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OSTIblog Articles in the nasa Topic

The Successes of Government Science and Technology

Sorry due to allocation we can serve no more gasoline today

Theodore Roosevelt, in his famous speech “Citizenship In A Republic” starts by saying “it is not the critic who counts;” What makes the speech poignant is that all too often it is the critic who counts because we see time and time again the media pointing out “how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.”

Too often we only hear about failures and waste in government, yet the contributions and success of government-funded science and technology are ubiquitous and often under-reported.

Mission X

Anyone who is old enough remembers President Nixon making a phone call from the oval office to Neil Armstrong on the moon. At the time, it was an almost superhuman feat of engineering. Yet today no teenager would be amazed because today they can take a cell phone out of theirpocket and place a call to the international space station…if we only knew the number. In fact, school children routinely have video conferences with our astronauts as part of NASA’s policy. The NASA space program of the 1960s helped make modern communications possible. By helping to create the integrated circuits and by re-purposing the missile technology of the cold war to launch satellites, NASA engineers deserve special praise. They deserve to be in the Hall of Fame. In my mind they already are.

A topic also not receiving the fanfare it deserves was recently noted by Pete Domenici, senior fellow at the Bipartisan Policy...

Related Topics: Bureau of Mines, communications, hydraulic fracturing, nasa, nuclear weapons technology, Oil Shale





You need information about the environment, or physics, or chemistry, or the earth and don't know where to go. You want the information quickly, and from an authoritative source.  No problem.


Stop by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Science exhibit to see and use the new search tool, was launched in Beta Version to provide stakeholders and the education community an opportunity for feedback. The site is publicly accessible and makes federal science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education resources accessible and transparent via a single, integrated portal for one-stop searching by teachers, students, education professionals and parents. Using open source software in a web 2.0 platform that invites public participation and collaboration, opens government STEM education resources as never before. deploys new grade-level stratification technology, assigning many resources a grade range based on the grade levels of the science concepts. was developed through a partnership of the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS).  Content contributors include the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and theNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  In addition, links are provided to related...

Related Topics: ERIC, nasa, NOAA, NSDL, osti, USGS

Read more... The Importance of Being Unique

In a world replete with information sources and options, it is imperative to offer users something unique. (, a federated search product that currently provides a single point of access to 61 scientific databases and portals from more than 60 countries, is a remarkably unique scientific discovery tool.  Representing more than three-fourths of the world’s population, enables access to over 400 million pages of science from around the globe.  Many of the databases searched through are not well known outside their originating countries and are not easily accessible through typical commercial search engines.  In fact, a recent analysis indicated that results, when compared to Google and Google Scholar results, were unique approximately 96.5 % of the time.  Some examples of the wide range of information that a user might find on are:

  • From the CERN Document Server, full text experimental reports from the Large Hadron Collider project.
  • From KoreaMed, an article on the specific risks of stroke in the Korean population.
  • A PhD dissertation from the University of Queensland, available through ARROW, which assesses the potential contribution of renewable energy to the electricity supply in Australia.
  • An article from Nepal Journals Online which discusses the critical role of irrigation water for food production within that country.
  • From African Journals Online, a journal article discussing the impacts of human activities on the persistence of malaria.
  • Through NASA’s contributions to, information on manned space flights.
  • Technical reports from the INIS database on the disposal of high level radioactive wastes.
  • Journal articles on laser arrays from the Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China.
  • From the...

    Related Topics: cern, erff, google, nasa, (WWS)


Research Added to Federal R&D Project Summaries

Another opportunity for researchers and the public to be better informed about government research is afforded by OSTI's recent and major update to Federal R&D Project Summaries ( Three important project summary databases have been added to the portal, which currently provides access to more than 800,000 research projects complete with full-text single-query searching of databases residing at 9 different agencies and organizations. Now you can find research project summaries from the Department of Defense, NASA, and the Transportation Research Board at Federal R&D Project Summaries, which helps users find research projects across the federal government.

Updates to the site include: