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OSTIblog Articles in the climate change Topic

Climate Change Research 24/7

by Kathy Chambers 11 Apr, 2016 in

Image credit: ARM ProgramImage credit: ARM Program

One of the research programs managed by the Department of Energy (DOE) is the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, created in 1989 to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change.  ARM's Climate Research Facility, a DOE scientific user facility, provides the world's most comprehensive 24/7 observational capabilities to obtain atmospheric data specifically for climate change research. The ARM facility includes fixed, mobile, and aerial sites that gather continuous measurements used to study the effects and interactions of sunlight, radiant energy, clouds, and aerosols and their impacts on the global climate system.  The ARM program serves as a model and a knowledge base for climate change research endeavors across the globe.

ARM's facility sites are operated through a collaboration of nine DOE national laboratories, numerous government agencies, universities, and private domestic and international organizations.  ARM's primary fixed-site locations are selected for their broad range of climate conditions and importance for studying climate processes.  These highly instrumented sites include the Eastern North Atlantic, located on Graciosa Island in the Azores, ARM's newest fixed site.  This region is characterized by marine stratocumulus clouds that are being studied in global climate models.  The...

Related Topics: climate change, global


ACME - Perfecting Earth System Models

by Kathy Chambers 29 Oct, 2014 in

Earth system modeling as we know it and how it benefits climate change research is about to transform with the newly launched Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) project sponsored by the Earth System Modeling program within the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research.  ACME is an unprecedented collaboration among eight national laboratories, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, four academic institutions, and one private-sector company to develop and apply the most complete, leading-edge climate and earth system models to the most challenging and demanding climate-change issues.  They collectively represent a unique combination of scientific and engineering expertise as well as advanced computing and information technologies required to construct, maintain, and advance an earth system modeling capability that will help us better understand and address climate change.

The core of the ACME project is model development.  This element connects the scientific and energy mission needs with computing power provided by the DOE Office of Science.  The models created will be used to simulate changes in the hydrological cycle, with a specific focus on precipitation and surface water in orographically complex regions such as the western United States and the headwaters of the Amazon.  They will address biogeochemistry by examining how more complete treatments of nutrient cycles affect carbon-climate feedbacks, with a focus on tropical systems;...

Related Topics: Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy, ACME, Advanced Scientific Computing Research, ASCR, climate change, earth systems modeling, High-performance computing, HPC, In the OSTI Collections, Supercomputers


Carbon Sequestration – Helping to Save Our Beautiful World

by Kathy Chambers 17 Apr, 2014 in


Carbon Sequestration – Helping to Save Our Beautiful World

Warmer winters are changing bird migratory patterns, warmer seawater is linked to coral reef bleaching in the Florida Keys and Puerto Rico, and more extreme climate events are affecting society and ecosystems.  According to the Department of Energy (DOE), the increasing air and water temperatures, decreasing water availability across regions and seasons, increasing intensity and frequency of storm events, flooding and sea level rise have caused major issues to the energy sector over the past decade. Our world as we know it is evolving because of climate change. 

Beginning with the Industrial Revolution, our reliance on fossil fuels, expanded transportation, and deforestation have resulted in the accumulation of excess carbon dioxide or CO2 in our atmosphere. The present amount of CO2 is estimated to be 40% more than the pre-industrial amount. DOE estimates that human activity now emits an astounding 40,000 metric tons of CO2 into the atmosphere every minute. CO2 is the primary greenhouse gas that is contributing to our climate extremes and the world has taken notice. Carbon capture and permanent safe and secure storage (carbon sequestration) is underway around the world and is an important component of the global CO2 emission strategy to mitigate climate change and save our beautiful world. 

Many significant carbon sequestration research programs are progressing throughout DOE with federal, state, and private sector regional partnerships,...

Related Topics: carbon dioxide, carbon sequestration, climate change, greenhouse gases


ETDEWEB World Energy Base


ETDEWEB World Energy Base

Just in time for the summer heat, a refreshing new design of ETDEWEB World Energy Base!  New results screen and display options make your search experience cool.  (Registration may be required). See more records on your search results screen and don’t forget to use the new ‘…Show More’ to expand content.  Interested in full text?  Users may now limit their searches to show only records with full text available.

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ETDEWEB World Energy Base is constantly working to expand the content you know and love.  Come explore and search for information on energy R&D; energy policy and planning; basic sciences and materials research; the environmental impact of energy production and use, including climate change; energy conservation; nuclear; coal and fossil fuels; renewable energy technologies and much, much more. ETDE is always open to receiving your thoughts and suggestions.

Related Topics: climate change, coal, conservation, energy, ETDEWEB, fossil, fuels, nuclear, r&d