Accelerating Science Discovery - Join the Discussion

OSTIblog Articles in the communications Topic

The Successes of Government Science and Technology

Sorry due to allocation we can serve no more gasoline today

Theodore Roosevelt, in his famous speech “Citizenship In A Republic” starts by saying “it is not the critic who counts;” What makes the speech poignant is that all too often it is the critic who counts because we see time and time again the media pointing out “how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.”

Too often we only hear about failures and waste in government, yet the contributions and success of government-funded science and technology are ubiquitous and often under-reported.

Mission X

Anyone who is old enough remembers President Nixon making a phone call from the oval office to Neil Armstrong on the moon. At the time, it was an almost superhuman feat of engineering. Yet today no teenager would be amazed because today they can take a cell phone out of theirpocket and place a call to the international space station…if we only knew the number. In fact, school children routinely have video conferences with our astronauts as part of NASA’s policy. The NASA space program of the 1960s helped make modern communications possible. By helping to create the integrated circuits and by re-purposing the missile technology of the cold war to launch satellites, NASA engineers deserve special praise. They deserve to be in the Hall of Fame. In my mind they already are.

A topic also not receiving the fanfare it deserves was recently noted by Pete Domenici, senior fellow at the Bipartisan Policy...

Related Topics: Bureau of Mines, communications, hydraulic fracturing, nasa, nuclear weapons technology, Oil Shale


DOE research videos available on ScienceCinema


DOE research videos available on ScienceCinema

Scientific videos highlighting research and development (R&D) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are available on ScienceCinema. ScienceCinema uses innovative, state-of-the-art audio indexing and speech recognition technology to enable users to quickly find video files produced by the DOE national laboratories, other DOE research facilities and CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research). When users search for scientific words and phrases, precise snippets of the video where the search term was spoken are provided along with a timeline.

More than 2,500 videos are currently available in ScienceCinema, and the database will continue to grow as new R&D-related videos are produced by DOE programs, labs and facilities and submitted to OSTI. Scientific videos, animations, interactive visualizations and other multimedia are expected to become an increasingly prominent form of scientific communications. ScienceCinema was recently recognized as one of DOE’s six new initiatives in the DOE Open Government Plan 2.0 for making the federal government more transparent, participatory and collaborative. 

Related Topics: audio indexing, communications, open government plan, r&d, ScienceCinema, scientific, transparency, videos