Newsletter for Office of Scientific and Technical Information

OSTI.gov Newsletter

DOE PAGES Features Enhancements for Users, Video for DOE-
Funded Authors

Department of Energy PAGES

As the Department of Energy (DOE) Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science (DOE PAGES) marks its third anniversary, the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is continuing its efforts to grow the number of scientific publications available via the discovery tool and to improve the user experience for DOE researchers.

Developed and maintained by OSTI, DOE PAGES is a web-based portal that makes scholarly scientific publications resulting from DOE research funding publicly accessible and searchable at no charge to readers.  The DOE public access repository offers free access to the best available full-text version of DOE-affiliated scholarly publications – either the peer-reviewed, accepted manuscript or the published article – after an administrative interval of 12 months.  Launched in August 2014, DOE PAGES now contains more than 40,000 accepted manuscripts and journal articles, including more than 34,000 that are publicly accessible in full text. 

DOE-funded authors at national laboratories and grantee and other research institutions play a key role in enabling public access to their publications.  To help get the word out to researchers funded by DOE at its national laboratories and research universities around the country, OSTI and the DOE Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recently teamed up to produce a video about DOE PAGES.  Entitled “A Video Message about DOE PAGES for DOE-funded Authors of Scientific Publications,” the infographic video provides an introduction to the DOE public access portal – and encourages DOE laboratory and grantee researchers to submit their accepted manuscripts to OSTI. 

A Video Message about DOE PAGES for DOE-funded Authors of Scientific Publications

DOE PAGES “was created to provide free public access to articles by DOE-funded researchers,” the video notes.  “To get their papers into DOE PAGES, all DOE-funded researchers are required to submit their accepted manuscripts to their lab’s publication system or directly to OSTI.  This is a great way for DOE to show the American public the important work that’s underway to solve some of the biggest science and technology challenges.” 

Meanwhile, OSTI has worked to improve the functionality of DOE PAGES in a number of ways.  Users now have the opportunity to sign up for a DOE PAGES account to save searches, export bibliographies, and create content alerts.  There are a number of additional features that may be activated by the DOE research community – anyone accessing DOE PAGES from a DOE national laboratory or DOE office IP address – as indicated during the account registration process.

DOE PAGES Create a New Account

 

For the DOE community, DOE PAGES displays a reference citation tree that enables users to explore a publication’s references and any articles citing the publication, through an agreement between DOE and Web of Science.  OSTI produced a tutorial that explains these features, DOE PAGES – Improved Reference Navigation for DOE Researchers.

Finally, DOE PAGES now offers an application programming interface (API) designed specifically for researchers and developers who want to obtain metadata programmatically.  The API is HTTP-based, so it provides a way for individuals to retrieve metadata more quickly (by writing a GET request for a resource) without using the front-end interface. 

Please check out the DOE PAGES video and enhancements.  OSTI will continue working to improve DOE PAGES, and, as always, we welcome feedback from users.  If you have any comments, questions or suggestions, please submit them to pagescomments@osti.gov.

OSTI Hosting Data ID Service Workshop on September 13-14

DOE Data ID Service

As reported in the last OSTI.gov Newsletter, OSTI will hold a two-day research data-focused workshop September 13-14, 2017, at OSTI in Oak Ridge, TN.  The goals of the workshop are to share information about the DOE Data ID Service and Interagency Data ID Service, gain a deeper understanding of researchers’ data needs, and determine how to better support those needs. 

We want to tackle evolving changes in the data world that may influence the growth and development of the products and services we provide.  We also want to discuss issues and challenges confronting data researchers.

We have posted a high-level workshop agenda with session descriptions.  Please check back regularly to find updated information and resources about the workshop.

If you are interested in attending OSTI’s Data ID Service Workshop, please RSVP by August 1, 2017 to DOEDataID@osti.gov.

2017 DOE STIP Working Meeting

2017 DOE STIP Working Meeting Attendees

2017 DOE STIP Working Meeting Attendees

The 2017 DOE Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP) Working Meeting was hosted by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and INL STI Manager Chris Kowalczyk May 1-4 in Idaho Falls, ID.  Led and coordinated by OSTI, the DOE STIP is a complex-wide collaboration that works to ensure the collection, preservation, and dissemination of DOE-funded research and development results.

The theme of this year’s meeting was “STIP 2017: Success Through Innovation and Partnership.”  Representatives from 15 of the 17 DOE national laboratories attended, along with representatives from DOE program, field, and site offices and facilities.  Topics included completing and connecting STI in the research landscape, updates on implementation of the DOE Public Access Plan, development of the new DOE CODE software dissemination model, intellectual property and software license issues, technology transitions and program support for lab commercialization, citation traversal and metrics linking in DOE PAGES, and updates on other STI formats (technical reports, conferences, and datasets).  Each of the STI representatives gave a report during the roundtable discussions, and STI managers from Sandia, Brookhaven, Oak Ridge, and Argonne gave detailed presentations on activities at their national laboratories.  Representatives from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory also presented updates on ORCID implementation.  

