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Critique of the electricity industry. Research report ERG 013. [In United Kingdom]

Technical Report:

Abstract

The studies described in this report were begun in October 1975 and had the aim of examining the future role of the electricity industry in the light of the changes in fuel prices and the government's ''Save It'' campaign. As the study proceeded, it became obvious that the electricity industry was facing a crisis which threatened a number of government policies. The essence of this crisis is a declining demand for electricity coupled with an installed capacity 55 percent greater than required to meet peak demand. The most obvious solution to the electricity industry's problems is to promote vigorously electricity sales so as to improve its revenue and maintain the growth in number of power stations. This is clearly in conflict with the ''Save It'' campaign and likely to increase the U.K.'s consumption of oil. The alternative solution, namely to raise the price of electricity and drastically reduce orders for new power stations, is in conflict with the government's policies aimed at curbing inflation and unemployment. Thus the study was enlarged to encompass not only the role of electricity in a national fuel policy but also to examine policies which would alleviate the worst effects of the immediate crisis without  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Mar 01, 1976
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
NP-21227
Reference Number:
ERA-02-013835; EPA-; EDB-77-025770
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; ELECTRIC POWER; REVIEWS; ENERGY CONSERVATION; POWER GENERATION; UNITED KINGDOM; AVAILABILITY; CHARGES; DATA COMPILATION; EFFICIENCY; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; ENERGY SOURCES; FORECASTING; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; INDUSTRY; MARKET; OCCUPATIONS; OPERATION; DOCUMENT TYPES; EUROPE; POWER; 296000* - Energy Planning & Policy- Electric Power; 200000 - Fossil-Fueled Power Plants
OSTI ID:
8194076
Research Organizations:
Open Univ., Milton Keynes (UK). Energy Research Group
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Availability:
Dep. NTIS (US Sales Only) $8.00.
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 234
Announcement Date:
Jan 01, 1977

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Not Available. Critique of the electricity industry. Research report ERG 013. [In United Kingdom]. United Kingdom: N. p., 1976. Web.
Not Available. Critique of the electricity industry. Research report ERG 013. [In United Kingdom]. United Kingdom.
Not Available. 1976. "Critique of the electricity industry. Research report ERG 013. [In United Kingdom]." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_8194076,
title = {Critique of the electricity industry. Research report ERG 013. [In United Kingdom]}
author = {Not Available}
abstractNote = {The studies described in this report were begun in October 1975 and had the aim of examining the future role of the electricity industry in the light of the changes in fuel prices and the government's ''Save It'' campaign. As the study proceeded, it became obvious that the electricity industry was facing a crisis which threatened a number of government policies. The essence of this crisis is a declining demand for electricity coupled with an installed capacity 55 percent greater than required to meet peak demand. The most obvious solution to the electricity industry's problems is to promote vigorously electricity sales so as to improve its revenue and maintain the growth in number of power stations. This is clearly in conflict with the ''Save It'' campaign and likely to increase the U.K.'s consumption of oil. The alternative solution, namely to raise the price of electricity and drastically reduce orders for new power stations, is in conflict with the government's policies aimed at curbing inflation and unemployment. Thus the study was enlarged to encompass not only the role of electricity in a national fuel policy but also to examine policies which would alleviate the worst effects of the immediate crisis without prejudicing either short-term economic objectives or longer-term fuel policies. Part 2, Technical Factors, explains technical issues involved in the discussions. Part 3, Industry Problems, sets out the problems as seen by the industry and the explanation of how the industry came to its present position. Part 4, Consumer Problems, explains the nature of customers problems and how government services and pricing policies could be used to alleviate these. Part 5, Government Policy, shows the need for an integrated fuel policy and the general direction that the studies suggest this policy should take. Conclusions are summarized in Part 6. (MCW)}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1976}
month = {Mar}
}