Newsletter for Office of Scientific and Technical Information

New OSTI Tool Facilitates Submission of Accepted Manuscripts

doe pages

Over the past year, the Department of Energy (DOE) has taken a series of historic steps to make scholarly scientific publications resulting from DOE research funding publicly accessible and searchable at no charge to readers.  In July 2014, the DOE Public Access Plan was issued, and that August, the Department launched the DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy and ScienceBeta (DOE PAGESBeta).  These milestones were in response to a February 2013 directive by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP).  When fully operational, DOE PAGESBeta will offer free access to the best available full-text version of DOE-affiliated scholarly publications – either the accepted manuscript or the published article – after an administrative interval of 12 months.  DOE PAGESBeta was developed and is maintained for DOE by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Under the DOE Public Access Plan, DOE-funded lab-affiliated authors are expected to submit metadata and links to accepted manuscripts in their lab repositories (or the full texts of the manuscripts themselves) to OSTI from October 1, 2014, onward.  For DOE financial assistance recipients (grantees) at universities and other institutions, the public access requirement likewise applies to any award made or renewed after October 1, 2014.  Leveraging the Department’s long-standing program for managing R&D results emanating from DOE labs, facilities, programs, and awards, the DOE Public Access Plan establishes a process under the DOE Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP) whereby accepted manuscripts of peer-reviewed journal articles will be collected and submitted via the corporate DOE E-Link system for dissemination on DOE PAGESBeta.

Submitting accepted manuscripts of peer-reviewed journal articles has become much easier with the help of a new tool that OSTI has developed.  This new interactive form guides users through a simplified process; it provides hover-over instructions, allowing users to access help information without leaving a particular screen, or risking the loss of work.  Uncertain of what a digital object identifier (DOI) is, or whether your version of an article is an accepted manuscript?  Place your mouse pointer over the corresponding question marks to get immediate answers.

This smart form changes to accommodate different users.  Selecting “Non-Grantee” prompts you to select your associated research organization or site to continue.  “Grantees” move on to the next screen.  On a subsequent screen, users have the option of adding a DOI; including a DOI reduces your time and effort, since it auto-populates a majority of the required metadata.  A DOI often fills in the title, journal name, volume and issue, serial identifier, page range, publication date, authors, and sponsoring DOE program office, leaving only a few steps to completion.  This form also accommodates Open Researcher and Contributor IDs (ORCID IDs), a type of unique identifier for authors assigned by ORCID, an international, interdisciplinary, nonprofit organization that provides a registry of persistent identifiers for authors.  These identifiers support the disambiguation of scientific and academic authors, and help provide long-term access to their research. Other key pieces of metadata are added throughout the process, with required fields noted, and clear navigation is provided to next and previous sections.

DOE Policy for Digital Research Data Management Released

The Department of Energy recently released the DOE Policy for Digital Research Data Management, which requires that research activities sponsored by the Department have an associated Data Management Plan (DMP) that describes whether and how the digital research data generated by DOE-sponsored research will be shared and preserved.  The policy FAQs encourage DOE researchers to use an OSTI resource to help increase access to their digital data. 

The new DOE policy was developed in response to the February 2013 OSTP memorandum, “Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research,” which directed agencies that spend more than $100 million a year on research and development to develop plans for increasing public access to peer-reviewed scientific publications and digital data resulting from federally funded research investments.  The DOE Public Access Plan that the Department subsequently issued in July 2014 detailed principles and requirements for the management of digital research data and provided that a data management policy to implement them would be forthcoming.

Under the new DOE Policy for Digital Research Data Management, beginning October 1, 2015, each DOE sponsoring research office must include the requirements for DMPs in all solicitations and invitations for research funding, with details about how and when a DMP should be submitted.  Some DOE sponsoring research offices have already begun requiring DMPs as part of research proposals.  For guidance and requirement information, refer to specific solicitations and the guidance provided by the DOE sponsoring office.

doe data id service

In FAQs accompanying the policy, guidance on citing data products is offered to DOE researchers:  “To facilitate the citation of data products, the DOE encourages the use of persistent identifiers such as Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs).  DOIs facilitate the accurate linking between publications and data products.  In most cases, the DOE can provide DOIs free of charge for datasets resulting from DOE-funded research through its Office of Scientific and Technical Information DOE Data ID Service.” 

Through this service, OSTI assigns DOIs to datasets submitted by DOE and its contractor and grantee researchers and registers the DOIs with DataCite, an international organization that supports data visibility, to aid in citation, discovery, and retrieval.  OSTI provides this free registration service to enhance DOE’s management of datasets.

Search Tip: Datasets vs. Data Collections in DOE Data Explorer

doe data explorer

The DOE Data Explorer (DDE) was launched in 2008 as a way to guide users to collections of publicly available DOE-sponsored data.  In 2011, OSTI also began to announce individual datasets and register them for DOIs through its partnership with DataCite.  These two distinct types of resources, data collections and datasets, are both searchable at DDE. 

