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The United States of America Country Update

Abstract

Geothermal energy is used for electric power generation and direct utilization in the United States. The present installed capacity (gross) for electric power generation is 2,534 MWe with about 2,000 MWe net delivering power to the grid producing approximately 17,840 GWh per year for a 80.4% gross capacity factor. Geothermal electric power plants are located in California, Nevada, Utah and Hawaii. The two largest concentrations of plants are at The Geysers in northern California and the Imperial Valley in southern California. The latest development at The Geysers, starting in 1998, is injecting recycled wastewater from two communities into the reservoir, which presently has recovered about 100 MWe of power generation. The second pipeline from the Santa Rosa area has just come on line. The direct utilization of geothermal energy includes the heating of pools and spas, greenhouses and aquaculture facilities, space heating and district heating, snow melting, agricultural drying, industrial applications and groundsource heat pumps. The installed capacity is 7,817 MWt and the annual energy use is about 31,200 TJ or 8,680 GWh. The largest application is ground-source (geothermal) heat pumps (69% of the energy use), and the next largest direct-uses are in space heating and agricultural drying. Direct utilization (without heat pumps) is increasing at about 2.6% per year; whereas electric power plant development is almost static, with only about 70 MWe added since 2000  More>>
Product Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2005; Antalya, Turkey; 24-29 April 2005
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; Geothermal Legacy
Sponsoring Organizations:
USDOE
OSTI ID:
895237
Research Organizations:
Geo-Heat Center, Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR; Washington State University Energy Program, Olympia, WA; Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID
Country of Origin:
United States
Language:
English
Announcement Date:
Nov 20, 2006

Citation Formats

Lund, John W, Bloomquist, R Gordon, Boyd, Tonya L, Renner, Joel, (1) Geo-Heat Center, Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR, (2) Washington State University Energy Program, Olympia, WA, and (3) Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID. The United States of America Country Update. United States: N. p., Web.
Lund, John W, Bloomquist, R Gordon, Boyd, Tonya L, Renner, Joel, (1) Geo-Heat Center, Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR, (2) Washington State University Energy Program, Olympia, WA, & (3) Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID. The United States of America Country Update. United States.
Lund, John W, Bloomquist, R Gordon, Boyd, Tonya L, Renner, Joel, (1) Geo-Heat Center, Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR, (2) Washington State University Energy Program, Olympia, WA, and (3) Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID. "The United States of America Country Update." United States.
@misc{etde_895237,
title = {The United States of America Country Update}
author = {Lund, John W, Bloomquist, R Gordon, Boyd, Tonya L, Renner, Joel, (1) Geo-Heat Center, Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR, (2) Washington State University Energy Program, Olympia, WA, and (3) Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID}
abstractNote = {Geothermal energy is used for electric power generation and direct utilization in the United States. The present installed capacity (gross) for electric power generation is 2,534 MWe with about 2,000 MWe net delivering power to the grid producing approximately 17,840 GWh per year for a 80.4% gross capacity factor. Geothermal electric power plants are located in California, Nevada, Utah and Hawaii. The two largest concentrations of plants are at The Geysers in northern California and the Imperial Valley in southern California. The latest development at The Geysers, starting in 1998, is injecting recycled wastewater from two communities into the reservoir, which presently has recovered about 100 MWe of power generation. The second pipeline from the Santa Rosa area has just come on line. The direct utilization of geothermal energy includes the heating of pools and spas, greenhouses and aquaculture facilities, space heating and district heating, snow melting, agricultural drying, industrial applications and groundsource heat pumps. The installed capacity is 7,817 MWt and the annual energy use is about 31,200 TJ or 8,680 GWh. The largest application is ground-source (geothermal) heat pumps (69% of the energy use), and the next largest direct-uses are in space heating and agricultural drying. Direct utilization (without heat pumps) is increasing at about 2.6% per year; whereas electric power plant development is almost static, with only about 70 MWe added since 2000 (there were errors in the WGC2000 tabulation). A new 185-MWe plant being proposed for the Imperial Valley and about 100 MWe for Glass Mountain in northern California could be online by 2007-2008. Several new plants are proposed for Nevada totaling about 100 MWe and projects have been proposed in Idaho, New Mexico, Oregon and Utah. The total planned in the next 10 years is 632 MWe. The energy savings from electric power generation, direct-uses and ground-source heat pumps amounts to almost nine million tonnes of equivalent fuel oil per years and reduces air pollution by almost eight million tonnes of carbon annually (compared to fuel oil).}
journal type = {FT}
place = {United States}
}