Accelerating Science Discovery - Join the Discussion

Published by Lorrie Johnson
WorldWideScience.org

 

WorldWideScience.org recently released a new mobile version (http://m.worldwidescience.org).  Scientists and researchers throughout DOE and the entire U.S. now have access to over 80 scientific and technical databases from preeminent libraries and information centers around the world, all via their “smart phones” or tablets. 

Operating in the same fashion as the computer-based version of WorldWideScience.org, the user simply enters a single query into the search box on the phone.  Using federated search technology, the query is distributed to each of the approximately 80 databases and the search results are combined and re-ranked according to relevance. 

Search results are streamlined for easier viewing on mobile devices, but the user can still connect to the full citation at the originating source database.  If full text is provided, users can view it on the phone/tablet, or they may choose to download it into e-reader software.  Users also have the option of emailing the full set of search results to themselves, or others, for later viewing. 

As “smart phone” and tablet usage continues to grow at a rapid pace, Mobile WorldWideScience.org makes finding important scientific and technical information as convenient and easy as possible! 

Published by Dr. Jeffrey Salmon

Everyone speaks well of the idea that the results of scientific research should be open for all to see, although there are obvious caveats to complete openness: Proprietary research, human subjects research, preliminary results, the pace and timing for releasing results, all come to mind.  But when it comes to research funded by the taxpayer, open science is almost a truism.  And again, while there are practical and principled reasons why complete openness is sometimes restricted, the readers of the OSTI blog will be familiar with the arguments for openness; the principle of reproducibility is a fundamental tenant of science, the possibility of accelerating the pace of discovery by making scientific results readily and easily accessible, these are just two critical pieces of the argument.  There is another reason for openness connected to both these points that was highlighted recently in Jonah Lehrer’s always interesting Head Case column in the Wall Street Journal (6/25/11).

Published by Kate Bannan
The Chamber

 

We are proud to note that OSTI was featured in the Tennessee Chamber of Commerce & Industry’ssummer issue of its newsletter, the Business Insider

The Chamber says that OSTI and our comprehensive services “…might be one of the most useful – and best kept secrets – in the federal government.”

The article describes OSTI’s mission and our principle that to advance science, research must be shared.  Science.gov and WorldWideScience.org are highlighted.

The Tennessee Chamber of Commerce & Industry is based in Nashville and is the state’s chamber of commerce and the state manufacturers' association.  Its membership represents more than 1,000 members across Tennessee from all facets of business and industry.  The newsletter is posted online, and is sent to business and industry leaders, as well as government officials across Tennessee.

OSTI thanks the Chamber for informing its members, and encourages them to use our comprehensive, state-of-the-art (and free!) tools for easy access and delivery of research results that are tailored to their needs.

Published by Sharon Jordan
STIP meeting

 

Many posts could be written about the rich history of the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), which dates back to 1945 when Colonel K. D. Nichols announced plans for a complete and authoritative scientific record of all research work performed by Manhattan District contractors.  However, I want to focus on a specific slice of that history, one that is going strong and is well represented across the DOE complex.  I’m referring to DOE’s Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP, www.osti.gov/stip).

Just a month ago, STIP representatives from across the DOE complex convened in Pleasanton, CA, to participate in the annual STIP Working Meeting.  This important present-day collaboration, which is coordinated by OSTI, stems from the 1948 establishment of the Technical Information Panel by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC).  In 1948, the country was just coming to terms with the wealth of scientific research resulting from the Manhattan Project. The formation of the Technical Information Panel was an important step forward for the agency and focused on establishing information policies, ascertaining information needs, recommending information dissemination methods, and serving as an important liaison between central and local organizations.

Published by Tim Byrne

Standing in line at the DMV, sitting in the waiting room at the doctor’s office, commuting to work on the bus or train, waiting for a meeting to start, whenever and wherever you get the urge to do a little energy-related research, you can do so now with your mobile phone via OSTI Mobile at m.osti.gov.