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Biomass production in willows. What did we know before the energy crisis

Technical Report:

Abstract

The biological foundations of biomass with willows originate in the experiences from basket willow husbandry. This was an established discipline in Europe in the 18th century. Problems concerning site preparation, selection of clones, planting as cuttings, spacing, weed control, rotation time, harvesting and coppicing vigour with respect to the longevity of the stand, were practically solved at the research level and already in practice. The yield potential of basket willow and willows for hoop production as well as yield figures from field experiments were quite high also according to present-day biomass willow experiments. An explanation of this could be the much higher stand densities than has been customary in current willow experiments. Although many practical questions got their answers in basket willow husbandry, open questions still remain. The basket willow era gave only little experience on willow production in peatlands; actually peatsoils were almost avoided. Knowledge of nutrient require ments and fertilization was also rather elementary. These aspects must therefore be established for biomass production. Control of weeds in the establishment phase of the willow husbandry was solved by manual work. Since this is a labour intensive method which is no longer possible, a more modern weed control needs to  More>>
Authors:
Perttu, K L [1] 
  1. ed.
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1984
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
SLU-IEM-15
Reference Number:
NOR-85-07580; EDB-86-049774
Resource Relation:
Related Information: In: Ecology and management of forest biomass production systems. Papers dedicated to Professor Gustaf Siren for his contributions in the field of biomass research.
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; WILLOWS; CULTIVATION TECHNIQUES; BIOMASS; BIOMASS PLANTATIONS; CLONING; ECONOMICS; FINLAND; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; PRODUCTIVITY; SHORT ROTATION CULTIVATION; WEEDS; WETLANDS; AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS; ECOSYSTEMS; ENERGY SOURCES; EUROPE; PLANTS; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; SCANDINAVIA; TREES; WESTERN EUROPE; 140504* - Solar Energy Conversion- Biomass Production & Conversion- (-1989)
OSTI ID:
8103266
Research Organizations:
Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala. Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research
Country of Origin:
Sweden
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE86751156
Availability:
NTIS (US Sales Only), PC A24/MF A01; 1.
Submitting Site:
NORD
Size:
Pages: 563-587
Announcement Date:
Jan 01, 1986

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Perttu, K L. Biomass production in willows. What did we know before the energy crisis. Sweden: N. p., 1984. Web.
Perttu, K L. Biomass production in willows. What did we know before the energy crisis. Sweden.
Perttu, K L. 1984. "Biomass production in willows. What did we know before the energy crisis." Sweden.
@misc{etde_8103266,
title = {Biomass production in willows. What did we know before the energy crisis}
author = {Perttu, K L}
abstractNote = {The biological foundations of biomass with willows originate in the experiences from basket willow husbandry. This was an established discipline in Europe in the 18th century. Problems concerning site preparation, selection of clones, planting as cuttings, spacing, weed control, rotation time, harvesting and coppicing vigour with respect to the longevity of the stand, were practically solved at the research level and already in practice. The yield potential of basket willow and willows for hoop production as well as yield figures from field experiments were quite high also according to present-day biomass willow experiments. An explanation of this could be the much higher stand densities than has been customary in current willow experiments. Although many practical questions got their answers in basket willow husbandry, open questions still remain. The basket willow era gave only little experience on willow production in peatlands; actually peatsoils were almost avoided. Knowledge of nutrient require ments and fertilization was also rather elementary. These aspects must therefore be established for biomass production. Control of weeds in the establishment phase of the willow husbandry was solved by manual work. Since this is a labour intensive method which is no longer possible, a more modern weed control needs to be developed for current husbandry. As a whole it is a task for related research to attach proper optimization of cultural techniques to suitable willow clones in order to attain and maintain as high a production level as was the case in the old basket willow husbandry. With 25 refs.}
place = {Sweden}
year = {1984}
month = {Dec}
}