Accelerating Science Discovery - Join the Discussion

Published by Lorrie Johnson
ScienceCinema

 

Looking for a good summer movie?  Over 600 new videos have been added to ScienceCinema recently.  Learn more about the Higgs Boson, and what it means for the universe, in “Unraveling the Higgs Boson Discovery”.  Or, watch “Breakthrough: Using Microbes to Make Advanced Biofuels” to learn how the Joint BioEnergy Institute is using microbes to convert non-food crops and agricultural waste into fuels for cars, trucks, and planes.  Interested in harnessing the sun’s power?  See how companies are improving the efficiency of solar cells in “Solar Innovator”.   Simply enter a search, and ScienceCinema’s advanced audio indexing technology and powerful search capabilities will identify videos containing the words, plus pointers to the exact spots in the videos where the words were spoken.  ScienceCinema adds new videos as they are produced and submitted by the DOE Laboratories, programs, and other facilities.  Over 3,200 videos are now available – take a break from the heat and enjoy a new film!

Published by Kathy Chambers

Alternate Text PlaceholderPerhaps the most beautiful and eerie displays of light in our sky are a phenomenon known as the auroras. This natural glow of light in the sky in high latitude regions usually displays ribbons of colors from a fluorescent green to brilliant purple to a vivid crimson somewhat like an unexpected beautiful sunrise or sunset.  Observers often call it the greatest show on Earth.

Auroras are triggered by geomagnetic storms when gusts of solar plasma wind strike the Earth’s magnetic field; charged particles rain down over the north and south magnetic poles, lighting up the atmosphere and causing the air to glow.

Published by Jannean Elliott

Alternate Text PlaceholderA database and its supporting website can get periodic makeovers and sometimes it can even undergo rebirth!  The DOE Data Explorer (DDE) has just emerged from a rebirth process, and we are proud to announce its transformation.  The first version of DDE was launched in 2008 with the mission of guiding users to collections of publicly available, DOE-sponsored data and other non-text information.

Published by Kathy Chambers
Norris Lake

If you look closely, you can find fossilized material on the banks of the Norris Lake shoreline in Anderson County, Tennessee when the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) lowers the water level.  If you are really lucky, you will find traces of sea creatures or beautiful flora or fauna impressions encased between the freshly exposed layers of rock. These are ancient treasures from our country’s rich geological history.

A paleogeography reconstruction of the Earth took place some 56 to 34 million years ago during the Eocene geologic period of time .  At the beginning of the Eocene, high temperatures and warm oceans created a hothouse world.  Continents drifted toward their present positions. As Australia split from the southern continent, a cold water channel developed between the two continents and a global cooling trend began.  In western North America, mountain building started and huge lakes formed.  Oil shale was formed by deposition of silt and organic debris on lake beds and on the ocean floor.

Published by Dr. Walt Warnick
Eleanor Frierson

 

Eleanor Frierson, who passed away in April 2013, was the grande dame of partnerships to improve public access to federal and international science information.  For 10 years, she helped spearhead U.S. interagency efforts to make federal science information more accessible to Americans, playing an absolutely crucial leadership role on the Science.gov Alliance.  She took Science.gov  all the way from a nascent concept through to its maturation.  Ms. Frierson also made similar contributions to the international science portal, WorldWideScience.org.

She had extensive and diversified experience in information service development and management and had great business acumen and network-building skills.  But Ms. Frierson was much more than a consummate professional; she also was a caring colleague who took great personal interest in her associates.    

Eleanor Frierson was that rare public servant who made a very special mark.  Her legacies continue on today as vital national and international resources. 

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