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OSTIblog Articles in the cern Topic

Watch More Science Videos – Now with Closed Captioning

Scientific videos just became even more plentiful and even more accessible through OSTI’s multimedia search tool ScienceCinema. Over a three-month period and with the help of a wonderful summer intern working alongside OSTI staff, we have added 560 new science videos to ScienceCinema from DOE Labs. Now, ScienceCinema contains over 3,200 videos highlighting exciting research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and CERN. Using innovative, state-of-the-art audio indexing and speech recognition technology, ScienceCinema allows users to quickly search videos, and identify the exact point in the video where the search terms were spoken.

In our continuing collaboration with Microsoft Research and its cloud services vendor GreenButton, ScienceCinema has just added a closed captioning option, which allows users to see the videos’ audio in textual format, for all videos added since July 2013. Users simply turn on the closed captioning feature while watching the individual video of interest. For an example, click here, then click on the video image.   When the video begins playing, click on the “CC” circle at the bottom of the video screen.  (Closed captioning is seamlessly supported with Internet Explorer 10 and Chrome.)  For ScienceCinema, this is a breakthrough in accessibility for hearing-impaired patrons.

Scientific videos, animation, interactive visualizations, and other multimedia are expected to become increasingly prominent forms of scientific communication. ScienceCinema will continue to grow rapidly as new R&D-related videos are produced by DOE...

Related Topics: audio indexing, cern, Closed Captioning, GreenButton, Microsoft Research, ScienceCinema, speech recognition


Exploring DOE Data Treasures


Exploring DOE Data Treasures

There are databases, and then there are treasure maps. The DOE Data Explorer (DDE) merges the two concepts into a product offering the best of both. DDE’s database provides the features needed for simple retrieval or advanced searching. The treasure map aspect comes from DDE’s content, which links you to collections of data and non-text information wherever those collections reside.

Instead of sailing the seven seas, you can browse DDE’s seven types of content. Choose “Browse by Content Type” from the drop down menu on the DDE homepage and hit the “Submit” button. Each one of the seven categories shown on the results page will open a list of every collection tagged in DDE with that particular type of content. Naturally, “Numeric Files/Datasets” is a content type with a huge “footprint.”  High-Energy Physics (HEP) data from experiments at DOE’s National Laboratories, Scientific User Facilities, CERN, and prestigious universities vie for the most visible presence on the treasure map with terabytes of climate and environmental data gathered around the globe and made available by DOE Data Centers such as the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the archive for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program.

Browse “Interactive Data Maps” to discover sophisticated, layered views of everything from nuclides to energy resource data (solar, wind, geothermal, etc.) to genetic details of plant and animal kingdoms, to carbon sinks, the ocean floor, and drought-stricken land.

If you want graphs and charts, diagrams, and data plots, the DOE Data Explorer can show you where “X” marks the spot.  Or, if you want a little more action from your treasure haul, check out the collections of computer models and resulting simulations, along with downloadable tools, codes, and sample data that will help you generate your...

Related Topics: cern, DOE Data Explorer (DDE), national laboratories


The Web and Science: the First Twenty Years


The Web and Science: the First Twenty Years

Twenty years ago this month, Tim Berners-Lee, ayoung scientist at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), worked on a better way to communicate and share research information stored on computers at the CERN facility. The result was a browser and editor that could enable information sharing through a common hypertext language. The result was the world’s very first website.  The project was started to allow high energy physicists to share data, news and documentation, and it quickly spread. Now, it touches nearly all aspects of our daily life.

The Web has radically changed how we access information, products, services and applications. Prior to the Web, we stored paper documents in file cabinets.  We went to libraries to look up information and went to bookstores to buy books. Twenty years ago, we got our news at 6 pm on network television or in the morning newspaper. Twenty years ago, if you wanted to buy an item, you drove to the store to purchase it.  The web has changed the world!

The Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the DOE office that collects, preserves and disseminates DOE-sponsored R&D results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.  OSTI has performed this service since the 1940s, but over the years it has evolved and pioneered techniques to make scientific information more readily available to a growing audience.  Today OSTI provides access to scientific and technical information using web-based searchable databases offering ever-expanding sources of R&D information to DOE, the research community and the science-attentive public. The number of information...

Related Topics: cern, customized alerts, r&d results


ScienceCinema Goes International


ScienceCinema Goes International

In February, I wrote to you about the launch of ScienceCinema, a multimedia search engine developed by OSTI, in partnership with Microsoft.

It continues to grow, and I am pleased to let you knowthat it is adding audio and video materials from CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research.  The inclusion of CERN materials is a milestone in the longstanding scientific collaboration between DOE and CERN and will increase public access to CERN scientific multimedia collections 

You can readabout the groundbreaking technology behind ScienceCinema and the new collaboration at theOSTI Press Releaseand on theDOE Blog. And be sure to try ScienceCinema and let us know what you think.

Brian Hitson, Associate Director

Administration and Information Services
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Related Topics: cern, DOE blog, ScienceCinema

Read more... The Importance of Being Unique

In a world replete with information sources and options, it is imperative to offer users something unique. (, a federated search product that currently provides a single point of access to 61 scientific databases and portals from more than 60 countries, is a remarkably unique scientific discovery tool.  Representing more than three-fourths of the world’s population, enables access to over 400 million pages of science from around the globe.  Many of the databases searched through are not well known outside their originating countries and are not easily accessible through typical commercial search engines.  In fact, a recent analysis indicated that results, when compared to Google and Google Scholar results, were unique approximately 96.5 % of the time.  Some examples of the wide range of information that a user might find on are:

  • From the CERN Document Server, full text experimental reports from the Large Hadron Collider project.
  • From KoreaMed, an article on the specific risks of stroke in the Korean population.
  • A PhD dissertation from the University of Queensland, available through ARROW, which assesses the potential contribution of renewable energy to the electricity supply in Australia.
  • An article from Nepal Journals Online which discusses the critical role of irrigation water for food production within that country.
  • From African Journals Online, a journal article discussing the impacts of human activities on the persistence of malaria.
  • Through NASA’s contributions to, information on manned space flights.
  • Technical reports from the INIS database on the disposal of high level radioactive wastes.
  • Journal articles on laser arrays from the Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China.
  • From the...

    Related Topics: cern, erff, google, nasa, (WWS)