Newsletter for Office of Scientific and Technical Information

OSTI.gov Newsletter

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OSTI is the DOE office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored R&D results, both through OSTI search tools and through other other commonly used search engines.  We hope this newsletter broadens public awareness of the scientific and technical information we provide and how best to use our products and services.

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DOE PAGES Adds Citation Metrics

Department of Energy PAGES

The Department of Energy (DOE) Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science (DOE PAGES), developed and maintained by the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), provides free public access to scholarly scientific publications resulting from DOE research funding.  This access generally occurs within 12 months of publication. 

OSTI recently added citation metrics on DOE PAGES search results and article metadata pages.  Through an agreement with Clarivate Analytics, DOE PAGES uses Web of Science citation data to provide authors and readers with information about how many times an article has been cited by other works, a measure of the article’s scholarly impact.  (For more information about this new publicly-accessible feature, please see the Search Tip below.)  Separately, through the agreement, DOE PAGES will display additional features and citation metrics for users with national lab and DOE IP addresses.  These enhancements are part of an ongoing effort to better serve the needs of DOE-funded scientists and the public. 

OSTI also recently compiled and posted a completely new and more extensive set of DOE PAGES FAQs.  The revamped FAQs provide answers to questions about public access, general information about DOE PAGES and its content, and advanced search help (such as what bibliographic data and metadata is searchable in DOE PAGES).  There is additional information for authors, including a flowchart outlining the process for submitting accepted manuscripts.    

When DOE PAGES was launched nearly three years ago, it contained an initial collection of accepted manuscripts and journal articles as a demonstration of its functionality and eventual expanded content.  Thanks to the support of DOE-funded authors at national laboratories and grantee institutions, the ongoing assistance of DOE program managers and the DOE Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP) community, and innovative collaboration with the publishing community, the portal now contains more than 36,000 accepted manuscripts and journal articles, including almost 30,000 that are publicly accessible in full text. 

OSTI continuously strives to improve its discovery tools, so as always, we invite and welcome feedback from DOE PAGES users.  Please submit comments and suggestions for enhancements to pagescomments@osti.gov.

 

70 years osti.gov Advancing Scientific Knowledge Since 1947

Celebrating 70 Years of Scientific and Technical Information

Ever since it was established in 1947, OSTI has been committed to ensuring citizens have appropriate access to their government’s research results.  (For a quick tour of OSTI's past, present, and future, please see OSTI – A Young 70.)

To celebrate 70 years of advancing scientific knowledge, OSTI is featuring some of the leading scientists and works particularly relevant to the formation of DOE, OSTI, and their predecessor organizations and is highlighting Nobel Laureates and other important research figures in DOE’s history.  Please check out Leading Scientists in the DOE OSTI Collections.

Search Tip: Citation Metrics in DOE PAGES

DOE PAGES is one of the first federal agency public access portals to offer citation metrics for journal articles.  Users of DOE PAGES can now see how many times an article has been cited by other research – and sort their results to show the most highly cited articles first.  These citation counts, provided by the Clarivate Analytics Web of Science research platform, can be seen on the results pages and with the bibliographic metadata for each record.  “Sort by Most Cited” is an option in the sort dropdown on the results pages. 

Citation metrics form the basis for many advanced analyses of scholarly literature and, with other aspects of the article such as scientific discipline, type, and journal influence, can provide useful intelligence about impact.  These numbers are available to all users and are a helpful addition for anyone interested in citation numbers for individual articles. 

Citation Metrics in DOE PAGES

OSTI to Host DOE Data ID Service Workshop on September 13-14

OSTI will host a two-day DOE Data ID Service Workshop at its Oak Ridge, TN headquarters on September 13-14 to share information about its data registration service and gain a deeper understanding of researchers’ data-related challenges, concerns, and needs and how to help address them.

DOE Data ID Service

Recognizing the increasingly integral role of scientific research data in the modern science environment, OSTI offers a data search tool and a service for registering datasets with digital object identifiers (DOIs).  Through the DOE Data ID Service, OSTI assigns DOIs to datasets submitted by DOE and its contractor and grantee researchers and registers the DOIs with DataCite, an international organization that supports data visibility, ease of data citation in scholarly publications, data preservation and future re-use, and data access and retrievability.  DOIs can be used to search for datasets on a number of OSTI’s DOE scientific and technical information (STI) dissemination products, including SciTech Connect, the principal repository of DOE science, technology, and engineering research information, and DOE Data Explorer, a search tool that provides access to publicly available DOE scientific research data collections and helps researchers retrieve individual datasets submitted by data centers, repositories, and other organizations within the Department.

