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OSTIblog Articles in the erda Topic

15 Years of Featuring DOE R&D Accomplishments

by Mary Schorn 04 Apr, 2014 in


15 Years of Featuring DOE R&D Accomplishments

Fifteen years ago was the genesis of DOE R&D Accomplishments.  It was established with the purpose of featuring U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and predecessor agency past research accomplishments whose benefits are being realized now.  As the individual responsible for the growth and development of this Web product, the journey has been challenging, fun, exciting, and thought-provoking -- but never boring.

DOE R&D Accomplishments has over 100 feature pages with topics ranging from tiny atoms to the Big Bang and supernovae; from Archaea (the third branch of life) to RTGs (great to have if you’re a spacecraft), from a video game to a PET, from photosynthesis to superconductivity, and much much more.

Nobel Prizes in Chemistry, Physics and Medicine/Physiology are also recognized at DOE R&D Accomplishments.  There are feature pages for over 90 of them and the number continues to grow.  Each year in October, the question addressed is “Are any of the newly-announced Nobel Laureates associated with DOE or any of it predecessors?”  Sometimes finding the answer to this question is like searching for a needle in a haystack.  Other times, information is easily found.  However, it is interesting to explore and find pertinent facts and tidbits about each of these newly-announced Laureates.

The same process is followed for each and every...

Related Topics: DOE Research & Development (R&D) Accomplishments, erda


What's in the OSTI Legacy Collection?

by Tim Byrne 20 Mar, 2009 in Products and Content

The DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information legacy collection contains an estimated one million technical reports representing six decades of energy research that is, for the most part, unavailable in electronic format.  On average, OSTI receives close to two hundred requests each month to digitize specific reports, with the vast majority of the requests coming from DOE employees and contractors.  The legacy collection represents an enormous investment in research and development from the Atomic Energy Commission, Energy Research and Development Administration and Department of Energy.  With the growing tendency of many researchers to rely solely on research information available electronically, this incredibly valuable resource collection is often ignored.  By not having electronic access to previous research, scientific advancement may be diminished and funds wasted duplicating what has already been done. 


OSTI has recently implemented the Adopt-a-Doc program that allows the general public to pay for the digitization of a document of their choosing.  Documents in need of digitization can be identified by searching the Energy Citations Database and clicking on the Materials available for digitization box on the Fielded Search window.  This is proving to be a popular service.  Unfortunately, with the level of digitization that OSTI can currently handle, it will take a very long time to digitize the entire legacy collection.


The birth of the OSTI legacy collection really began with the declassification and distribution of reports from the Manhattan Project.  Following the end of World War II, our nation was inquisitive and interested in the government's hitherto top-secret program on...

Related Topics: Adopt-A-Doc, AEC, digitization, doe, Energy Citations Database (ECD), erda, legacy collection, Nobel Prize, osti