You need JavaScript to view this

Applications of wind turbines in Canada

Abstract

There are differing views as to the role of wind energy in the overall requirements. While some people tend to ignore it there are others who think that wind could be a major source of energy. In this paper an effort has been made to determine the wind power potential and also the amount that is economically usable. From the existing wind data a map showing the distribution of wind power density has been prepared. This map shows that the maritime provinces and the west coast of Hudson Bay have high wind power potential. These figures show that the wind power potential is of the same order as the installed electrical generating capacity in Canada (58 x 10/sup 6/kW in 1974). However, in order to determine how much of this power is usable the economics of adding wind energy to an existing system must be considered. A computer program has been developed at NRC to analyze the coupling of wind turbines with mixed power systems. Using this program and making certain assumptions about the cost of WECS and fuel the maximum amount of usable wind energy has been calculated. It is shown that if an installed capacity of 420 megawatts  More>>
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1977
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-770980-P4
Reference Number:
EDB-85-112161
Resource Relation:
Conference: 10. world energy conference on availability and rational use of energy resources, Istanbul, Turkey, 19 Sep 1977; Related Information: In: Unconventional energy resources - studies of development: Division 4.
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; WIND TURBINES; USES; AVAILABILITY; CANADA; DIESEL ENGINES; ECONOMICS; ENERGY STORAGE; HYBRID SYSTEMS; HYDROELECTRIC POWER; VERTICAL AXIS TURBINES; WIND POWER; WIND POWER PLANTS; ELECTRIC POWER; ENERGY SOURCES; ENGINES; HEAT ENGINES; INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES; MACHINERY; NORTH AMERICA; POWER; POWER PLANTS; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; STORAGE; TURBINES; TURBOMACHINERY; 170601* - Wind Energy Engineering- Applications
OSTI ID:
8330766
Research Organizations:
World Energy Conference, London (UK)
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE85920220
Availability:
NTIS (US Sales Only), MF A01; 2.
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 1-22, Paper 4.4-1
Announcement Date:
Mar 15, 2013

Citation Formats

South, P, Rangi, R S, and Templin, R J. Applications of wind turbines in Canada. United Kingdom: N. p., 1977. Web.
South, P, Rangi, R S, & Templin, R J. Applications of wind turbines in Canada. United Kingdom.
South, P, Rangi, R S, and Templin, R J. 1977. "Applications of wind turbines in Canada." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_8330766,
title = {Applications of wind turbines in Canada}
author = {South, P, Rangi, R S, and Templin, R J}
abstractNote = {There are differing views as to the role of wind energy in the overall requirements. While some people tend to ignore it there are others who think that wind could be a major source of energy. In this paper an effort has been made to determine the wind power potential and also the amount that is economically usable. From the existing wind data a map showing the distribution of wind power density has been prepared. This map shows that the maritime provinces and the west coast of Hudson Bay have high wind power potential. These figures show that the wind power potential is of the same order as the installed electrical generating capacity in Canada (58 x 10/sup 6/kW in 1974). However, in order to determine how much of this power is usable the economics of adding wind energy to an existing system must be considered. A computer program has been developed at NRC to analyze the coupling of wind turbines with mixed power systems. Using this program and making certain assumptions about the cost of WECS and fuel the maximum amount of usable wind energy has been calculated. It is shown that if an installed capacity of 420 megawatts of wind power was added to the existing diesel capacity it would result in a savings of 60,000,000 gallons of fuel oil per year. On the other hand it is shown that if the existing installed hydro electric capacity of 37,000 megawatts (1976) was increased to 60,000 megawatts without increasing the average water flow rate, an installed capacity of 60,000 megawatts of wind power could be added to the system. This would result in an average of 14,000 megawatts from the wind. Using projected manufacturing costs for vertical axis wind turbines, the average cost of wind energy could be in the range of 1.4 cents/kwh to 3.6 cents/kwh.}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1977}
month = {Jan}
}