OSTI provides the DOE Data ID Service to DOE-affiliated researchers at no charge.  In addition, as a member of DataCite, OSTI can assign DOIs to other federal agencies’ datasets on a cost-reimbursable basis.

DOE Data Explorer

The DOE Data ID Service is a useful tool for increasing access to digital data, as the DOE Public Access Plan noted:  “The Department’s Office of Scientific and Technical Information can provide digital object identifiers to datasets resulting from DOE-funded research.  To improve the discoverability of and attribution for datasets created and used in the course of the research, DOE encourages the citation and identification of datasets with persistent identifiers such as DOIs.”  

OSTI convened its first DOE Data ID Service workshop at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in April 2016.  OSTI is holding this second workshop to continue its collaboration with current and potential data clients in support of their data research and management needs.  The September workshop will explore common issues, success stories, and researchers’ data needs that will help inform and improve OSTI services and products.  Planned sessions include Data in Today’s Science, Data Publishing, Discovering Data, Defining Data Types, Software as Data, Obtaining Data Digital Object Identifiers via the DOE Data ID Service, and an Update on DataCite. 

OSTI is sending information about the upcoming workshop to DOE Scientific and Technical Information Program managers, current and prospective DOE Data ID Service clients, members of digital data working groups across DOE program offices, interagency Data ID Service clients and prospects, and other key contacts.  Individuals and groups interested in attending the workshop are encouraged to email DOEDataID@osti.gov for further information.

Science.gov Provides Cost-Effective Search of Distributed Federal Public Access Portals

Science.gov

Science.gov has a new, easier to navigate homepage, and the gateway to U.S. government science information now prominently presents links to information about federal science agencies’ public access programs.

Science.gov offers free access to R&D results and scientific and technical information from scientific organizations across 15 federal agencies.  Through federated search, the portal makes it possible for users to search over 60 databases, over 2,200 websites, and over 200 million pages of authoritative federal science information in many formats, including full-text documents, citations, scientific data supporting federally funded research, and multimedia.

Since its inception, Science.gov has been a model of voluntary interagency collaboration.  Launched in 2002, the gateway is a pioneering initiative by U.S. science agencies to improve access to the nation’s scientific research information.  Users do not need to know ahead of time which agency has funded or produced the information that they are looking for.  The information is free.  No registration is required.

Science.gov now also provides seamless search of and access to agencies’ new public access websites and databases.  The newly re-designed Science.gov homepage features links to U.S. Federal Agencies’ Public Access Plans and information for federally funded scientists on How to Submit Research Papers to Funding Agencies.  Science.gov also provides a single search of multiple agencies’ collections of free journal articles, peer-reviewed accepted manuscripts, and other reports of research results.  Soon, Science.gov will provide a directory of agencies’ application programming interfaces (APIs) for these collections to facilitate machine-driven dissemination and discovery.  Through these efforts, Science.gov is virtually aggregating multiple agency collections in a single search at an extremely low cost.

Science.gov is governed by the interagency Science.gov Alliance, which includes representatives from scientific and technical information organizations from the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, and Transportation; and the Environmental Protection Agency, the Government Publishing Office, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the National Science Foundation.

Science.gov is supported by CENDI, an interagency working group of senior scientific and technical information managers.  The website was developed and is maintained by DOE OSTI.

Meet Lance Vowell

Lance Vowell

Lance Vowell

Lance Vowell has been at OSTI since 2005, when he was hired as a Project Coordinator by contractor Information International Associates.  In 2009, he took over the role of Contract Manager and then in August 2012 was hired by OSTI as an Information Security Specialist.  Lance currently serves as a Project Director in the OSTI Office of Access and Operations, leading OSTI's application development and maintenance activities.  In this role, Lance has worked on many major projects, including the development of SciTech Connect, DOE PAGES, and DOE CODE.  He also serves as an advisor to the CHORUS (Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States) Technical Working Group.

Lance resides in Oliver Springs, TN with his wife Lori and their two children.

Retiree Tribute: Juanita Davis Braswell

Juanita Davis Braswell

Juanita Davis Braswell

Juanita Davis Braswell began her 36-year career at the Technical Information Center (TIC), as OSTI formerly was known, during the 1950s, when the Atomic Energy Commission was expanding the distribution of atomic energy literature in the U.S. and around the world.  Juanita saw the TIC move to OSTI’s current location, broaden its technical information program beyond nuclear energy to include all forms of energy, and support the nation’s science education endeavor. 

