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Ground-Coupling with Water Source Heat Pumps

Abstract

Ground-coupled heat pumps (GCHPs) have been receiving increasing attention in recent years. In areas where the technology has been properly applied, they are the system of choice because of their reliability, high level of comfort, low demand, and low operating costs. Initially these systems were most popular in rural, residential applications where heating requirements were the primary consideration. However, recent improvements in heat pumps units and installation procedures have expanded the market to urban and commercial applications. This paper discusses some of the current activity in the commercial sector. The basic system and nomenclature are discussed. Several variations for commercial buildings are presented along with examples of systems in operation. Several advantages and disadvantages are listed. Operating and installation costs are briefly discussed. Finally, the GCHP is presented as an alternative that is able to counter much of the criticism leveled by the natural gas industry toward conventional heat pumps.
Authors:
Product Type:
Technical Report
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; Geothermal Legacy
Sponsoring Organizations:
USDOE
OSTI ID:
894588
Research Organizations:
The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama
Country of Origin:
United States
Language:
English
Announcement Date:
Nov 07, 2006

Citation Formats

Kavanaugh, S. Ground-Coupling with Water Source Heat Pumps. United States: N. p., Web.
Kavanaugh, S. Ground-Coupling with Water Source Heat Pumps. United States.
Kavanaugh, S. "Ground-Coupling with Water Source Heat Pumps." United States.
@misc{etde_894588,
title = {Ground-Coupling with Water Source Heat Pumps}
author = {Kavanaugh, S}
abstractNote = {Ground-coupled heat pumps (GCHPs) have been receiving increasing attention in recent years. In areas where the technology has been properly applied, they are the system of choice because of their reliability, high level of comfort, low demand, and low operating costs. Initially these systems were most popular in rural, residential applications where heating requirements were the primary consideration. However, recent improvements in heat pumps units and installation procedures have expanded the market to urban and commercial applications. This paper discusses some of the current activity in the commercial sector. The basic system and nomenclature are discussed. Several variations for commercial buildings are presented along with examples of systems in operation. Several advantages and disadvantages are listed. Operating and installation costs are briefly discussed. Finally, the GCHP is presented as an alternative that is able to counter much of the criticism leveled by the natural gas industry toward conventional heat pumps.}
place = {United States}
}