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Saving electricity in a hurry. Dealing with temporary shortfalls in electricity supplies

Abstract

Blackouts are normally the result of imbalances in electricity supply and demand. A brief blackout is mostly an inconvenience. But persistent shortfalls ? those lasting days, weeks, or months ? can cause economic disruption and danger to human life in our technology-rich societies. Saving Electricity in a Hurry describes some of the recent power shortfalls, from Norway to New Zealand, from Tokyo to Arizona and the policies these regions used to quickly reduce their power consumption. How did the whole country of Sweden cut its power consumption by 4% in only three days? How did California save 14% in only a few months? While the temporary shortfalls in electricity supplies described in this book are relatively rare events, they disproportionately shape future energy policies. Saving Electricity in a Hurry shows that countries can quickly reduce electricity consumption without harming the economy as much as blackouts or unplanned curtailments. The strategies are diverse, unique and often surprisingly cheap. They include mass media campaigns ? where a good joke can save a Megawatt ? improvements in equipment efficiency and quickly adjusting electricity prices. This book explains how California replaced a million traffic signals with energy-saving models, how millions of Tokyo residents raised  More>>
Authors:
"none"
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2005
Product Type:
Book
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY; MARKET; SUPPLY DISRUPTION; ECONOMIC IMPACT; ENERGY POLICY; EMERGENCY PLANS; OUTAGES; POWER GENERATION
OSTI ID:
882239
Research Organizations:
International Energy Agency, Paris (FR)
Country of Origin:
IEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XY0600010
Availability:
Available from the IEA bookshop: http://www.iea.org/w/bookshop/add.aspx?id=201
Submitting Site:
ETDE
Size:
130 p.
Announcement Date:
May 17, 2006

Citation Formats

Saving electricity in a hurry. Dealing with temporary shortfalls in electricity supplies. IEA: N. p., 2005. Web.
Saving electricity in a hurry. Dealing with temporary shortfalls in electricity supplies. IEA.
2005. "Saving electricity in a hurry. Dealing with temporary shortfalls in electricity supplies." IEA.
@misc{etde_882239,
title = {Saving electricity in a hurry. Dealing with temporary shortfalls in electricity supplies}
abstractNote = {Blackouts are normally the result of imbalances in electricity supply and demand. A brief blackout is mostly an inconvenience. But persistent shortfalls ? those lasting days, weeks, or months ? can cause economic disruption and danger to human life in our technology-rich societies. Saving Electricity in a Hurry describes some of the recent power shortfalls, from Norway to New Zealand, from Tokyo to Arizona and the policies these regions used to quickly reduce their power consumption. How did the whole country of Sweden cut its power consumption by 4% in only three days? How did California save 14% in only a few months? While the temporary shortfalls in electricity supplies described in this book are relatively rare events, they disproportionately shape future energy policies. Saving Electricity in a Hurry shows that countries can quickly reduce electricity consumption without harming the economy as much as blackouts or unplanned curtailments. The strategies are diverse, unique and often surprisingly cheap. They include mass media campaigns ? where a good joke can save a Megawatt ? improvements in equipment efficiency and quickly adjusting electricity prices. This book explains how California replaced a million traffic signals with energy-saving models, how millions of Tokyo residents raised their thermostat settings, and how New Zealanders took shorter showers, all quickly enough to help avoid imminent blackouts. Finally, it connects these policies to the traditional goal of ?saving electricity slowly?.}
place = {IEA}
year = {2005}
month = {Jul}
}