Data collections contain many forms and formats and reach across all of DOE's science disciplines.  Datasets are similar, but have distinct boundaries determined by the creators, ensuring that assigned DOIs reflect appropriate levels of granularity.  Both types of resources may contain multiple items; data collections are obviously inclusive of datasets, but only individual datasets have DOIs.  A DOI for a dataset allows it to be more easily searched and discoverable within a search engine such as DDE and provides a permanent “landing page” for the dataset, from which the patron can then begin to access or navigate the dataset.  Within both types – data collections and datasets – there are further categorizations including animations, figures, genetics data, multimedia, and data maps.

On the DDE Advanced Search screen, a “Limit to” picklist lets you select datasets or data collections, with a separate list that allows refinement by additional categories.  Many of the data collections function as “umbrella” records, housing datasets that also have individual records in DDE.  You can search using various other fields, including host website, sponsoring organization, and publication date.  Citation screens for each record clearly indicate the resource type (dataset or data collection) and the data type, and provide links to host websites where the datasets, or collections, can be viewed.

WorldWideScience.org: A Global Role in Aggregating Public Access to Research Data and Scholarly Publications

worldwidescience org

WorldWideScience.org is a global search portal offering users the ability to simultaneously search, in real-time, over 100 scientific and technical information databases from more than 70 countries.  Relevance-ranked search results incorporate information in textual, multimedia, and scientific data formats, and multilingual translation capabilities are available for ten languages.  The WorldWideScience Alliance, a strategic partnership formed in 2008 and comprised of national and international science agencies, libraries, and information centers, provides the governance structure for WorldWideScience.org.  WorldWideScience.org was developed and is maintained by OSTI, on behalf of the WorldWideScience Alliance.

As the public access movement continues to expand within the United States and other countries, the WorldWideScience Alliance envisions an important new role for WorldWideScience.org.  Namely, it will be possible to offer aggregated, federated searching of public access resources and portals, allowing users to perform one-stop searching of publicly funded research output from around the world.  Although it is still in beta version, the Department of Energy’s PAGESBeta has already been added to WorldWideScience.org.  Once DOE PAGESBeta reaches full maturity, it is expected to grow by 20,000-30,000 articles and accepted manuscripts per year.  Plans are underway to incorporate additional public access portals from other U.S. federal agencies, as well as from other Alliance members and international partners.  These new resources will offer access to both digital research data and scholarly publications, supporting scientific collaboration and information exchange between DOE researchers and international colleagues.

OSTI Product Flyers and Posters Available Online

flyers and posters

The Office of Scientific and Technical Information has updated and created new digital and print materials about the scientific and technical information (STI) resources it makes freely and publicly available.

The revised flyers are about OSTI and the complete OSTI Catalogue of Collections.  The fact cards and sheets provide information about OSTI’s DOE STI products and services, including SciTech Connect, DOE PAGESBeta, DOE Data Explorer, DOE Data ID Service, ScienceCinema, DOepatents, DOE R&D Accomplishments and the National Library of EnergyBeta.  In addition, there are flyers about U.S. federal science information available on Science.gov and global science information offered on WorldWideScience.org and WorldWideEnergy.org. 

OSTI also has created new posters about several of its STI products and services. The materials highlight key features of OSTI’s products, point out particular search and customization options, describe content, and provide contact information.

Designed for use by researchers, academics, teachers, students, and the science attentive public, the flyers and posters are intended to help increase awareness of and access to the DOE and other R&D results that OSTI collects, preserves, and disseminates.  Files may be downloaded and printed directly from the flyers and posters pages on the OSTI website.

Meet DC Liaison Joanna Martin

Joanna Martin

Joanna Martin
OSTI DC Liaison

Joanna Martin joined OSTI in 2007 as an IT specialist helping to support and manage OSTI projects in its Washington, DC-area office, working closely with the DOE Office of Science IT operations team.  She managed and helped to develop the Office of Science Searchable Field Work Proposal project.  Following that, she transitioned to the OSTI program integration office, supporting various projects within that team and analyzing program information for OSTI products.  Since then, Martin has worked on public access implementation, particularly establishing and socializing requirements for grantees to submit their final peer-reviewed manuscripts to OSTI.  She serves on CENDI, the interagency group of federal scientific and technical information managers, and co-manages Science.gov, the gateway to federal agency science information that is hosted by OSTI.  In addition, Martin supports the OSTI Director on various DC-based STI activities.

Martin has a Bachelor’s degree in Sociology from American University and a Master’s degree in Policy, Planning, and Administration from Catholic University of America.  She has a son, Davis, and resides in the Washington, DC suburbs.

Retiree Tribute: Jack and Mary Ridenour

Jack and Mary Ridenour

Jack and Mary Ridenour

Jack Ridenour wore many hats during his OSTI career.  He began work in 1955 at the “Castle on the Hill,” where unclassified scientific and technical information related to atomic energy was first printed.  Jack then worked in warehouse report distribution and the declassification change notice program.  Jack went on to work in OSTI’s descriptive cataloging operations, where he was a group leader until his retirement in 1986. 

