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OSTIblog Articles in the Nobel Prize Topic

Congratulations to SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory on its Golden Anniversary


Congratulations to SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory on its Golden Anniversary

SLAC was established in1962 at Stanford University. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is a Department of Energy Office of Science national laboratory  and home to a two-mile linear accelerator—the longest in the world.  Originally a particle physics research center, SLAC is now a multipurpose laboratory for astrophysics, photon science, accelerator and particle physics research and home to some of the world’s most cutting-edge technologies used by researchers from around the world to uncover scientific mysteries on the smallest and the largest scales—from the workings of the atom to the mysteries of the cosmos.

SLAC is at the frontier of scientific discovery. With its range of diverse programs and facilities and exceptional researchers, SLAC is at the forefront of groundbreaking discoveries across the sciences, from astrophysics and accelerator research to chemistry, materials and energy science.

The lab’s core competencies are:

  • Electron-based accelerator research and technology
  • Advanced instrumentation, diagnostics and systems integration
  • Theory and innovative techniques for data analysis, modeling, and simulation in Photon Science, Particle Physics and Particle Astrophysics
  • Management of ultra-large data sets for users and collaborations distributed worldwide

Evidence of their success?  Nearly 3,400 scientists from around the world use SLAC’s facilities each year, 275 universities make use of the lab’s resources, 6 scientists have been awarded the Nobel Prize for work carried out at SLAC and over 1000...

Related Topics: Nobel Prize, slac, Stanford


Keep current – sign up now!


Keep current – sign up now!

We’ve made tracking a science topic in key DOE/OSTI resources easy with the Science Accelerator Alerts service.  It's as simple as first registering for Science Accelerator Alerts and then proceeding along one of the following channels:

1) conduct a search on your chosen topic/author and then select the 'Create an Alert' button on the search results page;

2) go directly to the Alerts Login page and register.

Either of these methods will take you to a page containing an 'Alert Profile' form. Complete the profile, select the frequency of your Alerts and save. You will then receive Alerts via email and also create a personal account.

The Science Accelerator was developed as a tool to advance discovery and to deliver science information. It empowers you to search, via a single query, important information resources of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) scientific and technical information. These resources contain the results of DOE research and development (R&D) projects and programs, major R&D accomplishments, and recent research of interest to DOE. They enable you to explore significant DOE discoveries, learn about DOE Nobel Prize Winners, access and search scientific e-prints, locate science conference papers and proceedings, and more.

So to broaden your knowledge base and accelerate your science, register for Science Accelerator Alerts today.

Related Topics: alerts, e-prints, Nobel Prize, research results, resources, science, Science Accelerator, scientific


Congratulations to Saul Perlmutter -- 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics DOE-Affiliated Researcher


Congratulations to Saul Perlmutter -- 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics DOE-Affiliated Researcher

"For the Discovery of the Accelerating Expansion of the Universe through Observations of Distant Supernovae"

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics to Saul Perlmutter, an astrophysicist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor of physics at the University of California at Berkeley.  Perlmutter heads the International Supernova Cosmology Project, which pioneered the methods used to discover the accelerating expansion of the universe.  Dr. Perlmutter has been a leader in studies to determine the nature of dark energy.

Perlmutter shares the prize with Brian Schmidt and Adam Riess, leader of the High-z Supernova Search Team and first author of that team’s analysis, respectively, which led to their almost simultaneous announcement of accelerating expansion, which implies the existence of so-called dark energy, a mysterious force that acts to oppose gravity and increase the distance among galaxies. The nature of dark energy is unknown and has been termed the most important problem facing 21st century physics.  It will continue to be studied by cosmologists, astrophysicists and particle physicists.

On learning of the award, Perlmutter said, “I am delighted, excited, and deeply honored. It’s wonderful that the Nobel Prize is being awarded for results which reflect humanity’s long quest to understand our world and how we got here. The ideas and discoveries that led to our ability to measure the expansion history of the universe have a truly international heritage, with key contributions from almost every continent and culture. And quite appropriately, our result – the acceleration of the...