Juanita worked as a library assistant in the descriptive cataloging section, where she evaluated and classified incoming reports in preparation for distribution to the science community.  As computers and databases became available to store and exchange information, the distribution of technical reports, printed materials, microfiche, motion picture films, and educational materials increased rapidly each year.  Juanita assisted with these expanding program activities over four decades — and took a four-year break from 1964 to 1967 to raise her two daughters. 

After Juanita retired from OSTI in 1994, she began a new career working for the Knoxville Heart Group, where she prepared physician insurance credentials for the staff of physicians.  She retired from there after 11 years. 

During retirement, Juanita has served as president of her Knoxville neighborhood’s Dean Hill Alliance, representing her community in various municipal forums and projects.  Today, Juanita’s first priority continues to be her husband, children, and extended family.  In looking back at her federal career, Juanita says her fondest memories are of her coworkers, and she values the lifetime friendships she made with them while at OSTI.   

This retiree tribute is intended to help our OSTI community keep up with former colleagues and friends.  Look for additional tributes to OSTI retirees in upcoming issues.

In the OSTI Collections: Rare Earth Elements

Europium, a rare earth element

Europium, a rare earth element
Image credit: Ames Laboratory

The rare earths are a set of 17 elements in the periodic table comprised of scandium, yttrium, and the lanthanides.  Refined rare earths are critical materials in a broad variety of applications, including permanent magnets, rechargeable batteries, smart phones, computers, televisions, advanced lighting, clean energy, advanced transportation, health care, advanced optics, environmental mitigation, national defense, precision weapons systems, lasers, and more. 

Rare earths occur naturally as mixtures of ore but must be purified prior to use.  Because mining and separation of the rare earth ore is challenging, DOE researchers are working to develop new recycling and recovery methods and to find substitutes for rare earths. 

DOE databases provide numerous free DOE research project reports and publications about rare earths and their applications.  Read more in William Watson's white paper, In the OSTI Collections: Rare Earth Elements.

Check out In the OSTI Collections to see other featured topics, including Deep Learning, Memristors, and Infrasound and Ultrasound.

The Latest from OSTIblog

OSTIblog

OSTIblog features the technology, services, people, and policies that are crucial to OSTI’s role in increasing accessibility of DOE-sponsored research.  Here are some of the most recent OSTIblogs:

 

 

DOE Science Resources

 
Scitech Connect

Science, technology, and 
engineering research 
information from DOE 
www.osti.gov/scitech

DOE PAGES

Scholarly scientific
publications resulting from
DOE-funded research 
www.osti.gov/pages

DOE Data Explorer

Scientific research data
resulting from
DOE-funded research 
www.osti.gov/dataexplorer

ScienceCinema

Scientific videos featuring
leading-edge research from DOE 
www.osti.gov/sciencecinema

DOepatents

Patents resulting from
DOE-sponsored research 
www.osti.gov/doepatents

DOE R&D Accomplishments

Remarkable outcomes in science
resulting from past
DOE research and development 
www.osti.gov/accomplishments

Energy Science & Technology Software Center

DOE-sponsored scientific 
and technical software 
www.osti.gov/estsc

DOE CODE

Open source, social platform
for DOE scientific software
(under development)
 
www.osti.gov/doecode

 

SciTech Connect

Science, technology, and 
engineering research 
information from DOE
 
www.osti.gov/scitech

DOE PAGES

Scholarly scientific
publications resulting from
DOE-funded research 

www.osti.gov/pages

DOE Data Explorer 

Scientific research data
resulting from
DOE-funded research 

www.osti.gov/dataexplorer

 ScienceCinema

Scientific videos featuring
leading-edge research from DOE 

www.osti.gov/sciencecinema

DOepatents 

Patents resulting from
DOE-sponsored research 

www.osti.gov/doepatents

 DOE R&D Accomplishments

Remarkable outcomes in science
resulting from past
DOE research and development 

www.osti.gov/accomplishments

 Energy Science & Technology Software Center

DOE-sponsored scientific 
and technical software 
www.osti.gov/estsc

DOE CODE

Open source, social platform 
for DOE scientific software
(under development)
 
www.osti.gov/doecode

 

OSTI Mission: To advance science and sustain technological creativity by making R&D findings available
and useful to Department of Energy (DOE) researchers and the public.

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