But Jack wasn’t someone to quit working.  For the next 10 years, OSTI was lucky to have an on-site snack shop hosted by Jack and his wife Mary.  They kept us well fed – and brightened our workdays with their laughter and smiles.

Since they closed their snack shop in 1995, Jack and Mary have enjoyed a picture-book retirement.  They keep up with their two children and three grandchildren, do yard work, grow flowers, and garden.  Both are artistic – Jack paints, Mary draws – and they fix food for their church, travel, read, and stay in touch with old friends on Facebook.  They have just moved into a lovely new home in Powell, TN, and are excited about new vegetable gardens, landscaping, and decorating. 

This retiree tribute is intended to help our OSTI community keep up with former colleagues and friends.  Look for additional tributes to OSTI retirees in upcoming issues. 

Alternate Text PlaceholderJack Ridenour wore many hats during his OSTI career.  He began work in 1955 at the “Castle on the Hill,” where unclassified scientific and technical information related to atomic energy was first printed.  Jack then worked in warehouse report distribution and the declassification change notice program.  Jack went on to work in OSTI’s descriptive cataloging operations, where he was a group leader until his retirement in 1986. 

But Jack wasn’t someone to quit working.  For the next 10 years, OSTI was lucky to have an on-site snack shop hosted by Jack and his wife Mary.  They kept us well fed – and brightened our workdays with their laughter and smiles.

Since they closed their snack shop in 1995, Jack and Mary have enjoyed a picture-book retirement.  They keep up with their two children and three grandchildren, do yard work, grow flowers, and garden.  Both are artistic – Jack paints, Mary draws – and they fix food for their church, travel, read, and stay in touch with old friends on Facebook.  They have just moved into a lovely new home in Powell, TN, and are excited about new vegetable gardens, landscaping, and decorating. 

This retiree tribute is intended to help our OSTI community keep up with former colleagues and friends.  Look for additional tributes to OSTI retirees in upcoming issues. 

In the OSTI Collections: Quantum Chaos

Quantum Chaos

Quantum chaos, a branch of physics that attempts to understand the connection between the two phenomena, is opening up a new world of research opportunity.  Researchers are taking the conditions that cause chaotic behavior in everyday objects and are studying them on the atomic level.  Quantum chaos is being used as a launching point to create new models in the exotic, quantum world to further understand the familiar, classical models of physics.  Applications are anticipated in energy capture, batteries and energy storage, electronic transistors, and more.  Read more about quantum chaos theory in William Watson’s latest white paper In the OSTI Collections: Quantum Chaos.

Check out the In the OSTI Collections to see other featured topics, including Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS), Lithium-Ion Batteries, Ultrafast Processes, Mesoscale Science, and Supernovae.

The Latest from OSTIblog

OSTIblog

OSTIblog features the technology, services, people, and policies that are crucial to OSTI’s role in increasing accessibility of DOE-sponsored research.  Here are some of the most recent OSTIblogs:

 

 

DOE Science Resources 

 
scitech connect

DOE-sponsored 
research and other 
energy-related STI
www.osti.gov/scitech

doe pages

DOE-funded accepted
manuscripts/articles
www.osti.gov/pages

doe data explorer

Data from 
DOE-funded research
www.osti.gov/dataexplorer

sciencecinema

DOE research videos
www.osti.gov/sciencecinema

doe-patents

DOE-sponsored patents
www.osti.gov/doepatents

accomplishments

DOE Nobel Prize winners 
and more
www.osti.gov/accomplishments

estsc

DOE-sponsored scientific 
and technical software
www.osti.gov/estsc

e-print network

E-prints in basic and
applied sciences
www.osti.gov/eprints

nle beta

Science resources and other 
information from across the 
DOE complex
www.osti.gov/nle

SciTech ConnectSciTech Connect

Science, technology, and
engineering research
information from DOE

www.osti.gov/scitech

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Scholarly scientific
publications resulting from
DOE-funded research

www.osti.gov/pages

DOE Data ExplorerDOE Data Explorer 

Scientific research data
resulting from
DOE-funded research

www.osti.gov/dataexplorer

 ScienceCinemaScienceCinema

Scientific videos featuring
leading-edge research from DOE

www.osti.gov/sciencecinema

DOepatentsDOepatents 

Patents resulting from
DOE-sponsored research

www.osti.gov/doepatents

 DOE R&D AccomplishmentsDOE R&D Accomplishments

Remarkable outcomes in science
resulting from past
DOE research and development

www.osti.gov/accomplishments

 Energy Science & Technology Software CenterEnergy Science & Technology Software Center

DOE-sponsored scientific
and technical software
www.osti.gov/estsc

 National Library of EnergyNational Library of Energy

Science resources and other
information from across the
DOE complex
www.osti.gov/nle

 

OSTI Mission: To advance science and sustain technological creativity by making R&D findings available
and useful to Department of Energy (DOE) researchers and the public.

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