Related Topics: Berkeley, dark energy, DOE Research & Development (R&D) Accomplishments, Nobel Prize, Perlmutter


80 Years of Excellence in Science


80 Years of Excellence in Science

Congratulations to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(Berkeley Lab) as they celebrated their 80th anniversary on August 26. 

Berkeley Lab is a member of the national laboratorysystem supported by the U.S. Department of Energythrough its Office of Science.  Berkeley Lab is an incubator for ideas, innovations and products that help society and explain how the universe works;  Their unclassified research portfolio includes renewable energy sources such as biofuels and artificial photosynthesis; energy efficiency at home, at work, and around the world; the ability to observe, probe, and assemble materials atom by atom; climate change research, environmental science and the growing connections between them; the chemistry and physics of matter and force in the universe — from the infinite to the infinitesimal; computational science and advanced networking to enable discovery and remote collaborations; and biological sciences for human health and energy research.

Berkeley Lab is highly respected for bringing science solutions to the world.  Lab employees have been recognized as leaders in their fields, including:

·         The Lab's scientific expertise has been recognized with 12 Nobel prizes

·         Fifty-seven Lab scientists are members of the National Academy of Sciences

·         Thirteen scientists have won the National Medal of Science

·         Eighteen of the laboratory’s engineers were elected to the National Academy of Engineering

·         Three of the Lab’s scientists were elected into the Institute of Medicine, and

·         Berkeley Lab has trained thousands of university science and engineering students who are advancing technological innovations across the nation and around the world

Berkeley Lab was founded in 1931...

Related Topics: Berkeley, Nobel Prize, Office of Science


A Unique Insight into DOE Research Accomplishments: A Special Collection

Unique and interesting insights into U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Research and Development (R&D) accomplishments are available in a special collection that features research of DOE and its predecessor agencies, the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC).

This special collection contains historically significant government documents that have been specially selected and digitized to make them accessible via the Web. Landmark documents such as The Eightfold Way: A Theory of Strong Interaction Symmetry and The First Weighing of Plutonium are among approximately 300 specially-selected documents included in the database. Additionally, documents are aggregated with related aspects of the collection into more than sixty (60) Feature Topic pages with diverse topics such as Video Games -- Did They Begin at Brookhaven? and Human Genome Research: Decoding DNA.

The collection features a large number of DOE-associated Nobel Laureates and showcases a diversity in DOE research areas, including Solar Energy (with related educational materials) and Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) that are used to power spacecraft.

Easy access to this unique collection is provided via...

Related Topics: doe, DOE Research & Development (R&D) Accomplishments, legacy collection, nobel laureates, Nobel Prize, research results, technical reports


What's in the OSTI Legacy Collection?

by Tim Byrne 20 Mar, 2009 in Products and Content

The DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information legacy collection contains an estimated one million technical reports representing six decades of energy research that is, for the most part, unavailable in electronic format.  On average, OSTI receives close to two hundred requests each month to digitize specific reports, with the vast majority of the requests coming from DOE employees and contractors.  The legacy collection represents an enormous investment in research and development from the Atomic Energy Commission, Energy Research and Development Administration and Department of Energy.  With the growing tendency of many researchers to rely solely on research information available electronically, this incredibly valuable resource collection is often ignored.  By not having electronic access to previous research, scientific advancement may be diminished and funds wasted duplicating what has already been done. 


OSTI has recently implemented the Adopt-a-Doc program that allows the general public to pay for the digitization of a document of their choosing.  Documents in need of digitization can be identified by searching the Energy Citations Database and clicking on the Materials available for digitization box on the Fielded Search window.  This is proving to be a popular service.  Unfortunately, with the level of digitization that OSTI can currently handle, it will take a very long time to digitize the entire legacy collection.


The birth of the OSTI legacy collection really began with the declassification and distribution of reports from the Manhattan Project.  Following the end of World War II, our nation was inquisitive and interested in the government's hitherto top-secret program on...

Related Topics: Adopt-A-Doc, AEC, digitization, doe, Energy Citations Database (ECD), erda, legacy collection, Nobel Prize, osti