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OSTIblog Articles in the doe research Topic

DOE’s Scientific and Technical Information Program: A Winning Collaboration

by Judy Gilmore 26 Mar, 2014 in


DOE’s Scientific and Technical Information Program: A Winning Collaboration

Once again, dedicated representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) headquarters program offices, field offices, national laboratories and technology centers are convening along with OSTI staff for the DOE Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP) Annual Working Meeting. This year the STIP Annual Working Meeting will be held March 31-April 4 in Richland, Washington. The meeting will be hosted by DOE’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

The DOE STIP program is an OSTI-led collaboration of scientific and technical (STI) managers and technical information officers across the DOE complex responsible for identifying, collecting, preserving and making accessible the results of DOE-funded research and development (R&D). Their behind-the-scenes work and dedication increases the availability and transparency of various types of STI. This collaborative effort is a win-win situation for everyone involved. DOE researchers, information managers and the science and educational community all benefit big time. Last year the STIP community collectively submitted the results of 30,000 DOE-funded research and development projects, and the number of submissions is projected to double for 2014. These DOE-funded research results are incorporated into the ever-increasing scientific database content of SciTech Connect, DOE’s flagship STI product.

The focus of this year’s workshop is “Raising the Bar for DOE R&D Results,” with emphasis on increasing public access to DOE science research outcomes and preparing for future technologies and endeavors.


Judy Gilmore



Image credit:  PNL

Related Topics: DOE field offices, DOE program offices, doe research, national laboratories, Scientific and Technical Information Program Website, sti, STIP Annual Meeting


Basic Research and Innovation

by Dr. Jeffrey Salmon 24 Mar, 2014 in


Basic Research and Innovation

Recently, I attended a roundtable discussion hosted by the Hudson Institute in Washington, D.C. on the topic of innovation – how it comes about, what factors can impede it, where the U.S. might be headed as a lead innovator in the 21st Century, and what cultural and ethical issues need to be considered in a complete understanding of innovation.

As a science and technology agency, the Department of Energy (DOE) cares a great deal about questions surrounding innovation.  As an information management agency within DOE, the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) works to accelerate innovation through the sharing of knowledge.  We also love to point out where DOE has done just that.

The discussion at Hudson on innovation was rich and multi-layered.  But there were a set of key ideas and arguments that should be of particular interest to DOE and OSTI.

Organization and Innovation.  What kind of organization best drives innovation?  The answer is not completely clear.  Is innovation or rapid development of technology more likely to come about today through a large, multidisciplinary enterprise, such as our DOE national laboratories, i.e. “big science,” or through a nimble, relatively small market-shaped group of entrepreneurs?  But even this way of posing the question isn’t precise.  It could be that the requirements for basic research today call for big science, but that application of that research to technology development is more likely to flourish where customer feedback is immediate and the consequences of failure brutal.  Certainly, something like this latter point was strongly suggested in the think-tank conversation.  Still there are gradations of technology development, and understanding when something is poised for market deployment is very difficult.  

Innovation in Energy.  While the extraordinary economic impact of...

Related Topics: basic research, doe research, economic impact, Hudson Institute, innovation


Aspirations for Connecting Researchers in New Media

For several years I've been responsible for organizing OSTI staff to capitalize the benefits of web and mobile web innovations.  An important endeavor of mine aspires to help OSTI become a leader in connecting scientists in the second generation of the WorldWideWeb - Web 2.0.  Connecting scientists supports our director's vision of Global Science Discovery (More on this vision later.)  Web 2.0 has enabled new types of media that are capable of accomplishing his ideals for knowledge diffusion, increasing contact rates between scientists, and accelerating science.  After years of grassroots research I assembled OSTI's Web 2.0 Team to seed new Web innovation and exchange Web 2 accomplishments.   As we progress in the coming months, I hope to incite my Teammates and others to share more Web 2.0 accomplishments on the OSTIblog.

Outside of science, the Web already accelerates commerce, entertainment, social issues, and politics.  In theory, new Web 2 media spaces such as Twitter, LinkedIn, Youtube, Facebook, Google, Blogger, Wordpress, Flickr, Feedburner, etc. have useful features for attracting and connecting thousands of science work groups.  A key factor is that these new sites make services and content available on Web-enabled devices like cellphones, iPods, and eBooks.  This combination of hardware and web software can help researcher's core information needs and practices - finding and monitoring science information, directing staff, and circulating information with peers and officials. So, it's not a huge leap to see the possibilities of new media connecting...

Related Topics: doe research, federated search, new media, web 2.0