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Vegetation types and forest productivity, west part of Syncrude's Lease 17, Alberta. Environmental Research Monography 1977-6. [Tar sands]

Technical Report:

Abstract

The vegetation that existed in August 1977 on the western half of Syncrude's Lease 17 near Fort McMurray, Alberta is described. Eight vegetation types were identified and are mapped at a scale if 1 : 24,000. Black Spruce--Labrador Tea was the dominant vegetation type, making up 35.0% of the 9250 hectare study area. The second most abundant vegetation type was Aspen--White Spruce (26.0%) and the third was White Spruce--Aspen (18.0%). The remaining 21.0% of the area was occupied by the Aspen--Birch vegetation type (7.5%), Balsam Poplar--Alder (6.0%) along the McKay River, Sedge--Reed Grass (4.0%) mainly around bodies of standing water created by beaver dams, Willow--Reed Grass (3.0%) along stream courses, and Black Spruce--Feathermoss (0.5%). The White Spruce--Aspen type is best developed in the southern part of the lease. It is the only vegetation type that contains some white spruce stands approaching the present lower limits of merchantable forest in Alberta. The Aspen--White Spruce type was less productive. In terms of mean annual increment and site index, the two vegetation types with the greatest potential for fibre production (White Spruce--Aspen and Aspen--White Spruce types) are average or below average productivity when compared to data from similar stands elsewhere in Alberta and  More>>
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1977
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
NP-23408
Reference Number:
ERA-04-017085; EDB-79-027485
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; ALBERTA; OIL SAND DEPOSITS; FORESTS; PRODUCTIVITY; GRASS; INVENTORIES; HERBS; GROUND COVER; SHRUBS; TREES; CANADA; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; NORTH AMERICA; PLANTS; 510500* - Environment, Terrestrial- Site Resource & Use Studies- (-1989); 553000 - Agriculture & Food Technology; 041000 - Oil Shales & Tar Sands- Environmental Aspects
OSTI ID:
8160144
Research Organizations:
Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Availability:
Dep. NTIS (US Sales Only), PC A04/MF A01.
Submitting Site:
CAN
Size:
Pages: 59
Announcement Date:
Mar 14, 2013

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Peterson, E B, and Levinsohn, A G. Vegetation types and forest productivity, west part of Syncrude's Lease 17, Alberta. Environmental Research Monography 1977-6. [Tar sands]. Canada: N. p., 1977. Web.
Peterson, E B, & Levinsohn, A G. Vegetation types and forest productivity, west part of Syncrude's Lease 17, Alberta. Environmental Research Monography 1977-6. [Tar sands]. Canada.
Peterson, E B, and Levinsohn, A G. 1977. "Vegetation types and forest productivity, west part of Syncrude's Lease 17, Alberta. Environmental Research Monography 1977-6. [Tar sands]." Canada.
@misc{etde_8160144,
title = {Vegetation types and forest productivity, west part of Syncrude's Lease 17, Alberta. Environmental Research Monography 1977-6. [Tar sands]}
author = {Peterson, E B, and Levinsohn, A G}
abstractNote = {The vegetation that existed in August 1977 on the western half of Syncrude's Lease 17 near Fort McMurray, Alberta is described. Eight vegetation types were identified and are mapped at a scale if 1 : 24,000. Black Spruce--Labrador Tea was the dominant vegetation type, making up 35.0% of the 9250 hectare study area. The second most abundant vegetation type was Aspen--White Spruce (26.0%) and the third was White Spruce--Aspen (18.0%). The remaining 21.0% of the area was occupied by the Aspen--Birch vegetation type (7.5%), Balsam Poplar--Alder (6.0%) along the McKay River, Sedge--Reed Grass (4.0%) mainly around bodies of standing water created by beaver dams, Willow--Reed Grass (3.0%) along stream courses, and Black Spruce--Feathermoss (0.5%). The White Spruce--Aspen type is best developed in the southern part of the lease. It is the only vegetation type that contains some white spruce stands approaching the present lower limits of merchantable forest in Alberta. The Aspen--White Spruce type was less productive. In terms of mean annual increment and site index, the two vegetation types with the greatest potential for fibre production (White Spruce--Aspen and Aspen--White Spruce types) are average or below average productivity when compared to data from similar stands elsewhere in Alberta and Saskatchewan.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1977}
month = {Jan}
}