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The biological importance of nickel in the food chain

Journal Article:

Abstract

The ultra trace element nickel (Ni) is both essential and toxic for animals and humans. A Ni-poor nutrition of < 0.1 mg/kg dry matter led to Ni deficiency symptoms. Ni is a component of the urease and it is also essential for several species of bacteria which occur in the rumen of ruminants. Ni deficiency symptoms, however, have not yet been found in animals and humans since the Ni offer exceeds the Ni requirement. On the other hand, an external Ni exposure to nickel alloys induces Ni dermatitis in 8 to 14% of nickel-sensitive women and in > 1% of men after the filling of the Ni depot in the body. Experiments with 4 animal species showed that Ni exposure leads to disturbances in the Mg and above all in the Zn metabolism. Ni excess induces Zn deficiency symptoms which are similar to parakeratosis in pigs. They correspond to the symptoms of nickel allergy in humans. Therefore, the Ni intake of humans, which leads to the gradual filling of the Ni pool in the body and which can then induce nickel dermatitis in Ni-sensitive women and men, is of particular importance. The Ni requirement of adults does not exceed 25  More>>
Authors:
Anke, M; [1]  Angelow, L; [1]  Glei, M; [1]  Mueller, M; [1]  Illing, H [1] 
  1. Friedrich Schiller Univ., Jena (Germany). Inst. of Nutrition and Environment
Publication Date:
May 01, 1995
Product Type:
Journal Article
Report Number:
CONF-940486-
Reference Number:
SCA: 400102; PA: DE-95:0GF054; EDB-95:113015; SN: 95001435868
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Fresenius` Journal of Analytical Chemistry; Journal Volume: 352; Journal Issue: 1-2; Conference: 6. international symposium on biological and environmental reference materials, Kailua-Kona, HI (United States), 17-21 Apr 1994; Other Information: PBD: May 1995
Subject:
40 CHEMISTRY; NICKEL; FOOD CHAINS; TOXICITY; NUTRITION; QUANTITATIVE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; PLANTS; PUBLIC HEALTH; WOMEN; METABOLISM; ZINC
OSTI ID:
84197
Country of Origin:
Germany
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: FJACES; ISSN 0937-0633; TRN: DE95GF054
Submitting Site:
DE
Size:
pp. 92-96
Announcement Date:
Aug 22, 1995

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Anke, M, Angelow, L, Glei, M, Mueller, M, and Illing, H. The biological importance of nickel in the food chain. Germany: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.1007/BF00322304.
Anke, M, Angelow, L, Glei, M, Mueller, M, & Illing, H. The biological importance of nickel in the food chain. Germany. doi:10.1007/BF00322304.
Anke, M, Angelow, L, Glei, M, Mueller, M, and Illing, H. 1995. "The biological importance of nickel in the food chain." Germany. doi:10.1007/BF00322304. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1007/BF00322304.
@misc{etde_84197,
title = {The biological importance of nickel in the food chain}
author = {Anke, M, Angelow, L, Glei, M, Mueller, M, and Illing, H}
abstractNote = {The ultra trace element nickel (Ni) is both essential and toxic for animals and humans. A Ni-poor nutrition of < 0.1 mg/kg dry matter led to Ni deficiency symptoms. Ni is a component of the urease and it is also essential for several species of bacteria which occur in the rumen of ruminants. Ni deficiency symptoms, however, have not yet been found in animals and humans since the Ni offer exceeds the Ni requirement. On the other hand, an external Ni exposure to nickel alloys induces Ni dermatitis in 8 to 14% of nickel-sensitive women and in > 1% of men after the filling of the Ni depot in the body. Experiments with 4 animal species showed that Ni exposure leads to disturbances in the Mg and above all in the Zn metabolism. Ni excess induces Zn deficiency symptoms which are similar to parakeratosis in pigs. They correspond to the symptoms of nickel allergy in humans. Therefore, the Ni intake of humans, which leads to the gradual filling of the Ni pool in the body and which can then induce nickel dermatitis in Ni-sensitive women and men, is of particular importance. The Ni requirement of adults does not exceed 25 to 35 {mu}g/day. The Ni balance of men and women was positive (+ 20%) and shows the Ni incorporation even in the case of a Ni consumption which exceeds by far the requirement. (orig.)}
doi = {10.1007/BF00322304}
journal = {Fresenius` Journal of Analytical Chemistry}
issue = {1-2}
volume = {352}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Germany}
year = {1995}
month = {May}
}