes on Expanded Role in Disseminating Department of Energy Scientific and Technical Information

by Lynn Davis 29 May, 2014 in

The National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta), a gateway to information across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is taking on an expanded role in providing access to DOE scientific and technical information (STI) with the retirement of the federated search product Science Accelerator.    In addition, the NLEBeta, launched in February 2013, has a redesigned home page and new features that makes it easier to use than ever. 

Developed by DOE’s Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), the NLEBeta search tool makes it easy for American citizens to find and access information about the Department from across the DOE complex nationwide, without knowing DOE’s organizational structure.    

The NLEBeta integrates and makes searchable disparate and decentralized information collections across DOE.  Users can search hundreds of webpages and 18 databases – a total of 25 million pages – hosted by DOE (; all DOE program offices; the National Nuclear Security Administration; the Energy Information Administration; all DOE staff offices; all DOE field/site offices; and all DOE National Laboratories and technology centers.  DOE’s program offices include Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Environmental Management, Fossil Energy, Nuclear Energy, and Science.

The NLEBeta makes it possible to search all this information via a single search box.  Using federated search and indexing technology, the NLEBeta retrieves relevance-ranked individual site results with links to the sites or databases where the original content can be viewed.


Related Topics: Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, DOE field offices, DOE staff offices, Energy Information Administration, federated search, national laboratories, National Library of Energy (NLE) - Beta, National Library of Energy (NLE) - Beta, National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Science


DOE’s Scientific and Technical Information Program: A Winning Collaboration

by Judy Gilmore 26 Mar, 2014 in


DOE’s Scientific and Technical Information Program: A Winning Collaboration

Once again, dedicated representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) headquarters program offices, field offices, national laboratories and technology centers are convening along with OSTI staff for the DOE Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP) Annual Working Meeting. This year the STIP Annual Working Meeting will be held March 31-April 4 in Richland, Washington. The meeting will be hosted by DOE’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

The DOE STIP program is an OSTI-led collaboration of scientific and technical (STI) managers and technical information officers across the DOE complex responsible for identifying, collecting, preserving and making accessible the results of DOE-funded research and development (R&D). Their behind-the-scenes work and dedication increases the availability and transparency of various types of STI. This collaborative effort is a win-win situation for everyone involved. DOE researchers, information managers and the science and educational community all benefit big time. Last year the STIP community collectively submitted the results of 30,000 DOE-funded research and development projects, and the number of submissions is projected to double for 2014. These DOE-funded research results are incorporated into the ever-increasing scientific database content of SciTech Connect, DOE’s flagship STI product.

The focus of this year’s workshop is “Raising the Bar for DOE R&D Results,” with emphasis on increasing public access to DOE science research outcomes and preparing for future technologies and endeavors.


Judy Gilmore



Image credit:  PNL

Related Topics: DOE field offices, DOE program offices, doe research, national laboratories, Scientific and Technical Information Program Website, sti, STIP Annual Meeting


Exploring DOE Data Treasures


Exploring DOE Data Treasures

There are databases, and then there are treasure maps. The DOE Data Explorer (DDE) merges the two concepts into a product offering the best of both. DDE’s database provides the features needed for simple retrieval or advanced searching. The treasure map aspect comes from DDE’s content, which links you to collections of data and non-text information wherever those collections reside.

Instead of sailing the seven seas, you can browse DDE’s seven types of content. Choose “Browse by Content Type” from the drop down menu on the DDE homepage and hit the “Submit” button. Each one of the seven categories shown on the results page will open a list of every collection tagged in DDE with that particular type of content. Naturally, “Numeric Files/Datasets” is a content type with a huge “footprint.”  High-Energy Physics (HEP) data from experiments at DOE’s National Laboratories, Scientific User Facilities, CERN, and prestigious universities vie for the most visible presence on the treasure map with terabytes of climate and environmental data gathered around the globe and made available by DOE Data Centers such as the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the archive for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program.

Browse “Interactive Data Maps” to discover sophisticated, layered views of everything from nuclides to energy resource data (solar, wind, geothermal, etc.) to genetic details of plant and animal kingdoms, to carbon sinks, the ocean floor, and drought-stricken land.

If you want graphs and charts, diagrams, and data plots, the DOE Data Explorer can show you where “X” marks the spot.  Or, if you want a little more action from your treasure haul, check out the collections of computer models and resulting simulations, along with downloadable tools, codes, and sample data that will help you generate your...

Related Topics: cern, DOE Data Explorer (DDE), national laboratories


Celebrate National Engineers’ Week 2012 – February 19-25, 2012


Celebrate National Engineers’ Week 2012 – February 19-25, 2012

National Engineers’ Week was started in 1951 by the National Society of Professional Engineers.  The celebration is held in conjunction with President George Washington's Birthday; our first President is considered by many engineers to be the nation's first engineer because of his survey work.

Engineers use imagination and analytical skills to invent, design, improve and build things and turn ideas into reality, apply basic research and dream up creative and practical solutions.  Engineering has made numerous contributions to modern life, and has made it more comfortable, safe and prosperous.  Engineers change the world.

The engineering field is as varied as engineers themselves. Engineers design and build superstructures and delicate medical instruments.  They explore for energy and better and more efficient ways to deliver it, they design environmental controls for buildings and drive innovation in various fields of energy such as wind, fuel cell technology, solar energy, geothermal energy, petroleum, gas, nuclear engineering, alternative energy, energy efficiency, fusion, hydrogen and superconductor technologies.

At DOE and its National Laboratories engineers support the discovery and design of new materials with novel structures, design functions and properties that may lead to new materials for the generation, storage and use of energy and address and solve environmental impacts of energy use. Other engineers use modern tools and capabilities in the engineering sciences to ensure the safety, security, reliability and performance of the current and future U.S. nuclear...

Related Topics: National Engineers’ Week, national laboratories, Science Accelerator


Discover the data behind DOE publications!

If you're ready to discover data, then OSTI's newest product is ready for you!  The DOE Data Explorer (DDE) is a unique tool that identifies collections of DOE-sponsored numeric files, figures and data plots, multimedia and images, computer simulations, specialized databases, and interactive data maps. Browse, run a quick search, or advanced search, then click a link to results. You'll be amazed at the data you can freely see and use, the highly specialized interfaces developed by the owners of the data that will help you delve deeper into their collections, and the software toolkits that allow you to manipulate, compare, visualize, download, and re-use the data.

The DOE Data Explorer will guide you to data collections at national laboratories, data centers, scientific user facilities, colleges and universities ...and across all of the science areas with DOE involvement.  The DOE Data Explorer development team sifted through hundreds of these websites so that you would not have to, selecting each collection for inclusion according to strict criteria. 

DOE has several data centers  that provide excellent collections and expert services. Each of these centers specialize in data belonging to a specific subject area or scientific discipline. The DOE Data Explorer will help you find those centers and their collections. However, its unique usefulness is in helping you find the collections that are NOT in a data center.  In addition, what if you want to do cross-disciplinary research?  Or what if you don't even know what data might be out there or what discipline it might belong to? You need a data discovery tool that will allow you to see ALL of DOE's data - regardless of scientific discipline, regardless of format, and, even,...

Related Topics: data, DOE Data Explorer (DDE), national laboratories