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Oil and natural gas energy plan for Canada, 1977--1985: Appendix D to Canada's resources and the national interest

Technical Report:

Abstract

Governments in Canada have made a number of changes in oil and gas policies and fiscal treatments recently. There remains a considerable question, however, whether Canada will have sufficient volumes of these two energy fuels available securely and economically in the years ahead. This report examines the position that oil and gas will occupy in Canada's energy future, and assesses the contribution that domestic supplies could provide. It was concluded that, under current and proposed royalty, taxation, and regulatory systems, the flow of investments into exploration and development will be insufficient to increase the domestic supply base to provide an acceptable level of future self-reliance. Additionally, because of jurisdictional factors, reinvestments from current production are not being directed to the areas of greatest resource potential in Canada. In order to illustrate the types and degrees of further policy and fiscal changes that are required, an investment program that could lead to a minimum acceptable level of production from Canadian sources was formulated. Recommendations for changes in fiscal regimes lead to a ''formula'' that directs 35 percent of net production revenue from current production to the exploration and development of new supplies; mobilizes new investment; and directs a greater portion of  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1976
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
NP-22249(App.D)
Reference Number:
ERA-02-060020; EPA-; EDB-77-139965
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; CANADA; NATURAL GAS; PETROLEUM; FORECASTING; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; CONSUMPTION RATES; ECONOMIC POLICY; ECONOMICS; ENERGY POLICY; ENERGY SOURCE DEVELOPMENT; ENERGY SOURCES; FINANCING; LEGISLATION; MINERAL RESOURCES; MINING; OCCUPATIONS; PUBLIC RELATIONS; RESERVES; STATE GOVERNMENT; TAXES; FLUIDS; FOSSIL FUELS; FUEL GAS; FUELS; GAS FUELS; GASES; NORTH AMERICA; RESOURCES; 294002* - Energy Planning & Policy- Petroleum; 294003 - Energy Planning & Policy- Natural Gas; 021000 - Petroleum- Legislation & Regulations; 031000 - Natural Gas- Legislation & Regulations
OSTI ID:
8178789
Research Organizations:
Independent Task Force on the Development of Canada's Mining and Petroleum Resources
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Availability:
Dep. NTIS (US Sales Only), PC A04/MF A01.
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 53
Announcement Date:
Nov 01, 1977

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Not Available. Oil and natural gas energy plan for Canada, 1977--1985: Appendix D to Canada's resources and the national interest. Canada: N. p., 1976. Web.
Not Available. Oil and natural gas energy plan for Canada, 1977--1985: Appendix D to Canada's resources and the national interest. Canada.
Not Available. 1976. "Oil and natural gas energy plan for Canada, 1977--1985: Appendix D to Canada's resources and the national interest." Canada.
@misc{etde_8178789,
title = {Oil and natural gas energy plan for Canada, 1977--1985: Appendix D to Canada's resources and the national interest}
author = {Not Available}
abstractNote = {Governments in Canada have made a number of changes in oil and gas policies and fiscal treatments recently. There remains a considerable question, however, whether Canada will have sufficient volumes of these two energy fuels available securely and economically in the years ahead. This report examines the position that oil and gas will occupy in Canada's energy future, and assesses the contribution that domestic supplies could provide. It was concluded that, under current and proposed royalty, taxation, and regulatory systems, the flow of investments into exploration and development will be insufficient to increase the domestic supply base to provide an acceptable level of future self-reliance. Additionally, because of jurisdictional factors, reinvestments from current production are not being directed to the areas of greatest resource potential in Canada. In order to illustrate the types and degrees of further policy and fiscal changes that are required, an investment program that could lead to a minimum acceptable level of production from Canadian sources was formulated. Recommendations for changes in fiscal regimes lead to a ''formula'' that directs 35 percent of net production revenue from current production to the exploration and development of new supplies; mobilizes new investment; and directs a greater portion of both these sources of funds to the development of potential supplies from remote and technologically difficult, high-risk areas. The implementation of this formula will require concessions by both the producing provinces and the Federal government together with commitments from producers.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1976}
month = {Dec}
}