Search Tip: Search SciTech Connect by Author ORCID iD

SciTech Connect

SciTech Connect, the primary repository of DOE science, technology, and engineering research information, allows searching by ORCID iD.  Select Advanced Search, type the complete ORCID iD in the Creator/Author field, choose ORCID from the dropdown box underneath, and select Find.  Alternately, you can enter the ORCID iD in All Fields or in the basic search box on the homepage.  The results will be records associated with that author’s iD.  An ORCID iD icon will be displayed by the author name on the bibliographic information page.  Selecting that icon beside any author name will present options for you to locate more works by that author, search for that ORCID iD, or initiate a search at orcid.org for that iD.

Have you authored a report found in SciTech? Authorize SciTech to add it directly to your ORCID Works.  Learn more at www.osti.gov/scitech/orcid

ORCID is a not-for-profit organization working to connect and identify research and researchers and address problems of author ambiguity.  Through ORCID, an author can register and be assigned a unique identifier, presented in the form of a web address, linked to the author’s profile, that will remain valid and stable, regardless of the author’s changes in discipline, research project, organization, or position.

What Are MARC Records?

SciTech Connect Full-Text MARC Records


Since 2008, OSTI has offered librarians and the library community the opportunity to download records of DOE scientific and technical information in MARC format.  MARC, short for MAchine Readable Cataloging, is a standard format for bibliographic records, a universal translation of the information that allows any computer to read and interpret the record.  The MARC standard relies on field designations, file structure, and content encoding to present clear descriptions of each record.

SciTech Connect full-text MARC records include all the records from SciTech Connect that contain links to freely available full text, including textual material, multimedia files, and datasets.  Currently, the downloadable files comprise 540,000 DOE-sponsored STI records.  To date, 23 universities and five DOE national laboratories have downloaded parts or all of the SciTech Connect collection into their catalogs using the OSTI MARC Records System.

Adding these full-text MARC records is a valuable way to expand access to scientific information, aid in research and discovery, and encourage library usage.  If you are interested in more information about downloading SciTech Connect full-text MARC records, please view the MARC FAQ or send an email to MARCrecords@osti.gov.

WorldWideScience.org: A Global Science Gateway to Public Access Resources and
Research Data

WorldWideScience.org

WorldWideScience.org is a global science gateway that offers federated searching across over 100 scientific and technical databases from more than 70 countries.  The WorldWideScience Alliance, a strategic partnership of national and international libraries and data and information centers from around the world, provides the governance structure for WorldWideScience.org.  OSTI serves as the Operating Agent for the Alliance, whose members are committed to eliminating barriers associated with finding and sharing scientific and technical information, including public access resources and scientific research data. 

The federated search technology employed by WorldWideScience.org offers a user a number of distinct advantages, including the ability to perform a real-time, simultaneous search of multiple databases.  A user receives a consolidated, relevance-ranked results list incorporating information in textual, multimedia, and scientific data formats.  Multilingual translations are automatically performed in ten languages, which makes scholarly material, including scientific data, more accessible to a worldwide audience. 

WorldWideScience.org makes it possible to search data collections in a way that facilitates the discoverability of research data.  For example, unless a user is familiar with a particular data center or knows that specific datasets exist, it can be difficult to identify and locate scientific data, especially outside the researcher’s own discipline or specialty.  WorldWideScience.org enables a user to receive data results in a separate results tab; upon selecting a specific result, the user will be directed to the landing page at the originating source, which in turn makes the data accessible for viewing or downloading. 

WorldWideScience.org has also incorporated public access portals, from both U.S. federal science agencies and international partners, into its federated search capabilities.  Results are available via a separate “Public Access” tab, allowing the user to seamlessly link to free, open access journal articles and peer-reviewed accepted manuscripts.

The inclusion of research data collections and public access portals in WorldWideScience.org, as part of the broad public access movement among government research funders in many countries, further expands access to R&D results during the full research lifecycle and ultimately contributes to increased scientific collaboration and progress.  WorldWideScience.org significantly increases the visibility and usage of DOE R&D results.

Meet Josh Nelson

Josh Nelson

Josh Nelson

Josh Nelson began working at OSTI in 2010 as a technical project lead.  He subsequently contributed to the development of a number of OSTI core scientific and technical information dissemination products.  He has been involved in the development and application of many aspects of OSTI’s technical infrastructure, including the implementation of SciTech Connect and DOE PAGES.  He serves as Enterprise Architect for the OSTI Office of Access and Operations, working with applications and systems staff to continue to expand and refine OSTI’s data delivery capabilities.

Josh lives in Powell, TN, with his wife Angela and their three children.

Retiree Tribute: William McGill Vaden

Bill Vaden

Bill Vaden

Bill Vaden was associated with the technical information programs at DOE and its predecessor agencies for more than 40 years.  A member of “the Greatest Generation,” Bill served a three-and-a-half year tour of service in the U.S. Navy before returning to graduate from Tennessee Tech in 1947.  That same year, he began his federal service with the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Technical Information Division.  From 1951 to 1955, he was the Assistant Chief to a McGraw-Hill Book Company contract group organized initially in Oak Ridge to produce the National Nuclear Energy Series.  He subsequently returned to the AEC Technical Information Division and served as its Deputy Manager from 1965 until his retirement in 1985.

In 1968, Bill Vaden represented the United States as a delegate to the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, and helped design the International Nuclear Information System, or INIS, which became the principal indexing and announcement medium on nuclear science and technology for the United Nations.  He received the Meritorious Service Award from the Department of Energy in 1979, and he was presented with a Distinguished Career Service Award by DOE in 1984.

Bill is the author of The Oak Ridge Technical Information Center: A Trailblazer in Federal Documentation, which was published in November 1992.  It is an enlightening history of the organization now known as the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information from 1945 through 1977.

Bill and his wife Maxine continue to enjoy their retirement.  Bill reflects fondly on his time at OSTI and in support of the technical information program, and he is gratified to know that his book on the history of the organization still has value in today’s rapidly evolving landscape.

This retiree tribute is intended to help our OSTI community keep up with former colleagues and friends.  Look for additional tributes to OSTI retirees in upcoming issues.

In the OSTI Collections: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

Artist's impression of double rotation NMR
Image Credit:  U.S. Department of Energy

The nuclei of many atoms are magnets, with north and south magnetic poles like those of larger magnets.  Under given conditions, the orientation of a magnetic nucleus will oscillate back and forth at a particular natural frequency that depends on what type of nucleus it is and on the conditions it is subject to.  If the nucleus is exposed to a radio wave of the same frequency, its orientation will oscillate in resonance with the radio wave and alter the wave as a result.  Observing this effect on the radio waves provides information about the nucleus and its condition – a condition that may depend on its location within a sample of material and on what kinds of atoms are nearby in the sample.

This phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance, first reported in 1938, has been used since then to help determine compositions, structures, and chemical activities of materials, including those in the human body, so that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a common technique for examining the body’s interior.  New ways to use nuclear magnetic resonance to better understand materials’ atomic structures and behaviors continue to be explored.

DOE databases provide numerous free DOE research project reports and publications about nuclear magnetic resonance and its applications.  Read more in William  Watson's white paper, In the OSTI Collections: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

Check out In the OSTI Collections to see other featured topics, including Density Functional Theory, Isotope Separation, and Rare Earth Elements.

The Latest from OSTIblog

OSTIblog

OSTIblog features the technology, services, people, and policies that are crucial to OSTI’s role in increasing accessibility of DOE-sponsored research.  Here are some of the most recent OSTIblogs:

 

 

DOE Science Resources

 
SciTech Connect

Science, technology, and 
engineering research 
information from DOE 
www.osti.gov/scitech

DOE PAGES

Scholarly scientific
publications resulting from
DOE-funded research 
www.osti.gov/pages

DOE Data Explorer

Scientific research data
resulting from
DOE-funded research 
www.osti.gov/dataexplorer

ScienceCinema

Scientific videos featuring
leading-edge research from DOE 
www.osti.gov/sciencecinema

DOepatents

Patents resulting from
DOE-sponsored research 
www.osti.gov/doepatents

DOE R&D Accomplishments

Remarkable outcomes in science
resulting from past
DOE research and development 
www.osti.gov/accomplishments

Energy Science and Technology Software Center

DOE-sponsored scientific 
and technical software 
www.osti.gov/estsc

DOE CODE

Open source, social platform
for DOE scientific software
(under development)
 
www.osti.gov/doecode

 
SciTech Connect

Science, technology, and 
engineering research 
information from DOE
 
www.osti.gov/scitech

DOE PAGES

Scholarly scientific
publications resulting from
DOE-funded research 

www.osti.gov/pages

DOE Data Explorer

Scientific research data
resulting from
DOE-funded research 

www.osti.gov/dataexplorer

ScienceCinema

Scientific videos featuring
leading-edge research from DOE 

www.osti.gov/sciencecinema

DOepatents

Patents resulting from
DOE-sponsored research 

www.osti.gov/doepatents

DOE R&D Accomplishments

Remarkable outcomes in science
resulting from past
DOE research and development 

www.osti.gov/accomplishments

Energy Science and Technology Software Center

DOE-sponsored scientific 
and technical software 
www.osti.gov/estsc

 DOE CODE

Open source, social platform 
for DOE scientific software
(under development)
 
www.osti.gov/doecode

 

OSTI Mission: To advance science and sustain technological creativity by making R&D findings available
and useful to Department of Energy (DOE) researchers and the public.

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